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Spring 2019

NATURAL INSTINCTS

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URE C LT

IF OR NI

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Cover

MEN’S EDITION

WITH DIEGO LUNA / BODE MILLER / JR / JIMMY CHIN / CHRIS BROCK

& CU


Hermes


Hermes


Prada


Prada


Cartier


Cartier


Saint Laurent


SOUTH COAST PLAZA T. 1.714.429.0101

Saint Laurent


Michael Kors


Michael Kors


Sandro


Sandro


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Spring 2019 32.

STATEMENTS Ford updates its all-American dragster for the next generation...................................... 23

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L.A.’s Auburn enters the rarefied fine dining world with a fresh take......................... 26 Prints on prints on prints never looked so good.......................................................................... 30 Furniture maker Chuck Moffit blurs the line between art and commerce ......... 32

TOC

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About face: Climbing expert and filmmaker Jimmy Chin’s career highs................ 42

FEATURES Diego Luna might play a bad boy on Narcos: Mexico, but offscreen he is all heart..................................................................... 44 A ride-or-die tribe of surfers fights to help save Point Dume during the Woolsey Fire............................................................. 58 An all-encompassing portrait of San Francisco through the lens of internationally acclaimed artist JR ................... 64

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Like his work, potter Chris Brock’s studio in Ojai is as stylish as it is down-to-earth.................................................................. 70

DISCOVERIES

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Camping on a barren Bolivian salt flat.............................................................................................................................................................................. 77 Bali beckons with a slew of new hotel offerings ....................................................................................................................................................... 78

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Skier and entrepreneur Bode Miller’s SoCal................................................................................................................................................................ 82

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: DEWEY NICKS; BEAU GREALY; JACK PLATNER; JR-ART.NET; AMAZING ESCAPES, COPYRIGHT 2019; DAN ARNOLD. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.81.

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The players making the cut in California’s progressive “steak moment”................. 34


Gucci


JENNIFER SMITH HALE

Founder, Editorial Director & CEO JENNY MURRAY

Editor & President Chief Brand & Content Officer

ANDREW BARKER

| Chief Creative Officer JAMES TIMMINS

Executive Creative & Fashion Director

ALISON EDMOND

Senior Editor

Arts & Culture Editor

Senior Designer

MELISSA GOLDSTEIN

ELIZABETH KHURI CHANDLER

GABRIELLE MIRKIN

Copy Editor

Beauty Director

Contributing Photo Editor

MARIE LOOK

KELLY ATTERTON

QUINN BUGGS

Contributing Assistant Editor

Fashion Market Editor

Graphic Designer

CAROLYN MEERS

REBECCA RUSSELL

JACOB WITT

Assistant Fashion Editor MARGRIT JACOBSEN

Masthead

Deputy Managing Editor ANUSH J. BENLIYAN Digital Content Consultant Nandita Khanna San Francisco Editor-at-Large Diane Dorrans Saeks | Contributing Editor-at-Large Kendall Conrad Contributing Editors Danielle DiMeglio, Kelsey McKinnon, Andrea Stanford, Stephanie Steinman, Nathan Turner Contributing Writers Catherine Bigelow, Caroline Cagney, Kerstin Czarra, Heather John Fogarty, Marshall Heyman, Punch Hutton, Christine Lennon, Martha McCully, Degen Pener, Jessica Ritz, Lindzi Scharf, Khanh T.L. Tran, Elizabeth Varnell, S. Irene Virbila Contributing Photographers Christian Anwander, David Cameron, Mark Griffin Champion, Victor Demarchelier, Amanda Demme, Michelangelo di Battista, Lisa Eisner, Douglas Friedman, Sam Frost, Beau Grealy, Zoey Grossman, Pamela Hanson, Kurt Iswarienko, Mona Kuhn, Kurt Markus, Bella Newman, Carter Smith, Alistair Taylor-Young, Jan Welters

RENEE MARCELLO

Publisher

Executive Director Southern California

Executive Director Fashion

Integrated Marketing Director

CRISTA VAGHI

DEBBIE FLYNN

JILLIAN DeMARCHE

Executive Director Northern California

Executive Luxury Director

Sales & Marketing Associate

AUTUMN O’KEEFE

AVERY TRAVIS

MADISON DAHLKE

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Bottega Veneta


F O U N D E R’S

L E T T E R

EDITORS’ PICKS This month’s wish list

LECLAIREUR LOS ANGELES

H

eroic conduct can sometimes seem like a rarity these days, so when acts of courage present themselves, I think it is something to celebrate. With the tragic fires last fall came just as many stories of neighbors helping neighbors and of the heroes in our midst. In this issue we tell the story of the Point Dume Bomberos, a band of brothers who came together to help save their beloved Malibu neighborhood from the Woolsey Fire. A photographic reportage by one of their own, Jack Platner, is as powerful and poignant as it gets. Speaking of power, our cover subject, Narcos: Mexico star Diego Luna is one of those rare actors who delivers a strong performance in every role. His strength, convictions and sense of self shine through in Helena de Bertodano’s interview, and in our portfolio, for which he dons the best of spring’s sartorial looks. As acclaimed artist JR brings his large-scale works to the City by the Bay, we sit down and chat all things culture with him on the eve of his show at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. He had just finished an installation at the Louvre when we went to print — further proof he is on his way to a global takeover. A little closer to home, potter Chris Brock is most happily ensconced in his Schult trailer in Ojai. His ceramics have started to garner a cult following and even California-born, Paris-based Rick Owens carries Brock’s work in his L.A. store. See where his coveted creations originate from as he takes the wheel and invites us into his rustic oasis. From surfers-turned-soldiers on the front lines of fires, to artists at the top of their crafts, we celebrate the courageous and creative community that surrounds us day in and day out in our place under the sun.

Edmond de Rothschild coffee table, made in 1965 as a limited edition of six, $85,000. Leclaireur Los Angeles, West Hollywood, 310-360-0262.

THE ELDER STATESMAN Painted California Republic intarsia sweater, $2,075. The Elder Statesman, West Hollywood, 424-288-4221.

Founder’s Note

LACALIFORNIENNE ROLEX Datejust two-tone watch in pastel blue with a Tricolore strap, $9,500. Towne by Elyse Walker, Pacific Palisades, 310-554-7666.

JENNIFER SMITH HALE Founder, Editorial Director and CEO

@ccaliforniastyle

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DIEGO LUNA. Photography by BEAU GREALY. Creative & Fashion Direction by ALISON EDMOND. Grooming by BARBARA GUILLAUME at Forward Artists using Every Man Jack . Luna wears PRADA sweater, $1,230.

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ILLUSTRATION: DAVID DOWNTON. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.81.

ON THE COVER


Salvatore Ferragamo

RODEO DRIVE FLAGSHIP BEVERLY CENTER WESTFIELD TOPANGA SOUTH COAST PLAZA FASHION VALLEY SAN FRANCISCO WESTFIELD VALLEY FAIR THE FORUM SHOPS AT CAESARS THE GRAND CANAL SHOPPES WYNN LAS VEGAS FERRAGAMO.COM


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P E O P L E

HELENA DE BERTODANO

DEWEY NICKS Photographer Dewey Nicks captured the studio of potter Chris Brock for “The Shape of Things,” p.70. His collection of photographs from the 1990s called “Polaroids of Women” was recently published as a book by the same name. He is fresh from his trip to Mauritius, where he undertook a new book project for Rizzoli. MY C SPOTS • The Alchemy Works store is a must when I’m in DTLA • I like to order the “Ahicado” (ahi plus avocado) at Spencer Makenzie’s Fish Company in Ventura • Lucky Llama Coffee House in Carpinteria for a perfect Americano

Based in Santa Monica, British journalist Helena de Bertodano spoke with actor and C cover star Diego Luna for “Character Study,” p.44. She started writing for The Times from Madrid, then spent a decade in Washington, D.C., before moving to California in 2012. MY C SPOTS • Paper or Plastik Cafe on Pico Boulevard for the best breakfast burritos in L.A. • Furthur Furniture in Silver Lake for quirky gifts and unique furnishings • The Mishe Mokwa trail to Sandstone Peak for views from the highest point in the Santa Monica Mountains

JACK PLATNER In “Band of Brothers,” p.58, Malibu-born photographer Jack Platner shares some of the powerful images he captured during last year’s Woolsey Fire. The lensman, who splits his time between L.A. and New York, has contributed work to Vogue and Milk Gallery. MY C SPOTS • Hinano Cafe in Venice Beach has all-youcan-eat popcorn, live music and pool tables • Big Sur’s Ragged Point Fire Road trail is a dirt road that twists above the marine layer • Ben Brown’s Golf Course in Laguna Beach has a canyon full of wildlife

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JORDAN MACKAY Jordan Mackay, who discusses all things steak-related in “Love Me Tender,” p.34, is a James Beard Award-winning writer who dishes on wine, spirits and food. His work has appeared in Food & Wine, The New York Times and Los Angeles Times. His most recent books are The Sommelier’s Atlas of Taste and Franklin Steak. MY C SPOTS • San Francisco’s The Morris restaurant should be a national destination • Princess Seafood market in Fort Bragg — the women who run it also do much of the fishing • The interesting, delicious beers of Sante Adairius in Santa Cruz take advantage of incredible California fruit

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WORDS BY MARIE LOOK. NICKS: HENRY HAN. DE BERTODANO: JOSHUA MONESSON. MACKAY: VANESSA EINBUND. PLATNER: DENISE MALONE.

Contribs


Tag Heuer


Jimmy Choo


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An American classic conquers the road again

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The FORD Mustang Shelby GT500 2020 in Ford Performance Blue, Red Hot Metallic and Iconic Silver.

