C California Style & Culture

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April 2019

Cover

SHE WILL ROCK YOU LUCY BOYNTON IS HOLLYWOOD’S QUEEN IN THE MAKING

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URE C LT

IF OR NI

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PLUS THE HAAS BROTHERS / KLAUS BIESENBACH / BRIGETTE ROMANEK / FAREWELL KARL LAGERFELD

& CU


Saint Laurent


Saint Laurent


Christian Dior

S O U T H C O A S T P L A Z A - 7 14 . 5 4 9 . 4 7 0 0


Christian Dior


Prada


Prada


Bottega Veneta


Bottega Veneta


Bulgari


Bulgari


Michael Kors


Michael Kors


Ben Bridge


Ben Bridge


David Yurman


David Yurman

RODEO DRIVE

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W E S T F I E L D T O P A N G A & T H E V IL L A G E

THE AMERICANA AT BRAND

SOUTH COAST PLAZA

WESTFIELD VALLEY FAIR


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April 2019 STATEMENTS A storied hotel on the American Riviera makes a comeback......................................................................................................................... 27 Inside Karl Lagerfeld’s love affair with The Golden State................................................................................................................................... 34 Where the design world cognoscenti is shopping right now........................................................................................................................... 44

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Can the tech world solve California’s housing crisis?........................................................................................................................................... 54 A new restaurant at the Hammer Museum steals the show.......................................................................................................................... 56

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FEATURES The Haas Brothers double down........................................................................................................................ 60 Lucy Boynton waxes rhapsodic.............................................................................................................................. 66 Brigette Romanek’s house of style.................................................................................................................... 76

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Meet MOCA’s new maestro..................................................................................................................................... 86

91. DISCOVERIES How to do Barcelona in 72 hours........................................................................................................................................................................................... 91 What’s new in the world of sleep, from A to Z’s........................................................................................................................................................... 95

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Beauty maven April Gargiulo’s California hit list..................................................................................................................................................... 98

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HAAS BROTHERS: RAINER HOSCH. ROMANEK: SHADE DEGGES. BOYNTON: VICTOR DEMARCHELIER. BIESENBACH: NOLWEN CIFUENTES. GRAYE: MINH TRAN. LITTLE BEACH HOUSE: COURTESY OF SOHO HOUSE. PLUME: KATE BERRY. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.97.

Baristas and bouquets join forces at Los Angeles’ Bloom & Plume Coffee........................................................................................ 46


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KELLY ATTERTON

ELIZABETH KHURI CHANDLER

GABRIELLE MIRKIN

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REBECCA RUSSELL

ANUSH J. BENLIYAN

QUINN BUGGS

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MARIE LOOK

JACOB WITT

Assistant Fashion Editor MARGRIT JACOBSEN

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Digital Content Consultant Nandita Khanna San Francisco Editor-at-Large Diane Dorrans Saeks | Contributing Editor-at-Large Kendall Conrad Contributing Editors Danielle DiMeglio, Kelsey McKinnon, Andrea Stanford, Stephanie Steinman, Nathan Turner Contributing Writers Catherine Bigelow, Caroline Cagney, Kerstin Czarra, Heather John Fogarty, Marshall Heyman, Punch Hutton, Christine Lennon, Martha McCully, Degen Pener, Jessica Ritz, Lindzi Scharf, Khanh T.L. Tran, Elizabeth Varnell, S. Irene Virbila Contributing Photographers Christian Anwander, David Cameron, Mark Griffin Champion, Victor Demarchelier, Amanda Demme, Michelangelo di Battista, Lisa Eisner, Douglas Friedman, Sam Frost, Beau Grealy, Zoey Grossman, Pamela Hanson, Kurt Iswarienko, Mona Kuhn, Kurt Markus, Bella Newman, Carter Smith, Alistair Taylor-Young, Jan Welters

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RODEO DRIVE FLAGSHIP BEVERLY CENTER WESTFIELD TOPANGA SOUTH COAST PLAZA FASHION VALLEY SAN FRANCISCO WESTFIELD VALLEY FAIR THE FORUM SHOPS AT CAESARS THE GRAND CANAL SHOPPES WYNN LAS VEGAS FERRAGAMO.COM


F O U N D E R’S

L E T T E R

EDITORS’ PICKS This month’s wish list

MIRI MARA

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Ostia ceramic vase, $260, Miri Mara, Carpinteria, c-stateofmind.com.

VRAM

Founders Note

JENNIFER SMITH HALE Founder, Editorial Director and CEO

@ccaliforniastyle

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Chrona 18-karat gold necklace, $19,500, vramjewelry.com.

ANINE BING Daphne flats, $349, Anine Bing, Pacific Palisades, 424-238-5738.

ON THE COVER

LUCY BOYNTON. Photography by VICTOR DEMARCHELIER . Creative & Fashion Direction by ALISON EDMOND. Hair by JENNY CHO at Starworks Artists using Suave Professionals. Makeup by JO BAKER at Forward Artists using Dior Beauty. Manicure by EMI KUDO at Opus Beauty using Chanel Le Vernis. Boynton wears VALENTINO dress. ALEXANDRA JULES earrings.

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SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.97.

siren song of sorts, the call of California is louder than ever, beckoning the best talent from all over the globe to these shores. For those of us already here (for me it’s 28 years and counting) we continue to be enchanted on a daily basis by this crucible of creativity we call home. The latest tastemaker to arrive is a fully fledged member of the global cultural cognoscenti, Klaus Biesenbach. He left New York’s MoMA to head up Los Angeles’ MOCA and, spoiler alert, he has grand plans for this institution as it undergoes yet another regime change. In this issue, he joins the Haas brothers. L.A. natives, the twin designers have always marched to their own beat (while remaining laser-focused in their artistic approach), and their pieces have bewitched collectors and curators alike. We delve inside their magical, mystical world. As a relatively new arrival to the interior design world, but a Cali girl since she was 5, Brigette Romanek has already made quite a name for herself, landing some of the biggest gigs (and clients) around. She invites us into her legendary Laurel Canyon lair, where among her exquisitely curated art and furniture pieces, we find an utterly fresh design philosophy. After her star turn in Bohemian Rhapsody, British belle Lucy Boynton has Hollywood’s floodlights shining brightly upon her. We’ve believed in her from the start (we profiled her in September 2017) and are thrilled she’s making her U.S. print cover debut with us. Having emerged as a style standout on the red carpet this season (with her Oscar-winning beau, Rami Malek, at her side), Lucy has us enthralled both on and off the screen. All of these creatives have culled inspiration from this golden place we call home. We can’t think of a better place to mine from.


Chanel © 2019 South Coast Plaza

South Coast Plaza

Alexander McQueen · Balenciaga · Bottega Veneta · Brunello Cucinelli · Camilla · Celine · Chanel Chloé · Dior · Dior Men · Dolce&Gabbana · Fendi · Gianvito Rossi · Givenchy · Golden Goose · Gucci Hermès · Louis Vuitton · Marni · Max Mara · Moncler · Moynat · Prada · Roberto Cavalli · Roger Vivier Saint Laurent · Salvatore Ferragamo · Stella McCartney · The Webster · Valentino · Versace · Zimmermann partial listing

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VICTOR DEMARCHELIER New York-based lensman Victor Demarchelier photographed actor and C cover star Lucy Boynton for this issue. Specializing in fashion photography and portraiture, he has shot for Ralph Lauren, Dior and Vogue. His work is exhibited all over the world. MY C SPOTS • My favorite breakfast is at Ronnie’s Diner in the Del Rey neighborhood • Boutique hotel Petit Ermitage for West Hollywood atmosphere • Hama Sushi in Venice for Japanese fare

ROB HASKELL Psychiatrist and journalist Rob Haskell interviewed Bohemian Rhapsody’s Boynton for “Don’t Stop Her Now,” p.66. Before earning his medical degree from Brown University, Haskell was a features director at Condé Nast Publications. In addition to C, he has contributed to Vogue, Architectural Digest, The New York Times and Harper’s Bazaar. MY C SPOTS • I love the combination of natural wine and Bangkok mall pasta at Night + Market Song in Silver Lake • Bon Vivant in Palm Springs for midcentury glass • Vermont Canyon for tennis at dusk

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NOLWEN CIFUENTES

SHADE DEGGES

California native Nolwen Cifuentes, who shot Klaus Biesenbach for “The Talented Mr. Biesenbach,” p.86, enjoys creating conversations around shifting social consciousness. Her photography has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and W Magazine. MY C SPOTS • Eaton Canyon is a fun hike — you cross through a river and find yourself at a waterfall • Pioneer Boulevard in Artesia for authentic Indian cuisine • Cuties Coffee is a shop and bakery in East Hollywood that cultivates an inclusive queer community

Photographer Shade Degges captured the home of interior designer Brigette Romanek and filmmaker Mark Romanek for “Perfect Harmony,” p.76. Beyond C, he’s contributed to Architectural Digest and just wrapped shooting Bibliostyle (a photo-heavy read about private libraries and book collectors), set to debut in October. MY C SPOTS • Hi-Lo in Culver City for Champagne • Larchmont Village Wine, Spirits and Cheese for provisions • I like being first in line at Konbi in Echo Park

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WORDS BY MARIE LOOK. CIFUENTES: YUMNA AL-ARASHI. DEGGES: SHADE DEGGES. DEMARCHELIER: VICTOR DEMARCHELIER.

Contribs


Brunello Cucinelli


Welcome to Medmen the New Normal Witness history now at

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.com


S T A T E

Statements Opener

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A FIAT JOLLY in cheery pink awaits at ROSEWOOD MIRAMAR BEACH in Montecito.

CONTRIBUTORS KELLY ATTERTON ANUSH J. BENLIYAN PHOEBE DOHENY MELISSA GOLDSTEIN JENNIFER BLAISE KRAMER

BLAKE BRONSTAD

MARIE LOOK CRYSTAL MEERS KAREN PALMER

RETURN TO SPLENDOR

The storied Miramar hotel finally reopens its doors in Montecito

JESSICA RITZ ELIZABETH VARNELL

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From top: The Grand Bungalow at Rosewood Miramar Beach. The Manor Pool includes a lounge area. A booth at onproperty restaurant Caruso’s. Miramar Beach Bar affords alfresco seating and ocean views.

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n the early 1900s, Montecito’s Miramar By The Sea was the fashionable “it” getaway, drawing the Hollywood elite to its homey clusters of white cottages on the shores of Santa Barbara’s prime oceanfront position. As decades rolled on, the Miramar went into decline under multiple owners, including hotelier Ian Schrager, who began a promising renovation, but then shuttered the half-demolished hotel for good in 2000. The property sat vacant for years until builder and developer Rick Caruso (best known for The Grove in Los Angeles) bought it for an undisclosed price in 2007. Caruso had a soft spot for the site’s history, and despite having never worked on a hotel before, made it his mission to reimagine the grand landmark. Under Caruso’s care and Rosewood’s management, the 16-acre Rosewood Miramar Beach opened quietly in March. The beach club vibe is a modern take on the original bungalow-style plantation design inspired by Paul Williams, often referred to as the “architect to the stars.” Filled with Gatsby-esque grace and glamour, several design details nod to the past — the boardwalk was reinstated for sunset strolls, the interiors’ custom Pantone shade of “Miramar blue” harks back to its vibrant rooftops and archival photographs of the Miramar glory days hang on the walls. “I wanted to bring our guests back to the golden age of hospitality,” says Caruso. “Growing up, I had the good fortune of spending quite a bit of time at an iconic hotel in Beverly Hills that was owned by the family of one of my childhood friends. They lived at the property and I was immediately infatuated with this idea that a hotel could be your home.” Promising to entice the “neighbors” of Montecito, Santa Barbara and Carpinteria, as much as out-oftowners, he has landed a permanent Goop store; Malibu Farms is also putting down roots, and there are two cabana-lined pools and beach service. For overnighters, the best of the 161 guest rooms and suites (available by the night or the season) are in the Beach House, where 26 oceanfront rooms are perched on the sand for unparalleled Pacific views. Here, a fully stocked, complimentary cocktail trolley rolls up to the door every evening to toast the sunset. In a day when Santa Barbara is lined with luxe lodging options up and down the coast, it doesn’t get any closer to the water than this. Rooms from $800/night. 1759 S. Jameson Ln., Montecito, 805-900-8388; rosewoodhotels.com. J.B.K.

Rosewood

SOUND CLOUD Leave it to Karen O and Danger Mouse (aka Brian Burton) to transform a listening party for their new psych rock-infused album Lux Prima (BMG) into the multimedia art event of the season. The Yeah Yeah Yeahs frontwoman and the super producer and musician (Broken Bells, Gnarls Barkley) tapped O’s husband, film and music video director Barnaby Clay, Oscar-nominated sound designer Ren Klyce, projection mapping pioneer Travis Threlkel and others for an immersive experience unlike any other at the Marciano Art Foundation. Reservations required. April 18-21; 4357 Wilshire Blvd., L.A., 424-204-7555; marcianoartfoundation.com. M.G. DANGER MOUSE and KAREN O bring “An Encounter with Lux Prima” to the MARCIANO ART FOUNDATION.

