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FOR MEN

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SMART MOVES

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JARED LETO’S NEXT CHAPTER

BOND OF BROTHERS Meet The Brosnan Boys SCOOTER WARS Who Will Win The Battle? ARTIST COLONY Frogtown’s Big Leap


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C FOR MEN

CONTENTS

FEATURES

74

68

SCOOTER WARS

FROGTOWN’S BIG LEAP

TOC 80

92

“YOU FEEL MOST ALIVE WHEN YOU’RE ON THE EDGE”

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SONS

Jared Leto tells Stephanie Rafanelli why taking risks—whether he’s performing in front of 20,000 people or hanging off a cliff in Yosemite—is his raison d’être

When your dad’s James Bond, you pick up a trick or two. C meets models Paris and Dylan Brosnan as they enter the spotlight

102

HIGH LIFE For his house above Sunset Boulevard, Eric Duffy knew exactly who to call to give character to his “white box” on a hill: the mother-son duo the stars have on speed dial

JARED LETO WEARING A GUCCI JACKET, SHIRT, PANTS, AND TULLE PANTS, AND A JOHN HARDY RING. PHOTOGRAPHY BY GAVIN BOND. CREATIVE AND FASHION DIRECTION BY ALISON EDMOND. HAIR BY DAVID COX AT ART DEPARTMENT USING KEVIN MURPHY. GROOMING BY JAMIE TAYLOR AT THE WALL GROUP.

24

FALL/WINTER 2018

“FROGTOWN’S BIG LEAP” (P.68): RAINER HOSCH. “SCOOTER WARS” (P.74), PAULIUS KOLODZEISKIS. “YOU FEEL MOST ALIVE WHEN YOU’RE ON THE EDGE” (P.80): GAVIN BOND. “LIKE FATHER, LIKE SONS” (P.92): BEAU GREALY. “HIGH LIFE” (P.102): SHADE DEGGES. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.109.

The next great transport revolution is happening right on your doorstep. But who will come out on top in this two-wheel race for global dominance?

How did a forgotten backwater on the L.A. River become the most desirable neighborhood on the east side?


CH Premier


60

C FOR MEN

41

DEPARTMENTS

56

48 FOUNDER’S LETTER ................................................................................................. 30 C PEOPLE

Who’s who behind the scenes of C for Men..............................................................

32

C WHAT’S HOT Filmmaker Rory Kennedy shoots for the moon. Brandy stages a cocktail comeback. On the face of Yosemite’s El Capitan with top climber Alex Honnold. What jeweler-to-the-stars Ben Yang is coveting for fall.................................................................... 35

54

40

36 44

00

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C STYLE

Model Jordan Barrett teams up with Los Angeles’ Frame on a unisex collab. The Row takes on menswear. Punk’s not dead................................................................................. 43

C DESIGN C MENU

TOC

Into the woods with Ido Yoshimoto. Hemp heads for the bedroom..................

51

Distilling the ultimate bar cart with Dushan Zaric. California’s newest pizza

YAYOI KUSAMA SKATEBOARD (P.56): COURTESY OF MOMA DESIGN STORE. PIZZA (P.60): ROBERTA’S. FREE SOLO (P.41): NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC/JIMMY CHIN. WATCH (P.48): COURTESY OF BAUME. AUTOCAMP (P.40): AUBRIE PICK. ABOVE AND BEYOND STILL (P.36): NASA, COURTESY OF DISCOVERY. GOLD-DIGGERS (P.65): LAETITIA WAJNAPEL. ROLLS-ROYCE (P.54): COURTESY OF ROLLS-ROYCE. LOUIS VUITTON FRAGRANCE (P.44): COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON. RUNWAY (P.46): COURTESY OF HAIDER ACKERMANN. IDO YOSHIMOTO (P.51): AUBRIE PICK. BAR CART (P.62): WONHO FRANK LEE.

CONTENTS

joints face off ..................................................................................................................................................... 59

C TRAVEL

An East Hollywood dive gives way to an all-in-one bar, boutique hotel and

recording studio................................................................................................................................

59

51 SHOPPING GUIDE PHOTO FINISH

26

65

62

46

00 .................................................................................................................... 109

Shameik Moore’s Spidey sense is tingling.............................................

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FALL/WINTER 2018


Gucci


Jennifer Smith Hale Founder, Editorial Director & CEO Jenny Murray Editor & President Chief Brand & Content Officer Andrew Barker | Chief Creative Officer James Timmins Executive Creative & Fashion Director Alison Edmond Lesley McKenzie Deputy Editor Beauty Director Kelly Atterton

Arts & Culture Editor Elizabeth Khuri Chandler

Senior Designer Gabrielle Mirkin

Fashion Market Editor Rebecca Russell

Associate Editor Anush Benliyan

Photo Editor Maya Harris

Assistant Fashion Editor Margrit Jacobsen

Masthead

Graphic Designer Niki Sylvia

Contributing Senior Editors Melissa Goldstein, Kelsey McKinnon San Francisco Editor-at-Large Diane Dorrans Saeks | Contributing Editor-at-Large Kendall Conrad Copy Editors Lily Maximo Villanueva, Nancy Wong Bryan | Special Projects Contributor Stephanie Steinman Contributing Editors Danielle DiMeglio, Suzanne Rheinstein, Cameron Silver, Michael S. Smith, Andrea Stanford, Jamie Tisch, Nathan Turner, Mish Tworkowski, Hutton Wilkinson Contributing Writers Catherine Bigelow, Caroline Cagney, Kerstin Czarra, Heather John Fogarty, Marshall Heyman, Punch Hutton, Christine Lennon, Martha McCully, Degen Pener, Jessica Ritz, Lindzi Scharf, Khanh T.L. Tran, Elizabeth Varnell, S. Irene Virbila Contributing Photographers Christian Anwander, David Cameron, Mark Griffin Champion, Victor Demarchelier, Amanda Demme, Michelangelo di Battista, Lisa Eisner, Douglas Friedman, Sam Frost, Beau Grealy, Zoey Grossman, Pamela Hanson, Kurt Iswarienko, Mona Kuhn, Kurt Markus, Carter Smith, Alistair Taylor-Young, Jan Welters Interns Amanda Goldstein, Kendall Meleski, Rae Smooke

Renee Marcello Publisher Executive Director Southern California Crista Vaghi

Executive Director Fashion Debbie Flynn

Integrated Marketing Director Jillian DeMarche

Executive Director Northern California Autumn O’Keefe

Executive Director Jewelry & Watch Avery Travis

Sales & Marketing Associate Madison Dahlke

Executive Director Beauty & Lifestyle Office Assistant Heidi Kurlander-Kail Wendi Coto Information Technology Director Sandy Hubbard Finance Associate Troy Felker | Finance Assistant Lee Sultan Andy Nelson Chief Financial Officer & Chief Operating Officer C PUBLISHING 1543 SEVENTH STREET, SECOND FLOOR, SANTA MONICA, CA 90401 T: 310-393-3800 SUBSCRIBE@MAGAZINEC.COM MAGAZINEC.COM C-STATEOFMIND.COM


CH Premier - Vacheron


FOUNDER’S LETTER

C FOR MEN

I am a big believer that you can’t teach talent—you have to look for what you are good at and develop that skill religiously. If you are lucky, your passions arise at a young age, while sometimes you need time to discover what defines you. For cover star Jared Leto, it was the former: He unearthed his acting abilities early on with his star-making debut in the cult television show My So-Called Life—and his fate was sealed. That he has spent the better part of three decades honing his craft while consistently staying at the top of his game is a feat. Even more impressive, at the same time, he developed his musical talents, and is highly regarded for his band, Thirty Seconds to Mars. Leto is a perfect example of finding your calling (or shall I say callings?) from the outset. I know I have enjoyed watching him grow over these decades and become the true talent that he is. On the subject of high achievers, the Brosnan brothers are undoubtedly stars in the making. Of course, it doesn’t hurt that they are blessed with the bone structure of their gorgeous parents, Pierce Brosnan and Keely Shaye Smith, but that can only get them so far. Dylan, the eldest, is pursuing his musical ambitions, while Paris already has the twinkle in his eye that his actor father possesses. We expect big things from these siblings, as evidenced in their fashion portfolio shot on the streets of Downtown Los Angeles. Speaking of attention-getting sights on city streets, in this issue we delve into one of California’s most hot-button lifestyle topics: the scooter wars. Love them or hate them, the two-wheeled modes of transport have become a ubiquitous part of city life up and down the coast. We examine how they got here, and where exactly the phenomenon is headed. We also explore L.A.’s buzzy east side neighborhood Frogtown, and get to know some of the creative tastemakers who are flocking to the city’s under-the-radar hub, including internationally renowned artist David Wiseman, who is building a 30,000-square-foot compound in the area with his brother, Ari Wiseman, former deputy director of the Guggenheim Museum and Foundation in New York. Considering the many talents in this issue (too many to mention here, in fact)—some in the middle of their careers, some just starting out—it seems safe to say that they were always destined for greatness. Then again, their West Coast locale certainly makes for an ideal setting in which to nurture it.

Founder’s Letter

JENNIFER SMITH HALE

DAVID DOWNTON

Founder, Editorial Director and CEO

We’d love to hear from you. Please send letters to edit@magazinec.com.

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FALL/WINTER 2018


Salvatore Ferragamo

RODEO DRIVE FLAGSHIP BEVERLY CENTER WESTFIELD TOPANGA SOUTH COAST PLAZA FASHION VALLEY SAN FRANCISCO WESTFIELD VALLEY FAIR THE FORUM SHOPS AT CAESARS THE GRAND CANAL SHOPPES WYNN LAS VEGAS FERRAGAMO.COM


C PEOPLE

C FOR MEN

Who’s who BEHIND THE SCENES of this issue, plus their FAVORITE CALIFORNIA PLACES

couple of projects with Eric [Duffy], but this was the first complete renovation,” says Kathleen Clements, who, with her son and design partner Tommy, made over their client’s Hollywood Hills West residence, featured in “High Life,” p.102. “With him, it’s less about work and more about fun,” adds Tommy. The firm—whose A-list clients include Adam Levine and Behati Prinsloo, and Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi—has also been featured in Architectural Digest and T magazines. C SPOTS • LeadApron in West Hollywood: The owner, Jonathan, curates phenomenal libraries • Platinum Motorsport in Los Angeles styles the best rides • West Hollywood’s E. Braun & Co. for cashmere blankets

PAULIUS KOLODZEISKIS

GAVIN BOND “I decided to let off some colored smoke flares for one of the shots—thankfully no fire brigade was called,” says photographer Gavin Bond, who captured Jared Leto for this month’s cover. Bond is currently working on a retrospective of his backstage fashion photography, as well as a personal project with Black Jaguar-White Tiger, a rescue foundation for large felines. C SPOTS • Soap Plant + Wacko in Los Feliz is my go-to bookshop • RTH in West Hollywood is a clothing store with quintessentially L.A. fashion • East Hollywood’s Jitlada is the best Thai restaurant outside of Thailand

C People

“The Full Metal Jacket reference really got me into doing this project,” says Lithuania-based illustrator Paulius Kolodzeiskis of creating the visuals for “Scooter Wars,” p.74. He is currently working on a new series of prints, and a graphic novel based on his hometown of Marijampole. Though he’s never been to California, he dreams about visiting “mainly tourist places—when you’re halfway around the world you see these places in movies and want to check them out.”