CONTRIBUTORS KELLY ATTERTON ANDREW BARKER ANUSH J. BENLIYAN LAURA BURSTEIN MELISSA GOLDSTEIN

FORD MOTOR COMPANY

ANH-MINH LE CAROLYN MEERS KAREN PALMER BROOKE PORTER KATZ S. IRENE VIRBILA

STYLE

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n 1967, the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 ruled the drag strip and the hearts of American teenagers with its big-block V-8 and hard-to-beat straight-line performance. More than 50 years later, Ford is rolling out a new GT500 (available this fall), the most powerful production car the company’s ever built. With its 5.2-liter supercharged V-8 and 7-speed dual-clutch gearbox, the 2020 GT500 generates 700-plus horsepower and can run a quarter mile under 11 seconds. It stands apart from other Mustangs with its massive front grille and dominating power bulge; a top-of-the-line carbon fiber package adds a big rear wing and 20-inch Michelin performance tires. And thanks to refinements in the chassis and suspension, it smokes the competition just as capably in the corners as it does in the straightaway. • L.B. CULTURE

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Dare to bare under spring’s coolest tailoring

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Clockwise from above: PAUL SMITH jacket, $1,750, and pants, $620, and BOSS shoes, $445. HERMÈS jacket, $14,400, pants, $8,050, and sandals, $800. SALVATORE FERRAGAMO suit and DIOR MEN top, prices upon request. DIOR MEN top, $1,700, and pants, $790. BOSS suit, $995, JIMMY CHOO loafers, $750, and tank top, stylist’s own. ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE jacket, $4,295, and pants, $1,150, and HERMÈS sandals, $800.

MODEL: JESSE SOMERA AT PHOTOGENICS. GROOMING BY MICHELLE MUNGCAL AT THE VISIONARIES USING MAC COSMETICS AND R+CO HAIRCARE. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.81.

Statements Suits

Photography by MARK GRIFFIN CHAMPION Styling by ALISON EDMOND 24

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BOSS ©2019 South Coast Plaza

THE ULTIMATE MEN’S COLLECTION

South Coast Plaza

Alexander McQueen · Allen Edmonds · Balenciaga

Bally · Berluti · Boss · Bottega Veneta · Brunello Cucinelli Burberry · Canali · Cartier · Christian Louboutin Dior Men · Dolce&Gabbana · Ermenegildo Zegna · Fendi Giorgio Armani · Givenchy · Gucci · Harry Winston Hermès · IWC · Jaeger-LeCoultre · John Hardy John Lobb · John Varvatos · Lanvin · Loro Piana Louis Vuitton · Moncler · Montblanc · Omega · Panerai Porsche Design · Prada · Ralph Lauren · Roberto Cavalli Rolex · Saint Laurent · Salvatore Ferragamo · Sandro Stella McCartney · The Webster · Tiffany & Co. Tod’s · Tourneau · Vacheron Constantin Van Cleef & Arpels · Versace partial listing

San Diego FWY (405) at Bristol St., Costa Mesa, CA SOUTHCOASTPLAZA.COM 800.782.8888 @SouthCoastPlaza #SCPStyle


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ON THE DOT The sleekest timekeepers with ultimate precision

1. SOOTHE MOVE

2. COURSE WORK

3. Statements News

Clockwise from top: AUBURN’s private dining room. A shrub mocktail. Asparagus with razor clams, bone marrow, fava beans and green garlic.

For his first restaurant, chef Eric Bost (formerly of Guy Savoy and République) is redefining the future of fine dining. At Auburn, opening this spring, diners create their own tasting menu of four, six or nine courses from that day’s roster of 12 — in any order. Bost explains, “I want to give guests an experience that’s approachable and understandable, but executed on a very high level.” Bost’s experimental technique underpins every dish. Fresh English peas play against chive blossoms and seaweed. Oysters and purple radish accent Hiramasa yellowtail crudo, while wagyu beef arrives with artichokes and charred onions in a smoky broth. For the sunny interiors of the Melrose Avenue space — formerly home to Hatfield’s and Citrus — Bost collaborated with the Klein Agency on natural, modern furnishings anchored by a wood-burning hearth, which inspired the restaurant’s moniker. Just when the concept of fine dining seems almost passé, here comes an elegant surprise. 6703 Melrose Ave., L.A., 323-486-6703; auburnla.com. S.I.V.

4. 1. CARTIER Santos de Cartier chronograph watch, $8,950. 2. MONTBLANC TimeWalker automatic chronograph watch, $3,370. 3. PANERAI Luminor Regatta Chrono Flyback automatic watch, $17,200. 4. TAG HEUER Heritage Calibre Heuer 02 chronograph watch, $5,800.

SEKALA’s new CBD-infused hemp compresses, $16 each, target muscle inflammation.

Alex Meyer of Sekala, a San Diego-based inhome massage company, created CBD-infused hemp compresses to enhance the results of her massages. Having studied holistic health science in college and traditional herbal medicine in Asia, Meyer combines aroma (lemongrass), herbal (coriander) and thermal (heat) therapies with highly potent CBD oil in her new take on an ancient Indonesian remedy. The result is a soothing, hemp-wrapped compress that targets muscle inflammation and can be reused up to five times as long as it fully dries in between. Application is easy: Heat a Sekala compress, then place it directly on the skin, massaging in circular motions. “The compresses work because the properties penetrate down into the skin and into the body itself, which makes it an extremely effective, postworkout recovery treatment,” Meyer explains. sekala.co. K.A.

SPIN OFF Peloton, whose indoor cycling bike revolutionized the home workout in 2014, has recently debuted the Peloton Tread. With a 32-inch, high-definition touch screen, this innovative and immersive treadmill, while pricey, affords a high-end studio experience, functioning as a private, full-body fitness studio, with both live and on-demand classes for total-body circuit training, running, walking and floor exercises led by elite NYC instructors. onepeloton.com. K.A. The PELOTON Tread, from $4,295. MAGAZ I N EC.COM

AUBURN: NICOLE FRANZEN. SEKALA: COREY VILLICANA. SMALLS: BARRON CLAIBORNE. EASY E: ITHAKA DARIN PAPPAS. COURTESY OF CULT GAIA.

S S T T A A T T E E M M E E N N T T S S


GEO STORM Angular shades are a graphic win

2. 1.

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1. FENDI sunglasses, $485. 2. ALEXANDER McQUEEN sunglasses, $470. 3. BOTTEGA VENETA sunglasses, $510. 4. SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO sunglasses, $450.

3.

Below: BARRON CLAIBORNE’s King of New York, 1997. Right: Eazy-E from N.W.A skateboarding, 1989, by ITHAKA DARIN PAPPAS.

SUN WORSHIP For its debut menswear collection, Los Angeles label Cult Gaia did not stray from its coveted mod and muted take on casualwear. Dubbed Cult Guy, the capsule collection, part of the brand’s Resort 2019 line, comprises 12 vacation-ready pieces in lightweight fabrics such as linen and silk. “There’s a lack of warm-weather men’s apparel that is simple in design yet interesting in fabrication,” says Cult Gaia founder and creative director Jasmin Larian Hekmat, who has been making clothes for the men in her life for some time. The line’s matching button-down shirts and tailored shorts include playful prints, such as the Nolan style, which features a painterly motif created in collaboration with Brazilian artist Lane Marinho — perfect for a tropical getaway or a staycation. cultgaia.com. A.J.B.

Statements News

FACE THE MUSIC Hip-hop’s cultural journey from underground movement to the mass market is traced in the new exhibition “Contact High: A Visual History of Hip-Hop,” opening April 26 at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Century City. Based on the book of the same name — also by curator Vikki Tobak — the show presents over 75 original contact sheets from the genre’s most influential documentarians. “People always knew what hip-hop sounded like, but what did it look like?” asks Tobak, whose personal highlights include Barron Claiborne’s King of New York photo of Biggie Smalls (“perhaps the best known image in hip-hop”), Gordon Parks’ Great Day in Hip-Hop (“200 hip-hop artists on a stoop in Harlem … truly a moment in time”) and Hassan Hajjaj’s portrait of Cardi B (“so unique to both her and the times we live in”). With creative direction from Fab 5 Freddy, the show will also be accompanied by a documentary short film. April 26 to Aug. 18. Annenberg Space for Photography, 2000 Avenue of the Stars, L.A., 213-403-3000; annenbergphotospace.org. M.G.

Cult Guy by CULT GAIA Nolan button-down, $178, and shorts, $158.

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ON THE GLOW Play the neon game with Louis Vuitton’s iridescent hits

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LOUIS VUITTON top, $2,400, pants, $1,050, sunglasses, $665, gloves, $365, and bag, $3,850.

Photography by MARK GRIFFIN CHAMPION Styling by ALISON EDMOND 28

MAGAZ I N EC.COM

MODEL: JESSE SOMERA AT PHOTOGENICS. GROOMING BY MICHELLE MUNGCAL AT THE VISIONARIES USING MAC COSMETICS AND R+CO HAIRCARE. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.81.

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Embrace a maximalist sensibility, layering contrasting prints with abandon

MODEL: JESSE SOMERA AT PHOTOGENICS. GROOMING BY MICHELLE MUNGCAL AT THE VISIONARIES USING MAC COSMETICS AND R+CO HAIRCARE. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.81.

Statements Print

Clockwise from top: 2 MONCLER 1952 jacket, $2,345, and sweater, $495, PAUL SMITH jersey, $395, and FENDI shorts, $750. VERSACE jacket, $3,250, shirt, $1,395, shorts, $1,125, and hat, $375. LOUIS VUIT TON windbreaker, $6,550, shirt, $1,470, pants, $1,050, and sneakers, $1,020. PRADA jacket, $1,560, top, $1,060, and shorts, $1,060, FOLK x ALFIE KUNGU at MR PORTER hat, $80, and 3.1 PHILLIP LIM bag, $395. VALENTINO jacket, $1,395, shirt, $750, pants (sold as suit), $4,150, and sneakers, $1,145. PALM ANGELS jacket, $875, and pants, $630, KENZO top, price upon request, GUCCI backpack , $3,300, and AMIRI sneakers, $550. All jewelry, model’s own.