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MIRAMAR EXTERIOR: COURTESY OF AVABLU PHOTOGRAPHY. MIRAMAR POOL, DINING AND PATIO (3): BLAKE BRONSTAD. LUX PRIMA: COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS AND THE MARCIANO ART FOUNDATION.

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Valentino

ADUT AKECH

VALENTINO.COM BEVERLY HILLS: 324 NORTH RODEO DRIVE (310) 247-0103 SOUTH COAST PLAZA: 3333 BRISTOL STREET (714) 751-3300 SAN FRANCISCO: 105 GRANT AVENUE (415) 772-9835


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FLIGHTS OF FANCY

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It’s time to make feathers your best friends

SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.97.

Feathers

Clockwise from top left: GIANVITO ROSSI stiletto sandals, $1,395. GUCCI fan, $4,400. ROGER VIVIER slingback pumps, $1,150. SIMONE ROCHA flats, price upon request. LOEWE woven bag, price upon request.

Photography by MARK GRIFFIN CHAMPION Styling by REBECCA RUSSELL 30

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A A T T BRUNELLO CUCINELLI Monili shopper, $6,995. Below: Satin blazer, $3,995.

SOFT FOCUS

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SPHERES OF INFLUENCE

BARTON PERREIRA x SPINELLI KILCOLLIN Kuma Ony sunglasses, $1,860 (left), and Kuma Amber sunglasses, $1,650.

Two Los Angeles-based creative teams, eyewear authorities Barton Perreira and jewelry innovators Spinelli Kilcollin — both devoted to the constant pursuit of spare architectural shapes — have teamed up to produce two styles that can be adorned with various fine jewelry annulets. Customizable Lennon-esque limited-edition Kiso metal frames and Kuma metal-and-Japanese acetate designs launch this April with a groovy circular silhouette yet read thoroughly modern. Go on and picture yourself in lenses adorned with subtle gold or silver annulets awash in diamonds. bartonperreira.com. E.V.

PIECE OF CAKE

News 4

The reward for waiting in line at Los Angeles’ République? A heart emoji-inducing chocolate croissant, strawberry-pistachio tart or brioche loaf from the pastry case that greets you the moment you enter the restaurant. Now pastry chef Margarita Manzke’s new cookbook, Baking at République (Lorena Jones Books, $35), shares 100 of her mouthwatering recipes so readers can live the sweet life at home. K.P.

Brunello Cucinelli’s boutique is the latest addition to Palisades Village. The starkly modern, 1,268-square-foot shop housing the Italian brand’s knitwear opens with airy womenswear in natural fibers and earth tones: houndstooth doublebreasted linen blazers, paper-bag belted cotton pants and shorts, and diaphanous silk skirts. For men, there is a dapper twist to tailored blazers with trim waists in lightweight cottons and textured linens, available in beach-ready sandy hues, and casual sportswear staples. Also on hand is a trove of cashmere blankets, teak-scented candles, ceramic tableware and desk accessories. 15225 Palisades Village Ln., Pacific Palisades; brunellocucinelli.com. E.V. brunellocucinelli.com

RÉPUBLIQUE co-owner and pastry chef MARGARITA MANZKE’s chocolate and hazelnut Paris-Brest.

INSIDE OUT From a midcentury modern-inspired, all-weather wicker woven sofa by Barcelona’s Mario Ruiz to a streamlined lounge chair by Amsterdam-based Piet Boon, the new RH Outdoor collection elevates backyard furniture with design gallery bona fides. The lattice-themed work of two California artisans takes prominence: Ann Marie Vering nods to European neoclassical garden furniture for her Greystone range in finishes including handcrafted aluminum, while Fred Doughty’s Loire line retools a Louis XVI silhouette in sustainably harvested teak. rh.com. M.G. RH Sebastian lounge chairs in natural solid teak , from $1,473 each, and Topanga fire table in weathered gray, from $1,946; rh.com.

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PERREIRA X KILCOLLIN: CONTENT IS RELATIVE. CUCINELLI: COURTESY OF BRUNELLO CUCINELLI. REPUBLIQUE: REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM BAKING AT REPUBLIQUE BY MARGARITA MANZKE. RH: COURTESY OF RH.

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Roberto Cavalli


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GREGORIO BORGIA/SHUTTERSTOCK

Features - Karl

KARL LAGERFELD (1933-2019)

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KARL

L.A. As we bid farewell to Karl Lagerfeld, we look back on his time spent in his beloved Golden State

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esigner Karl Lagerfeld, who died in February after a battle with pancreatic cancer, had a lifelong love affair with the sandy beaches and endless asphalt boulevards of Southern California. Raised in the damp climes of northern Germany — his mother telling him that he was a homely child — he became obsessed with beauty and architecture and chased the sunshine. California supplied sun, muses and Schindlers (Lagerfeld argued that Rudolph Schindler was one of the world’s greatest architects) in quantity. He blew into Los Angeles on private jets, arriving with an entourage so deep he had to be spotted by the remarkable head of powder-white hair, slung back in a Paul Revere ponytail, that was the touchstone for his identity in his final decades. He chose to sleep at the most golden age of all Hollywood-era hotels, The Beverly Hills Hotel, with its pink bungalows and famed Polo Lounge, where he was generally the biggest star among stars. At the hotel, he was never seen out of costume and — ever the gentleman — he was a beloved guest. “He was lovely to all the employees and was always impeccably dressed,” says Steven Boggs, the hotel’s longserving director of guest relations. “We always looked forward to his stays with us.” Lagerfeld’s trips to California reflected the work ethic that was the foundation of his career. He often juggled work for the three fashion brands for which he was responsible — Chanel, Fendi (alongside scion of the Roman dynasty Silvia Venturini Fendi) and his eponymous label — as

Features - Karl

well as ancillary creative assignments, working in a whirlwind of assistants, muses and caretakers who, in turns, wielded both his cellphone and his glass of Diet Coke on ice. Lagerfeld died at the American Hospital of Paris in February at the age of 85, leaving one of the most storied legacies in fashion. The most famous — and possibly the most beloved — fashion designer of the latter 20th century, and the early 21st, he led design at Fendi since 1965, a reign unmatched for a designer of a brand that was not originally his own. Like a tenured professor or a Supreme Court justice, he held a lifetime contract as creative director of Chanel, a job he took on in 1983. He led Chanel into a tweed bouclé future that adroitly encompassed punk rebellion and grandmotherly tea party socials in a way that might have cheered the rambunctious founder, Coco Chanel. Under his helm it became one of the biggest luxury goods brands in the world, worth an estimated $10 billion. While fashion insiders for years speculated about who might take Chanel’s reins from him — Hedi Slimane? Phoebe Philo? — in the end, the Wertheimer family, who owns Chanel, went with the designer least likely to veer from Lagerfeld’s approach, Virginie Viard, the brand’s creative studio director and his close collaborator for more than 30 years, whom he once called his “right and left” hand. Lagerfeld jet-setted around the world so extensively it could be easy to overlook the impact that California had on his work — and alternately, the

Words by CHRISTINA BINKLEY 35


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T R I B U T E impact that his work had on Southern California’s relation to fashion. The designer’s first trip to The Golden State took place on a family holiday from Hamburg, Germany. Lagerfeld, who famously obfuscated his age, claimed to have been 12 at the time. That would place the trip in 1944 or 1945 — an unlikely moment for a German family to have vacationed in the United States. But he also described the era of his first visit as the 1950s, which would have made him a teenager — an impressionable age at which the sights and sounds of Hollywood in the era of Gene Kelly and Alfred Hitchcock would have been a dramatic contrast to postwar, bombed-to-bits Hamburg. “California was the place to see the American dream that you saw in magazines,” Lagerfeld once told C. “In the ’50s, Europe did not look the way it does now. There was no war in California — it looked like an ideal life.” Years later, Lagerfeld would communicate the aspirations of the Parisian Chanel with a flock of honeyed supermodels who became mainstays in his collections and themselves settled in California or hailed from the state — Christy Turlington Burns, Cindy Crawford, Tatjana Patitz, Amber Valletta. In 2007, when the globe-trotting Lagerfeld was considering creating an eponymous international hotel chain, he reached out to one of Southern California’s pre-eminent hospitality experts, Ali Kasikci, famed former managing director of The Peninsula Beverly Hills. Kasikci recalls the proposal’s uniquely Lagerfeldian vision of luxury: “His vision of a hotel room was basically a bathroom. It was a giant Turkish bath in the midst of the hotel room.” Lagerfeld told C in 2006 that despite his fondness for the architecture

Lagerfeld on the runway of the CHANEL Resort 2007 show at the Santa Monica Airport.

of Schindler, he had yet to visit the homes in Los Angeles — he was always over-scheduled and failed to find the time. Priscilla Fraser, director of the MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House, says she can understand the fashion designer’s affinity for the architect. Both men conveyed “decadence with an exacting precision,” and both responded to the needs of the client rather than imposing personal rules. It’s one of the reasons Lagerfeld masterfully designed disparate brands. Lagerfeld helped shift the world’s view of Los Angeles from race riots and surfwear to a global art hub and trend incubator. In 2007, he invited the industry’s fashion elite to an airplane hangar at the Santa Monica Airport to view Chanel’s Resort collection. They arrived in droves to be seated in a luxurious airport lounge at white banquettes as models streamed from two airplanes marked with the Chanel logo that pulled up in a roar of engines. His muses walked a runway that included a conveyor belt that sluiced through the banquet seating where the likes of Demi Moore, Jessica Alba, Eva Mendes, Ashley Olsen and Mary-Kate Olsen (in their pre-The Row years) could be found. Conveniently, stars could take a limo rather than a red-eye

Features - Karl

to attend, making it one of the most see-and-be-seen fashion shows of any city in recall. Stylist Tanya Gill, who had been working with Chanel for her client, Kate Winslet, recalls the utter shock of encountering a European luxury brand and its crowd on her home turf. “I’d never been to a show at a location away from Paris with a major European designer,” Gill says. “It was so new and exciting.” That Chanel Resort show reverberated with the Euro fashion set. In the following decade, Burberry, Saint Laurent, Tom Ford, Stella McCartney and Christian Dior paraded collections through Southern California. Hedi Slimane, Lagerfeld’s friend and protege, subsequently moved to Los Angeles, buying a home in Beverly Hills and later designing Saint Laurent from a studio in West Hollywood, drawing on L.A.’s skate and music scenes to inspire collections that made Saint Laurent an effervescent jewel in the Kering crown alongside Gucci. Devoutly cynical, Lagerfeld suggested he didn’t altogether buy the Southern California fantasy he was promoting. “Seen from Europe, L.A. is the idea of easy, pleasant life, of light, sunshine, fun and all that,” he told C. “Maybe the reality of daily life in L.A. is not that glamorous, but I don’t care.” 2

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CHRISTY TURLINGTON BURNS “Such perfect faces just don’t exist,” Lagerfeld said of the Chanel campaign star.

CINDY CRAWFORD The Malibu resident walked many Chanel shows in the ’90s with her fellow supermodels.

KAIA GERBER At 16, Crawford’s daughter opened Chanel’s Spring ’18 show and landed a handbag campaign.

GIGI HADID Hadid made her Chanel debut in the Spring ’16 show alongside Bella Hadid and Kendall Jenner.

TOP IMAGE: DONATO SARDELLA/PENSKE MEDIA/SHUTTERSTOCK. TURLINGTON BURNS: NEVILLE MARRINER/ASSOCIATED NEWSPAPERS/SHUTTERSTOCK. CRAWFORD: ART STREIBER/PENSKE MEDIA/SHUTTERSTOCK. GERBER: CHRISTOPHE PETIT TESSON/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK. HADID: DAVID FISHER/SHUTTERSTOCK.

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CLASH OF THE PATTERNS

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S Clockwise from top right: DOLCE & GABBANA jacket, $3,345, vest, $995, pants, $1,345, KENZO top, $325, and HERMÈS bag, $14,200. PACO RABANNE red mosaic top, $890, short-sleeve dress, black dress, and sandals, prices upon request. PAUL SMITH blazer, $1,125, pants, $495, GUCCI dress, $4,500, HERMÈS scarf, $460, CHLOÉ sunglasses, $400, and CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN pumps, $995. VERSACE dress, $3,375, top, $7 75, tights, $575, and CHLOÉ sunglasses, $430. CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC tank top, $590, scuba top, $1,200, skirt, $4,500, pumps, $995, and GOLDIE striped T-shirt, $125.

When prints, stripes and spots collide

Print

MODEL: MARIANA DOWNING AT NEXT MODELS LA. HAIR & MAKEUP: MICHELLE MUNGCAL USING MAC COSMETICS AND R+CO HAIRCARE AT THE VISIONARIES. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.97.