HADLEY MEARES “I felt like I had entered a small town a million miles away, where no one was in a hurry and everyone was eager to chat,” says journalist Hadley Meares of exploring Los Angeles’ Frogtown neighborhood for “Frogtown’s Big Leap,” p.68. Meares leads historical tours of Southern California, and recently completed a guidebook for Angels Walk L.A. C SPOTS • Greystone Mansion in Beverly Hills: You feel like you’ve stepped into Wuthering Heights • Crystal Cove is a beachside community that feels too charming to be real • Atop Barnsdall Art Park in Los Feliz, you can see the city under the shade of one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpieces

ANDREW BARKER C’s chief brand and content officer recently arrived from London, where he was editorial director of Mr Porter and, before that, executive editor of The Business of Fashion and editor of ES Magazine. “I first assigned an interview with Jared Leto in 2014, five days after he won an Oscar,” says Barker. “Inviting the same writer, Stephanie Rafanelli, to interview him four years on for C makes for a really insightful piece on the evolution of this modern-day Renaissance man.” C SPOTS • La Cabaña in Venice for the guacamole cart • Bow Bow Cocktail Lounge in San Francisco for karaoke • The roaming L.A. dance party Spotlight for a proper night out FALL/WINTER 2018

CLEMENTS AND CLEMENTS: SAM FROST. BARKER: MR PORTER.

TOMMY AND KATHLEEN CLEMENTS “We’ve done a


Montblanc

C r e a t i n g n ew h e i g h t s The new Montblanc 1858 Geosphere. Spirit of Mountain Exploration. montblanc.com/1858

South Coast Plaza


Jimmy Choo


THE WOLVES’ PARISIAN-STYLE INTERIORS WERE INSPIRED BY THE EARLY 1900S.

Edited by

Lesley McKenzie

WH - Opener

LEADER OF THE

PACK

EDEN TYLER

With its turn-of-the-century design and craft cocktails, The Wolves is sure to be a howling success Following a three-year renovation, Downtown Los Angeles has a grand new drinking den straight out of Belle Epoque Paris. Situated in the former Hotel Alexandria on South Spring Street, The Wolves is the brainchild of three discerning gents relatively fresh on the drinks scene: Al Almeida, Isaac Mejia and Daniel Salin. The cocktails, full of seasonal ingredients and botanical accents, are as

FALL/WINTER 2018

pleasing as the stained-glass ceiling. Mixologistin-chief Kevin Lee, former owner of La Mirada’s Puzzle Bar, whips up fresh amaros, liqueurs, bitters and vermouths on a weekly basis. We recommend a pineapple- and smoky mezcal-based cocktail to kick off the weekend in sumptuous style. 519 S. Spring St., L.A., 213-265-7952; thewolvesdtla.com. • AND REW BARKER

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WHAT’S HOT

C FOR MEN

From left: DR. WERNHER VON BRAUN EXPLAINS THE SATURN SYSTEM TO PRESIDENT JOHN F. KENNEDY AT THE CAPE CANAVERAL MISSILE TEST ANNEX ON NOV. 16, 1963. AN ICEBERG IN PATAGONIA, NOVEMBER 2016. Below: RORY KENNEDY.

OUT OF

WH Kennedy THIS

WORLD

Rory Kennedy’s new documentary on NASA weaves cautionary tales with triumphs of the human spirit Rory Kennedy wants to save the world. And the award-winning documentary filmmaker has made a movie about NASA—revisiting the agency’s extraordinary achievements for its 60th anniversary—whose subtext is clear: Our planet is in danger. “What NASA is doing to help us understand what is happening with our planet became a driving theme of the film,” Kennedy says of Above and Beyond: NASA’s Journey to Tomorrow, from her house in Malibu. “[There’s] this new sense of purpose and urgency that NASA has to help us protect Earth, which is really in jeopardy.” Kennedy, whose past documentaries have tackled human rights and social issues, such as the AIDS crisis (Pandemic: Facing Aids, 2003) and the treatment of prisoners of war (Ghosts of Abu Ghraib, 2007),

36

traveled from Florida to Hawaii to the Great Barrier Reef over the course of two years to interview NASA scientists who are using their research on the ozone layer and the effects of pollution to educate the public. “We are in a time and a place where we need to heed these warnings,” says Kennedy. “We need, as human beings, to rethink a lot. And one of the big things we need to do is invest in these scientists and the work that they’re doing. They’ve helped us understand what the problem is and what we need to do to find the solution.”


A comprehensive history of six decades, the film (which airs on the Discovery Channel and Science Channel on Oct. 13) examines the agency’s past and future: from the historic mission to the moon, propelled by Kennedy’s uncle, President John F. Kennedy, to exploring the surface of Mars, searching for life outside of Earth, and gazing back down on our own planet. Accompanied by dazzling visuals from the Hubble Space Telescope, the documentary offers a lens on mankind’s greatest mysteries (“Everybody at NASA I talked to believes that there is absolutely life on other planets,” says Kennedy). It also features interviews with astronauts, including the Apollo missions’ Rusty Schweickart and Jim Lovell, as well as a chilling alert about the environmental path our “Blue Marble” is on—a particularly pressing issue for California, which according to recent reports can expect a huge increase in fires and higher water levels due to the effects of climate change. Still, Kennedy has hope: “There’s a lot we can do to preserve this planet for future generations,” she says. “This film speaks to this extraordinary ability of humans, that when we come together with that sense of purpose, we can really accomplish extraordinary things.” • P E T E R DAV I S

ABOVE AND BEYOND STILLS: NASA, COURTESY OF DISCOVERY. RORY KENNEDY PORTRAIT: RAINER HOSCH.

WH - Kennedy

From above: AN ASTRONAUT PARTICIPATES IN A SPACEWALK. THE SOYUZ MS-03 SPACECRAFT IS SEEN LAUNCHING FROM KAZAKHSTAN’S BAIKONUR COSMODROME.

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2

WHAT’S HOT

C FOR MEN

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4

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BEN YANG WH - Tastemaker

There are multihyphenate creatives, and then there’s entrepreneur Ben Yang. The Los Angeles native began his career as the vice president of artists and repertoire at Dr. Dre’s Priority Records, spinning at weekly DJ gigs, and cornering the online resale market on Nike’s first SB Dunks. His moniker, Ben Baller, comes from playing basketball at San Francisco State University, where he studied cinematography, but he’s best known as the jeweler behind the diamond-heavy chains and pendants his company IF & Co. (ifandco.com) creates for the likes of Drake, John Mayer and Nas. Yang just opened IF & Co.’s newest boutique in the Beverly Center, and it feels like a homecoming. “Growing up in Koreatown, on Olympic and Kingsley, there was one bus—the 28; you’d make that right turn on San Vicente and it would take you straight to the mall, so it’s nostalgic for me,” he reminisces. The modern Renaissance man also counts VVS Pens (vvspens.com), his wildly successful cannabis company (named for diamond clarity), the kids’ clothing line Superism (superism.co) in partnership with A$AP Rocky, and a collaboration with skate footwear brand Straye in the offing, among his current ventures. Here’s what’s catching Yang’s eyes and ears this fall. • E LIZABE LIZA BE TH VARN EL L

1. IF & CO. TENNIS CHAIN, FROM $18,000, IF & CO., BEVERLY CENTER, L.A. 2. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE BY J.D. SALINGER (LITTLE, BROWN AND COMPANY, $9). 3. TRAVIS SCOTT ASTROWORLD ALBUM. 4. MIELE CM6150 COUNTERTOP COFFEE MAKER, $1,749, WILLIAMS-SONOMA.COM. 5. INTERLUDE HOME AVA ACRYLICAND-GLASS COFFEE TABLE, $2,925, HD BUTTERCUP, L.A. 6. MONTY’S GOOD BURGER 516 S. WESTERN AVE., L.A. 7. IF & CO. X ROLEX CUSTOM WATCH, FROM $95,000, IF & CO., BEVERLY CENTER, L.A. 8. MCLAREN SENNA, FROM $960,000, MCLAREN.COM. 9. NIKE THE 10 AIR PRESTO OFF-WHITE SNEAKERS, $1,740, FLIGHTCLUB.COM. 10. KAPITAL SLIM-FIT SELVEDGE DENIM JEANS, $235, MRPORTER.COM.

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10

9 8 7 38

M C LAREN SENNA: © 2018 M C LAREN AUTOMOTIVE. TABLE: HD BUTTERCUP.

3


Sandro


C FOR MEN

Yosemite

PITCH IN

AUTOCAMP YOSEMITE SIGNATURE CLUBHOUSE. Right: AIRSTREAM TRAILERS ARE AVAILABLE FOR BOOKING NOW.

AutoCamp, the style-forward, Airstream-based hotel minichain, is moving just outside of Yosemite National Park, and roughing it is not required. The new 35-acre retreat, dreamed up by Anacapa Architecture and San Francisco-based Geremia Design, is the hospitality brand’s largest and most secluded property yet, rounding out its Russian River Valley and Santa Barbara locations. Beginning in February, guests can trailblaze and stargaze before retiring to one of 20 luxury tents, three cabin suites or 80 deluxe Airstream trailers on-site, all outfitted with Coyuchi sheets and handmade Chilean textiles. 6323 CA-140, Midpines, 888-405-7553. G I L L I A N KOEN I G

autocamp.com

THE TENNIS PLAYER’S CHILDREN MODEL THE ADIDAS STAN SMITH MILLENNIAL SNEAKER IN 2002.

PORSCHE’S MISSION E CONCEPT, ON WHICH THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED TAYCAN IS BASED.

GRAND SLAM

ELECTRIC AVENUE

WH - Auto Camp Porsche is rolling out a production

The ubiquitous footprint that Stan Smith sneakers have left on fashion is traced in Stan Smith: Some People Think I’m a Shoe (Rizzoli New York, $55) written by the namesake tennis player who was once ranked No. 1 in the world. Spanning about 50 years, the history of the classic white, green-trimmed Adidas shoe is celebrated in street-style photos, rap songs, Bollywood movies, and collaborations with Yohji Yamamoto, Raf Simons and Pharrell Williams, the latter of whom penned the book’s foreword. KHA N H T. L. TRAN

version of its Mission E concept, the futuristic electric model first shown in 2015. Now called the Taycan, the 600-plus horsepower executive four-seater goes on sale near the end of 2019, and is expected to have a range of more than 300 miles per charge. porsche.com

CLEAN JEAN With dye-contaminated rivers top of mind, surfer Kelly Slater swore off denim when he co-founded Outerknown, his Culver City-based, sustainably manufactured apparel line. Then he and his team discovered Saitex, a fully transparent, eco-conscious factory in Vietnam that recycles 98 percent of its water, uses the last 2 percent of sludge to make building blocks and air-dries the bulk of its denim. “We stripped everything back and started from the ground up,” Slater says. The result: S.E.A. (Social Environmental Accountability) Jeans crafted from organic cotton (sourced from Italy’s Candiani and Turkey’s Isko mills) and available in three fits—with unlimited free repairs. Go ahead and wear them out. E.V.

outerknown.com 40

LIFEGUARDS FROM THE NORTH SHORE LIFEGUARD ASSOCIATION WEARING OUTERKNOWN S.E.A. JEANS.

FALL/WINTER 2018


AUTOCAMP (2): AUBRIE PICK. STAN SMITH LINEUP: COURTESY OF STAN SMITH ARCHIVE. PORSCHE MISSION E: COURTESY OF PORSCHE. OUTERKNOWN: TODD GLASER/OUTERKNOWN. FREE SOLO: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC/JIMMY CHIN. BERTOUX BRANDY: ERIC MEDSKER. SEED: BRETT SIMON FOR SEED C. 2018. VISVIM: COURTESY OF VISVIM.

WHAT’S HOT

EDGE OF GLORY Yosemite’s El Capitan, the 3,000-foot granite pinnacle of the rock climbing world, serves as the arresting backdrop of Free Solo, National Geographic’s gravitydefying and heart-stopping account of elite climber Alex Honnold’s bare-handed ascent of the monolith. Filmmaker Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and her husband, photographer and co-director Jimmy Chin, capture the Sacramento native’s record-setting feat in this film, including Honnold’s methodical preparation for the rope-free, gearless climb that defines free soloing. It’s an unprecedented triumph worth witnessing as much for the realization of a seemingly impossible dream as the halting beauty of Yosemite. In theaters now. G . K . freesolofilm.com BERTOUX BRANDY, $45.