Photography by MARK GRIFFIN CHAMPION Styling by ALISON EDMOND 30

MAGAZ I N EC.COM


Mandarin Oriental


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KING OF THE HILL At his remote Mount Baldy studio, Chuck Moffit finds a natural home for brutalist design

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“I am always reminded Moffit of scale and the interdependence of things”

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rtist and furniture designer Chuck Moffit has an enviable daily commute: From his cabin in Mount Baldy, he walks about 30 feet to his studio — a glass-and-steel, 1,800-square-foot structure that he enlisted friends, including architect Rufus Turner, to build five years ago. In place of congested freeways, there are oak, pine and cedar trees, native yuccas and craggy boulders. Inside the 21-foot-tall studio, expanses of windows ensure a constant connection to nature and the San Gabriel Mountains beyond.

Words by ANH-MINH LE 32

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“I am always reminded of scale and the interdependence of things,” Moffit says. This is evident in his work, which balances brutalist processes with delicate moments — like the Oshibana table, which is inspired by the Japanese art of floral arrangement and composed of a steel base and bronze petals. His distinct style has won him such clients as interior designers Oliver M. Furth, Nickey Kehoe and Suzanne Tucker, and high-level collectors. Last year, he was picked up by several notable design showrooms, including JF Chen in Los Angeles and De Sousa Hughes in San Francisco. Some days, the only sounds in the studio come from the rushing waters of nearby San Antonio Creek or from the barking of his dog, Elko, a McNab that considers it his job to “defend us from squirrels,” quips Moffit. Arranging the hand-dyed leather, cast glass and inlaid brass elements of his new Stratum table, for instance, is quiet and painstaking labor. (In addition to catamaran sailing and hiking the local mountains, he and his partner, Margie Keith, spend their off-duty hours taking Elko to sheepherding training.) The Wisconsin-born Moffit moved to Southern California in 1998 to pursue an MFA at Claremont Graduate University, where he focused on sculpture and experimented with steel. An interest in “creating objects that have a function,” he recalls, led to designing furniture. Visiting architect Bruce Goff ’s corkscrew-shaped Bavinger House in Oklahoma was transformative: “It helped erase that line between the decorative arts and fine arts for me.” (Goff also designed the Pavilion for Japanese Art at Los Angeles County Museum of Art.) Moffit’s creations often marry time-honored techniques and cutting-edge technologies. Take his

latest sconces: The fixtures, reminiscent of Japanese lanterns, are a mix of blown glass, steel and bronze. The bronze component is computer-designed and 3-D-printed. Having shown at the Hammer Museum and been included in installations at Andrea Zittel’s Joshua Treebased arts organization, High Desert Test Sites, he was also the subject of a hotly tipped 2016 solo furniture exhibition at fragrance and floral designer Eric Buterbaugh’s eponymous Los Angeles gallery. As Moffit acquires new equipment for his studio, like a glass kiln or a leather sewing machine, his repertoire expands. He is currently ideating tabletop and hardware collections, both slated for release in 2020. “Bigger pieces can be all-consuming,” he explains. “In a way, it’s a nice creative break to think about something smaller.” He envisions bronze bowls and leather table runners and ruminates about sterling silver hardware accented with gemstones. The latter, he says, “needs to be run through the reality-check machine. But that’s how a lot of stuff starts out — as some kind of fantastical idea.” Since inspiration can strike at any time, Moffit carries around a Moleskine notebook. “There might be some moment of architecture or a part of a painting at a museum — I make sure I can sketch it,” he says. It’s no surprise that he has stacks of rough sketches everywhere. “Sometimes, it’s just part of a form, and that form might turn into a table leg or a light,” he continues. “I’m looking outside now and there’s a shadow pattern on the studio from all the oak trees. You never know. … Let’s cross our fingers and hope it keeps coming!” chuckmoffit.com. •

DAN ARNOLD

March 2019

Statements Moffit

Clockwise from top: CHUCK MOFFIT’s Zhinü daybed, Studio Series sconce and Stratum dining table. The artist’s Mount Baldy workspace. “Creative work is appealing for me because it is an equation that you write and solve for at the same time,” says Moffit, pictured in his studio. Opposite, from far left: Moffit’s design for the studio’s facade comprises steel and glass and stands 21 feet tall. Oshibana center table. All pieces, price upon request.

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Steak, in all its mouthwatering incarnations, is reclaiming its place at the California table

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enowned as an Eden of fresh fruits, nuts and veggies, California is officially having its steak moment. And by “steak moment,” I’m referring to all aspects, from pasture to plate. Responsible ranching is a big part of the California ethos, but so is gastronomy, and this moment encompasses the best of both. California is a leader in progressive, eco-friendly ranching, led by businesses like Stemple Creek Ranch (stemplecreek.com), which, as part of the Marin Carbon Project, prove that cattle, raised properly, can be an asset in storing carbon in the soil. Belcampo (belcampo.com), another business dedicated to responsible ranching, is vertically integrated, producing its beef in California and selling it throughout the state. But it’s not all about locally raised, grass-fed beef. Some merchants pursue luxury, no matter the origins, and currently, wagyu beef — that crazily marbled meat — from Japan and beyond is still in demand. Holy Grail Steak Co. (holygrailsteak.com), a high-end mail-order outfit out of San Francisco, ships wagyu from Hokkaido and other far-flung locales to your door. Also in S.F., Niku (nikusteakhouse.com) is a new Japan-inspired steakhouse and butcher shop specializing in Japanese wagyu beef, including A-5, sizzled over binchotan charcoal. In Century City, Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steakhouse (delfriscos .com) just bowed its 15,000-square-foot temple to beef and steakhouse culture; there, diners can dig into a tasting menu of wagyu from Japan, Australia and Texas. Dry-aged beef is another trend, as a few weeks in a cold cellar can add tenderness and umami-driven deliciousness to a steak. Thank renowned chef and meatman Adam Perry Lang for the craze and sample it at his year-old steakhouse, APL (aplrestaurant.com), in Los Angeles, where beefy, funky 380-day-aged steaks are on the menu. To get dry-aged cuts at home, order from Marin’s Flannery Beef (flannerybeef.com), where butchers Katie Flannery and her father, Bryan, produce some of the country’s finest steaks. With so many vendors making the cut, this may be more than just a moment. •

From top: NIKU’s grilled Imperial wagyu tomahawk steak for two with housemade kimchi. The $50 Serious sandwich with shaved prime New York strip steak , available at APL’s Hole in the Wall takeaway window. HOLY GRAIL STEAK CO.’s American-raised Tajima wagyu tomahawk steak with tomatoes. Franklin Steak: Dry-Aged. LiveFired. Pure Beef. (Ten Speed Press, $20), the new book by JORDAN MACKAY and pitmaster AARON FRANKLIN, out now.

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NIKU: PATRICIA CHANG. APL: JAKOB LAYMAN. HOLY GRAIL: EVA KOLENKO. FRANKLIN STEAK: WYATT MCSPADDEN.

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GANTRI’s PyraSphere table lamp in Snow, $128.

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From top: PALIHOTEL Culver City’s indoor-outdoor bar and restaurant Simonette. A Palihotel Westwood Village guest room. A retro-inspired guest room vignette at the Culver City outpost.

Here’s a bright idea: Headquartered in San Francisco, Gantri partners with designers worldwide — including Los Angeles-based industrial designer Chris Granneberg and Bilbao’s awardwinning Muka Design Lab — to deliver lighting that’s 3-D-printed on demand. “We want to make nebulous technologies like 3-D printing relevant to real people,” says founder and CEO Ian Yang, who launched the company in 2017. Utilizing a production method that minimizes waste and relies on a custom-blended biodegradable plastic comprised of natural corn starch, Gantri will debut four new designs in April, including S.F.based Louis Filosa’s Cantilever, a take on the spherical table lamp, and PyraSphere, which evokes a moon rising over a mountain. gantri.com. A.M.L.

PALLING AROUND Avi Brosh’s Palisociety is officially taking over Los Angeles’ hospitality scene with three new locations. The Palihotel Culver City (rooms from $250/night, 3927 Van Buren Pl., Culver City, 424-321-7000) brings a 1920s boarding house back to life, with 49 rooms and indoor-outdoor restaurant and bar Simonette outfitted in a sophisticated, idiosyncratic style befitting a Wes Anderson film. Across town, the Palihotel Westwood Village (rooms from $250/night, 1044 Tiverton Ave., L.A., 323-327-9702) opens in June less than a mile from UCLA. Also set to debut this summer, Silver Lake Pool & Inn (rooms from $275/night, 4141 Santa Monica Blvd., Silver Lake), has an outdoor Italianinspired restaurant and spacious, sunlit rooms just blocks from Sunset Junction. For postcard-worthy vistas of the Griffith Observatory, ask for a room on the third floor. palisociety.com. B.P.K.

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PALIHOTEL: COURTESY OF PALISOCIETY. COURTESY OF GANTRI.

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RIDE ON Dior is trotting out a new men’s version of one of its most famous accessories — the Saddle bag. When it first debuted in the late ’90s, the design (playfully shaped as a saddle, complete with hanging stirrups) quickly became the bag of the moment. Now, creative director Kim Jones has given the famed style a utilitarian overhaul, grooming it into sleek new leather iterations for men on the go. “The Saddle bag is an iconic Dior silhouette which feels so relevant in current culture,” Jones says. “It was the right time to bring this into the men’s universe.” dior.com. C.M. DIOR MEN Saddle bag in navy blue grained calfskin, $2,700.