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Photography by MARK GRIFFIN CHAMPION Styling by ALISON EDMOND 38

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HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?

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Landscape master Scott Shrader shares his secrets to putting the “great” in outdoors

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From top: A quintessentially Californian scene outside of a house on Rincon Point, for which SCOTT SHRADER collaborated with architect CJ PAONE. Alfresco entertaining in action. Shrader’s take on a boardwalk garden, complete with a fire pit and boulders intentionally placed at random.

Connect spaces through focal points. Fire and water are real Scott attractors S C OT T S H RAD E R

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y their very nature, gardens take us out of our everyday worlds,” writes landscape designer Scott Shrader in his book, The Art of Outdoor Living: Gardens for Entertaining Family and Friends (Rizzoli New York, $50). With a knack for conjuring alfresco idylls, the designer has won celebrity clients, including Ellen Degeneres and Portia de Rossi and Patrick Dempsey, and helped shape L.A.’s most inviting outdoor patios, such as at Gracias Madre. Here, in his own words, the secrets for a charmed exterior space. For a seamless interior/exterior flow, ask yourself these questions: What is the house missing to better access the exterior? Can simple connections be established for a fresher way to live? Can I easily get to my outdoor dining room for entertaining from the kitchen? And how do my materials blend from one space to another while relating to the indoors? Connect spaces through focal points. I emphasize axial views, from the front door through the house, from the living room to the side views, and so on. Usually, I create a central focal point at moments of entry. Often I use fire or water because those are real attractors. Lighting helps define a space, the atmosphere and mood. For the outdoors to feel warm and inviting, it needs to be well lit. Think about using trees to light from; placing small MR11 LED 2700K downlights crossed through branches in larger trees helps mimic moonlight. Use uplights to focus on the most important elements. A good canopy is crucial. Typically, people feel most comfortable when they have some form of covering overhead, such as an umbrella, a tree or shade. These “outdoor ceilings” provide shelter, create a sense of human scale under the endless sky and can also hide lights and space heaters. Keep people outdoors all year round. Think about the seasons: What could be blooming in summer that really enhances an outdoor experience? Keep people warm and fed and provide comfortable seating — everyone appreciates comfortable seating. 2

As told to MELISSA GOLDSTEIN 40

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HAILEY BIEBER models a WEEKEND MAX MARA x ANTHONY BARATTA Nantucket button-down shirt, $350.

WEEKEND UPDATE

GET THE GENERAL IDEA

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The Topanga Canyon living room of GENERAL STORE founders SERENA MITNIK-MILLER and MASON ST. PETER .

News 3.1 Mixing handcrafted objects, abundant plant life and elemental materials in a light-drenched, neutrals-washed space, San Francisco- and Los Angeles-based design and lifestyle shop General Store is the modern Californian aesthetic in action. Its masterminds, married couple Serena Mitnik-Miller and Mason St. Peter (who have fine art and architectural practices, respectively), have pioneered this brand of warm minimalism since opening in the Outer Sunset 10 years ago. Now, three stores, one Instagram-famous home makeover (#ourtopangahome) and two children later, they unpack their design philosophy in a new book, co-written with C senior editor Melissa Goldstein. Abode: Thoughtful Living With Less (Abrams Books, $35) makes a case for stripping your environment back and curating meaningful beauty; the title chimes with Marie Kondo-mania as well as the pursuit of the West Coast lifestyle made manifest. P.D.

1. VACHERON CONSTANTIN Métiers d’Art Florilège watch, price upon request. 2. BULGARI Lvcea Skeleton watch, $29,800. 3. CARTIER Libre Diagonale watch, price upon request. 4. CHOPARD Happy Hearts watch, $6,440.

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Daring color palettes and nautical designs animate interior designer Anthony Baratta’s striking coastal retreats. Now 12 equally exuberant ready-to-wear leisure looks he’s created in collaboration with Weekend Max Mara incorporate his bold motifs. The Italian fashion house tapped Baratta for its Nantucket capsule collection after spotting his Instagram feed brimming with colonial antiques, nautical accoutrements, and floral and chinoiserie prints decorating houses he’s designed around Cape Cod. Relaxed dresses, oversized shirts, pants and accessories printed with vibrant micro gingham checks or stripes, Chinese porcelain vases, and bushels of roses (many adorned with rickrack trimmings) signal the start of an adventurous weekend. 3333 Bristol St., Costa Mesa, 714-754-1876; world .weekendmaxmara.com. E.V.

MAKING WAVES Georg Jensen, Denmark’s heritage crafter of Scandinavian home wares, and West Coast interior design star Kelly Wearstler join forces for Frequency, a new contemporary decor collection of six sinuous polished steel pieces. Ranging from elegant hurricanes with handmade glass candleholders to sleek bowls, each features a wave-like ribbon motif, evoking the energy of the ocean. 351 N. Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-273-4741; gearys.com. M.L. GEORG JENSEN x KELLY WEARSTLER stainless-steel Frequency bowl, $165.

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ABODE: MARIKO REED. VACHERON CONSTANTIN: COURTESY OF VACHERON CONSTANTIN. BULGARI: COURTESY OF BULGARI. CARTIER: VINCENT WULVERYCK AT CARTIER. CHOPARD: COURTESY OF CHOPARD. MAX MARA: COURTESY OF WEEKEND MAX MARA. JENSEN: COURTESY OF GEORG JENSEN. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.97.

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From above: An interior styled with HONEYED FIGS’ new collection. STUDIOPEPE’s Ossimori range at the new location of GRAYE. Opposite, from top: HEM dining set and Rope Rug by PAULINE DELTOUR . Inside PREVALENT PROJECTS, a HAND & EYE STUDIO lamp hangs above an ETHNICRAF T sideboard with a SHINOLA turntable and speakers. The garden variety at THE SILL.

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Los Angeles’ lauded design atelier Graye moved from its Robertson Boulevard perch in West Hollywood to a roomier warehouse-style space in Hollywood earlier this year. Graye founder Maria Cicione continues to spotlight local and European collaborative furniture, and art and lighting collections by makers such as Porro and Linteloo. She still offers architectural, interior design and project management services plus a new focus on customization, including a COM (Customer Own Material) fabrics option. No longer appointmentonly, the showroom debuted with Ossimori, a limitededition range of one-off geometric mirrors, lamps and sculptures by Milanese firm Studiopepe. The line, crafted from reclaimed materials like marble, is a foretaste of Studiopepe’s capsule collection coming to Graye in April after its premiere at Salone del Mobile in Milan. 1026 N. Sycamore Ave., L.A., 310-385-7872; graye-la.com. A.J.B.

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GRAYE: MINH TRAN. HONEYED FIGS: LAURE JOLIET. PREVALENT PROJECTS: JULIA ALBEE. HEM: FRIDA VEGA SALOMONSSON. THE SILL: MARISSA VITALE.

the coast offer a wealth of au courant ideas


HONEYED FIGS Los Angeles-based film set decorator (she lent her styling to Inception) and interior designer Tamar Barnoon conceived of online interiors shop Honeyed Figs as a collection of modern, minimal furniture “basics,” featuring a select group of L.A. makers and designers. “I like to compare these pieces to the basics in a wardrobe — like the perfect suit,” she says. “Because of that, we offer customizable sizes so that your dining table or your new sofa will fit just right in your home.” Produced locally with sustainable, mostly green materials, the madeto-order pieces include two new additions for April: a grain-showcasing circular side table by Eric Ervin Woodworking and a svelte hardwood frame, loose cushion sofa by EBJoinery. honeyedfigs.com. M.G.

D OWNTOWN L.A.

HEM Stockholm-based online furniture retailer Hem (Swedish for “home”) commissioned an unabashedly jubilant, site-specific installation for its first U.S. showroom, which it shares with wood flooring company Madera, in L.A.’s Arts District. Endemic Architecture’s Clark Thenhaus devised Confetti Courtyard for the site, blanketing the outdoor space in colorful graphic shapes echoing the hues of Hem’s ready-to-ship, unfussy furniture, lighting, rugs and accessories from a roster of international designers including Max Lamb, Philippe Malouin and Nao Tamura. “The way confetti can be appropriated is so multivalent,” Thenhaus says. “It’s all so playful.” 810 Mateo St., L.A.; hem.com. E.V.

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PREVALENT PROJECTS New to Mill Valley, Prevalent Projects is a design studio and shop proffering modern home decor, furniture and gifts. Discover earthenware by South L.A.’s Humble Ceramics, lighting by London-based Hand & Eye Studio, and candles by Swedish perfumery 19-69. Photographer Julia Albee curates the space with both California and international makers while her husband, Floyd Albee (a production designer), runs the interiors firm with designer Liza Reyes. Patrons can shop Prevalent Projects’ proprietary line of handcrafted Japanese- and Scandinavian-inspired white oak furnishings with a 100 percent nontoxic finish, and, come next year, the duo’s line of contemporary wool rugs and textiles. 61 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley, 415-888-3257; prevalentprojects.com. A.J.B.

New York-based plant e-tailer The Sill has opened a West Hollywood shop, its third brick-and-mortar and first outside of Manhattan. Having simplified the plantbuying game, The Sill delivers succulents, ferns and tropical plants, sized mini to medium, in cheery utilitarian pots, and extends support throughout the experience. “We’ll be offering some special plants that are unique to California,” says founder Eliza Blank, referring to varieties of cacti and euphorbias at the L.A. incarnation. At the new locale, greenery is categorized according to lighting needs and labeled as pet-friendly or best for beginners. There’s also a gifting station, workshop area and an online plant care forum. 8125 W. Third St., L.A., 323-879-9720; thesill.com. M.L. •

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WAKE UP AND SMELL THE FLOWERS Clockwise from top left: BLOOM & PLUME COFFEE co-founder MAURICE HARRIS. A cappuccino with activated charcoal. Inside the cafe.

News 2

Maurice Harris is waking up the east side of Los Angeles. Harris, the visionary behind high-art floral boutique Bloom & Plume, has opened a coffee shop by the same name next door to his studio in Historic Filipinotown. “Flowers are a straight-up luxury,” says Harris, whose work is sought out by bold-faced names and next-level event planners. “Coffee is still a luxury,” he adds. “But it’s a luxury most of us allow ourselves to afford.” Harris partnered with his brother, Moses, on the cafe concept in 2014, and after facing several hurdles, it finally opened in late February. To take his signature brand of #naturalopulence from flowers to a physical space, Harris mixed textures, including dyed concrete and quartzite, with vibrant, saturated hues like Yves-Klein-blue-meets-jacaranda-purple, emerald forest green and plenty of gold. “I wanted it to feel like a diverse space immediately when you walk in,” Harris says. “And that diversity translates to all other aspects of the business.” On any given morning, a mix of longtime residents and newer neighbors can be found out front perched on neon peach chairs, enjoying Deacon Herb egg sandwiches with their honey oat milk lattes. With any drink, there’s an option to “make it black” with activated charcoal. “The coffee industry is a white male-dominated industry,” Harris says. “And I wanted to literally put color on it.” 1638 W. Temple St., L.A.; bloomandplumecoffee.com. C.M.

LET IT SLIDE Slip into streamlined sandals this spring

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“If you really travel through the Ojai Valley, it’s amazing the amount of agriculture you see,” says Howard Backen of the inspiration behind new culinary-focused event space The Farmhouse at Ojai Valley Inn. The Napa-based architect and his firm, Backen & Gillam Architects, designed the $20 million complex to host special events and meetings in The Farmhouse’s two redwoodclad structures and lush outdoor areas, which total about 30,000 square feet. The Great Room, an expansive ballroom space, is opposite the olive treelined courtyard and The Library and The Kitchen, with the latter boasting a dreamy state-of-the-art open kitchen and chef’s counter seating. Meanwhile, Ojai’s town spirit shines through in the long communal table local craftsman/teacher Ryan Lang and his students built using logs charred by the Thomas Fire. 905 Country Club Rd., Ojai, 855-6978780; ojaivalleyinn.com. J.R.

4. 1. JIMMY CHOO Lela sandals, $695. 2. ROCHAS buckle sandals, $630. 3. CHLOE GOSSELIN Gloria sandals, $835. 4. BALLY Relax slippers, $290.

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PLUME: KATE BERRY. OJAI VALLEY INN: COURTESY OF OJAI VALLEY INN. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.97.

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Clockwise from top left: ALEX REED Openwork stool, $3,000, thefutureperfect.com. NICKEY KEHOE glazed ceramic egg holder, $30, nickeykehoe.com. BEN MEDANSKY Interlacing Hexagons on a Circle (Wall Mount), $3,400, benmedansky.com. STAHL + BAND handmade terracotta collection set, $245, stahlandband.com. TABARKA STUDIO Adama collection tiles (assorted), price upon request, tabarkastudio.com. BZIPPY & CO large terra-cotta Dot vase, $450, bzippyandcompany.com.