FREE SOLO’S ALEX HONNOLD PEERS OVER THE EDGE OF GLACIER POINT IN YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK AFTER CLIMBING 2,000 FEET FROM THE VALLEY FLOOR.

GOOD LIBATIONS Brandy lovers, take note: The often underrated spirit is making a comeback, at least if NoMad sommelier Thomas Pastuszak and PDT (New York City and Hong Kong) master bartender Jeff Bell have anything to do with it. The duo’s premium spirit, Bertoux Brandy, is blended in California and made especially for mixing. “It’s a touch lighter than its European counterparts,” says Bell, crediting the Golden State’s vast grape varietals and climatic diversity. Order up a Bertoux-infused classic at Los Angeles’ drinking den Harvard & Stone, or take a note from Bell and craft an autumnal-inspired cocktail with nutmeg and allspice for a festive nightcap. G . K . bertouxbrandy.com

WH - Free Solo Left: SEED CO-FOUNDERS AND CO-CEOS ARA KATZ AND RAJA DHIR. Below: MALE DAILY SYNBIOTIC, $60.

GUT INSTINCT After making her mark on the world of online retail with the launch of startup shopping app Spring and e-commerce destination BeachMint, Ara Katz has set her sights on a new frontier: the human microbiome. Founded by Katz and expert Raja Dhir (with the help of a team of esteemed scientists and entrepreneurs), Venice-based Seed is challenging the growing probiotic industry with its genderspecific Daily Synbiotic supplements. Loaded with both probiotics (restores or maintains good bacteria) and prebiotics (promotes the growth of said bacteria), the science-driven formulations not only improve digestive, dermatological and cardiovascular health, but boost immune system function, too. PHOE BE DOHE N Y

Downtown Los Angeles

RISING SON Visvim founder Hiroki Nakamura showcases his traditional Japanese-meets-Americana designs in his first Los Angeles flagship. Dubbed Visvim Exposition, the new 3,000-square-foot space in the landmark Bradbury Building highlights Nakamura’s workwear, as well as his concept line, F.I.L. Indigo Camping Trailer, and Contrary Dept—a utility clothing-inspired brand created exclusively for L.A. “I am always inspired by older things, whether they are actual garments or cars, signs and buildings,” Nakamura says of the shop, which features a 1950s Airstream and antiques by woodworker and furniture maker George Nakashima. 304 S. Broadway, Ste. 218, L.A., 213-265-7901. K.T.L .T. visvim.tv CONTRARY DEPT OUTERWEAR, FROM $1,600, F.I.L. INDIGO CAMPING TRAILER BOOTS, FROM $1,180, AND OTHER OFFERINGS AT VISVIM EXPOSITION.

seed.com FALL/WINTER 2018

FALL/WINTER 2018


Paul Smith


Edited by

Alison Edmond

Style - Opener BLAME FRAME MILITARY COVERALL (seen here, right and above), $295. Top right: GRAPHIC TEE, $115.

CHRIS COLLS FOR FRAME

REBEL

REBEL

There’s something about Jordan Barrett. No wonder the guys at Frame jumped at the chance to translate the model’s insouciant, urban aesthetic into a unisex collaboration dubbed Blame Frame (a play on Barrett’s Instagram handle @iblamejordan), comprising fluorescent slippers, distressed jeans, printed tees and military-style coveralls. “Jordan was a friend before we began working together,” says Erik Torstensson, cofounder of the Los Angeles brand. “We have always been drawn to his free spirit and bold sense of style,” adds fellow co-founder Jens Grede. 8467 Melrose Pl., L.A., 310-464-2270; frame-store.com. • K.T.L .T.


C FOR MEN

Los Angeles

KIDS ARE ALRIGHT Studying at New York University hasn’t stopped Natasha Hunt Lee from designing Where Los Angeles with fellow Angeleno and University of Michigan student Tyler Makhani. Lee says the question driving them is, “What would we want to wear?” Their made-in-L.A. hoodies and fitted sweatpants “could go from the couch to dinner,” says Makhani. A portion of profits from sales of select pieces benefit Time’s Up. Jill Roberts, 920 Montana Ave., Santa Monica, 310-260-1966. K .T. L .T.

whereyouatbaby.com From left: WHERE LOS ANGELES REPOSE COLLECTION. THE LA TOUR T-SHIRT, $79.

TOM FORD UNDERWEAR LINE, $60-$350.

Beverly Hills

WILD CARD Valentino creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli tapped musicians Syd, Nas, A$AP Ferg and Keith Apa to name their animal alter egos, and wove their answers into his camoprint designs for fall. The pieces feature intricate microglass beading and embroidery—and are available in the new men’s section of the brand’s Rodeo Drive store from Nov. 14. Consider this street couture at its finest. 324 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-247-0103. A. E .

Style - Vuitton

From top: VALENTINO EMBROIDERED TRACK JACKET, $3,850. EMBROIDERED BELT BAG, $1,845.

IT’S A MAN’S WORLD Unparalleled in dressing dapper men, Tom Ford is equally focused on the details underneath his refined suits. For his underwear line, launching in November, the designer found inspiration in a fashion trend from the ’60s and ’70s: flesh-colored stockings. Encompassing boxers, briefs and trunks in cotton, silk and cotton stretch jersey, the collection includes novel touches such as zebra stripes and metallic sheens. 346 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-270-9440.

K.T.L .T. tomford.com

valentino.com LOUIS VUITTON EAU DE PARFUMS, 100 ML, PRICES UPON REQUEST.

SCENTS & SENSIBILITY Louis Vuitton has launched its first series of men’s fragrances with five new scents, including the grapefruitaccented freshness of L’Immensité and Orage’s woody essence, each presented in minimalist bottles envisioned by industrial designer Marc Newson. 233 Geary St., S.F., 415-391-6200. K .T. L .T.

louisvuitton.com

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FALL/WINTER 2018


Los Angeles

STYLE

TAILOR MADE As evident in the name of their 12-year-old brand, The Row co-founders Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen hold deep respect for Savile Row’s tradition of tailoring. In their premiere men’s collection, the centerpiece is a singlebreasted suit jacket, designed to be worn relaxed with straight-leg trousers with a long rise. The minimalist lineup also includes denim, tees, shirting, knitwear and coats. 8440 Melrose Pl., L.A., 310-853-1900. K.T.L .T.

VILEBREQUIN QUEEN LOGO T-SHIRT, $135.

therow.com

WHERE LOS ANGELES REPOSE COLLECTION: GALEN OAKES. WHERE LA TOUR TEE: COURTESY OF WHERE LOS ANGELES. TOM FORD UNDERWEAR: COURTESY OF TOM FORD. THE ROW (2): COURTESY OF THE ROW. EIDOS (2): COURTESY OF EIDOS.

THE ROW LIGHTWEIGHT BRITISH WOOL SUIT, $3,450. Right: LEATHER GOODS, PRICES UPON REQUEST.

SHARP OBJECTS Inspired by artists Carmen Herrera and Sol LeWitt, newly appointed Eidos creative director Simon Spurr balances tailoring and youthfulness in his inaugural collection for the company, a standalone brand from Italian menswear label Isaia. The range includes double-breasted suits and cashmere sweatshirts embroidered with “otium,” the Latin word synonymous with leisure. “I want to underscore the intellectuality of the brand and increase that out-ofthe-box thinking,” he says. Barneys New York, 9570 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, 310-276-4400. K.T. L.T.

BREAK FREE From left: EIDOS CHRISTO COAT, $1,495, ROLL NECK, $795, AND PANTS, $395. BALTHAZAR LAPEL SUIT, $1,650, HEATHERED SWEATER, $425, AND WRAP BELT, $223.

Vilebrequin’s new collaboration with legendary band Queen sees the rock act’s album artwork, posters and show passes splashed across the French brand’s swimsuits, T-shirts and water-resistant totes.

Style - Queem

9519 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, 310-205-9087.

vilebrequin.com TECHMERINO WASH & GO SUIT BY Z ZEGNA, $1,495.

eidosnapoli.com

ON THE GO

For the man who is both active and dapper, Z Zegna fuses forward-thinking functionality with classic tailoring in its Techmerino Wash & Go suit’s winter iteration. Pairing slim pants with a peak-lapel jacket featuring streamlined patch pockets in light gray mélange or houndstooth flannel, the ensemble dries quickly after a wash in warm water. 337 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-247-8827. K.T.L .T.

zegna.com 45


STYLE

C FOR MEN

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1. VERSACE FALL/WINTER 2018. 2. LOCAL AUTHORITY LA ANARCHY JACKET, $2,195. 3. DANIEL PATRICK TRACK PANTS, $300. 4. PRADA BELT BAG, $895. 5. JOHN VARVATOS BRASS CUFF, $298. 6. PALM ANGELS FLAME SNEAKERS, $561.

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JOIN THE

BAND

Trend Punk Are you a tartan-clad punk or more

3

troubadour in velvet? 1. BILLY LOS ANGELES WORK PANT, $330. 2. CANALI GREEN LEATHER BELT, $295. 3. HAIDER ACKERMANN FALL/WINTER 2018. 4. KITON CHELSEA BOOTS, $15,959. 5. DOLCE & GABBANA JACQUARD CLUTCH, $1,875. 6. FURRER JACOT SNAKEBONE RING, FROM $2,760.

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FASHION MARKET EDITOR: REBECCA RUSSELL. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.109.

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A woman’s best accessory is a well dressed man

Barcelino

San Francisco • San Mateo • Sausalito barcelino.com


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MIDNIGHT

5

HOUR

Deep blues stand the test of time 9

Trend - Watches 12

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1. BAUME CUSTOM TIMEPIECE MOONPHASE, $630. 2. ROLEX OYSTER PERPETUAL SUBMARINER, $13,400. 3. MONTBLANC STAR LEGACY MOONPHASE, $4,200. 4. WEISS LIMITED AMERICAN ISSUE FIELD WATCH, $1,995, AND CORDOVAN STRAP, $200. 5. VAN CLEEF & ARPELS MIDNIGHT PLANETARIUM, PRICE UPON REQUEST. 6. JAEGER-LECOULTRE REVERSO TRIBUTE SMALL SECONDS, $7,950. 7. SHINOLA LAKE MICHIGAN MONSTER DIVE WATCH, $1,250. 8. PANERAI LUMINOR AUTOMATIC TITANIO, $11,200. 9. VACHERON CONSTANTIN OVERSEAS DUAL TIME, $25,400. 10. IWC PORTUGIESER CHRONOGRAPH 150 YEARS EDITION, $7,150. 11. PIAGET POLO S, $11,200. 12. CARTIER SANTOS DE CARTIER, $17,900.

FALL/WINTER 2018

FASHION MARKET EDITOR: REBECCA RUSSELL. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.109.

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Vilbrequin

FondĂŠ Ă St Tropez en 1971 Beverly Hills - Two Rodeo Drive Santa Monica - Fairmont Miramar Hotel www.vilebrequin.com


High Camp

highcampsupply.com HIGHCAMPSUPPLY.COM


“IF YOU HAD TOLD ME WHEN I WAS 16 THAT I COULD CLIMB TREES FOR A LIVING, I WOULD HAVE BEEN THRILLED,” SAYS IDO YOSHIMOTO. “AND THAT THEN I COULD MAKE ART WITH THEM? EVEN BETTER.”