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Old Lightning (oldlightning.com) — a reservations-only speakeasy housed in back of Venice’s Scopa with an impressive library of vintage spirits — was recently christened with a James Beard Award nomination for Outstanding Bar Program. While we wait to see who takes home the trophy this May, here are three more new hidden drinking dens worth seeking out. Tucked in a back room of L.A.’s 6th & La Brea Brewery is the midcentury-inspired brewpub Brandon (brandonsonlabrea.com). The Moxy San Diego’s library houses the Gaslamp’s very own speakeasy (viiiv.co), which lives down a staircase beyond one of the bookcases. Through an unmarked door at Lupetti Pizzeria in DTLA lies In Sheep’s Clothing (insheepsclothinghifi .com) — a bar inspired by Japan’s World War II kissaten lounges — where the large collection of vinyl records is best enjoyed with a Japanese whisky cocktail in hand. K.P.

The designer of one of the world’s most recognizable sneakers hopes to do it again. David TourniaireBeauciel, co-designer of the Balenciaga Triple S, has come up with an “ugly” sneaker inspired by fairground bumper cars. Bump’Air by Shoes 53045 (the digits spell “shoes” if reversed and turned upside down) features a platform bubble sole and a corrugated rubber tread. Although TourniaireBeauciel is based in Paris, the brand and his co-founder, CEO Aurelia Ammour, are based in Los Angeles. “We want to be energetic, reactive, like anything is possible. And the Californian way gives me this,” he says. New colorways will drop roughly every two months on the straight-to-consumer brand’s website; an open-toe sandal is on the slate and a store is on the horizon, too. “I don’t want to be a luxury brand. There is an album by Depeche Mode called Music for the Masses. I want to do shoes for the masses.” shoes53045.com. A.B.

MALIBU, THE MUSE Los Angeles’ surfing mecca continues to inspire designers across the world. Michael Kors (michaelkors.com) riffed on its lapping shores for his ( maritime-driven Spring/Summer 2019 collection replete with “MK Beach Club”-emblazoned towels. British-Brazilian beachwear company Frescobol Carioca (frescobolcarioca.com) has collaborated with Malibu boutique Ranch ( at the Pier on exclusive designs for its beach bats. And for the trifecta, Calvin Klein 205w39nyc (calvinklein.us) sent models in neoprene wetsuits ( down the runway this spring as an ode to Hollywood’s cult classic Jaws. A.B. STITCHED UP Our favorite patchwork shirts

LOEWE Asym shirt with bandana patchwork, $1,550. barneys.com. barneys.com

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UNIVERSAL WORKS Patchwork shirt, $110. mrporter.com.

STELLA McCARTNEY Patchwork Rover shirt, $500. stellamccartney.com. stellamccartney.com

IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING: ALEN LIN. COURTESY OF MICHAEL KORS. COURTESY OF CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.81.

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From far left: MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION Spring/Summer 2019. CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC Spring/Summer 2019. RANCH AT THE PIER x FRESCOBOL CARIOCA beach bat set, $355. A view of Malibu boutique Ranch at The Pier from the water.


Passes On Sale Now

JULY 12–21, 2019

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Clockwise from top left: AMIRI sweater, price upon request, and HERMÈS crossbody bag, $6,150. ISSEY MIYAKE MEN shirt, $930, STELLA McCARTNEY jeans, $545, and CONVERSE sneakers, $55. COMME DES GARÇONS top, $149, ISAIA jeans, $445, and THE ELDER STATESMAN boots, $500. LOUIS VUITTON jacket, $2,530, jeans, $1,600, and scarf, $650. 3.1 PHILLIP LIM sweatpants, $350, and ANONYMOUS ISM at MR PORTER socks, $28. All jewelry, model’s own.

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From top: Climber and filmmaker JIMMY CHIN on the Pacific Ocean Wall of Yosemite National Park’s El Capitan. Climbers on top of Yosemite’s Higher Cathedral Spire.

lex Honnold’s rope-free climb of El Capitan, a 3,200-foot slab of vertical granite in Yosemite National Park, in 2017 has been called one of the most stunning physical feats in human history. Nearly as impressive is the fact that it was documented at all. Free Solo, the Academy Award-winning film that depicts Honnold’s feat in all of its death-defying pathos, was conceived and directed by Jimmy Chin, a worldclass climber in his own right, and his wife, documentary filmmaker Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi. Chin followed Honnold’s ascent, lugging a 50-pound camera on his back with the rest of his gear. “It gets heavy pretty fast,” he says modestly. The filmmaker, 45, grew up in one of the flattest places in America — Minnesota. His parents, first-generation Chinese immigrants, demanded excellence: He practiced martial arts, played the violin and swam competitively. The rest of his time was spent studying. While attending Carleton College, he discovered rock climbing. “Climbing requires a lot of the things that I grew up with, like discipline and training and pushing myself physically and mentally, but it also had an element of adventure. And it was freeing. There were no rules.” After graduating in 1996, Chin moved to Yosemite to become a “dirtbag” (a term for climbers who do just enough to get by so they can spend their days scaling walls). His parents were nonplussed. As fate would have it, one climb changed the trajectory of his career: Chin took a photograph of a friend sleeping atop El Capitan and later sold it for $500. “That’s two months of climbing supplies,” he explains. “When you’re living out of the back of your car, it’s a lot of money.” He has since documented countless expeditions, including to Mount Everest, and moved from photography into film. His 2015 film, Meru, follows Conrad Anker’s attempt to summit the famed peak in the Himalayas. Chin has two children, ages 5 and 3. Does having a family give him pause? “It’s actually the reverse,” he says. “I got to the point where my acceptance of risk meant that I felt like I could responsibly have children.” Next up for Chin? A documentary chronicling the lives of North Face founder Doug Tompkins and Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard is in the works. •

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CHARACTER Diego Luna talks love-hating L.A., fatherhood, the state of Mexican filmmaking and the art of playing a bad guy

STUDY Feature Luna

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GUCCI trench coat, $2,900, pants, $1,300, and sneakers, $750. CHIMALA at MR PORTER top, $290.


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iego Luna is working against the clock to find a pink violin. It makes his day job — controlling the Mexican drug trade as kingpin Félix Gallardo in Narcos: Mexico — look like a doddle. “My task is to buy a pink violin for my daughter before I fly home tomorrow morning,” he explains, sounding far more stressed than the smooth-talking Gallardo. How about buying a normal violin and having it painted? “I don’t think that will work,” he replies forlornly. “There must be somewhere on Sunset Boulevard that sells pink violins …” In many ways, it’s hard to imagine Luna, who is boyishly good-looking, a devoted father and one of the most internationally recognized Mexicans, as a bad guy. But it is a tribute to his powers as an actor that in Narcos: Mexico he is terrifyingly convincing as El Padrino (The Godfather), the man behind modern Mexican drug trafficking. In the last 30 years, the epidemic has claimed the lives of half a million

people (and counting, as the Netflix series ominously makes clear). Narcos: Mexico will be returning soon for a second season, once again with Luna at its helm. We are meeting at Chateau Marmont, where he is staying during a brief trip from Mexico City. He is always happy to return to Los Angeles, which was his home for several years, and was last here a few weeks ago to introduce Alfonso Cuarón’s film Roma at the Oscars. “I was nervous, but I had a mezcal before going onstage and that got me very relaxed.” So relaxed that he improvised some of his speech in Spanish, to the delight of Spanish-speaking audiences everywhere: “Ya nos abrieron la puerta y no nos sacan de aquí.” (“They’ve opened the door to us and we’re not leaving.”) It was a big moment for Mexico — to see a Mexican at the Oscars introducing a Mexican film by a Mexican director, a film that went on to win multiple awards. It was also particularly

“The stories that connect us are stronger and more powerful than this hate that divides us”

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COACH jacket, $1,200, and boots, price upon request. BUCK MASON T-shirt, $32. TODS pants, $3,445. Opposite: BOTTEGA VENETA parka, $3,700, leather shirt, $2,400, T-shirt, $350, and pants, $980.


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BALENCIAGA top, $1,390, and pants, $850. THE LOST EXPLORER T-shirt, $29. JIMMY CHOO sneakers, $575.


timely. While President Donald Trump continues to talk about building a border wall, Luna is focused on building bridges. “I don’t even listen to Trump anymore,” he says. “I don’t want to waste my time. … The stories that connect us are stronger and more powerful than this hate that divides us.” He adds, “I was really happy [the Academy] invited me to present — first, because Alfonso is a friend and mentor but also because celebrating a film like Roma sends the message to young people shooting in Mexico and all around the world that their stories matter. You don’t have to come [to L.A.] to be the new someone else.” Luna, 39, first made his name as “the new someone else” starring in Cuarón’s 2001 coming-of-age story, Y Tu Mamá También. Later he became known as “the guy from the video,” as he puts it, when he played Katy Perry’s boyfriend in her 2011 track “The One That Got Away.” To date it has been viewed nearly 700 million times. In 2016, he took on the role of rebel spy Cassian Andor in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, becoming the first Mexican in a major role in the franchise. As he says today: “You don’t beat the phenomenon of Star Wars.” After being greeted in Spanish by fellow diners at the restaurant, Luna orders “a beer bien fría.” Although fluent in English, he sprinkles Spanish words liberally throughout our conversation. Los Angeles, he says, constantly reminds him of Mexico. “Every street name is in Spanish. You go to the Eastside and you feel like you’re in Mexico, walking through a Mexican market.” He usually stays in Santa Monica, where he used to live with his ex-wife, Camila Sodi, and their two children, Jerónimo and Fiona, now 10 and 8. “I like being able to look at the water every morning,” he says. Luna tries to fit in a visit to one of his two favorite restaurants: Hiko Sushi or the Mexican cantina El Carmen in Beverly Grove. “They have a good selection of tequilas,” he explains. While living here, he welcomed an endless stream of friends from Mexico. “I was like the Mexican embassy of L.A. — people would come for a few months to see if things worked out. There was an open lunch at my house on Saturdays and Sundays: people would stay until really late. You would have to put them in a cab and say, ‘You’re leaving your car here.’ That’s the only moment you realize you’re in L.A.; in Mexico, they would take the car.” But he missed his homeland’s relaxed spontaneity. “In L.A., sometimes the only connection you have in a day is with valet