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From left: CLEBAN Electra mist, $72/4 oz. The Lumen brew and moisturizer set, $78.

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SITTING PRETTY From top: The JEUNE ET JOLIE dining room. Asian pear with radish, Parmesan and olive in a FELT + FAT dish. STEADY STATE ROASTING coffee.

Restaurateur John Resnick and chef Andrew Bachelier pulled inspiration from around the world to plan their second Carlsbad project after their resounding success with wood-fired restaurant Campfire. Enter Jeune et Jolie, a modern French bistro that opened late last year. Diners can hit the waves and then enjoy the bright patio and art-peppered interior by Los Angeles-based design firm Bells + Whistles, who utilized plush banquettes, natural oak and pink marble. “Chefs in Paris are starting to embrace a lot of global flavors, and we wanted to do that,” says Resnick of Bachelier’s seafood- and produce-intensive menu featuring classic French dishes with a contemporary twist, such as Vietnamese-influenced frog legs. Leigh Lacap’s beverage program incorporates ingredients from France (the extensive absinthe list is served either drip or frappe) while cocktails such as the Algérie with Calvados, absinthe, lemon and ras el hanout look to former French colonies for inspiration. 2659 State St., Carlsbad, 760-637-5266; jeune-jolie.com. J.R.

News 3

Sisters Roxane and Liana Pekelharing’s new clean beauty line, Cleban, named for their grandfather’s former apothecary shop in Amsterdam, continues the family’s tradition of beauty through wellness. Liana, a trained herbalist, and Roxane formulate their Northern California-made products to high standards, free of GMOs, parabens, synthetic colors, flavors and fragrances. The newly launched Lumen set, designed to nourish and illuminate the skin, features a moisturizer and an extract brew crafted with rose, hibiscus, goji berry, tulsi and vanilla. “Our products are designed in sets that complement each other like sisters to restore balance and awaken beauty,” Roxane says. “When done right, some things are just better together.” cleban.com. K.A.

BEAUTY BUZZ Dial up your look at three new hot spots MELANIE GRANT At her new Melrose Place atelier, the in-demand Australian aesthetician mixes technology with tradition. melaniegrant.com.

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STARRING BY TED GIBSON With husband and partner Jason Backe, this celebrity hairstylist is behind the world’s first smart salon in Los Angeles. starring.tedgibson.com.

KAREN LORD PILATES MOVEMENT The beloved New York fitness guru has brought her resultsdriven workouts west with a sleek new Venice studio. karenlordpilatesmovement.com.

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JOLIE: LILY GLASS. CLEBAN: COURTESY OF CLEBAN. GIBSON: BRAD MITCHELL COHEN.

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Clockwise from top left: GUCCI dress, $8,800, gloves, $490, and necklace, $2,390. ZIMMERMANN dress, $2,650, and PRADA headband, $570. JONATHAN SIMKHAI dress, $995. PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI dress, $1,995. ALEXANDER McQUEEN dress, price upon request, GUCCI glasses, $1,230, DIOR earrings, $220, and EMPORIO ARMANI boots, $925. VALENTINO dress, $19,900, and VALENTINO GARAVANI espadrilles, $875.

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MODEL: JULIAN FLORES AT LA MODELS. HAIR & MAKEUP BY MICHELLE MUNGCAL USING MAC COSMETICS AND R+CO HAIRCARE AT THE VISIONARIES. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.97.

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THE HOUSE THAT TECH BUILT Can 3-D printed homes and a progressive new governor solve the housing crisis?

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n his first day on the job, governor Gavin Newsom likened The Golden State to the bombed-out ramparts of Western Europe after World War II, announcing the Marshall Plan for affordable housing. In case you haven’t seen the tent cities, sevenfigure prices for two-bed bungalows, and rents that now rival Manhattan, we are in the midst of a housing crisis. Fewer Californians own their homes today than at any time since the 1940s — and it’s getting worse. Construction rates of new homes run at just 80,000 annually, 100,000 short of demand. California now has the dubious honor of having one of the highest poverty rates in the nation and accounts for nearly a quarter of America’s homeless, but just 12 percent of the population. But the technology industry is riding to the rescue. Forge New in San Francisco and Sunconomy of Houston recently teamed up to unveil a 3-D house printing system that can churn out a three-bed, two-bath, multistory home in a matter of weeks and for as little as $100 per square foot. For comparison, homes being rebuilt after the wildfires in Sonoma wine country are getting done for $350 per square foot or more, with timelines of up to a year. “In November alone there were 19,000 structures that were destroyed [in the wildfires]. And what do we do? We turn around and we build it the same exact way that we built before. We want to change that,” says Gregory Takeshita, chief executive of Forge New. The technology, dubbed We Print Houses, is a mobile system that crafts a home, inkjet-style, with a geopolymer cement that dries in the open air. The idea is that the “printed” homes will “last for centuries, not decades,” Takeshita says, because they are made of solid cement versus wood, impermeable to water, resistant to fire and able to withstand an 8.0 earthquake. Takeshita is not alone. Airbnb this year will roll out test units from Backyard, a project of its futures lab, Samara, which has been working on

single-family and multiunit dwellings that are quicker and cheaper to build, thanks to modular floorplans. While the brand’s co-founder and CPO, Joe Gebbia, hasn’t shared a starting cost, he told Fast Company last November: “We’re interested in thoughtfully exploring the opportunity and doing something transformative, similar to how Airbnb did when it started.” New Story, a San Francisco charity, and construction technologies company Icon of Austin, debuted a rudimentary, 800-square-foot, 3-D printed home at South by Southwest last year that they said took under 24 hours to erect, at a cost of $10,000. Rethinking how homes are built is laudable. There are no bricklayers,

The idea is that the printed Tech homes will last for centuries drywall installers or specialist labor to wait on (or pay for). Takeshita says: “We’re eliminating a lot of the trades from the job site, which essentially speeds up our build time.” The challenge, of course, is that technological progress does not occur in a vacuum. To say nothing of how unions might react to the automation of huge swaths of human labor, there is another, more profound challenge: simply breaking ground on a new development in California has become a daunting undertaking. In San Francisco, for example, it takes nearly seven years and costs about $650,000 to navigate the thicket of environmental requirements,

municipal building laws and nimbyism to get a single unit of low-income housing built, according to Brian Blalock, former head of policy at Tipping Point Community, a nonprofit combating poverty in the Bay Area. Newsom campaigned on a pledge to build 3.5 million new homes by 2025, which would mean a production rate four times the state’s current one. He approved a lawsuit against Huntington Beach for failing to comply with a 1967 state law that requires cities to zone enough development land to accommodate the population. Forty-six other cities are also falling short, often by design, passing anti-development laws that make it difficult to meet state requirements. Newsom has hinted that he will use the courts as a cudgel against recalcitrant city councils. There are also more straightforward, civically minded efforts from Big Tech. Mark Zuckerberg recently announced his foundation, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, was spearheading a $500 million plan to build up to 8,000 affordable homes in the Bay Area, ground zero for the state’s housing crunch. Indeed, between 2012 and 2017 in the region, more than 370,000 new jobs were created but only 58,000 units were built to house the new recruits. Fred Blackwell, head of The San Francisco Foundation, a partner in the Zuckerberg plan, called it “a defining moment for the Bay Area.” Google has also joined in. The search giant plans to build 8,000 new homes, including more than 1,000 low-income units, as part of a sprawling headquarters expansion it has proposed in Mountain View. These are helpful gestures. But to roll back the slow-motion crisis taking hold in the state, Newsom will need to wipe away decades of overlapping regulations. He will need to bully cities into building. He will need to lead a housing revolution. And when he does, the 3-D printers, no doubt, will be waiting. •

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useum restaurants usually play it too safe. Not so with Audrey at the Hammer, the institution’s exciting new restaurant that combines high design with a fresh, inviting and gutsy menu. Set at the back of the museum’s sprawling contemporary courtyard, the indoor-outdoor affair comprises a cozy dining room that opens out into a patio and lounge area decorated with Cuban-American sculptor Jorge Pardo’s tile wall mural. Envisioned by Hammer Museum director Ann Philbin and brought to life by restaurateur Soa Davies Forrest and chef Lisa Giffen — both New York transplants — Audrey is a female-driven project. Seventy-five percent of the investors are women and it’s named for museum board member Audrey Irmas. “For me, it makes a huge difference in how things would be run,” Davies Forrest says. After cooking at New York’s Blue Hill, Prune, and Daniel, and at Brooklyn’s beloved Maison Premiere and its sister restaurant, Sauvage, Giffen wants to celebrate all that California has to offer. “Everything has a story behind it,” says Giffen, who spotlights local ingredients, visiting growers and producers. “It’s a good feeling.” Her food at Audrey is bright and full of flavor, both graceful and precise. Kampachi crudo comes scribbled with chile oil and scattered with tiny segments of finger lime. A plate of raw vegetables poses as artfully as a 17thcentury still life next to a kelp-flecked aioli. Lunchtime offers a burger with some of the best fries in town. At dinner, served against a backdrop of dozens of Pardo’s glowing lanterns bobbing from a trellis, the more expansive menu offers black cod with puntarelle and sunchoke puree and a big bone-in ribeye steak — grass-fed, of course. Desserts include a delicate panna cotta topped with passion fruit and a pecan-sesame tuile. The wine list proposes top Burgundies and other plum bottles for deep-pocketed donors, but few choices under $50 for starving artists. The beautiful thing is that happy hour stretches from 4 to 7:30 p.m., perfect for indulging in a glass of Equipo Navazos manzanilla and a bite before the museum’s many evening events. 10899 Wilshire Blvd., L.A., 310-443-7037; audreyatthehammer.com. •

Clockwise from top: Inside the dining room at AUDREY AT THE HAMMER, fitted with mohair velvet booths and banquettes. Farmers’ market crudités with kelp aioli. Audrey operator SOA DAVIES FORREST (left), executive chef LISA GIFFEN (center) and HAMMER MUSEUM director ANN PHILBIN. The Stone’s Throw cocktail with apricotinfused Toki whisky. A citrus salad features rainbow radishes, Castelvetrano olives and pecans.

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Features - Haas

SIMON HAAS (left) wears PAUL SMITH shirt, $295. NIKI HAAS wears PRADA shirt, $500.

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Inside the surreal world of the Haas Brothers

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ypical California. It was a freeway mishap that started the whole thing. In 2010, Nikolai (who goes by Niki) and Simon Haas were driving along Interstate 10 between West Los Angeles and West Adams when the bed frame the fraternal twins were transporting slid off their truck and smashed onto the roadway. In general, Simon is considered the analytical, precise one, while Niki is the reactive, big picture guy. “[But] neither of us remembered to secure the fucking bed,” Simon says, then laughs, when we meet at his brother’s treehouse-like abode in Highland Park. This wasn’t just any bed frame — it was a midcentury marvel by Italian modernist architect Gio Ponti that the budding artists and designers, then 26, were repairing as a sort of tryout for the esteemed L.A. architecture firm Johnston Marklee. It helped, too, that the Haases had scored the gig on the recommendation of their friend, SpiderMan and The Cider House Rules actor Tobey Maguire. (The twins’ older brother, Lukas, is a successful actor and was part of Leonardo DiCaprio’s notorious 1990s entourage that counted Maguire as a member.) What might have been a disaster turned into an opportunity. Rather than make the Haases pay for the damage (“We had no money whatsoever,” Simon says), the firm’s co-directors, Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, asked them to produce three interior pieces for a remodel of the Baxter-Hodiak House originally built for Frank Lloyd Wright’s granddaughter and later redone by John Lautner. Simon wasn’t a builder,

but he knew CAD, having studied at RISD. Niki couldn’t draw, but he had learned construction techniques with Simon from their father, a painter and sculptor. The furniture pieces, including a teardrop plywood-and-resin coffee table, made an impression, and through word of mouth, splashy commissions began pouring in. Lady Gaga ordered monster masks for her Fame perfume campaign. Architect Peter Marino hired the Haases to design a steel ceiling that appears to ripple for the Guerlain store in Paris. Commune co-founder Roman Alonso had them pencil “cave paintings” of iconic Angelenos (Diane Keaton, Ed Ruscha, Abbot Kinney) in the lobby of the downtown Ace Hotel. “We don’t have the typical success story,” Niki says, pacing in his living room with his son, Fox (now 17 months old), and a sippy cup in his arms. (The toddler needs a nap. Niki’s wife, Djuna, a wardrobe stylist, is not home, and the babysitter didn’t show.) The Haas brothers spent their early years in Los Angeles — where their mom, Emily Tracy, wrote for TV series like The Cosby Show — but then moved to Austin, where Tracy grew up, for what Niki calls “a supposedly saner lifestyle.” “It was lots of unstructured time in our father’s art studio,” Niki says. The patriarch, German-born Berthold Haas, is a sculptor and painter who now lends a hand to some of his sons’ projects. “Playing with paints and materials and experimenting in dance and stonework and construction and music until we found our way forward.” The experiment was successful. After nine years of steadily gaining notoriety and critical acclaim, the Haases — who are represented by R & Company and Marianne Boesky Gallery — debuted their first solo museum exhibition late last year, at The Bass in Miami, featuring anthropomorphic hairy chaises, creature-esque beaded chairs and hand-layered liquid clay accretion vessels that make them the go-to surrealist fabricators of their generation. George Lindemann Jr., president of The Bass’ board of trustees, says of the figures, “It’s like you are being let in on a secret and invited into a fanciful world created by two brothers over their entire lives.”