Edited by

Melissa Goldstein

Design - Opener

TRUNK

AUBRIE PICK

SHOW For woodworker Ido Yoshimoto, every fallen tree is a work of art in waiting FALL/WINTER 2018

51


DESIGN

On a remote, densely wooded spot along a ridge in Inverness, Ido Yoshimoto’s life has come full circle. The self-taught woodworker recalls a childhood spent running around the bay tree-studded land, the site of the late artist J.B. Blunk’s studio. “Since I was a kid, I was in and out of the studio, playing in the sawdust,” Yoshimoto says. His father, Rick, assisted the pioneering sculptor from 1978 until Blunk’s passing in 2002. Today, it’s where the 39-year-old Yoshimoto carries on a legacy deeply entwined with nature, transforming chunks of timber into one-of-a-kind furniture and artworks that embody an organic minimalism in the tradition of Donald Judd and Constantin Brancusi, for such design firms as Commune, Jamie Bush + Co. and Jay Jeffers. At the moment, he’s kitting out a private dining room for Oakland’s Ramen Shop, which previously enlisted him to create a wall installation, benches, tables and beams for its bar. Yoshimoto got his professional start as an arborist. He always knew that the lumber he handled on a daily basis—buckeye, bay, madrone, manzanita, pine, redwood, eucalyptus, acacia, cypress and elm—could be given new life, and about a decade ago, he decided to put it into practice. “I try to get the wood myself; I like the story in that,” he says. “The work, the process is inseparable from the environment: hiking in the woods and looking for material; four-wheeling around in the truck and salvaging logs.” “Made in Marin,” his most significant local show to date, runs through Oct. 31 at the College of Marin Fine Arts Gallery in Kentfield ((marin.edu). For this joint exhibition with fellow Inverness native Grayson

Design - Turn

FALL/WINTER 2018

AUBRIE PICK

Clockwise: THE ARTIST CRAFTS A BENCH FOR HIS MARIN SHOW. A SERIES OF MODULAR EUCALYPTUS DISCS. AN OLD-GROWTH REDWOOD STOOL. A SELECTION OF J.B. BLUNK’S TOOLS. YOSHIMOTO WORKING ON A STOOL BLOCK.


C FOR MEN

Kent, an artist who specializes in woodblock prints, Yoshimoto is displaying stools with geometric silhouettes, a 7-foot-high totemic sculpture, wall-mounted pieces and works on paper—about 15 creations in total. It follows an influential stint at Andrea Zittel’s A-Z lab near Joshua Tree, and a residency at The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation in Bethany, Conn. In addition to breaking out the chainsaw for various projects, Yoshimoto is putting his skills to use on his property adjacent to the Blunk site, updating a 600-square-foot cabin situated 100 yards from his studio. He resides in the shed-turned-dwelling, while his teenage daughter occupies an outbuilding, and they share a bathhouse that he constructed. Given that Blunk hand built his own house and studio, it seems especially fitting. “I witnessed my dad and J.B. making everything,” says Yoshimoto. “I absorbed a lot of that—applying creativity to every aspect of life.” idoyoshimoto.com • AN H -M I N H LE idoyoshimoto.com.

Clockwise from right: YOSHIMOTO CARRIES A SLICE OF OLD-GROWTH REDWOOD TO THE STUDIO. A CURVED REDWOOD-ANDEUCALYPTUS TABLE WITH EUCALYPTUS STOOLS. CUTTING INTO AN OLD-GROWTH REDWOOD ROOT TO EVALUATE THE USABLE MATERIAL. INSIDE THE STUDIO.

Design - Turn

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DESIGN

C FOR MEN

A NEW BREED OF

SUPER CAR

The latest (and future) head-turners prove blistering performance and top-tier luxury can be practical, too Clockwise from left: LAMBORGHINI URUS, FROM $200,000. MERCEDES-AMG GT 63 S COUPE, PRICING TBA. ROLLS-ROYCE CULLINAN, FROM $325,000. ASTON MARTIN DBX, PRICING TBA.

Lamborghini’s first SUV since the LM002 of the 1980s appropriates the bold design language, race-inspired interior and snarling exhaust note of its sports car siblings. Built on the same platform as the Audi Q7 and Bentley Bentayga, the Urus, with looks derived from the audacious Aventador and Huracán, exudes a character that’s distinctly Italian. Its 4.0-liter, twin-turbocharged V8 engine churns out 650 horsepower, has a zero-to-62 mph time of 3.6 seconds, and comes equipped with four-wheel steering and active torque vectoring for precise handling. lamborghini.com.

Designed and built by Mercedes-AMG, Mercedes-Benz’s high-performance arm, the new AMG GT 63 S four-door is the roomier version of the brand’s two-seater coupes and convertibles. The line-topping 63 S can rocket from zero to 60 mph in 3.1 seconds thanks to its hand-built AMG 4.0-liter V8 biturbo engine good for 630 horsepower and 664 foot-pounds of torque. When the car goes on sale in early 2019, a limited Edition One model will include an aerodynamic package, matte gray sport stripes and matte-finish 21-inch wheels. mercedes-amg.com.

Based on the DBX concept shown a few years ago in Geneva, Aston Martin will debut a new production crossover at the end of next year with space for four adults and a “generous” amount of luggage. While specs hadn’t been announced as of press time, some speculate the DBX could be powered by a Mercedesbuilt six-cylinder engine or Aston’s own V8. A company spokesperson confirms the production car will have five doors instead of the concept’s three, and a price tag commensurate with the current DB11. astonmartin.com.

Rolls-Royce calls its newest and tallest model not an SUV, but a “high-bodied vehicle.” Combining superior craftsmanship with off-road capability, the Cullinan— named after the largest diamond ever discovered—has a back seat that can be configured with a folding, threepassenger lounge seat or two individual reclining seats. Despite its rugged construction, the model—which is powered by a 563-horsepower, 6.75-liter V12—retains the smooth and near-silent ride for which the brand is known. rolls-roycemotorcars.com. • LAURA BURST EI N

Design - Cars

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FALL/WINTER 2018


Canali


DESIGN

C FOR MEN

HOME BOYS Situated in a historic firehouse in the Russian Hill neighborhood of San Francisco, curated showroom Batch brings together a revolving range of online brands in a shoppable space since launching last year. This fall, for the first time, it’s all about the modern, urban man. “We’re in the golden age of men’s products,” says CEO and founder Lindsay Meyer of the edit, entitled [Batch]elor, which will spotlight leather footwear brand Moral Code, sustainable fragrances from A. N. Other, and handmade furniture from Croft House through Oct. 27. Caffeine fixes are served up via Ratio Eight, and small-batch cocktails come courtesy of Improper Goods. The year’s holiday-themed final edit, which will debut the first week of November, will include DIY and handmade giftable items from a series of makers. 1648 Pacific Ave., S.F., 415-757-0376 415-757-0376. M EAGHAN TIER NAN visitbatch.com

BOARD GAME Yayoi Kusama’s Yellow Trees, 1994, and Dots Obsession, 2018, grace the Museum Art new range of Modern Art’s of skateboards—bringing a surreal pop aesthetic to the distinctly Californian pastime.

THE [BATCH]ELOR EDIT BY BATCH FEATURES A CROFT HOUSE MIRROR, $1,075, DINING TABLE, $5,250, AND DINING CHAIRS, $1,250 EACH.

SECRET INGREDIENT Jungmaven’s Robert Jungmann—the fashion designer behind Hemp 2020, a campaign to promote the positive environmental impact of hemp farming—expands his brand to the bedroom with luxe new king-size duvets and sheet sets, plus tie-dyed pillowcases. “Our mission is to supply our customers with sustainable everyday basics in cotton alternatives,” says Jungmann. “I’m always searching for ways to bring hemp to everybody.” M .G .

Design - Bits

store.moma.org JAMES BRAND ELKO KNIFE, $75, AND REXFORD UTILITY TOOL V3 (below), $165. BOTH FROM URBAN EDC SUPPLY.

SHARP EDGE

jungmaven.com

YAYOI KUSAMA RED DOTS SKATEBOARD, $200.

Founded in 2015 by former Wall Street trader Yong-Soo Chung, San Francisco-based Urban EDC Supply teams with artisans around the world on small-batch, handcrafted, heirloom-grade gear you can carry in your pocket on a daily basis—from rosewood business card holders to solid titanium flashlights. Their latest exclusive, available mid-October: the James Brand Elko knife, a collaboration with the Portland, Ore.-based company founded by former Nike designers. M.G .

urbanedcsupply.com JUNGMAVEN DUVET COVER, SHEET SET AND TIE-DYED PILLOWCASES, FROM $32.

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BATCH: BRAD KNIPSTEIN, @RBRADLEYPHOTO. YAYOI KUSAMA SKATEBOARD: COURTESY OF MOMA DESIGN STORE. JUNGMAVEN: ASHLEY TURNER. URBAN EDC SUPPLY: RUBEN CARABEO.

San Francisco


SMOOTH THE LINES. KEEP THE EXPERIENCES THAT MADE THEM. Only BOTOX® Cosmetic is FDA approved for adults to temporarily smooth the appearance of moderate to severe:

Frown lines | Crow’s feet | Forehead lines It’s a quick, 10-minute treatment by a doctor. Get started at BOTOXCOSMETIC.COM/MEN

Botox Actual patient. Results may vary. By prescription only.

There’s only one BOTOX® Cosmetic

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION BOTOX® Cosmetic may cause serious side effects that can be life threatening. Get medical help right away if you have any of these problems any time (hours to weeks) after injection of BOTOX® Cosmetic:

Tell your doctor about all your muscle or nerve conditions, such as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, myasthenia gravis, or Lambert-Eaton syndrome, as you may be at increased risk of serious side effects including difficulty swallowing and difficulty breathing from typical doses of BOTOX® Cosmetic.

Problems swallowing, speaking, or breathing, due to weakening of associated muscles, can be severe and result in loss of life. You are at the highest risk if these problems are pre-existing before injection. Swallowing problems may last for several months.

Spread of toxin effects. The effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas away from the injection site and cause serious symptoms including: loss of strength and all-over muscle weakness, double vision, blurred vision and drooping eyelids, hoarseness or change or loss of voice, trouble saying words clearly, loss of bladder control, trouble breathing, and trouble swallowing.

Te l l y o u r d o c t o r a b o u t a l l y o u r m e d i c a l c o n d i t i o n s , i n c l u d i n g: p lans to h a ve surger y; h ad surger y on your face; h a ve troub le raisin g yo u r e y e b ro w s; d ro o p i n g e y e l i d s; a ny o th e r a b n o r m a l f a c i a l c h a n g e; are p re gn ant o r p l an to b e co m e p re gn ant (i t is n ot k n ow n i f BOTOX ® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).

BOTOX® Cosmetic dosing units are not the same as, or comparable to, any other botulinum toxin product. There has not been a confirmed serious case of spread of toxin effect when BOTOX® Cosmetic has been used at the recommended dose to treat frown lines, crow’s feet lines, and/or forehead lines. BOTOX® Cosmetic may cause loss of strength or general muscle weakness, vision problems, or dizziness within hours to weeks of taking BOTOX® Cosmetic. If this happens, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities. Serious and/or immediate allergic reactions have been reported. They include: itching, rash, red itchy welts, wheezing, asthma symptoms, or dizziness or feeling faint. Get medical help right away if you are wheezing or have asthma symptoms, or if you become dizzy or faint. Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.

Te l l y o u r d o c t o r a b o u t a l l t h e m e d i c i n e s y o u t a k e , i n c l u d i n g p r e s c r i p t i o n a n d o v e r-t h e - c o u n te r m e d i c i n e s , v i ta m i n s , a n d h e r b a l supplements. Using BOTOX® Cosmetic with cer tain other medicines may cause serious side ef fec ts. Do not star t any new medicines until you have told your doctor that you have received BOTOX® Cosmetic in the past. Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc,® Dysport,® or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners. Other side effects of BOTOX® Cosmetic include: dry mouth; discomfort or pain at the injection site; tiredness; headache; neck pain; and eye problems: double vision, blurred vision, decreased eyesight, drooping eyelids and eyebrows, swelling of your eyelids and dry eyes. For more information refer to the Medication Guide or talk with your doctor. To report a side effect, please call Allergan at 1-800-678-1605. Please see Summary of Important Information about BOTOX® Cosmetic on next page. BCT114212 03/18 © 2018 Allergan All rights reserved. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


Summary of Information About BOTOX® Cosmetic (onabotulinumtoxinA)

What Should I Tell My Doctor Before Treatment?