parking. … There’s so much bureaucracy: You have to confirm an invitation and make a reservation. And I was introduced to this idea of parties having an ending time. They invite you to lunch from 12 to 5 p.m., and I’m like, ‘What? You’re going to kick me out of your house at 5 p.m.?!’” Born in Mexico City in 1979, Luna is the son of Alejandro Luna, a set designer, while his British mother, Fiona Alexander, was a costume designer. When Luna was 2, his mother died in a car crash. “She was beautiful and full of energy and passion for her work, so she left a nice print on the Mexican theater community. I guess that’s why I started working in theater: I felt her warmth around me.” As a young boy, he sometimes sleepwalked out to the patio at night, where his father would find him in an imaginary conversation with his mother. “I had a lot of dreams and encounters with her energy,” he says. Around the time of his birth, Luna’s parents were putting on a theater production of ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore with the parents of Gael García Bernal: Patricia Bernal was assisting Luna’s mother in costume design, while José Ángel García was the lead actor. “They were rehearsing when [García Bernal] was born and performing when I was born. So our parents called us ‘The Sons of the Whore.’” The boys acted together as children and their careers have intersected at multiple points since, most memorably in Y Tu Mamá También. “We’re very different but share many passions — which makes best friends,” Luna says. “It’s nice to go through this crazy journey with a friend, it keeps you sane. Most actors don’t have a brother who understands you perfectly — it’s not often you find these relationships.” In 2005 they founded Ambulante, a documentary film festival that promotes films as a tool for social change, and last year they launched a new film and television production company, La Corriente del Golfo. As a young boy, Luna was shielded from the Mexico depicted in Narcos: Mexico. “My father was hiding it from me. You heard they were fighting in the mountains, but then the violence got out of control and started to happen in front of us, regular citizens. There was this feeling of, shit, they brought their fight now to our cities.” When first offered the role of Gallardo, Luna was hesitant, unwilling to glamorize the violence his country still endures. “I expressed my worries and [the producer] explained why the story mattered to him: It’s a reminder of what needs

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Opposite: MICHAEL KORS trench coat, $1,298, T-shirt, $60, and pants, $498. BATA boots, $66.

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to happen for cocaine to reach your wallet. It is a huge business that benefits just a very few people and creates a mess of violence and loss and pain.” He says he likes to play characters with contradictions. “I don’t like the moral approach of good and bad. I always try to make a rounded character, with layers and volume. [Otherwise] you are a cartoon, putting a mask on your face.” Even Gallardo — who was eventually captured in 1989 and is still in jail — is depicted with a human side, mourning his first wife, who, according to the show, died of leukemia. And power, predictably, does not bring his character happiness. “I used to sleep like a baby before I became rich,” he tells Kiki Camarena (played by Michael Peña), the DEA agent who becomes his nemesis. Luna says it is inaccurate to think of this as a golden age of Mexican television and cinema. Despite the fact that Narcos: Mexico films in Mexico, he points out that it is produced by a

French and American company and written by Americans. “It has Mexican actors, yes, but that doesn’t make it Mexican. The industry is not as healthy as you would think — it’s individual voices coming out of a country that does not want borders to define our reach. Roma is the first film to get this amount of attention. If I ask you to tell me your five favorite Mexican films, [you won’t get far]. That is why Roma is so important.” Beyond the second season of Narcos: Mexico, Luna is reprising his role as Cassian for a Disney Star Wars spinoff series and a Rogue One prequel. But his lips are sealed. “I’m not allowed to say anything.” He suspects he is told less than anyone else as he has a reputation for shooting his mouth off. “They know I love mezcal,” he says and chuckles. “So they’re all like, ‘Don’t tell him the end.’” And with that, the unlikely villain of Narcos: Mexico finishes his beer and resumes his quest for a pink violin. X

“I don’t like the moral approach of good and bad. I always try to make a rounded character, with layers and volume”

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VALENTINO coat, $6,950, jacket, $1,550, pants, $995, and VALENTINO GARAVANI sneakers, $1,145. SANDRO top, $245. Opposite: STELLA McCARTNEY jacket, $1,159, and pants, $690. BUCK MASON T-shirt, $32. LOUIS VUITTON sneakers, $990. Grooming by BARBARA GUILLAUME at Forward Artists using Every Man Jack .


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BAND OF BROTHERS As the Woolsey Fire engulfed Malibu’s Point Dume, a group of surfers bravely stood their ground to defend their beloved community

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ALEC HOUGE at Point Dume Elementary. Opposite: NICK NUSHAWG stands in a ravine in Point Dume.


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ou’d think a 7 a.m. mandatory evacuation message would evoke a singular response: Grab your family and get the hell out. But for a group of lifelong residents of Point Dume, it had the opposite effect. Last year, as the town was enveloped by a thick fog of smoke on Friday, Nov. 9, they chose to stay behind. In Malibu, fires are nothing new. Nor is the concept of people staying behind to protect their property. But the Woolsey Fire was reportedly the first to jump the Pacific Coast Highway in more than 20 years, presenting a whole new threat to the beachside communities of Point Dume and neighboring Paradise Cove. Childhood friends Sam McGee and Bo Bigelow were two of those who stayed. With shovels, they started putting out spot fires as best they could, protecting the homes of friends and family. Despite low water pressure, and in many cases no water at all, they fought the flames with garden hoses, dodging the flying embers as eucalyptus trees burned. They needed support. Via an iMessage chat group among their surfer friends, the Point Dume Bomberos amassed 15 people in just a few hours. (The group’s name derives from the surf term “bomber,” used by Point Dume’s first surf team in the early ’60s to refer to someone dropping into a big wave.) As houses started to collapse they soldiered on, collecting volunteers as they went. “We were just told [by the local firefighters] to wear 100 percent cotton because polyester will melt to your skin,” McGee says. There was a community to protect. With PCH gridlocked, there were close to 200 people on the beach, fearing for their lives, their homes, their friends and their animals. Making things worse: the unreliable cell coverage. From their front-row seat, the only certainty was that the fire wasn’t stopping anytime soon. “The thing that surprised me was all of these guys had the instinct to help and to fight and to be combative about the situation, rather than passive,” says Robert Spangle, who evacuated on Friday with a friend and neighbor to Santa Monica. Watching the news on TV, he was overwhelmed with a feeling of powerlessness that compelled him to drive back with some camping equipment. Having done two tours in Afghanistan with the Marine Corps, Spangle met the

“All of these guys had the instinct to help and to fight” R O B E R T S PA N G L E

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group and suggested he spot for them. He chose a vantage point on Big Dume, Malibu’s farthest-west location, which was a lookout during World War II for identifying Japanese submarines. Supplied with only his binoculars, a sleeping bag and a pair of ski goggles, he spotted fires and communicated with the team using a children’s walkie-talkie. Most importantly, he had a couple signal bars and could send out supply orders with the hope that someone might make it back on road or by water. “It would go from you seeing this wall of smoke to you being inside of it, not really being able to see anything,” he says. By Sunday, supplies, including generators, radios, gas masks, gasoline, food, water and medication, began to arrive by boats leaving

From top: Childhood friends SAM McGEE and GREG BERCEDA at Westward Beach. The POINT DUME BOMBEROS battle hot spots on Westward Beach. ROBERT SPANGLE perched atop his lookout on Big Dume.

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From top: NATE BRESSLER documents a flare-up north of Decker Canyon. Calpine Drive, West Malibu.


Marina del Rey. But with no place to dock, they had to improvise the landings with surfboards. At one point a 15-foot-long inflatable unicorn was used as transport. “I spent a lot of time [in the Marine Corps] working with small craft and landing on beaches,” Spangle says. “To unload noncommercial vehicles onto longboards is not only physically trying, it’s extremely dangerous. But it needed to be done.” By now the group had grown to nearly 30. The relief center had moved to the Point Dume Marine Science Elementary School, and the supplies went there to be sorted. Word had reached two New York-based Bomberos, who flew in that weekend to volunteer. One of them, Jackson Winner, hitched a ride on a fishing boat heading to Ventura and swam his way in. With the help of some “creative, dynamic thinkers we were able to form 25 young guys into an incredibly effective, basically, like, purpose-built emergency service brigade,” Spangle says. On Wednesday morning, after five nights with next to no sleep, the Bomberos

“It’s extremely dangerous. But it needed to be done” R O B E R T S PA N G L E

went surfing. With the ground smoldering but the fire under control, they knew Point Dume was far from saved. Power didn’t return for 10 days. In some parts of Malibu, it took two months. The cleanup is ongoing, and insurance claims are still being processed — that is, in situations where there is insurance. Three lives and more than 1,500 homes were lost in the Woolsey Fire. The Bomberos believe many of those could have been saved with better community organization and the right supplies. With the help of Malibu City Council, they are looking to receive fire training from professionals. The fund they launched has already raised more than $200,000, of which the lion’s share has gone to providing shelters for the displaced. Their ambition is to create an emergency supply bank with radios, generators, boots and clothing to better position the community for next time. Because, sadly, there will be a next time. Donations may be made at gofundme.com/ fundraiser-for-point-dume-bomberos. •

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A meeting on Point Dume to discuss resource management. Opposite: McGee and COLTON SARLO battle hot spots at Westward Beach.