“We don’t have the typical success story”- Haas Features

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Simon wears ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA coat, $6,995. DIOR MEN jacket, $4,700. L’OBJET Haas Optipus magnifying glass, $195, l-objet.com/haas. Opposite, clockwise from top: HAAS BROTHERS Mia Clam maple wood table, similar styles available for commission through MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY. L’OBJET Haas Lynda Box + Plates set (limited edition of 500), $850, l-objet.com/haas. HAAS BROTHERS Stein Shine lamp made of Pele de Tigre marble, similar styles available for commission through MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY.

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Niki, leaning on a walnut support beam he carved himself, wears GUCCI jacket, $3,700, pants, $980, and sneakers, $870. PAUL SMITH shirt, $295. L’OBJET Haas Vermiculation throw, $850, l-objet.com/haas. Hair by KAROLINA BERNAT at Walter Schupfer Management using R+Co. Grooming by SANDY GANZER at Forward Artists using Clark’s Botanicals.

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Today, the 34-year-olds’ large-scale installations fetch as much as $2 million. And with a new collaboration with luxury housewares brand L’Objet, they’re branching into everyday home decor — though “everyday” is relative when you’re talking about porcelain salad bowls shaped like otherworldly moppets and spoons that squiggle like spermatozoa. The line comprises tableware, home decor, textiles and fragrance and followed extensive research and inspiration trips to Joshua Tree and, later, Portugal, where they worked with Elad Yifrach, L’Objet’s creative director, to sculpt and mold each prototype by hand. “The collection transports people — to the Mojave Desert, to the stars, but mainly inside the wild fantasy realm where Niki and Simon live,” Yifrach says. “Our goal was to take those ‘out there’ ideas and make them functional and beautiful for practical use, and that’s where the real magic lies in this collaboration. It’s fantasy, but with a specific point of view.” Get the brothers alone and you instantly sense how distinctive their individual viewpoints are. Even physically they’re quite different. Simon is more classically good-looking, with high cheekbones and a neatly trimmed beard; Niki has a dreamier countenance, with great big eyes and flyaway hair. Simon is more Wacky Wacko, Walter Van Beirendonck and Kenzo; Niki loves vintage Dior and bell-bottoms. As their friend and artistic collaborator Johnny Smith puts it, “Simon is West Hollywood. Niki is a walk on a beautiful California trail somewhere.” Niki makes one last effort upstairs to get Fox to sleep. “I’m gay, Niki’s not,” Simon says. “I’m more of a nerd, with processes that are very methodical and slow. Niki’s are more emotional and fast. I do lots of research and get obsessive. He’s more about vision and implementation. Also, Niki’s a jock. He plays ice hockey. I’m an alcoholic. That’s another difference. Currently I’m sober, going on two and a half years.” That last piece was a major shift. “I was off the rails for a very long time,” Simon explains. Despite the success and acclaim that came with high-profile gigs with Donatella Versace and

Louis Vuitton, and a memorable 2014 showing at Design Miami/ Basel, he reached rock bottom in 2016 when he burned down his own bed. “I was super into psychedelics, ecstasy, weed, mushrooms, ayahuasca, OxyContin, everything. I would drink two or three six-packs every night and would just pee in the bottles and leave them next to my bed. I woke up one night and the bed was on fire and I actually put myself out with urine. My bank account was down to $80, and this was after we’d been making good money. I went and spent it on weed at MedMen and didn’t eat for three days.” He started going to AA meetings every day after that. Niki explains later that Simon’s sobriety has brought new energy to their work. “Simon’s hyperdependable and focused but also happier, which makes it easier to say, ‘What should we do now that we’re allowed to make anything we want?’” The list is long. There might be an animated children’s program, a children’s book and a podcast on the horizon. Plus, plans for more art shows, including a solo exhibition at Marianne Boesky Gallery this fall and a special beaded project debuting at Art Basel Miami Beach. Niki — who cites Niki de Saint Phalle and Yayoi Kusama as artistic influences, along with “colorful, rad 1970s shit” like Sly and the Family Stone and disco — says his dream commission would be a big outdoor park, like Park Güell in Barcelona. “If I could be part of any scene at any time, it would be the old-movement surrealists with Gaudí and, later, Dalí,” he says. Simon — who’s a devotee of queer erotic art by George Quaintance, Tom of Finland and Stuart Sandford — would love to build a church “because art and design are already my religions, and Sagrada Familia is my favorite building in the world.” Niki checks the baby cam app on his iPhone and sees Fox wide awake. A nap just isn’t happening today. He glances at Simon, who, in the knowing way the twins share, heads upstairs to grab his nephew so Niki can enjoy a second of peace. “I guess it’s like anything — having a kid, being a designer, an artist or whatever,” Niki says. “You figure it out as you go.” •

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Features - Haas “I do lots of research. ... [Niki’s] more about vision” SIMON HAAS

Simon (left) wears KENZO jacket, $750, sweater, price upon request, and pants, $625. GUCCI slides, $980. Niki wears MARNI blazer, $1,590, and pants, $990. HERMÈS sweater, $2,100. GUCCI moccasins, $890.

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DON’T STOP HER NOW

Features - Lucy

What’s next for Bohemian Rhapsody’s breakout star Lucy Boynton?

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GIVENCHY dress, $3,730. KATKIM ear pin, $1,620. ZOË CHICCO ring (left), $875. ERINESS ring, $750.

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Features - Lucy

CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC dress, $9,500, and belt, $1,950. JEMMA SANDS earrings, $695, and ring, $995. ROGER VIVIER sandals, $1,200. Opposite: PRADA dress, $3,260. KATKIM earrings, $375 each, and ring, $5,000.

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wo days after the Academy Awards, Lucy Boynton emerges from 72 hours of parties that followed 72 relentless days of press for Bohemian Rhapsody as a full-fledged star. With her unfailingly blond bob (Boynton has been dying her hair for so long she scarcely remembers its original light golden brown color) and a red carpet success rate that saw her rock floor-length Celine at the Golden Globes, ruched and ruffled Christian Dior at the BAFTAs and an embroidered Gucci gown at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, hers might be the defining style of the red carpet season. And 25-year-old Boynton and her 37-year-old beau, actor Rami Malek, are certainly the season’s defining couple. For aficionados of a Hollywood romance, Malek’s Best Actor Oscar win for his role as Queen frontman Freddie Mercury in Bohemian Rhapsody offered a breathtaking display: It wasn’t merely the succession of long kisses that Malek planted on her lips or the couple’s visible reluctance to unclasp their hands. At the end of his speech, Malek addressed Boynton directly, and the camera cut to her face, with its large, startled eyes. When he told her, before an audience of millions, that she had captured his heart, her mouth resolved into a trembling halfsmile, just barely beating back rivers of feeling. It was, as they say, a moment. “It was insane,” Boynton says in a British accent, today’s big grin decidedly more relaxed. “I’m usually watching the Oscars on the sofa at 3 in the morning at my mom’s in London. So for Rami to say that Mary Austin, or that I, was the heart of the film — it’s a weird thing to talk about or to know what to say to strangers about because it felt like such an intimate moment. I’m still processing that whole evening, but I’ll just say that I was really moved by what he said. And surprised! I don’t know. My heart is just full.” Boynton wears a vintage flower-print babydoll dress, a comfy old standby in which to wave away the glamour wars of February, from which she emerged victorious. Her custom Rodarte Oscars gown in violet satin nodded to Old Hollywood while honoring the contemporary design scene in Los Angeles (where Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte also live and produce all their clothing).

“People get quite nervous about red carpet stuff,” Boynton says. “But I realized early on that as long as I’m dressing for me, I can just have fun with it. Leith Clark, my stylist, always tells me, ‘If you don’t feel good, take it off immediately.’ I love her for that. You don’t want to walk out the door thinking, oh God, I hope I’ve got this right, I hope people like it. It should be, I feel fucking great. The nice thing about Bohemian is that it sort of granted you permission to go outside your comfort zone, to go slightly further with all the looks.” The truth is that Boynton knew next to nothing about Queen and had never heard of Mary Austin, Mercury’s longtime partner and closest friend, when she was sent the script for Bohemian Rhapsody in 2017. She maintains an instinctive skepticism about biopics. “I worry that they can be somewhat intrusive or exposing, but what struck me about Bohemian was that it was written as an ode,” she explains. “Some people wish it had been darker and dirtier, but that wasn’t really the story I wanted to be a part of telling. Freddie kept some of himself to himself. The point wasn’t to share everything, and that version would have excluded so many people, especially kids, when the message of the film is absolute inclusivity.” For some fans of Freddie Mercury, Austin has been a bugbear, standing instead for the phase of the singer’s life when he was closeted. Here was an opportunity to correct the record. “She was always the person who said, ‘Be your absolute ultimate self, and we’ll work through anything,’” Boynton says of Austin. “That she was such an integral part of his life doesn’t take away from the fact that he is a gay icon.” Boynton was born in New York, where her English parents, both journalists, relocated for what was supposed to be a year but turned into 10. (“I’ve got the passport,” she says. “Which is a golden ticket in this industry.”) She was brought up in London, where she became “painfully British,” and was 12 when a casting director came to observe a drama lesson at her school, which ultimately led to the role of a young Beatrix Potter in the 2006 film Miss Potter (Renée Zellweger played the adult version of the titular character). “I knew I wanted to be an actress as soon as I realized it wasn’t a job you had to wait to be a grown-up to do,”

“I find myself funny day to day, but turn a Features - Lucy camera on me and it’s terrifying to make an audience laugh”

Opposite: BALENCIAGA dress, $4,100. ERINESS ring, $3,095. SERGIO ROSSI pumps, $930.

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Features - Lucy

VERA WANG dress, price upon request. JEMMA SANDS earrings, $1,495. ALEXANDRA JULES ring, $3,400. SERGIO ROSSI sandals, $930. Opposite: MARC JACOBS dress, $2,200. ALEXANDRA JULES earrings, $9,000, and ring, $12,175.

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Features - Lucy

SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO dress, $3,990. FALKE tights, $38. ALEXANDRA JULES earrings, $2,600. JEMMA SANDS rings, from $495. ERINESS ring, $3,095. GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI flats, $850. Hair by JENNY CHO at Starworks Artists using Suave Professionals. Makeup by JO BAKER at Forward Artists using Dior Beauty. Manicure by EMI KUDO at Opus Beauty using Chanel Le Vernis.

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“There’s a sense of power that comes from playing the villain”

Boynton says. “But it’s incredibly competitive and difficult and unreliable, and still I wonder how people get into it. I was in the right place at the right time.” She had a few other child roles before breaking through in 2016, when she co-starred in the coming-of-age musical Sing Street. She then played Countess Andrenyi in Kenneth Branagh’s reboot of Murder on the Orient Express. There were lean years as well — too old for child roles, not mature enough to play the leading lady. And while Boynton might easily be mistaken for an overnight sensation, she is grateful for the hardships along the way. “I’ve had years of auditioning and not getting any work, which I think is an incredibly grounding thing,” she explains. “It forces you to question how much you really want it, and if you do, then OK, this is how hard you’ll have to work for it. You become quite resilient to endless rejection, and it’s good to have that so that you don’t fall into the trap of seeing it all in a rose-tinted way. The work itself, obviously, is the most sacred and exciting moment, and although the celebration of it is lovely, it’s just the frilly edges.” The real Mary Austin wanted no part in the making of Bohemian Rhapsody; she guards her privacy closely, which Boynton was determined to honor. Boynton’s character is the film’s moral core, a beacon of unconditional love. “As big and loud and

colorful as this film was going to be, every time our characters came together it was the eye of the storm,” she recalls. “Those are the scenes where Freddie doesn’t need to be ‘the guy,’ the leader onstage. He can kind of curl back up into himself.” The actor has often been pressed to explain the scene in which Mercury confides in Austin that he is bisexual, to which she replies, “No, Freddie, you’re gay.” She imagined that for Austin, nudging him toward what she understood to be his true sexual orientation was an act of love. “But then I heard from a lot of people who felt that this was her in fact failing to understand him,” Boynton explains. “That being bisexual is not a limbo period or an in-between, that you don’t have to define your sexuality. That was an important lesson for me, to stop and listen.” In December, Boynton wrapped The Politician, a Ryan Murphy satirical series premiering on Netflix in the fall. The show stars Ben Platt as well as Jessica Lange and Gwyneth Paltrow, though Boynton did not share any scenes with those venerable leading ladies. She is not allowed to reveal much about the series, but she concedes that comedy was a stretch. “Day one on set, Ryan was like, ‘OK, cool, so I want this thing to be very funny,’” she recalls. “And my heart just dropped. I find myself funny day to day, but turn a camera on me and it’s terrifying to try to make an audience laugh, to find that freshness every time.”