What Is the Most Important Information I Should Know About BOTOX® Cosmetic? BOTOX® Cosmetic may cause serious side effects that can be life threatening. Get medical help right away if you have any of these problems any time (hours to weeks) after injection of BOTOX® Cosmetic: • Problems swallowing, speaking, or breathing, due to weakening of associated muscles, can be severe and result in loss of life. You are at the highest risk if these problems are pre-existing before injection. Swallowing problems may last for several months. • Spread of toxin effects. The effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas away from the injection site and cause serious symptoms including: loss of strength and all-over muscle weakness, double vision, blurred vision and drooping eyelids, hoarseness or change or loss of voice, trouble saying words clearly, loss of bladder control, trouble breathing, trouble swallowing. There has not been a confirmed serious case of spread of toxin effect when BOTOX® Cosmetic has been used at the recommended dose to treat frown lines, crow’s feet lines, and/or forehead lines.

Tell your doctor if you have or have had bleeding issues; plan to or have had surgery; have forehead muscle weakness such as trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; or any changes to your face. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby or if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk.

What Are Common Side Effects?

Other side effects, while less common, have been reported including dry mouth; tiredness; neck pain; double vision, blurred vision, decreased eyesight, dry eyes; and allergic reactions (itching, rash, red itchy welts, wheezing, asthma symptoms, dizziness or feeling faint). These are not all of the possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice if you experience any side effects after treatment with BOTOX® Cosmetic.

What Should I Tell My Doctor About Medicines and Vitamins I Take?

Using BOTOX® Cosmetic with certain medicines may cause serious side effects. Do not start any new medicines until you have told your doctor that you have received BOTOX® Cosmetic in the past. Tell your doctor if you have received an injection with another botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months, such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin®. Be sure your doctor knows which product you received.

Botox

BOTOX Cosmetic may cause loss of strength or general muscle weakness, vision problems, or dizziness within hours to weeks of taking BOTOX® Cosmetic. If this happens, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities. ®

Tell your doctor about all your muscle or nerve conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), myasthenia gravis, or Lambert-Eaton syndrome, as you may be at increased risk of serious side effects.

BOTOX® Cosmetic dosing units are not the same as, or comparable to, any other botulinum toxin product.

What is BOTOX® Cosmetic? BOTOX® Cosmetic is a prescription medicine for adults that is injected into muscles and used for a short period of time (temporary) to improve the look of moderate to severe: · frown lines between the eyebrows · crow’s feet lines · forehead lines Who Should Not Receive BOTOX® Cosmetic?

Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you are: allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic such as botulinum toxin type A and human serum albumin; had an allergic reaction to another botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); or have a skin infection at the planned injection site.

Tell your doctor about all prescription and over-thecounter medicines and supplements you take including: vitamins and herbal products; recent antibiotic injections; anticholinergics; muscle relaxants; allergy or cold medicine; sleep medicine; aspirin-like products; and blood thinners. Ask your doctor if you are not sure whether your medicine is listed above.

To Learn More

If you would like more information, talk to your doctor and/or go to BotoxCosmetic.com for full Product Information. You may report side effects to the FDA at www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Based on PI72714SU10 Rev. 10/2017 BCT70101_v2 1/18

© 2018 Allergan. All rights reserved. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


A CUT

Edited by

Lesley McKenzie

ABOVE

Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis distill the unpretentious philosophy of Bestia into their debut cookbook

Menu - Opener

NICOLE FRANZEN

BESTIA’S TAKE ON A GRILLED FENNEL-CRUSTED PORK CHOP.

When Bestia opened in Los Angeles’ Arts District in 2012, it not only single-handedly revitalized a neighborhood, but it created a nonstop fever pitch for its house-made cured meats, wood-fired pizzas and fresh pastas. In their first cookbook, Bestia: Italian Recipes Created in the Heart of L.A. (Ten Speed Press, $35), out late October, husband-

FALL/WINTER 2018

and-wife duo (and self-taught chefs) Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis share their brand of highly personal, unfussy, Italian-inflected cooking, with recipes for everything from condiments, such as paprika salsa verde, to their famous charcuterie and pizza dough, to a grilled fennel-crusted pork chop. • KAREN PAL M ER

59


THE SLICE IS RIGHT Five new pizza spots are anything but cheesy

California has always had a weird thing with pizza: We don’t necessarily have our own “style,” like New York or Chicago, but that doesn’t mean that West Coast pizzaiolos aren’t pulling perfectly blistered pies out of ovens up and down the coast. A hot new crop of pizza joints is firing up its ovens—including one NYC legend that recently made its Los Angeles debut. • K. P.

ROBERTA’S Best for: Igniting Insta-envy. Neighborhood: Culver City. Who’s behind it: The same team behind the beloved Brooklyn pizza joint. What they’re known for: Wood-fired Neapolitan-style pies and a knack for inspired vegetables and salads. What to eat: Look for New York staples such as the Normcore (mozzarella, tomato, garlic, basil and sea salt), as well as a few California-style pies like the honey-drizzled Bee Sting. What to drink: Anything from the cocktail menu featuring hand-pressed juices. Who’s the crowd: Media types who live and work nearby, as well as foodie pilgrims willing to make the trek (and endure the wait). Extra toppings: The brunch- and lunchtime-only cheeseburger, a sleeper hit in Brooklyn, has also made its way onto the West Coast menu. robertaspizza.com.

ROBERTA’S: COURTESY OF ROBERTA’S. LUPETTI PIZZERIA: RYAN GALL. DOPPIO ZERO: ALAN BLAUSTEIN. NOLITA HALL PIZZA: DIANA ROSE SCIACCA.

MENU

DOPPIO ZERO Best for: Pizza purists. Neighborhood: Hayes Valley in San Francisco. Who’s behind it: Italy natives Gianni Chiloiro and Angelo Sannino, the same team behind locations in Mountain View and Cupertino. What they’re known for: Doppio Zero is one of only 18 pizzerias in the state to serve Vera Pizza Napoletana, made with double-zero flour (hence the restaurant’s name). What to eat: The namesake Doppio Zero pie, topped with burrata cheese, prosciutto di Parma, arugula, shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano, and extravirgin olive oil. What to drink: The Vesuvio, a combination of Hedge Trimmer Gin, blueberry honey syrup, pineapple juice, fresh lime juice and prosecco. Who’s the crowd: Boutique shoppers during the day; locals and the pre-opera crowd at night. Extra toppings: In addition to its 68 seats inside, the pizzeria is planning NOLITA HALL to open outdoor seating Best for: Sports fans. Neighborhood: on Gough Street. San Diego’s Little Italy. Who’s behind dzpizzeria.com. it: Black Swan Hospitality, a venture from

Menu - Pizza

co-founders Douglas Hamm and Anthony Viveros. What they’re known for: Soaring ceilings, a beer hall-meets-sports bar vibe, and pizzas cooked at 900-plus degrees in a Forza Forni wood-burning oven. What to eat: The Salsiccia di Finocchio pie, topped with fennel sausage, cremini mushrooms, garlic sauce, pecorino and fresh oregano.

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LUPETTI’S PIZZERIA IN THE ARTS DISTRICT OF LOS ANGELES.


ROBERTA’S

LUPETTI PIZZERIA Best for: Date nights. Neighborhood: L.A.’s Arts District. Who’s behind it: No Name Bar’s Bryan Ling, as well as chef and Gjusta alum Adam Tomei (yes, he’s Marisa’s brother). What they’re known for: An open, modern design from Studio Collective, complete with custom Douglas fir benches and outdoor seating, as well as bar-style pies, chicken Parm and other East Coast specialties. What to eat: Either of the superlative cheese slices—the Regular (made with good ol’ shredded mozzarella) or the Margarita (made with fresh mozz). What to drink: A Moretti, the classic Italian lager. Who’s the crowd: DTLA hipsters. Extra toppings: In Sheep’s Clothing, a highly stylized, high-tech, Tokyo-style kissa (a hi-fi cocktail bar that spins good music) opens through a not-so-secret doorway in the foyer. Expect a café vibe with pour-over coffees, teas and pastries during the day, and a casual, cocktail scene at night. lupettipizzeria.com.

SUPERFINE PIZZA

LUPETTI PIZZERIA

SUPERFINE PIZZA Best for: On-the-go lunch. Neighborhood: L.A.’s Fashion District. Who’s behind it: Steve Samson, chef and owner of highly acclaimed Italian restaurants Sotto and Rossoblu. What they’re known for: Samson calls his pies “Los Angeles style,” which draw inspiration from both Naples and New York. What to eat: Any of the producedriven pies—a nod to the building’s history as a wholesale produce market—such as the Es-Ca-Role, topped with escarole, red onion, olives, chilies, mozzarella and smoked provolone. What to drink: An ice-cold Mexican Coke or Topo Chico mineral water. Who’s the crowd: Downtown’s lunchtime set. Extra toppings: Pull up a chair at the counters flanking the pizza window, or grab a spot at a table across the sunny courtyard. superfinepizza.com. What to drink: Simple but refined drinks such as the NPT (Nolita Prescription Tonic), made with lemon-, cucumber- and rosemary-infused gin and Fever Tree Mediterranean tonic. Who’s the crowd: Families early in the evening, shifting to a mix of locals, tourists and cocktail lovers after 8 p.m. Extra toppings: Did we mention there’s a shuffleboard court to work off your pizza, too? nolitahall.com.

Menu - Pizza DOPPIO ZERO

NOLITA HALL

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MENU

C FOR MEN

À LA

CART

Mixologist Dushan Zaric of Bar Alta breaks down his ultimate mobile cocktail station in line with Bar Alta’s elegant, sophisticated vibe. “I prefer my bars to have warm materials,” says Zaric, co-founder of New York City’s Employee’s Only, which recently debuted a bar in West Hollywood. Here, Zaric breaks down the components of his dream design and build project, which includes the essential tools and ingredients he needs to prepare the tightly edited drink list (Old-Fashioned whiskey cocktail, Manhattan, dry martini, classic daiquiri and Negroni), as well as how to re-create the perfect bar cart at home. 939 S. Figueroa St., L.A., 213-627-8971; hotelfigueroa.com. • J ESS I C A R I TZ

Master barman Dushan Zaric knows how to make Bar Alta a standout experience when it opens in December in the recently revamped historic Hotel Figueroa in Downtown Los Angeles. A key element? Creating the ultimate custom bar cart. What Zaric dubs “the Ferrari of bar carts” took over a year to design and build with local furniture company Cisco Home, which customized the art decoinspired piece created to make five classic cocktails tableside. He consulted with Studio Collective, the design firm responsible for the property’s makeover, so that the wood and brass finishes are

Menu - Bar Cart

1 2 “THE CART TOP ITSELF HAS A DECO-STYLE BRASS RAILING WHERE WE KEEP OUR BITTERS AND HOMEMADE INGREDIENTS,” HE NOTES. THE SELECTION INCLUDES ORANGE, GRAPEFRUIT, ANGOSTURA AND PERUVIAN BITTERS. THE SURFACE ALSO FEATURES A DRAIN AND BAMBOO CUTTING BOARD, WITH A BUCKET FOR ICE HIDDEN UNDERNEATH.