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MORE World-renowned artist JR captures the essence of San Francisco and puts it all on display

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Artist JR wears shades in photographs to preserve his anonymity because he’s been arrested in so many places where he installs his work. (However, he goes sans glasses when traveling outside of the United States.) “I’m actually anonymous under my real name, and then I’m actually recognizable when I put on a hat and glasses,” he says. Opposite: A part of JR’s The Chronicles of San Francisco, which includes more than 1,200 individuals in the complete piece.


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he vibe at 11 p.m. at the San Francisco Public Library’s Night of Ideas, a February evening devoted to debate, readings and performance, is bustling. People cram in front of a makeshift stage and wander the stacks, munching on doughnuts and carrying plastic cups of wine, while members of the Bandaloop dance group scale the walls like giant bugs. Into this rowdy milieu bounds the French artist known only as JR, famous worldwide for his larger-than-life photographs splashed graffiti-style across buildings, trains and staircases — all of which embrace the idea of a universal community. He has pasted giant pictures of Israelis and Palestinians next to each other in eight Palestinian and Israeli cities. His “Kikito” installation of a giant photograph of a Mexican child peeking over the U.S.-Mexico border fence is iconic. And his collaboration with Time magazine, for which he interviewed and photographed 245 people on both sides of the gun control issue, ranging from professional marksmen to trauma nurses who treat shooting victims, is highly provocative. Suddenly, you’re forced to see your neighbors. Tonight he’s wearing his trademark sunglasses, a kooky little fedora, head-to-toe denim and combat boots. As he takes the audience through a tour of his body of work on a big screen — beginning with his early pieces in Les Bosquets, the “ghetto” of Montfermeil, a suburb east of Paris — his commentary is filled with such cheerful asides as, “The mayor sued me!” He’s irreverent and funny, sharp and easygoing. You get the impression he’s enjoying this ride but, like a true graffiti artist, could vanish at a moment’s notice. On May 23, he debuts a work that reflects the unique melting pot that is San Francisco. On view in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s Roberts Family Gallery (which the public can access for free) through April 27, 2020, The Chronicles of San Francisco is a mural inspired by Diego Rivera’s work but very much of the current time. Instead of frescoes of lumberjacks and farm workers, he’s created a 17-foot-by100-foot digital video collage of 1,206 people he collected at random from the city’s streets. “I had come to San Francisco many times, but I never understood the city,” he says. “All the technology comes from here. Diego Rivera had painted here. I started scouting and realized ... this city has incredible freedom ...

“I just see people. That’s howJR Feature I approach my work

and at the same time this homeless situation.” So, in January and February of 2018, JR loaded up a giant 53-foot trailer-truck with photographic and audio equipment and traveled to 22 different locations in San Francisco, from Ocean Beach to Bayview, inviting passersby to be photographed and filmed. People who follow his work also sought him out. When they showed up he asked them how they wanted to be portrayed. “Many people were just walking by and had not heard of the project. Or of me,” he notes. “They had to decide how they wanted to be represented — forever. Some were like, ‘Can I be drinking?’ Others said, ‘Can I be on the phone?’ ‘Can I be dancing?’” He filmed each person in front of a green screen, which he used later for the collage component. Then he ushered them outside to record their audio file and share whatever they wanted. People told him how proud they were of the city, or how the city has changed; others spoke of the city’s homeless population. For JR, it is extremely important there is no illusion of hierarchy. As a multiracial person (his father French, his mother Tunisian), he grew up in the suburbs of Paris where people came from all over the world. “I realized that home is everywhere, and I never see social class, or rich or poor, or black or white,” he says. “I just see people. That’s how I approach my work everywhere — Kenya, Liberia, here in San Francisco.” The 36-year-old currently works from his studio in New York. Artistically, that means every subject is photographed at the exact same size, all in focus, and in the same light (no one is shaded or brighter than another person). Afterward, everyone was collaged together for a looped video composite that calls to mind the surreal whirly-swirly paintings of Hieronymus Bosch. A unicorn is inserted among the masses (a play on startups valued at $1 billion or more). There are homeless people, tech entrepreneurs, cross-dressers, dancers and firefighters. Each of the 1,206 individuals and groups has its own video loop so nothing repeats with any predictability. It’s a seething mass of humanity. Michael Birch, founder of social networking site Bebo and members club The Battery, was invited to participate by friend Marc Benioff, founder and co-CEO of software company Salesforce. Benioff invited his entire CEO dinner club group, which includes Drew Houston, founder of file sharing service provider Dropbox, and

Opposite, from top: JR pastes an image of a homeless person onto the roof of his studio truck in 2018. A piece from the artist’s project The Wrinkles of the City in L.A. in 2012, for which he wanted to juxtapose the wrinkles of older people living in L.A. against the idealized version of beauty propagated in Hollywood.

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Nirav Tolia, founder of social networking site Nextdoor, among others, to participate (at the time the truck was parked in front of the Salesforce headquarters). Birch’s pose was a reaction to the recent election of President Donald Trump; he is seen scratching his head. Other notables pepper the mural: Julia Hartz, co-founder and CEO of ticketing service Eventbrite; Golden State Warriors basketball player Draymond Green; restaurateur Michael Mina; and California Governor Gavin Newsom. There’s even an homage to the late Mayor Ed Lee. “We wanted mayors,” says JR, who famously got the aforementioned French mayor, who sued him, to pose for another mural he made for the town after the riots in Les Bosquets. And there are names that don’t ring a bell: clinical research technical coordinator and homeless advocate Guiseppe Cavaleri, Salesforce employee and Afghan Refugee Islamic Community volunteer Brielle Nikaido, and a longtime S.F. resident who goes by the moniker Catbird. “There’s no rich or poor, there’s no black or white. They’re just people,” JR says. “By mirroring the people, suddenly you realize what they’re part of. Often that’s all we need to remember. Oh yes, we’re all in this together.” The director of SFMOMA, Neal Benezra, says, “I value the fundamentally inclusive

and populist character of JR’s work ... The Chronicles of San Francisco includes all aspects and communities of our city. All too often the art world is seen as exclusive and out of the reach of so many sectors of society, and I am thrilled that SFMOMA can engage individuals from all walks of life in this ambitious work.” JR also wants his subjects to interact with his work, to feel an ownership. The filter between his work and the public is very thin — no brands or galleries are involved (he relies on private donations) — which harks to his roots as a teenage graffiti artist. For his Women Are Heroes project in 2008, he pasted images of women’s faces and eyes on the stairways and buildings of the Morro da Providência in Rio de Janeiro. The next day, all the images were scratched. But he liked that — it showed that people living there felt like the art was their own. In March, his installation at the Louvre was destroyed by pedestrians within a day. For The Chronicles of San Francisco, you can touch a person’s face, hear their audio story and watch their movements. “You’ll never know if you’ll change people’s minds,” JR says. “But sometimes you can change the perspective of how people see things, and that’s a way of changing people’s minds.” X

Feature JR

“By mirroring the people, suddenly you realize what they’re part of”

COURTESY OF JR-ART.NET.

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Feature JR

A part of The Chronicles of San Francisco.

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THE SHAPE

Feature Brock

OF THINGS Amid the epic environs of Ojai, master potter Chris Brock turns out ceramic vessels with an air of the monumental

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Feature Brock

CHRIS BROCK at home in Ojai, flanked by a collection of his extraordinary ceramic vessels and a backdrop of the Topa Topa mountains.

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Feature Brock

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eramicist Chris Brock is inherently creative, the type of person who changes mediums fearlessly and instinctively. Over his professional lifetime he’s transitioned from arranging flowers to designing gardens to his current medium, clay, which he discovered after relocating from his native Los Angeles to a hilltop Modern Craftsman home he describes as “tiny, wellsited, and oozing charm” in Ojai six years ago. Simply put, Brock makes pots. But calling them pots seems wrong, as Brock’s vessels are iconic and grand, appearing ancient and modern at the same time, due in part to his layered glazing technique. “I wanted to make very refined deco pieces,” he says. “And I realized that stoneware, the clay that I use, is a bit rougher and is not only not refined, it’s quite earthy and rustic. So it informed me that the pieces were going to be both refined in design and rustic in execution and finish.” He considers himself a direct descendant of Ojai’s trailblazing potters, the most famous being “Mama of Dada” Beatrice Wood, as well as Otto and Vivika Heino (a duo renowned for their glazes) and Larry Carnes,

From top: Brock in his ceramics studio, a kitted-out vintage SCHULT trailer. The vintage guest trailer’s western-style interior is designed by Brock’s husband, PAUL FORTUNE. Opposite: Striped awnings provide a theatrical view of the couple’s vintage guest trailer.