The show filmed in Los Angeles, where Boynton and Malek spent the second half of 2018, living mainly out of suitcases. “You can always breathe here,” she says. “We’ve been staying in West Hollywood, where you have this incredible view of the canyons. Things are low, and there’s a sense of grounding. When you wake up in New York there’s this pressure to go go go, and it’s quite relentless. Instead there’s a peace to Los Angeles that I really cherish.” For the moment, Boynton has nothing on the docket, which suits her just fine. Bohemian Rhapsody has so completely seeped into the crevices of the last two years that she looks forward to some time to digest it all. “But come back to me in a month,” she says and laughs. “And I might be having the usual actor panic.” She’d like to take on other period pieces, maybe the 1920s or the 1940s, and lately it’s the darker scripts that grab her. “There’s a sense of power that comes from playing the villain. You’re not forced to stand for anything if your character is just bad. That’s freeing as an actor, especially now that so many people are turning to actors to be the spokesperson for some idea or some moment, which is a lot.” After Bohemian and the sense of moral responsibility that accompanied it, it’s easy to see the appeal. “No quietly seething women,” Boynton says. “I like the idea of not having to be polite.” X

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In BRIGETTE and MARK ROMANEK’s light-infused living room, a dramatic bonsai ficus shares space with a HANS WEGNER chaise, a vintage KNOLL coffee table by GAE AULENTI and more.

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Words by MELISSA GOLDSTEIN Photography by SHADE DEGGES 76

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How Brigette Romanek remodeled a Laurel Canyon estate suffused with rock glamour and gave it a soul

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From top: A drawing found in a vintage shop and gifted to the designer by ROSETTA GETTY shares floorspace with a JAMES NARES painting. A 1970 LUCIANO VISTOSI MUNEGA lamp, a FAYE TOOGOOD Roly Poly chair and a photo of FLEA taken by Mark populate a section of the living room. A statue of Ganesha sits beneath a drawing by KEVIN LLEWELLYN in the entry. Opposite: “I feel like I’ve just started. I’m so hungry in the sense that I just want to learn and grow and be better than I was last year,” says the designer, seated in a JEAN ROYÈRE Polar Bear chair beneath a painting by ERIK OLSON.

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here are two schools of people,” says interior designer Brigette Romanek. “People who have partied in this house, and people who drive past it every day and have never seen it.” She’s referring to the stately 1925 residence she shares with her husband, filmmaker Mark Romanek, and their daughters, Willow, 13, and Isobel, 10, in Laurel Canyon. And the same way a song can instantly imprint in your mind, once you’ve been introduced to the family’s home, it’s hard to remember a time you weren’t familiar with it. This could be because said residence is steeped in pop culture lore. Over its nine decades it’s hosted everyone from 1930s resident Errol Flynn to Jimi Hendrix and Mick Jagger (in its early incarnation as a recording studio in the ’60s and ’70s), and more recently, Red Hot Chili Peppers, LCD Soundsystem and Thom Yorke. Behind a sliding wood gate, steps from the vehicular anthill that funnels to Sunset Boulevard, the Mediterranean-style structure rises above a 2.5-acre plot. The entrance unfurls in myriad grand stairways for a chooseyour-own-adventure path to the front door. The interior offers more surprises, courtesy

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“It gave me everything when I walked in. It had so Bridgettemuch energy and heart”

of Brigette, a newly named addition to Architectural Digest’s prestigious AD100 list, who is also currently working on residences for Beyoncé and Jay Z (“so knowledgeable and involved — they know it and they know it beautifully”), Gwyneth Paltrow (“one of the greatest people I’ve ever met — and she’ll tell you if something isn’t working”), Demi Moore and Kelly Rowland, among others. The entry, with its Jacques Adnet table crowned with an erupting orchid plant, and its French chateau-sourced muted gray checkerboard floor tile, sounds a refined opening note. To the left, the living room stretches, gallery-like for a full 41 feet, framed by brilliant white neoclassical moldings and featuring an uncluttered array of era-spanning greatest hits. A pair of Jean Royere polar bear chairs sits opposite a reupholstered DDC sofa, above which hangs a photograph by Richard Avedon. A Hans Wegner chaise makes a case for a languorous pause, bisecting the space,

and a vintage Knoll table is topped with a collection of vessels sourced mainly from Galerie Half and abutted by a Pierre Jeanneret Senate Committee chair. Beyond that, a solarium houses fig trees and ficuses in David Cressey pots as well as a Ludwig drum set and a rideable stuffed giraffe belonging to Isobel, which somehow works brilliantly in this context — like throwing a Jeff Koons in the mix, without the price tag. Back down the hall is the immaculate kitchen (“Because I don’t cook,” she jokes of its pristine appearance) skinned in Belvedere black marble. And in the neighboring dining room, an Apparatus chandelier hangs above a utilitarian wood dining table whose patina bears traces of the kids’ art projects. This is where we sit to unpack the designer’s approach. A self-taught, self-professed “creative soul,” Brigette overwhelmingly cites “instinct” as her modus operandi. Formative influences include a nomadic upbringing by

From left: An APPARATUS table lamp sits in front of a RICHARD AVEDON photograph of FRANCIS BACON. The Mediterranean-style facade of the house. Opposite: A PIERRE JEANNERET Senate Committee chair pulls up to a vintage Knoll coffee table topped with vessels from GALERIE HALF and elsewhere.

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A pyramid chair by POUL VOLTHER holds its own in the curio-filled wood-paneled den.

Features - Bridgette


Features - Bridgette


her jazz singer mother, Paulette McWilliams; Brigette’s extensive library of design books; and the environments of creative friends, including Rosetta Getty and Lisa Eisner. She is aesthetically porous. “If it’s good, it’s good: I love Spanish, I love modern, I love traditional. I love it all,” she says. Her interiors ascribe to the idea that no element is filler. “I like pieces that stand alone and collectively make a huge beautiful space — but each is its own story,” she says. A work from Scott Campbell’s “Dollar Art” series, for example, adds edge to the environs, but also has special significance: Campbell created the designer’s inner wrist tattoo (a delicate double heart that symbolically nods to every member of her family). “I like things that make you feel something,” she says. Four and a half years ago, it was the estate’s then-owner, music super-producer and Def Jam Recordings co-founder Rick Rubin — best friend to Mark — who suggested the Romaneks make their life here. “It made no sense. A family hadn’t lived here in, I don’t even know … ever?” Brigette says. “There was no air-conditioning or heating or proper kitchen. The staircase had come apart from the landing. But it gave me everything when I walked in. It had so much energy and heart. And I’m good at seeing what things can be,” she says. “We had to keep the funkiness,” she adds with a sense of custodial duty. In three months, Brigette, then a handbag designer, made the place over — from removing existing decrepit elevators to replacing wrought-iron chandeliers with an eclectic range of fixtures including 1970s Murano glass and elegant crystal. “It’s fun to mix it all and make it ridiculous,” she says. The fresh results caught the attention of the couple’s high-profile circle of friends, including model-turned-Baby2Baby co-president Kelly Sawyer Patricof, who enlisted Brigette in her own Malibu residence. That project would launch the designer’s business; clients including Joe Jonas and Pressed Juicery co-founder Hedi Gores followed. (She also has a business with fellow designer Estee Stanley, Hancock Design, for which the two introduce products through collaborations, such as a figurative line of wallpaper with artist Carly Kuhn.) Work and pleasure intermingle for the Romaneks — they often entertain at home with their multitalented circle of friends — “By the end of the night no one wants to leave,

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“I love Spanish, modern, traditional. I love it all”

which is my favorite. I feel like I’ve done my job,” Brigette says. The spouses also exchange artistic input: Mark’s more “intense” and “understated” taste is evident in the moodier wood-paneled den, where Grammys (for his videos for Michael and Janet Jackson’s “Scream” and Johnny Cash’s “Hurt”) and MTV Moonman statues are on display, and where he often likes to work on scripts (his directorial filmography includes 2002’s One Hour Photo and 2010’s Never Let Me Go). The two met in 1995 on the set of one of Mark’s early videos for soul musician Steve Harvey, when Mark mistook Brigette for someone auditioning to be in the video. She was, in fact, dating Harvey and there to drop

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off his lunch. “I was so insulted!” she says. “I saw [Mark’s] work over the years and I always thought, ‘Ugh, that guy.’” They didn’t get together until about five years later, when they bumped into each other at L.A. restaurant Mandarette Chinese Cafe, where Mark was dining with Francis Ford Coppola, Jacqui Getty and Gia Coppola, and Brigette was fresh off a flight from New York. They traded numbers. “He called me the next day, and here we are, 15 years later,” she says. Home continues to captivate her. Six months ago, she undertook an extensive refresh. It started innocently enough, with the replacement of the original dark wood

floors, which were showing signs of wear and tear. “Then it became, ‘Well, maybe the fabrics need to change,’” she says wryly, nodding to a crew of workmen outside as if to acknowledge the knock-on effect. The new wave of interiors has manifested in a scheme that’s “a mixture of wabi-sabi mixed with midcentury modern — more grounded, a little bit softer,” she says. Next up, she plans to redo the basement as a hangout for her girls and their friends. “So they can be here but not here,” she explains. Unsurprisingly, the Romanek house is social HQ for adults and tweens alike. Chief among the recent acquisitions is a 30-year-old bonsai ficus from L.A. rare

plant emporium The Tropics, prospering in another David Cressey pot. It takes pride of place in the living room, the sun shining a spotlight on it through the expansive arched windows. “It’s the greatest thing ever. I cannot believe that I get to own one of those,” she says as we sit on a tufted leather Poul Kjærholm daybed against the wall, admiring the view. “And that’s how I feel about all of it. I would have been unhappy had I not pursued something creative, but I have found the exact creative thing that I want to do, and I honestly can’t believe that I get to do it.” She pauses, then adds in a confessional whisper: “I’m kind of in shock all the time.” X

The refined entry opens onto the dining room, where an abstract vintage painting hangs between a pair of Renaissance-style portraits, and the fireplace mantle is adorned with the designer’s extensive crystal collection.

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THE TALENTED MR. BIESENBAC

he’s been snapped with Frank Gehry, Takashi Murakami, Diane von Furstenberg and Lana Del Rey, to name a few. His reach crosses the spheres of architecture, design, fashion and popular culture. But he’s quick to remind you these relationships are long-standing, forged over 23 years as a curator at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, where he developed the Department of Film and Media (which eventually became the Department of Media and Performance Art), and as director of MoMA PS1 in Queens. “I had this role of translator between film and art and performance art,” he says. “This is a naturally grown dialogue, I’m not coming to L.A. and meeting these people.” The marketing benefits of said relationships might seem like the main reason the board of MOCA selected Biesenbach; but he brings a broader skill set. For Angelenos, it’s been a tumultuous 11 years or so at MOCA: four directors, a $30 million bailout by philanthropist Eli Broad, artists on the board resigning in protest of last year’s gala, curators departing under complex circumstances. So naturally, anyone selected for this seat faces a Herculean task. But the reality is the museum is as financially solid as it has ever been, with an endowment of more than $130 million, thanks to several board pushes over the last six years. Plus Biesenbach possesses a level of experience and intelligence that could silence most critics. “We need a seasoned leader, someone who embraces the arts in such an allencompassing way and with that social justice side [Biesenbach created the public arts festival Rockaway! after Hurricane Sandy in 2012 to galvanize the community], says MOCA board member and collector Maria Bell. “That’s something people in L.A. can relate to ... I’m one of many people who really believed in Klaus.” Since Biesenbach’s arrival, he’s embarked on what amounts to a listening tour, asking everyone from founding director Richard Khoshalek to both household names and unknown artists about what this city needs. “I had never understood the city as a social space that I can spend time in and explore,” he says, referring to his outsider’s view of L.A. After he publicly compared L.A. to Berlin to The New York Times in July — which didn’t go over too well — “everyone and anyone” started telling him what he should learn about the city. His thirst for knowledge and experience is seemingly endless.

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laus Biesenbach, the new director of The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, is already in all the right places: at the Gucci LACMA Art+Film extravaganza, the Hammer Museum’s annual gala in the garden, Susan Rockefeller’s birthday bash at The California Club and the

Vanity Fair Oscar party with Lady Gaga. “We looked at each other and said, ‘God, we’ve come a long way!’” he says. “She was 21 when I met her — so young!” It’s fair to say he also knows all the right people. Since he arrived in L.A. last year from New York (he’s originally from Germany),

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KLAUS BIESENBACH at Grand Central Market in Downtown Los Angeles.