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“THERE’S NOTHING BETTER, IN MY EXPERIENCE, THAN ANGOSTURA BITTERS FOR CLASSIC COCKTAILS,” HE SAYS.

THE SPIRITS FOR BAR ALTA’S COCKTAIL MENU OF FIVE CLASSICS INCLUDES FORD’S GIN (PICTURED), AS WELL AS FOUR ROSES BOURBON SINGLE BARREL, CAÑA BRAVA RUM AND WILD TURKEY 101.

4 ZARIC’S BAR CART INCLUDES “CUSTOM INDENTATIONS WHERE WE CAN SECURE SHAKERS” AND OTHER TOOLS BY HIS FAVORITE BRAND, URBAN BAR, AS WELL AS VINTAGE COCKTAIL SHAKERS THAT WERE GIFTS. LUIGI BORMIOLI IS ZARIC’S PREFERRED GLASSWARE.

WONHO FRANK LEE

GARNISHES, SUCH AS ORCHID BLOOMS AND BERRIES, ADD VISUAL APPEAL, EVEN IF THEY’RE NOT NECESSARY FOR SELECT COCKTAILS. GO FOR “SIMPLE BEAUTY,” ZARIC ADVISES.

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TURLINGTON BURNS: PAMELA HANSON. RATAJKOWSKI: BEAU GREALY. HAMMER: KURT ISWARIENKO. HUNTINGTON-WHITELEY: MICHELANGELO DI BATTISTA.

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Pacific Standard Style Gear up for the season

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Queen Tour men’s swim trunk, $290. Vilebrequin, 9519 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, 310-205-9087; vilebrequin.com.

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Lamb Aqua suede jacket in burgundy, $4,225. Isaia, 140 Maiden Ln., S.F., 415-500-4930; isaia.it.

BOSS

Novan5/Ben2 suit in navy, $795. Boss, 8522 Beverly Blvd., Ste. 681, L.A., 310-657-0011; hugoboss.com.

PANERAI

Luminor Submersible 1950 3 Days Automatic Acciaio 42 mm, $8,700. Panerai Boutiques, 3333 Bristol St., Ste. 2861, Costa Mesa, 714-481-7188; 441 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-228-1515; panerai.com.

SANDRO

CANALI

Dark gray suede ankle boot with rubber sole, $650. Canali, 260 N. Rodeo Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-270-4200; canali.com.

Suede jacket, $1,080. Sandro, 310 N. Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, 310-281-0083; sandro-paris.com.

PROMOTION


Edited by

Lesley McKenzie

GOLD-DIGGERS HOTEL ROOMS COME EQUIPPED WITH A RECORD PLAYER AND VINYL CURATED BY AQUARIUM DRUNKARD.

Travel - Opener

STRIKING IT

LAETITIA WAJNAPEL

RICH

A former strip club sets the stage for Gold-Diggers, a three-in-one boutique hotel, bar and recording studio in East Hollywood A one-time bikini bar is the unlikely site of Gold-Diggers, a new craft cocktail lounge, boutique hotel and recording studio from Dave Neupert, owner of the popular Los Angeles bars La Cita and Short Stop. As it turns out, it was the building’s creative,

FALL/WINTER 2018

slightly seedy past that attracted Neupert when he first laid eyes on the East Hollywood building in 2015. Formerly an inn above a tavern in the 1920s, the property’s 6,000-square-foot back annex was once the soundstage for director Ed Wood, and later a rehearsal 65


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space rumored to have been used by The Doors. Now a single campus with the motto “Drink. Sleep. Record,” it’s ready to rock again, thanks to a design overhaul by Tiffany Howell of Silver Lake’s Night Palm and David Wick of Wick Architecture and Design. The bar, opened this past summer, has been made over with chevron wood paneling, gold deco lighting and marble tables. Gold-Diggers Hotel debuted in September with 11 guest rooms taking cues from “places where creative, like-minded people came together, like The Chelsea Hotel,” says Howell. “Music inspired everything.” Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe are the muses for Room 5’s black-and-white palette. And Room 11’s credenza bar, tiger pillows and angular furniture were inspired by an ’80s Grace Jones album cover. The original brick walls and steel-and-wood-frame windows are

From above left: THE 11 ROOMS WERE DESIGNED TO FEEL MORE LIKE APARTMENTS THAN A HOTEL. VIEW OF LOS ANGELES FROM THE ROOFTOP. THE NEW GOLDDIGGERS BAR ALSO ACTS AS THE HOTEL LOBBY FOR GUEST CHECK-IN.

softened with lush velvet furniture, vintage accents, and custom beds dressed in Parachute linen bedding. The expressive art on the walls is by L.A. artist Kristi Head and Parquet Courts’ singer Andrew Savage, the latter of whom Neupert commissioned to create large-scale pieces that capture film noir voyeurism. Creature comforts include Odd Bird bathrobes and in-room libraries of curated music, art and books. Bespoke playlists, created by music blogger Justin Gage of Aquarium Drunkard, are pressed onto vinyl and placed on guests’ pillows. Already creating buzz in the music industry, the recording studio is helmed by veteran Dave Trumfio who has worked with Cat Power and Sia. So guests should be prepared to rub shoulders with rock stars. Rooms from $150. 5632 Santa Monica Blvd., L.A., 323-610-6972; gold-diggers.com. • KERST I N C ZARRA

Travel - Turn

THE HAVEN BY ORU KAYAK, FROM $1,899, IS AVAILABLE FOR PREORDER ON INDIEGOGO.COM.

TWOFOLD San Francisco-based Oru Kayak brings twice the fun with Haven, an origamiinspired tandem kayak weighing 40 pounds—easily assembled and ready for the water in 10 minutes.

SURF AND TURF The pair of experiences dubbed Taste of Oahu, now available at Four Seasons Resort Oahu at Ko Olina, ensures you’ll have fun not only eating your meal, but sourcing it, too. Oahu by Land (from $2,500 for two people) takes participants to places such as the bucolic and responsible Kahumana Organic Farm and Ko Hana Rum distillery with executive chef Richard Polhemus. And Oahu by Sea (from $3,500 for four people) is an early morning fishing expedition on a luxury Cabo 44 HTX where you’ll reel in some big game: ahi tuna, blue marlin or longtail red snapper. Then it’s time to relax, because dinner, a four-course, line-to-table feast featuring your fresh catch, is prepared by the real experts, chefs Michael Mina or Garrick Mendoza. KAT HRYN R OMEYN

fourseasons.com/oahu CHEF MARTIN KNAUBERT, DIRECTOR OF FOOD AND BEVERAGE FOR FOUR SEASONS RESORT OAHU AT KO OLINA, FIRING UP THE GRILL FOR DINNER.

orukayak.com

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GOLD-DIGGERS (3): LAETITIA WAJNAPEL. OAHU BY THE SEA: FOUR SEASONS RESORT OAHU AT KO OLINA.

C FOR MEN


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www. fur rer-j acot .com

TRUE & UNIQUE

Shreve


Writte n by

Hadley Meares Photography by

Rainer Hosch

FROGTOWN’S BIG LEAP Pre-Well - Frogtown

How did a forgotten backwater on the L.A. River become the most desirable neighborhood on the east side? 68

Heading south on the 5 freeway, you could easily miss the clutch of low-rise industrial buildings and 1930s bungalows on the Los Angeles River, sandwiched between Silver Lake and Glassell Park, collectively known as Frogtown. Look a little closer and you’ll find a hip oasis where collectible artists and creative innovators live and work in what is becoming the east side’s newest most desirable neighborhood. “There is this creative energy buzzing around the place, like what’s going to happen next?” says Richard Latronica, co-owner of Spoke Bicycle Cafe, one of Frogtown’s main social hubs. “That is enticing to artists, forward thinkers, and people trying to be part of something new.” You’ve probably heard Frogtown

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Clockwise from above: A VIEW OF FROGTOWN FROM THE RESTAURANTCUM-CONCERT VENUE ZEBULON. THE ENTRANCE TO LOCAL HOT SPOT SPOKE BICYCLE CAFE, A BIKE SHOP AND EATERY. GRAFFITI DEPICTING THE NEIGHBORHOOD’S NAMESAKE AMPHIBIAN. OUTSIDE ZEBULON. Opposite, from top left: A BRONZE FROG DETAIL FROM A CEILING INSTALLATION BY ARTIST DAVID WISEMAN. SPOKE BICYCLE CAFE’S EXTERIOR.

Pre-Well - Frogtown

dropped into conversation sometime in the last few years. The street artist-turned-establishment favorite Shepard Fairey, made famous by his iconic Hope poster featuring then-presidential candidate Barack Obama, has his studio here; Brad Pitt has paid frequent visits to his friend (and some say de facto art teacher) the sculptor Thomas Houseago, who lives and works in the area; two years ago in the neighborhood, Esdras Ochoa, the chef whom the Los Angeles Times calls “The Taco Missionary,” opened Salazar (now helmed by chef Jonathan Aviles), a restaurant so hot it still hasn’t bothered to get a phone line installed. “Because Frogtown is hemmed in on both sides, it lends itself to being its own creative cloister,” says Compass real estate agent Johnny Johnston, who has sold homes in the city’s most desirable areas, from Silver Lake to Mulholland Drive. “It gets to exist in a

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part of town that places high value and appreciation on art—while still being able to be its own distinct voice. It is an island in the middle of the city.” No wonder it has attracted burgeoning brands, such as the accessories company Clare V., to set up their headquarters there. But all the hype is underpinned by a curious culture within. The residents of Frogtown have a work ethic aligned with the millennial mantra of “work less, work better.” Life is slower here than in the nearby arts and fashion districts of Downtown L.A., and a million miles from the hustle and bustle of the congested metropolis that surrounds it. Some residents even liken it to L.A.’s answer to Mayberry, the fabled, near-perfect town in The Andy Griffith Show—albeit a scruffier, more down-at-the-heels version. “They say that less stress can lead to greater creativity,” says Jesse Peterson, a clean-cut musician with a winning smile. In 2017, Peterson and his wife, singer-songwriter and visual artist Mia Doi Todd, co-opened the restaurant-cum-musical venue Zebulon in partnership with brothers Jef and Joce Soubiran, who owned the previous incarnation of the hot spot in Brooklyn. With its hangarlike interior, Zebulon fits right in with the neighborhood. It has welcomed musicians as diverse as punk sax player James Chance, jazz legend Roscoe Mitchell and psychedelic folk singer Linda Perhacs. “Frogtown attracts interesting people who aren’t afraid to take risks,” says Latronica, who with his partner, Laurie Winston, opened Spoke Bicycle Cafe in spring 2015, which is now one of the cultural centers of the neighborhood, servicing everyone from freelancers on laptops to neighborhood families to Lycra-clad cyclists in need of a repair job. Latronica

“Frogtown attracts interesting people who aren’t afraid to take risks.” —R I CHAR D LATR ON I CA

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Clockwise from top left: THE CROWD INSIDE ZEBULON. AN ODE TO THE LATE AFROBEAT PIONEER FELA KUTI INSIDE THE VENUE. ZEBULON’S FULL BAR. THE ESTABLISHMENT IS ADJACENT TO ALTAMIRANO RECORDS ON FLETCHER DRIVE.

and Winston live up the river in Atwater Village, where they moved eight years ago from the Midwest and New England, respectively. Situated along the Los Angeles River, Spoke is a brightly painted, partly open-air space that serves some of the best coffee in the area. It also hosts multiple events every week, including live music, movie screenings, trivia nights, comedy shows and even tie-dye workshops. “People approach us with ideas for events they want to have all the time—we are a very communityoriented business,” says Winston. Witnessing this evolution with delight is artist Michael Todd, Mia’s father, an octogenarian with a youthful spirit who moved his studio and family to an old flooring factory on the river over 30 years ago. “As the factories closed, the creators arrived, transforming formally industrial spaces…because they need the space,” Michael explains. “So, I was the first.” Over the years, Michael has been joined by many prominent artists and architects, including multimedia artist Tanya Aguiñiga, designer and architect Eddy Sykes, and his wife, landscape architect and professor Astrid Sykes. Also, small businesses, such

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Clockwise: LAURIE WINSTON AND RICHARD LATRONICA. A MURAL BY L.A. ARTIST MIKOLAJ WYSZYNSKI GREETS GUESTS AT SPOKE BICYCLE CAFE. INSIDE THE BIKE SHOP. A VIEW OF FROGTOWN.