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a contemporary potter who taught Brock the basics, including the ancient coiling technique he uses to form his pieces. Although he’s been working with clay for a relatively short time, Brock’s two shows at Rick Owens’ avant-garde West Hollywood boutique were resoundingly successful, with sophisticated collectors such as Alix Goldsmith, Anna Getty, Nate Ruess and Charlotte Ronson snapping up his work. The artist is also one half of a style power couple whose meet-cute took place in 1999 at Michèle Lamy’s memorably chic restaurant Les Deux Café, where Brock arranged flowers, and his future husband, Paul Fortune, created the interiors. Fortune, an irreverent and revered interior designer, just penned his own shelter tome, Notes on Décor, Etc. And designer Marc Jacobs, who is a repeat client, enlisted Fortune to work his magic on a recently acquired Frank Lloyd Wright home in Rye, New York (where Fortune just attended Jacobs’ nuptials to Charly Defrancesco with one of Brock’s pots in tow as a wedding gift). A vintage 1949 orange and white Schult trailer — a surprise gift from Fortune — serves as Brock’s ceramics studio, which is parked next to another Fortune gift, a 1967 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow fondly known as Joyce. “Rolls-Royces make great birthday presents,” Brock quips. Since arriving in Ojai, Joyce has been repainted from midnight blue to sable brown. “It looks divine here in Ojai, where the official color is brown,” says Brock, who also had Joyce adorned with an orangeyred pinstripe. “A good friend says it’s very Hermès,” he says with a shrug. With his slender frame and leading man looks, Brock is also known for his polished sartorial tastes. The New York Times once compared his upscale style to Eva Gabor’s lavishly dressed character Lisa Douglas at her farm on the classic TV sitcom Green Acres. Brock’s Ojai uniform is comprised of Wrangler polyester jeans purchased at a western store in nearby Santa Paula (“you can only wear them about three months of

Feature Brock

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“You can’t repeat yourself ever in this world”

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Feature Brock

the year because they’re polyester and they hold in all the heat”) and SeaVees slip-on canvas deck shoes he discovered shortly after arriving in Ojai. “You can’t wear green-andred-striped horsebit patent loafers out during the day in the country,” he surmises, hence the deck shoes. After Brock appeared on the cover of Santa Barbara Magazine wearing

SeaVees, the brand asked him to be one of its ambassadors. “They send me dozens of pairs a year,” he says with a grin. But when he travels or, say, attends the opera at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Brock considers a suit and tie de rigueur and reaches into his closet filled with Gucci suits by Tom Ford or Carol Christian Poell.

“Older people can get away with a lot. I’ve been waiting years to be this age,” he says half-seriously. “You just have to reinvent and re-create your style. Not every decade or every year or every season or every week but every time you go out. That’s what I’ve learned — you can’t repeat yourself ever in this world.” brockpottery.com. X

Brock’s colorful vintage studio/trailer was a surprise gift from Fortune.

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D Bolivia’s new luxury camp KACHI LODGE by AMAZING ESCAPES is situated 12,000 feet above sea level, on the world’s largest salt flat, the Salar de Uyuni.

I S C O Discoveries Opener

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DOWN TO EARTH

On the barren Uyuni Salt Flat of Bolivia, Kachi Lodge presents an out-of-this-world camping experience

COURTESY OF AMAZING ESCAPES, COPYRIGHT 2019.

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mid the 4,000 salt-encrusted square miles of Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni sits Kachi Lodge, the new property from luxury camp outfitter Amazing Escapes. Situated at the foot of the Tunupa volcano, the camp, set to open in May, features a string of six solar-powered geodesic dome accommodations equipped with plush bedding, wood-burning stoves and, upon request, a supply of extra oxygen to help combat the 12,000-foot altitude. Hike the rugged Mad Max-evoking salt plain or venture to nearby Coquesa to explore the village’s ancient ruins; and come wet season (December through April), paddleboard upon the flooded, reflective terrain while soaking up the mesmerizing views. Back at camp, tuck into a multicourse dinner at the only satellite outpost of restaurateur Claus Meyer (Noma) and chef Kamilla Seidler’s La Paz restaurant, Gustu — one of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants in Latin America. Two-night minimum stay from $1,980/person. amazingescapes.ch. • A.J.B.

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BREAK AWAY TO BALI All adrenaline seekers are welcome on Indonesia’s beloved island

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shark-free. Add abundant coconuts, locally sourced cuisine, and an endless supply of pursuits tailormade for adrenaline junkies and outdoor enthusiasts — paragliding, paddleboarding, spearfishing and whitewater rafting — and it’s easy to see why Californians, in particular, are flocking to Bali in everincreasing numbers. The magic happens the minute you make landfall and are greeted with the heady, soothing scent of incense and frangipani flower-flecked canang sari (daily Balinese Hindu offerings), and locals’ smiling faces. It doesn’t take long to realize Bali oozes laidback California vibes, but taken to the next level, with genuine friendliness a compulsory personality trait among its locals. The aforementioned breaks around iconic Uluwatu — the charming surf town high on craggy limestone cliffs, whose profile continues to rise nearly half a

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hether it’s dawn patrol at barreling break Impossibles with few souls in sight, or the golden hour at Secrets and Racetracks as fishing boats slide past surfboards on the gilded Indian Ocean, the waves around Bali are epic. This is especially true for goofy-footers starved for the left-breaking waves so lacking in The Golden State. But it’s not just surfers being lured to Bali by the promise of warm, crystalline waters that are blessedly

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March 2019

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: TOMMY SCHULTZ; JARRAH LYNCH; TOMMY SCHULTZ; COURTESY OF SIX SENSES; COURTESY OF THE APURVA KEMPINSKI BALI; RIP ZINGER.

century after its inclusion in the classic surf film Morning of the Earth — are not the island’s only draw. Though it’s this incomparable perch on which Six Senses Uluwatu (sixsenses.com) recently opened, bringing its focus on sustainability and wellness to programming that includes chartered boat trips for snorkeling and swimming with mantas, cycling through villages, temple pilgrimages and even an alfresco Balinese traditional shave with head massage. Neighboring Bingin is where the hip lifestyle hotel and members club Habitas (ourhabitas.com) promises an overnight outpost later this year, and Dreamland (the next beach north) will be the site of Jumeirah’s latest luxury resort (jumeirah.com), coming soon. It seems the swell of Californians to Bali’s surf mecca won’t be dropping anytime soon. Those who aren’t interested in paddling out can find contentment among the yoga offerings at Uluwatu Surf Villas (uluwatusurfvillas.com), an iconic resort with private steps leading to primo breaks; a new infinity pool that, come May, will feature custom teak chill-out pods by San Francisco artist Jay Nelson; and a forthcoming collection of tropical modern villas. Among the plethora of holistic Balinese massage spas dotting the island is brand-new resort The Apurva Kempinski Bali (kempinski.com), located on a clifftop in Nusa Dua, where surfers find dream waves, too. Even die-hard watermen shouldn’t overlook Bali’s beating heart, the plush green jungle, river valleys and ridges of

The breaks around Uluwatu, a surf town on craggy limestone cliffs, are not the island’s only draw

Travel

Clockwise from above: Breezy indoor-outdoor accommodations in ULUWATU SURF VILLAS’ Jungle View 3 villa. The infinity pool at SIX SENSES ULUWATU. A peaceful breezeway at THE APURVA KEMPINSKI BALI. Bombie breaks between traditional alang-alang roofs. Opposite, from left: An aerial view of Uluwatu Surf Villas’ classic clifftop accommodations. A surfer rides one of Bali’s legendary left-breaking waves.

Sayan. Spend a night soothed by the sound of rushing water outside Bambu Indah’s new entirely bamboo Riverbend House (bambuindah.com) — complete with a FernGully-like stream running through a bedroom. Extracurriculars are also rich here: Mountain biking is one way to soak up the environment, hiking Mt. Batur (a still-steaming volcano) in time to catch a flaming sunrise at its peak is another. Most powerful is the hotel’s early morning Trash Walk, a vigorous exercise involving spearing insidious plastic garbage that helps preserve Bali’s magic and your own karma — it doesn’t get better than that. •

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C TRUNK SHOW

Jimmy Choo

Sandro

Jamir Aqua mix-knit fabric and Vacchetta low-top sneaker, $750. Jimmy Choo, 240 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-8609045; jimmychoo.com.

Button-down shirt with pineapple print, $220. Sandro, 310 N. Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-281-0083; 3333 Bristol St., Ste. 2848, Costa Mesa, 714-557-2820; sandro-paris.com.

Salvatore Ferragamo Trunk Show

Gancini duffle bag, $1,790. Salvatore Ferragamo, 357 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-273-9990; ferragamo.com.

Michael Kors

Variance

Aiden backpack, $498. Michael Kors, 10250 Santa Monica Blvd. #1950, L.A., 310-286-0337; michaelkors.com.

Ribbon ring green gold blend, $1,390. Variance, 1537 Pacific Ave., Ste. 101, Santa Cruz, 831-346-6758; varianceobjects.com.

PROMOTION


SHOPPING GUIDE COVER Prada orange knit sweater, $1,230, Prada, Beverly Hills, 310-278-8661. TABLE OF CONTENTS p.14 Hermès Men’s Suit, $3,850, Hermès, 310-278-6440; hermes.com. Sandro pink polo top, $245, Sandro, Beverly Hills, 310-281-0083; sandro-paris.com. STRONG SUIT p.24 Paul Smith double-breasted lilac jacket, $1,750, and wide-leg lilac pants, $620, Paul Smith, West Hollywood, 323-951-4800. Boss white shoes, $445, Boss Shop, 310-887-5555; hugoboss.com. Hermès men’s lambskin 3-button jacket, $14,400, lambskin pants, $8,050, and calfskin sandals, $800, Hermès, Beverly Hills, 310-2786440; hermes.com. Salvatore Ferragamo cotton Tailor suit, price upon request, and leather woven boots, $775, similar styles available, Salvatore Ferragamo, Beverly Hills, 310-273-9990; ferragamo.com. Dior Men white technical jersey transparent tank top, price upon request, Dior, Beverly Hills, 310-247-8003. Dior Men white striped blue technical canvas top in a double shirt effect, $1,700, and white striped blue technical canvas pants, $790, Dior, Beverly Hills, 310-247-8003. Boss pink suit, $995, Boss Shop, 310-887-5555; hugoboss.com. Jimmy Choo Foxley tassel loafers in Moon, $750; nordstrom.com. Ermenegildo Zegna Couture jacket, $4,295, and pants, $1,150, Ermenegildo Zegna, Beverly Hills, 310-247-8827. ON THE DOT p.26 Cartier Santos de Cartier chronograph watch, extralarge model, with interchangeable leather & rubber straps, $8,950, Cartier, Beverly Hills, 310-275-4272; cartier.com. Montblanc TimeWalker Automatic chronograph watch, $3,370, Montblanc, San Francisco, 415-403-4000. Panerai Luminor Regatta Chrono Flyback watch, $17,200, Panerai, Beverly Hills, 310-228-1515. Tag Heuer Heritage Calibre Heuer 02 chronograph watch with black calfskin strap inspired by the 1972 classic edition, $5,800; tagheuer.com.