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He began asking friends and artists: “What are the 10 places you would never think I would ever find myself?’’ And an itinerary was born. “It was a beautiful carte blanche,” he says. Jared Madere took Biesenbach to Eagle Rock in Topanga State Park for the best view of the canyon. Doug Aitken and Catherine Opie also showed him around town. Maria Bell, artist Alex Israel and Frieze L.A. executive director Bettina Korek spirited the besuited Biesenbach to Disneyland. “Understanding L.A. is understanding its relationship to fantasy and Hollywood, and there is no other place that better illustrates that than Disneyland,” Israel says. “So many artists have been inspired by it, from Mike Kelley and Paul McCarthy all the way up to the present.” Slowly and thoughtfully, Biesenbach’s plan is taking shape. So far he’s closed the MOCA outpost at the Pacific Design Center to focus on the downtown locations. He’s reinstalled the political 1989 mural by Barbara Kruger at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA in Little Tokyo; planted seven Japanese Yew pine trees in the Aileen Getty Plaza (with more plans to add greenery to the concrete plaza); and is working on converting the museum into a flexible warehouse space to accommodate dance and music lectures. He’s also expanded the board to include five new members, four of whom bring a worldly perspective: Adrian Cheng is a major collector from China; Marina Kellen French is a New Yorker who is a trustee at The Met; Simon Mordant is an investment banker in Sydney and chairman of

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the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia; and Julia Stoschek is a major collector and the founder of the Julia Stoschek Collection, a museum with branches in Berlin and Düsseldorf. There’s also Sean Parker, founder of Napster and the first president of Facebook, who brings a technological expertise to the group. Biesenbach points out that perhaps the most important change he has made was to expand the role of education director Amanda Hunt into the curatorial department and promote her to be curator of programs. “It’s my role to enable these curators, make their ideas real and help artists emerge,” he says. “He has a surprisingly academic side, which many people don’t see,” observes Aitken, who first met Biesenbach in Berlin in the mid1990s and has worked with him at MoMA. “He really cares about the voice of artists.” The opportunity to work in L.A. and “build on the incredible legacy of MOCA,” is the reason Biesenbach says he took the job. One way to honor the institution’s history is with what he’s calling the MOCA benefit on May 18. Instead of a traditional gala (which was previously run by the board), Biesenbach has plans to rework the event, which in the past has honored a specific artist, into something that “turns the attention to all the artists that made, and make, and will make MOCA,” he says. This will most likely mean that if you buy a table for 12 you will be encouraged to give six of your tickets to artists. During his 23-year tenure at MoMA PS1 and MoMA, MoMA PS1 expanded its board from 11 to 30 members and the budget tripled. The institution also vastly expanded its offerings, putting on exhibitions of lesser-known artists like Reza Abdoh and Carolee Schneemann. It’s also led revolutionary exhibitions at MoMA, including ones that have pushed the boundaries of the definition of art, such as the history-making Marina Abramović retrospective “The Artist Is Present” in 2010, which inspired multiple books and films.

Another is the controversial Björk exhibition in 2015, which was praised by some but called “a discombobulated mess” by New York magazine. “The program I [stood] for in New York was incredibly inclusive,” Biesenbach says. “One of the main qualities of a museum is that it has to be generous and it has to be inclusive — artistically and generationally.” Bell, who was on the board of PS1, remembers how he used to host gatherings at his home in the Rockaways for the local artist community, providing only his favorite foods —Diet Coke and Doritos — as an incentive to encourage others to contribute to the spread. At his goodbye party this fall at MoMA PS1 Doritos and Diet Coke were served to honor that participatory spirit. “When you are museum director, you are a host,” Biesenbach says. “You are an enabler, assisting the mission of the museum. It’s not about you. It’s about the difference you make,” he says. On the personal side, Biesenbach might be described as a little severe but not cold: angular haircut; piercing, intelligent, greeneyed gaze; neat and trim in his well-tailored attire. He hasn’t stated publicly where he was born (apart from western Germany), but he trained as a medical doctor before founding the KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin. Abramović has spoken in the press that the two had a “more than friends” relationship when he was younger. “We devoted three months together, and we decided we can have like a ‘house life.’ He would make the apple pies, but they were always burning!” she told the Observer. Today he lives alone, in a spare, all-white apartment. “I don’t collect art. It keeps you independent,” he says. There is something intimate yet unknowable in the “window#23” pictures he posts on Instagram, part of a series he started in 2007 that captures the daily view from his apartment. Biesenbach explains he began photographing the views as a meditative practice, an act inspired by a conversation he had with longtime friend and collaborator Yoko Ono. “It’s a simple gesture of gratitude,” he says. “You wake up in the morning and you are grateful you are still there.” MOCA’s future is just as intriguing. “It was the institution built by artists from the ground up. It needs to own that place and culture, and it needs to surprise us,” Aitken says. “I’m taking on such an important legacy and continuing it,” Biesenbach surmises. “We are walking the walk.” X

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Biesenbach aboard the ANGELS FLIGHT RAILWAY.


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D The rooftop pool at SOHO HOUSE BARCELONA offers breathtaking views of Port Vell Marina and the city skyline.

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SUCH A PLAYA With international hotel brands, homegrown hot spots and a city beach to rival California’s, it’s time to make Barcelona your next stopover

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arcelona, such a beautiful horizon, Barcelona, like a jewel in the sun.” So sang Queen vocalist Freddie Mercury with opera singer Montserrat Caballé in their single named after the city, released in honor of the 1992 Olympics, an event that helped transform Spain’s second city into the bucket list mainstay we know today.

Aside from Gaudí’s mind-bending masterpieces, the historic food markets and the monolithic Design Museum of Barcelona, it is the neo-Brutalist concrete boardwalk and sandy beaches — which exist thanks to the Olympic urban regeneration project — that, in my mind, are the No. 1 must-sees. Stroll from the former fishermen hamlet of La Barceloneta to El Poblenou (the erstwhile Athlete’s Village) in the summer and you’ll see deft-handed volleyball players kicking back at the chiringuitos (beachside bars). In Spain, beach drinking seems to be a national sport. As a regular visitor but feeble volleyballer, no trip for me is complete without a visit to Xiringuito Escribà (xiringuitoescriba.com), one such chiringuito, for a pan of paella and an Estrella Damm. It’s an ideal prelude to a siesta on the sand. Three years ago, Soho House (sohohouse.com) opened its first property in the Southern Mediterranean near the foot of Las Ramblas; any Angeleno in search of a homeaway-from-home experience can head to its Cecconi’s restaurant for some charcoal-grilled turbot washed down with a glass of Rioja. Last year, Little Beach House Barcelona (littlebeachhousebarcelona.com) opened in Garraf, a 45-minute drive down the coast and an easy day out if you’re in need of a break from the bustle of Barri Gòtic (Gothic Quarter).

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CECCONI’S AND LITTLE BEACH HOUSE: COURTESY OF SOHO HOUSE. MUSEUM DES DISSENY: LOURDES JANSANA/ BARCELONA DESIGN MUSEUM. PARADISO: COURTESY OF PARADISO. BARCELONA OLYMPICS: XAVI PADRS. THE BARCELONA EDITION: NIKOLAS KOENIG. PAELLA: ANDREW BARKER.

Edition Hotels emphasize fun. What else would you expect from a Studio 54 co-founder?

Call it the Soho House effect, but a second slick hotel brand, Edition Hotels, has just opened next to the Santa Caterina food market near the less touristy but well positioned El Born District. At The Barcelona Edition (editionhotels.com/barcelona) you’ll find fantastic restaurants such as Bar del Pla (bardelpla.cat) where the chicken canneloni is a must and Cal Pep (calpep.com) for cuttlefish flame-grilled before your very eyes. Edition Hotels are synonymous with sleek design, masculine interiors, low lighting and an emphasis on fun times — what else would you expect from hotelier and Studio 54 co-founder Ian Schrager? — and the Barcelona property is bang on brand. There, you can kick off the evening at the rooftop bar before heading to Cabaret in the basement for dinner and entertainment conceived by the team behind Ibiza superclub Manumission. Unlike in Madrid, most Barcelona bars don’t stay open all night. There comes a point around 1 a.m. when you must decide whether you want to brave some Latin beats or call it a night. So a tip from the Edition concierge about Paradiso (paradiso.cat), a speakeasy accessed via the fridge of a Pastrami Bar and serving labour intensive cocktails such as a Salvador Dalí Manhattan, was well received. A different gem to the one Freddie sang about, but something tells me he would have thoroughly approved. •

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Clockwise from top left: The DESIGN MUSEUM OF BARCELONA. The bar at PARADISO. A 1992 Olympics poster. The rooftop bar of THE BARCELONA EDITION. Paella from XIRINGUITO ESCRIBÀ. Opposite, from top: A balcony at LITTLE BEACH HOUSE BARCELONA. The dining room of CECCONI’S.

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The high tea presentation by BEVERLY HILLS PREMIER CATERING includes elegant macaron towers, exquisite petits fours and an assortment of delectable tea sandwiches.

PARTY PERFECT Promo

Luxury events company Beverly Hills Premier Catering designs bespoke occasions for Southern California’s most exclusive clientele

Clockwise from above left: Wild-caught big-eye tuna tartare with wasabi creme on crisp wontons. A slice of lemon elderflower cake with edible sugar petals. Beverly Hills Premier Catering also offers Champagne service. Founder and CEO LISA LAFFERTY. bhpremiercatering.com.

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THE REST The business of sleep wakes up to the future

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ore than one-third of American adults don’t get enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sleep deprivation impairs cognitive functions, degrades our emotional intelligence and raises stress levels, contributing to weight gain, diabetes, high blood pressure and depression. There are simple fixes to keep in mind, like no caffeine or big meals before bed, no screen time in the bedroom, and at least seven hours of sleep each night. But for many of us, that’s just not enough. From supplements to data analysis, personal coaching and creating ideal sleep environments, optimizing shut-eye has become big business, with an influx of technology, products and services to help you get your z’s. The OURA Smart Ring tracks daily physical and sleep activities.

DR. BARBARA STURM’S SLEEP FOOD Famous for her eponymous antiinflammatory skincare line, Dr. Barbara Sturm recently launched Sleep Food, an herbal supplement that facilitates the deep sleep vital for healthy skin. Containing purslane, passionfruit and melon extracts, Sleep Food is also loaded with anti-stress B vitamins, sleep-supporting herbs, (Valerian, St. John’s wort) and antioxidants that guard against dehydration, free-radical damage and accelerated aging. $95/60 capsules; violetgrey.com.

OURA SMART RING This sleek piece of wearable technology tracks daily sleep activity, with an emphasis on aligning with the circadian rhythm (the body’s natural clock). The ring monitors everything from total sleep time to sleep stages and sleep efficiency. The collected, personalized data connects with an app, helping the user to make smarter health and wellness choices. From $299; ouraring.com.

Wellness AMAZON ECHO PLUS

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Amazon’s Alexa is ready to get into bed with you. With a new wellness team in place, Amazon has curated a variety of skills (think apps) to help customize sleep routines — dimming the lights, playing sleep meditations, listening to sleep sounds or scheduling your favorite album to play for a set amount of time — through the Echo Plus smart home hub, all without the need for a screen in your bedroom. $150; amazon.com.

EQUINOX SLEEP COACHING Want a better body? Dreaming may be the answer. Equinox teamed up with the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA to validate the impact of sleep on fitness outcomes, using their findings to develop a 12-week Sleep Coaching program, available where Tier X training is available. These guided sessions, taught by certified trainers, will evaluate your sleep habits, implement better behaviors (think consistent bedtimes) and track your progress toward your personal goals. $495/six-pack of sessions, plus membership fees; equinox.com. 2

ZEN MOMENT: KELLY LYNCH Hollywood Hills-based actor Kelly Lynch is busier than ever. There’s her newly launched L.A./ California-centric Instagram style feed, @LACaKe, where she posts what she and her bestie, Carlota Espinosa, are crushing on. And there’s Lynch’s latest film, On the Rocks, directed by Sofia Coppola. Still, she never strays from self-care. Lynch survived a near-fatal car accident 40 years ago. “I had to learn to walk again,” she shares. “That I was an athlete, young and strong, saved me.” Lynch views her thrice-weekly workouts — strength training, plyometrics, Pilates — with trainer Boba Andric with almost religious vigor. “It’s another form of meditation, keeping my body fit, letting those fabulous endorphins surge. Later, I’ll hack a double espresso cappuccino with foamed oat milk and a mix of maca, he shou wu, collagen and pearl powders, plus a sprinkle of stevia.”

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OURA: COURTESY OF OURA RING. LYNCH: STEWART SHINING.

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silk dress, $3,375, knit one-shoulder top, $775, and Onyx Bouquet stretch tulle tights, $575. Chloé Carlina chain sunglasses, $430; chloe.com. Calvin Klein 205W39NYC Jaws tank top, $590, printed scuba top, $1,200, silk couture skirt, $4,500, and patent and rubber pumps, $995; calvinklein.com. Goldie long-sleeve wide-stripe Ringer t-shirt, $125; goldietees.com.