Pre-Well - Frogtown as the Lucas hair salon run by Lisa Mayer, to which customers will travel the breadth of the city to get to, have made Frogtown home base. This influx of creators has led to significant price increases for studios. “If you want a warehouse space

in Frogtown, you’re going to pay $5 million,” Johnston says. “The days of ‘cheap’ real estate in Frogtown, in that iteration, [have] passed.” “Prices have appreciated pretty quickly,” says commercial real estate broker Carle Pierose of Industry

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“The revitalization of the L.A. River has been the driving force that has transformed Pre-Well - Frogtown Frogtown.” —J OH N NY J OH N STON

Partners. “Some of the better Frogtown properties have exceeded $400 and even $500 per improved square foot when sold vacant to owner/users. Rents have also increased substantially. Both reflect healthy interest, but what I love most is it’s generally really cool companies and people driving that.” Since 2006, the neighborhood has celebrated a biennial Frogtown Artwalk, which spotlights its established and up-and-coming artists.Frogtown’s artistic explosion mimics that of Los Angeles as a whole, whose prominence on the global art map continues to grow with the arrival of the Frieze Los Angeles contemporary art fair at Paramount Pictures Studios in February 2019. One of the largest artistic centers in this enclave will be the Wiseman Studio, a 30,000-square-foot

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From top: WISEMAN IN HIS GLASSELL PARK STUDIO. (HIS 30,000-SQUAREFOOT FROGTOWN SHOWROOM WILL DEBUT EARLY NEXT YEAR.) A DETAIL OF THE ARTIST’S BRONZEAND-TERRAZZO JALI TABLE.

former factory complex turned artist’s studio and gallery set to open in early 2019. The multiuse compound is a collaboration between designer and mediagenic artist David Wiseman, known for his large-scale sculptural objects and ornate, natureinspired installations, and his brother, Ari, former deputy director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation. The industrial property is being sleekly transformed by Ted Trussell Porter of New York-based Ted Porter Architecture. “It seems like all the puzzle pieces are set to create this really dynamic community,” says Wiseman. “You don’t see evidence of a huge metropolitan city. You see hills and this large undeveloped tract of land on the other side of the river. It’s just acres and acres of fields and, of course, the river itself. It’s this great combination of industry, nature and just mellow neighborhood.” The L.A. River, and the paved path that follows it, is cited again and again by residents as one of the neighborhood’s biggest draws, highlighting the way gentrification often starts with the cleaning up of public spaces—as was the case with the Venice Canals and the warehouses of the Arts District.

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C FOR MEN

“The revitalization of the L.A. River has been the driving force that has transformed Frogtown,” Johnston confirms. “A tract of homes and warehouses that was once forgotten has been brought to the fore as the river has changed and the surrounding neighborhoods have gotten more expensive.” The river and nature that surrounds Frogtown has also attracted the interest of young environmentalists. Ten-year resident Arlan Jason Wood and his wife, Emily Gleicher, are the founders of Farm LA, a nonprofit organization dedicated to rescuing underutilized land in Los Angeles for urban farming. They began in Frogtown over three years ago and have helped transform a quarter-acre of sidewalks into community vegetable gardens. “We implemented almost a dozen sidewalk minifarms with our volunteers,” Gleicher says. “The water to keep them growing was donated by the home or business in front.”

“One 73-year resident of Frogtown was so pleased with what we’re doing that he donated his vacant plot in Frogtown to Farm LA,” adds Gleicher. “So, we now have our first full-size urban farm where we grow lima beans and donate them to organizations working with lower-income communities and families.” Lima beans also appear along the sidewalks and are the perfect crop, according to Gleicher, as they have protective shells and they grow on vines around willow frames— so they are out of reach from wayward feet and pets. Part and parcel with a neighborhood’s gentrification is the reality that longtime residents who can no longer afford the rents are eventually pushed out. “Five years ago, you could get a bungalow for around $400,000, and now you’ll be paying $800,000 to $900,000,” Johnston says. “Last year, a meditation center came on the market for $600,000—and every young artist who had visions of opening a commune pounced on it. It had 50 offers and sold for over $900,000.” For now, the sense of community is strong and a main selling point. “People bring us cookies during the holidays, send us postcards on vacations, pass down baby clothes,” says Jacqueline Goodman, the ebullient blonde owner of The Left Bank, a charming vintage and resale boutique that opened six years ago in Goodman’s grandfather’s old tool shop. “My favorite thing about Frogtown is probably our postal gal, Carmen, who has become a friend of mine. She works so hard in polyester in 100-degree L.A. summers. She’s the best. She’s what Frogtown is.” Real estate agent Johnston agrees. “It’s a perfect snapshot of a moment in L.A.’s history. A time when work and life were side by side—and you would walk to the factory where you worked,” he says. “Maybe the rebirth of Frogtown will bring that back in a city defined by its commute.” Whether it’s a blueprint for the future or just a pipedream for the privileged few, the Frogtown model isn’t going to solve the housing crisis. But as L.A.’s population grows eastward, it’s good to know there’s another desirable, under-the-radar option. Of course, it’s unlikely to stay that way for long. •

Pre-Well - Frogtown Clockwise from top left: AN EXTERIOR SHOT OF SALAZAR RESTAURANT. LUCAS SALON OWNER LISA MAYER. INSIDE THE HAIR STUDIO.

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SCOOTER WARS

The next great transport revolution is happening right on your doorstep. But who will come out on top in this twowheel race for global dominance?

Electric scooters, suddenly, are everywhere. For the believers, they represent an elegant and obvious solution to California’s smog and gridlock. Others see them as a dangerous nuisance foisted upon the public, with two companies locked in an all-out war for your $1 plus 15 cents-per-minute fares. In reality, at least a dozen companies have cropped up in the last 12 months, but the mayhem can largely be traced to two lavishly funded startups: archrivals Bird in Venice and Lime in San Francisco. Bird was set up by a former executive from Lyft and Uber and has pulled in more than $400 million in backing from the cream of Silicon Valley venture capitalists. Lime nabbed $335 million this summer from a group of investors, including Google and Uber, pushing its cash pile to nearly $470 million. Keep in mind, in August 2017, there wasn’t a single electric scooter for rent on the streets. More than 20 cities, from San Diego to Lake Tahoe, have been taken over by battalions of the silent two-wheelers. The results have been dramatic. Electric scooter rental companies may aim to convert urban commuters to a more convenient and efficient mode of transport, but emergency rooms have reported spikes in scooter-related injuries ranging from chipped teeth to broken arms and, this past September, its first fatality. (In Dallas, a 24-year-old man was killed while riding a scooter. It was the industry’s first death, and has raised tricky liability questions that could stunt the companies’ growth ambitions.) City councils are scrambling to police how they are used, where they can be left, and who is responsible should something go wrong. Some cities, such as Beverly Hills, have simply banned them outright. Others, including Santa Monica, have awarded retrospective licenses to

Writte n by

Bradley Spewak Illustrated by

Paulius Kolodzeiskis

the two biggest players. High-priced lobbyists, meanwhile, have been drafted by the new industry, applying pressure to keep regulations light and the number of scooters on the streets climbing from the thousands to, eventually, the millions. The land grab broke out quickly. San Francisco, ground zero of the state’s tech industry, was one of the first places both Bird and Lime went head-to-head. And it wasn’t just them. Smaller rivals, such as Spin, also rushed in. Virtually overnight, thousands of scooters materialized on the streets. They proved immediately popular—and unpopular, too. Nearly 1,900 complaints about tripping pedestrians, inebriated riders and cluttered sidewalks rolled in over just a sixweek period from around mid-April to the end of May. Caen Contee, one of Lime’s founding team members, said it was not to blame for the chaotic rollout. “If you look at the meeting notes, you’ll see that we were working with support from city stakeholders. Others did not,” he says. “Unfortunately, when there are bad actors, especially in an industry that’s early on, they often get lumped together.” San Francisco, however, did not take kindly to either Bird or Lime: Both were banned in August from operating in the city for a year—as were eight other companies—after scoring poorly on 12 different operating criteria, such as safety and labor practices. Instead, San Francisco handed licenses to two smaller rivals, Skip and Scoot, to run a one-year pilot program. So, who started all this? A refugee from the ride-hailing war between Uber and Lyft. After a stint as Lyft’s chief operating officer, Travis VanderZanden, 39, worked hand in glove for more than two years with Travis Kalanick, Uber’s former chief

Pre-Well - Scooter Wars

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Pre-Well - Scooter Wars


executive and resident enfant terrible. The latter led the transport-disrupting app to extraordinary heights before he was unceremoniously ousted last year by his board of directors due to a combination of the “toxic” work culture he fostered and the bare-knuckle, grow-at-all-costs approach that saw Uber clash with officials around the world and shirk regulations amid its bitter war for market share with sworn rival Lyft. VanderZanden, as vice president of global driver growth, was at the controls of the Uber machine, and took a few pages from its playbook for his own startup, Bird, when he left the car-hailing colossus in 2016. After a few months, VanderZanden, the son of a public bus driver, came up with what he considered to be “the best way to get people out of cars” and reduce congestion: scooters. (The irony is not lost on critics that the very congestion he is seeking to ameliorate has been made worse by the ride-sharing revolution he stoked.) VanderZanden released the first 1,000 “Birds,” which were repurposed electric scooters from China (meant as personal recreational toys), on the streets of Santa Monica. That was in September 2017. Only after he had released them “into the wild” did VanderZanden get in touch with the mayor via LinkedIn message to talk about how his fabulous idea would solve the city’s problems. Mayor Ted Winterer reportedly responded, “If you’re talking about those scooters that are out there already, there are some legal issues we have to discuss.” Despite the mayor’s annoyance, a lot of people liked them. VanderZanden showed the usage numbers to investors, and the feeding frenzy began. In February, Bird raised $15 million in its first round of venture

co-founder Brad Bao in Silicon Valley’s San Mateo (later moving its headquarters to San Francisco). His focus, initially, was on dockless bicycles, which Chinese factories were churning out by the millions. However, as it became clear that scooters, both economically and culturally, resonated more, Lime (originally the company was called LimeBike) switched its focus. In July, it raised $335 million from the group of backers led by Google and Uber. The deal valued the company, 17 months after its founding, at $1.1 billion. In what could be interpreted as a middle-finger-shaped reprisal to VanderZanden, Uber also agreed to integrate scooter and bicycle rides into its ride-hailing app: Lime has bikes, scooters or both in more than 80 American cities, 25 college campuses and four European countries. The two sides, while in the midst of a battle for market share, are united in their ultimate goal: to have California so chock-full of machines that you will simply walk out your door and happen upon one. If that vision comes to fruition, the need for short cab rides—or even trips with your own car—would be obviated, as would the bike-sharing programs that require expensive docking stations sprinkled throughout the cities where they operate. Outside California, the breakneck expansion has seen scooters pop up in dozens of cities across the country, as well as in European capitals including Madrid, Berlin and Zurich. Executives speak with an only-in-California zealotry about how pay-by-the-minute electric scooters will soon take their place alongside humanity’s other great feats of ingenuity, like the harnessing of fire or the invention of the internal combustion engine. “In 100 years, people will look back at this innovation, these electric scooters, and see them to be as profound as the invention of the automobile,” says Saar Gur, partner at CRV, a venture capital firm that has backed Bird. “There could be an Apple-like company that builds the hardware for this last mile.” Continued on p.108

Pre-Well - Scooter Wars

Outside California, the breakneck expansion has seen scooters pop up in dozens of cities across the country. backing. The next month it brought in $100 million, then in June, $300 million from a round led by Sequoia Capital, the legendary venture firm known for backing Apple, Google and PayPal. Today, Bird is worth an astonishing $2 billion and is in more than 100 cities in America, plus Paris and Tel Aviv. The plan for global domination is aggressive, as you might expect from a man who made his name helping to scale Uber. VanderZanden plans to open in more cities before the end of the year. His most well-wheeled competitor is Lime. Toby Sun, a graduate of University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, set up the company last year with

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FALL/WINTER 2018


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GUCCI JACKET, $23,000, T-SHIRT, $480, PANTS, $980, AND LOAFERS, $950. NECKLACE, JARED LETO’S OWN. PHOTOGRAPHY: GAVIN BOND. CREATIVE AND FASHION DIRECTION: ALISON EDMOND. HAIR: DAVID COX AT ART DEPARTMENT USING KEVIN MURPHY. GROOMING: JAMIE TAYLOR AT THE WALL GROUP. FASHION ASSISTANT: MOLLY DOWNING. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.109.