with matching suit jacket—not sold separately), $4,150, and sneakers with feathers, $1,145, Valentino, Beverly Hills, 310-247-0103. Palm Angels Eagle denim multi-color jacket, $875, and Eagle denim multi-color pants, $630, Maxfield, L.A., 310-274-8800. Kenzo striped top, price upon request, similar styles available, Opening Ceremony, West Hollywood, 310-652-1120. Gucci large yellow canvas GG backpack with leather tag and beaded heart appliqué, $3,300, Gucci, S.F., 415-392-2808; gucci.com. Amiri slip-on Palm patchwork sneakers in red, $550; amiri.com. STITCHED UP p.38 Loewe Asym bandana patchwork shirt, $1,550, Barneys New York, Beverly Hills, 310-276-4400. Universal Works Patchwork shirt, $110; mrporter.com. Stella McCartney patchwork Rover shirt, $500; stellamccartney.com. SPIN CYCLE p.40 Amiri cashmere tie-dye oversized sweater, price upon request; amiri.com. Hermès Cosmos leather hapache PM crossbody bag, $6,150, Hermès, Beverly Hills, 310- 278-6440; hermes.com. Stella McCartney Cesar tie-dye denim pants, $545, Stella McCartney, West Hollywood, 310-273-7051. Issey Miyake Men Shibori shirt in black, $930, H Lorenzo, West Hollywood, 310-652-7039. Converse Men’s Chuck Taylor All Star tie-dye low-top sneaker, $55; amazon.com. Comme des Garçons pink shirt, $149, Dover Street Market, L.A., 310-427-7610. Isaia Overdyed slim fit jeans in pink wash, $445, Isaia, S.F., 415-500-4930. The Elder Statesman Diemme Elder Vet hiking boot, $500, The Elder Statesman, West Hollywood, 424-288-4221; elder-statesman.com. Louis Vuitton denim oversized shirt, $2,530, Poppies Dorothy flared jeans, $1,600, and Brick Road orange scarf, $650, Louis Vuitton, Beverly Hills, 310-859-0457. 3.1 Phillip Lim tie-dye wide rib sweatpants in Taupe-Cobalt, $350, 3.1 Phillip Lim, L.A., 213-246-2588; 31philliplim.com. Anonymous ISM tie-dye socks, $28; mrporter.com.

Shopping Guide GEO STORM p.27 Fendi black Tiny sunglasses, $485; fendi.com. Alexander McQueen narrow octagonal sunglasses, $470; alexandermcqueen.com. Bottega Veneta narrow, half-rim cat-eye sunglasses, $510; bottegaveneta.com. Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello rhombus sunglasses, $450; ysl.com. ON THE GLOW p.28 Louis Vuitton Distorted quilted short-sleeve cycling top, $2,400, one pleat pants, $1,050, Skepticals sunglasses, $665, RGB gloves, $365, and Keepall Prism bag, $3,850, Louis Vuitton, Beverly Hills, 310-859-0457. THE CLASH p.30 2 Moncler 1952 printed jacket, $2,345, and printed sweater, $495; moncler.com. Paul Smith polka dot cycling jersey, $395, Paul Smith, Melrose, 323-951-4800. Fendi Tobacco FF logo shorts, $750; fendi.com. Versace Gioelleria Jetés print silk jacket, $3,250, Gioelleria Jetés silk long-sleeve shirt, $1,395, Gioelleria Jetés print silk shorts, $1,125, and Greca argyle print hat, $375, Versace, Beverly Hills, 310-205-3921; versace.com. Louis Vuitton Patch graphic windbreaker, $6,550, silk shirt, $1,470, triple pleat crease pants, $1,050, and Runner sneakers, $1,020; Louis Vuitton, Beverly Hills, 310-859-0457. Prada jacket, $1,560, turtleneck, $1,060, and shorts, $1,060, Prada, Beverly Hills, 310-278-8661. Folk x Alfie Kungu bucket hat, $80; mrporter.com. 3.1 Phillip Lim multi-color slim bumbag, $395, 3.1 Phillip Lim, Los Angeles, 213-246-2588. Valentino Men’s floral jacket, $1,395, floral shirt, $750, suit pants (sold

CHARACTER STUDY p.45 Gucci Holly-multicolor trench popeline coat, $2,900, Waikiki-chocolate pants, $1,300, and low-top sneaker in light brown suede, $750, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451. Chimala waffle-knit top, $290, mrporter.com. p.46 Bottega Veneta Nero string parka, $3,700, nappa leather shirt in Army, $2,400, Bianco T-shirt, $350, and Nero pants, $980, Bottega Veneta, Beverly Hills, 310-8058-6533. p.47 Coach leather jacket, $1,200, and boots, price upon request, Coach, Beverly Hills, 310-247-1309; coach.com. Buck Mason Pima curved hem T-shirt in faded black Venice wash, $32, Buck Mason, L.A., 323-498-0260; buckmason.com. Tod’s suede pants, $3,445, Tod’s, Beverly Hills, 310-285-0591; tods.com. p.48 Balenciaga sand polyester tilted long sleeve shirt, $1,390, sand polyester Fluid pants, $850, Balenciaga, Beverly Hills, 310-854-0557. The Lost Explorer Chiru cashmere T-shirt, $29, The Lost Explorer, Venice, 310-396-5678; thelostexplorer.com. Jimmy Choo red smooth calf leather high-top sneakers, $575, Jimmy Choo, Beverly Hills, 310860-9045; jimmychoo.com. p.51 Michael Kors khaki double breasted Inox trench coat, $1,298, white T-shirt, $60, and heather grey sweat pants, $498; michaelkors.com. Bata shoe in Storm King black, $66; amazon.com. p.52 Stella McCartney Jerry jacket, $1,150, and Parker pants, $690, Stella McCartney, Costa Mesa, 657-273-5727. Buck Mason Pima curved hem T-shirt in white, $32, Buck Mason, L.A., 323-498-0260; buckmason.com. Louis Vuitton Runaway sneakers, $990, Louis Vuitton, Beverly Hills, 310-859-0457; louisvuitton.com. p.53 Valentino green coat, $6,950, black jacket, $1,550, black pants, $995, and Valentino Garavani sneakers, $1,145, Valentino, Beverly Hills, 310-247-0103. Sandro white polo top, $245, Sandro, Beverly Hills, 310-2810083; sandro-paris.com.

C Magazine is published 12 times/year by C Publishing, LLC. Editorial office: 1543 Seventh St., Santa Monica, CA 90401. Telephone: 310-393-3800. Fax: 310-393-3899. E-mail (editorial): edit@magazinec.com. Subscriptions: domestic rates are $19.95 for one year (12 issues); orders outside U.S. and Canada add $49 postage; rest of world add $69. Single copies and subscriptions: shop.magazinec.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to C Magazine, P.O. Box 1339, Santa Monica CA, 90406.

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Favorite weekend away? Our friend has a condo on Catalina Island. We take out our motorboat and we sleep on it. There’s crazy-good fishing and sharks.

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Clockwise from far left: U.S. Olympic skier BODE MILLER wearing AZTECH MOUNTAIN (aztechmountain.com). BOMBER Gunpowder Mountain Range skis, $1,900. Mammoth Mountain. Catalina Island. IRVINE SPECTRUM CENTER . TESLA Model S. Filet mignon at HANNA’S.

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Favorite formal brand? I wear Prada suits and shirts. They were one of the early adopters of really good stretch fabric. Favorite denim? Levi’s is having a cool resurrection.

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Where do you shop? Irvine Spectrum Center is an easy hub for every luxury. My wife is really into Lululemon. The kids like walking around Fashion Island.

BODE MILLER The skier and co-owner of sportswear brand Aztech Mountain shares his Golden State favorites What’s your neighborhood? Coto de Caza, inland from Laguna Beach. Nearby, you have ocean, true forest, desert and Saddleback Mountain, which gets snow on it. Favorite hike? In the Holy Jim Canyon, there are steep valleys, rivers and waterfalls where you can swim. It’s only a 2-mile drive to the bottom of the trailhead. I take my kids and a tent. Favorite restaurant? Hanna’s in Rancho Santa Margarita. I go with my wife once a week. They have really good steaks and amazing burgers.

As told to ANDREW BARKER 82

What’s your style? At heart I’m a New Hampshire hippie. I own [Aztech Mountain], so I live in the things I design. The new hybrid short has great pockets and a click belt.

My CA

Where do you exercise? Dove Canyon Golf Club. I try to shoehorn it in before picking up my younger son for lunch. I have four kids. Best drive? I used to do therapy in Ensenada. I would deviate from the 5 freeway in San Diego and cross the border. It’s cool and winds up over the mountains. No people, no houses. You see dudes ripping motorcycles and driving pretty hard in sports cars. What do you drive? Teslas. I got my wife an S as a push present. We also have an X, but with four kids a van is also a necessity at this point. Sadly, Tesla only has a prototype. Best ski spots? Mammoth has amazing terrain, snow pack and they get huge storms there. I grew up going to Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows and Truckee. Plenty of challenging terrain and the cool, cultural, ski-bum lifestyle still exists there. Favorite drink? Juniper Mountain gin and tonic. My grandmother always drank it. •

MILLER: BRUNO STAUB. COURTESY OF BOMBER SKIS. COURTESY OF MAMMOTH MOUNTAIN. CATALINA ISLAND COMPANY. COURTESY OF IRVINE COMPANY. TESLA: TIMOTHY ARTMAN. COURTESY OF HANNA’S.

D


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