SHOPPING GUIDE ON OUR COVER Valentino red dress with bow, $3,890, Valentino, Beverly Hills, 310-247-0103. Alexandra Jules halfhoop ruby and diamond huggie earrings, $3,000; alexandrajules.com.

STRAP HAPPY

TABLE OF CONTENTS p.18 Simon Haas wears Kenzo orange jacket, $495, and orange pants, $328; kenzo.com. Paul Smith men’s tailored-fit light pink pinstripe shirt, $295, Paul Smith, West Hollywood, 323-951-4800. Niki Haas wears Dior Men yellow cashmere twill peak lapel double-breasted jacket with button-strap detail, $4,900, and yellow cashmere twill high-waist wide pants, $2,300, Dior, Beverly Hills, 310-247-8003; dior.com. Prada lime green ruffle shirt, $500, Prada, Beverly Hills, 310-2788661. Lucy Boynton wears Valentino red dress with bow, $3,890, Valentino, Beverly Hills, 310-247-0103. Alexandra Jules half-hoop ruby and diamond huggie earrings, $3,000; alexandrajules.com. Chanel Fine Jewelry Camélia Précieux ring with diamonds, $9,800, and Ruban ring with diamonds, $8,700, Chanel, Beverly Hills, 310-278-5500. Sergio Rossi fuchsia satin sling-back pumps with crystals, $930; sergiorossi.com.

FLIGHTS OF FANCY p.30 Gianvito Rossi Athena white feather stiletto sandals, $1,395, Gianvito Rossi, Costa Mesa, 714-6689477. Gucci yellow ostrich feather fan with wood handle, chain and metal double G detail, $4,400, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451. Roger Vivier Maharaja silver leather sling-back pumps with ostrich feathers, $1,150, Roger Vivier, Costa Mesa, 714-435-0015. Simone Rocha pink satin feather pumps, price upon request, similar styles available, Dover Street Market, L.A., 310-427-7610. Loewe multicolored woven feather bag, price upon request; loewe.com.

p.42 Vacheron Constantin Métiers d’Art Florilège Rosa Centifolia watch, price upon request, Vacheron Constantin, Beverly Hills, 310-598-2026. Bulgari Lvcea Skeleton watch set with diamonds and red alligator bracelet, $29,800; bulgari.com. Cartier Libre Diagonale watch with diamonds and black and burgundy enamel (limited edition of 50 numbered pieces), price upon request, Cartier, Beverly Hills, 310-275-4272, cartier.com. Chopard Happy Hearts watch with diamonds, $6,440, Chopard, Costa Mesa, 714-432-0963; chopard.com/us.

LET IT SLIDE p.46 Jimmy Choo Lela flat nappa leather sandals, $695, Jimmy Choo, Beverly Hills, 310-860-9045; jimmychoo. com. Rochas flat leather mule sandals with gold front buckle, $630; bergdorfgoodman.com. Chloe Gosselin Gloria sandals, $835; farfetch.com. Bally Relax slippers, $290, Bally, Beverly Hills, 310-247-1012; bally.com.

CARTE BLANCHE p.52 Gucci white magnolia silk taffeta short-sleeve v-neck dress with all-over flounce and ruffle details, $8,800, ivory tulle gloves, $490, and layered pearl necklace with feline crystal closure, $2,390, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451; gucci.com. Zimmermann Zippy Fan silk dress, $2,650, Zimmermann, West Hollywood, 323-746-5456; us.zimmermannwear.com. Prada headband, $570, Prada, Beverly Hills, 310-2788661. Jonathan Simkhai white threaded lace tiered midi dress, $995, Jonathan Simkhai, West Hollywood, 424284-3071; jonathansimkhai.com. Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini embroidered tulle ruffle dress, $1,995, Barneys New York, Beverly Hills, 310-276-4400. Alexander McQueen ivory silk knit sheer asymmetric drape dress, price upon request, Alexander McQueen, Beverly Hills, 323-782-4983. Gucci pearl glasses, $1,230; gucci.com. Dior My ABCDior Tribale star earrings, $220, Dior, Beverly Hills, 310-859-4700. Emporio Armani white heeled boots, $925, Emporio Armani, Beverly Hills, 310-271-7790; armani.com. Valentino white lace dress, $19,900, and Valentino Garavani white espadrilles, $875, Valentino, Beverly Hills, 310-247-0103.

Clover green uneven dyed velvet jacket, $3,700, Clover green uneven dyed velvet pants, $980, and low-top sneakers in white and green leather, original GG canvas with dirty effect and oval enameled detail with metal double G, $870, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451; gucci.com. Paul Smith men’s slim-fit purple shirt, $295, Paul Smith, West Hollywood, 323-951-4800. p.65 Simon wears Kenzo plaid button-up, $750, striped top, price upon request, and plaid pants, $625; kenzo. com. Gucci leather sole slides in black quilted leather with horsebit, $980, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451; gucci.com. Niki wears Marni plaid blazer, $1,590, and plaid pants, $990, Marni, L.A., 323-782-1101. Hermès men’s cashmere zip sweater, $2,100, Hermès, Beverly Hills; hermes.com. Gucci leather sole moccasins in orange leather with vintage-inspired horsebit, $890, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451; gucci.com.

DON’T STOP HER NOW p.67 Givenchy short cocktail dress in bright yellow, $3,730, Givenchy, Costa Mesa, 714-545-2185. Katkim C pavé ear pin, $1,620; katkimfinejewelry.com. Zoë Chicco flat-top white pavé bar ring, $875; zoechicco.com. Eriness large aquamarine eternity band, $750; eriness. com. p.68 Calvin Klein 205W39NYC silk couture dress, $9,500, and couture belt, $1,950; calvinklein.com. Jemma Sands Doheny rhodium diamond wavy disc stud earrings, $695, and Mercer ruby vintage-inspired cage ring, $995, The Store, Mill Valley, 415-888-8796. Roger Vivier black satin heeled sandal with ostrich feathers and embellished strass, $1,200, Roger Vivier, Costa Mesa, 714-435-0015; rogervivier.com. p.69 Prada white and gold studded dress, $3,260, Prada, Beverly Hills, 310-278-8661. Katkim diamond Oasis pearl earrings, $375 each, and Grande Crescendo Flare ring, $5,000; katkimfinejewelry.com. p.71 Balenciaga black and white 3-D molded check dress, $4,100, Balenciaga, Beverly Hills, 310-854-0557. Eriness black diamond domed ring, $3,095; eriness.com. Sergio Rossi black satin sling-back pumps with crystals, $930; sergiorossi.com. p.72 Vera Wang light ivory macramé lace baby-doll dress, price upon request, Vera Wang, Beverly Hills, 323-602-0174. Jemma Sands Jane pearl and diamond studs, $1,495, The Store, Mill Valley, 415-888-8796. Alexandra Jules diamond square Skinni ring, $3,400; alexandrajules.com. Sergio Rossi white leather sandals with crystal stones, $930; sergiorossi. com. p.73 Marc Jacobs pale green mini tent ruffle tiered dress, $2,200; marcjacobs.com. Alexandra Jules extra-large star earrings, $9,000, and diamond Lassell ring, $12,175; alexandrajules.com. p.74 Saint Laurent by Anthony Vaccarello black wool dress with strass detail and rhinestones, $3,990, Saint Laurent, Beverly Hills, 310-271-5051. Falke Dot 15 tights in black, $38, Bloomingdales, Santa Monica, 310-985-6400. Alexandra Jules white diamond shape huggies, $2,600; alexandrajules.com. Jemma Sands Ludlow rhodium and black diamond eternity stacking band rings, from $495, The Store, Mill Valley, 415-888-8796. Eriness black diamond domed ring, $3,095; eriness.com. Giuseppe Zanotti crystal butterfly silver patent leather flats, $850, Giuseppe Zanotti, Beverly Hills, 310-5505760; giuseppezanotti.com.

Shopping Guide

CLASH OF THE PATTERNS p.38 Dolce & Gabbana polka-dot jacket, $3,345, polkadot vest, $995, and polka-dot pants, $1,345, Dolce & Gabbana, Beverly Hills, 310-888-8701. Kenzo gingham sleeveless top, $325, Opening Ceremony, West Hollywood, 310-652-1120; kenzo.com. Hermès 2002 bag in Sieste Au Paradis printed silk and swift calfskin, $14,200, Hermès, Beverly Hills, 310-278-6440; hermes. com. Paco Rabanne red Mosaic printed satin top, $890, silver long flower printed jacquard Lurex dress, black rose flower printed tank dress, and red Mosaic Geta sandals in neoprene and lacquered wood, prices upon request; pacorabanne.com. Paul Smith blazer, $1,125, and pants, $495, Paul Smith, West Hollywood, 323-951-4800; paulsmith.com. Gucci brown-black Feline-printed Cady long-sleeve high-neck dress, $4,500, 310-278-3451; gucci.com. Hermès Pierres Et Cristaux silk scarf, $460, Hermès, Beverly Hills, 310278-6440; hermes.com. Chloé Romie sunglasses, $400; chloe.com. Christian Louboutin Clare black and white striped sling-back heels, $995, Christian Louboutin, West Hollywood, 310-247-9300. Versace L’Aurora ruby

DOUBLE VISION p.60 Simon wears Paul Smith men’s tailored-fit light pink pinstripe shirt, $295, Paul Smith, West Hollywood, 323-951-4800. Niki wears Prada lime green ruffle shirt, $500, Prada, Beverly Hills, 310-278-8661. p.63 Simon wears Ermenegildo Zegna Couture cashmere coat, $6,995, Ermenegildo Zegna, Beverly Hills, 310-247-8827. Dior Men light pink cashmere twill double-breasted oblique jacket, $4,700, Dior, Beverly Hills, 310-247-8003; dior.com. p.64 Niki wears Gucci

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Favorite drink? The cascara chai latte from Lady Falcon Coffee Club. The flavors of cascara are incredible and it has five times the antioxidants as coffee.

S C O Clockwise from left: APRIL GARGIULO at her family’s GARGIULO VINEYARDS. The spa at Napa Valley’s AUBERGE DU SOLEIL hotel. VINTNER’S DAUGHTER’s new Active Treatment Essence, $225/50 mL. McMULLEN boutique in Oakland. THE PROGRESS restaurant in San Francisco. The DE YOUNG museum. BROTHER VELLIES Atlas boot, $995.

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APRIL GARGIULO The founder of cult skincare brand Vintner’s Daughter shares her California favorites Where do you live? San Francisco. It’s filled with dreamers working to make their marks. Favorite hike? Tennessee Valley Trail. It’s very close to the city but feels like a world away. Favorite beach? Western Marin’s Kehoe Beach because of its dramatic sand dunes, high cliffs and remoteness. Favorite getaway? Napa Valley when we need family time or just some sunshine. But if we really want to get away, Lake Tahoe is our place, no matter what time of year it is. Go-to restaurant? The bar at The Progress. I dream about their green bean kimchi tempura.

As told to ANUSH J. BENLIYAN 98

My CA

Favorite museum? The de Young and Legion of Honor. They are smaller and more manageable, but the art is world-class. The new kids’ space, de Youngsters Studio, is really good, too. Last show that impressed you? Desert X. It lived up to every expectation. The artworks were thoughtprovoking, exhilarating and beautiful. Favorite vineyard? My family’s winery, Gargiulo Vineyards, in Oakville, Napa Valley. We produce limited-release, single-vineyard cabernet sauvignon. What do you wear by day? A midi dress (Stine Goya, Tibi, Co) with boots (Brother Vellies, Celine) or sneakers (Puma, Nike) most days, and a lot of vintage (A Current Affair). Favorite boutiques? McMullen in Oakland — the edit is both fashionforward and wearable. Metier in Hayes Valley for the most covetable vintage jewelry. Favorite Napa spa and treatment? Auberge du Soleil and its signature Vintner’s Daughter facial. Where do you get your hair done? Veer & Wander. The owner, Connie, is amazing and there’s always something fun to discover in the boutique. Favorite beauty products? Our Active Botanical Serum and new Active Treatment Essence, of course; Kjaer Weis mascara; Rye Beauty brow gel; Rodin lip oil. Favorite drive? S.F. to Inverness. Once you get off 101, you are driving through small towns on winding country roads in a spectacularly beautiful part of the world. It’s magical. •

GARGIULO: ANGIE SILVY. AUBERGE DU SOLEIL: AUBERGE DU SOLEIL, AUBERGE RESORTS COLLECTION. ACTIVE TREATMENT ESSENCE: VINTNER’S DAUGHTER. MCMULLEN: MARIA DEL RIO. THE PROGRESS: JEREMY JACHYM. DE YOUNG MUSEUM: RANDY DODSON. BROTHER VELLIES: JASON ERIC HARDWICK.

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