A DREAM HOUSE IN THE HILLS

Well Opener

INSIDE THE MIND OF JARED LETO

INTRODUCING THE BROSNAN BROTHERS


“YOU FEEL MOST ALIVE WHEN YOU’RE ON THE EDGE” Jared Leto tells Stephanie Rafanelli why taking risks— whether he’s performing in front of 20,000 people or hanging off a cliff in Yosemite— is his raison d’être

Feature - Jared

Ph otography by

Gavin B ond Creative and fashion direction by

Alison Edmond

If Laurel Canyon’s Lookout Mountain could talk, it might betray all sorts of secrets: tales of LSD-popping and bed-swapping, Satanic cult meetings, the truth behind conspiracy theories and even military intelligence. It is a neighborhood rife with X’s on the maps of curiosity hunters. And, in a clandestine location behind metal gates, lies one such example: a former classified Air Force compound built during World War II that later became a rehab clinic. Inside one of its sparsely furnished, hospital-like rooms, the property’s owner sits on a sofa—a Jesus-meets-Ken doll in a pink skater-style T-shirt, fuchsia patterned sweatpants and stripy socks. The bearer of all this Gucci is the enigma that is Jared Leto. The bareness of the surroundings may seem counter to his sartorial maximalism, but, he says calmly, “I’ve always loved minimal.” He adds, “I have 50 rooms here and I guarantee that 46 of them are empty.” In fact, six months ago it took him at least half a day to discover he had an uninvited roommate who had jumped the compound’s fence. “My assistant showed up and said, ‘Do you have a guest in the guest bedroom? Because there’s someone sleeping in there.’”


Feature - Jared

DOLCE & GABBANA JACKET, $2,595, AND PANTS, $1,295. GUCCI BEANIE, $310. CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN SNEAKERS, $1,195.


Last night, at The Forum, on the Los Angeles leg of his band Thirty Seconds to Mars’ “Monolith Tour” promoting their fifth studio album, America, Leto whooped and sprinted in circles onstage in a gold sequined ’70s-style suit and a technicolor dream coat, leading his fans in a mass sing-along. Today, he is as placid and composed as a spiritual guru, with a biblical beard, a man bun and alarmingly clear-blue eyes. You might think Alessandro Michele designed the blue suit of Leto’s Baroque Christ look at this year’s Met Gala to match the aforementioned gaze—in recent years, Leto has become the Gucci designer’s friend and muse, a veritable ’70s rock dandy peacock. He insists his outfit today is “a happy accident” and that his gray clogs are “probably from Kmart.” “As far as my fashion choices go,” Leto adds, “I don’t give a f---!” The haute fashion muse, 46-year-old dedicated rock star and award-winning video and documentary director is also, of course, a part-time method actor known for extreme acts of self-remolding. Most of his co-stars have never “met” him because he never breaks character on set. In addition to all of that, he’s a futurist, a shrewd tech investor, an early believer in the immersive digital age. He’s also a canny marketer—in 2013, he sent his band’s single “Up in the Air” aboard SpaceX’s Dragon capsule to the International Space Station. Currently he’s editing a documentary, A Day in the Life of America, out of footage filmed on a single day by 92 crews in all 50 states, plus Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico, and home footage from 10,000 invited fan submissions. So many busy Jared Letos, all coexisting in one prolific man. He seems to enjoy the shroud of mystery surrounding him. Not one to explain himself or lose control in an interview, he is polite and obliging, alternately earnest and high-minded—“We’re just a speck of dust floating in the small distant corner of the universe”—and occasionally drawn into playful provocation. When I joke that he has discovered the secret to immortality and that surely his baby-skin complexion cannot be the product of veganism alone, he grins and shoots back, “I do have a secret. I told Alessandro [Michele].” Referring to the red liquid he was drinking on stage last night, he says, “Maybe it was blood.” The album artwork for America, which entered the Billboard charts at No. 2 when it was released in April, is equally provocative. Credited to Leto, who worked in collaboration with art director Willo Perron, it comes in 10 different versions, each emblazoned with typography representing snapshots of American contemporary culture—listing the most profitable prescription drugs, for example, or the most highly paid YouTubers. Another lists sexual positions: Cowgirl, Doggy, Face, 69, Scissors, the Crab. “You have an entire generation of people [who] are growing up with access to pornography. That’s going to change things, because we are all very visual animals,

right? We learn so much from what we see and how we see other people behaving,” he explains. “I think because we now have these fleeting relationships via our social graphs, in 10 or 20 years it will be less common for people to be in relationships, as we think of intimate relationships today.” ***** I last met Leto in Helsinki at a Thirty Seconds to Mars gig a few days after he won the award for best supporting actor at the 2014 Academy Awards for playing Rayon, the transgender drug addict with AIDS in Dallas Buyers Club (2013), his first film since the 2009 drama Mr. Nobody. While most actors would have capitalized on this win—chasing more Oscars and maybe settling down in a nice house in Bel-Air— Leto went on touring with his bandmate, his older brother, Shannon, and didn’t make another feature film for three years. In 2011, Thirty Seconds to Mars set a Guinness World Record for most live shows during a single album cycle, with 309 concerts during its “Into the Wild” tour, about which Leto made a documentary that premiered in 2014. I ask him now, what does he get from playing all those concerts? “There are chemicals released [in the brain] when people sing together that are very similar to the chemicals that are released when people are in love. And it creates a feeling of well-being, bonding, euphoria,” Leto explains. Does he feel like he’s in love, too? “Absolutely. Not every night. But the beautiful thing about making music is that you always get another chance.” He says touring is now more or less a way of life. This is his first day at home in three months, and he confesses that he wasn’t ready to come back. Does he get restless here? “When I’m back, I end up not leaving the house, so it gets pretty isolating.” After his big break as the beautiful stoner Jordan Catalano in the 1994 ABC teen drama My So-Called Life, he eschewed all pretty-boy leads. Like Angel Face, his character in Fight Club (1999), who is liberated from his handsomeness when his face is beaten to a pulp, Leto took on only self-punishing roles, characters who were in some way physically or spiritually disfigured. He reportedly lived on the streets of New York with junkies to play the heroin addict in Requiem for a Dream in 2000. He speed-gained 67 pounds to play John Lennon’s assassin, Mark David Chapman, in Chapter 27 (2007), giving himself gout and confining himself to a wheelchair. And six years later, to play Rayon, he dropped about 40 pounds so quickly that it endangered his health. “I have very strong

Feature - Jared

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“The beautiful thing about making music is that you always get another chance.”


GUCCI JACKET, $3,980, SHIRT, $1,380, AND PANTS, $2,280. NECKLACE, JARED LETO’S OWN, SEEN THROUGHOUT.

Feature - Jared


Feature - Jared

LOUIS VUITTON SWEATER AND FLIGHT SUIT, PRICES UPON REQUEST. GLOVES, STYLIST’S OWN.


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MICHAEL KORS FAUX FUR COAT, $2,498, AND T-SHIRT, $59. HAIR BY DAVID COX AT ART DEPARTMENT USING KEVIN MURPHY. GROOMING BY JAMIE TAYLOR AT THE WALL GROUP. FASHION ASSISTANT: MOLLY DOWNING.

Feature - Jared


self-control. There is something very seductive about it,” he said to me back then in Helsinki. Leto appears to be drawn to the flame of danger— as if needing to test his own limits again and again. “I think that you feel most alive when you’re on the edge,” he says. When he returned to the silver screen in 2016, it was as the Joker in DC Universe’s supervillain blockbuster Suicide Squad. “I always found the Joker really intoxicating because you are living in the skin of someone who has no rules,” he tells me. “It taught me to be braver as an actor. I felt like I was doing my bravest work. Taking a beloved character and putting a new spin on it is already a Sisyphean task. It was just very risky, because of the trepidatious waters of the history of that part.” (Actor Heath Ledger died shortly after completing his own fearsome turn in that role, posthumously winning an Oscar for 2008’s The Dark Knight.) With the upcoming Suicide Squad 2, as well as two slated spin-offs including a solo Joker film, Leto will return to that unhinged place and risk it all again. It is perhaps no surprise that he is an avid rock climber, often posting photos of himself on Instagram halfway up a mountain face in Yosemite or one of his favorite spots, Joshua Tree. “I know that there’s a risk involved in some of the things that I do and that I’ve done in my life, but I don’t take a blind jump ever,” he says. “I rock climb safely. And yes, there are times where I’ll take off the rope and, yes, there is a possibility that I could slip, fall and die. I’m not afraid to take risks: [physical] risk, creative risk, business risk. But it’s calculated risk.” Does he get a thrill from fear? “There’s the fear when you’re on a roller coaster and you’re like, ‘This is so scary, this is great.’ And then there’s that other kind of fear, when you’re so anxiety-ridden you want to puke: When it’s emotional, it’s worse than when it’s physical.” He yawns—he does this when the topic veers close to personal territory. “For me, if someone were to break your heart or betray you or you failed so greatly that you felt that you let people down—that to me is much worse.”

Feature - Jared

SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.109.

***** Leto’s personal life has always hung enigmatically in the air. Decades of prolific dating rumors have rarely been confirmed or denied (his exes include Cameron Diaz and Scarlett Johansson). And he has painted his upbringing in broad, romantic brushstrokes with gaping holes: “I don’t think about the past much,” he says, “I believe in the future.” As the story goes: Leto was born in Bossier City, La., to a young mother, Constance, who had two sons by age 20. His father left after he was born, and Leto never saw him again. He subsequently committed suicide when Leto was 8. Leto, his brother Shannon, and their mother soon fled Louisiana Continued on p.108


Balenciaga


Balenciaga


Balenciaga


Balenciaga


LIKE FATHER, LIKE SONS Photography by

B eau Grealy Creative and fashion direction by

Alison Edmond

Feature - Brosnan

When your dad’s James Bond, you pick up a trick or two. C meets models Paris and Dylan Brosnan as they enter the spotlight


Feature - Brosnan

PARIS (FAR LEFT) WEARS: BALENCIAGA LEATHER LAYERED JACKET, $5,400, AND TURTLENECK, $1,790. DYLAN WEARS: BALENCIAGA FRINGE LAYERED JACKET, $5,800, AND TURTLENECK, $1,050. JEWELRY, HIS OWN (SEEN THROUGHOUT).


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DYLAN WEARS: COACH 1941 FRINGE JACKET, $1,800, WHITE JACKET, PRICE UPON REQUEST, PANTS, $995, AND SNEAKERS, $275. BERLUTI TURTLENECK, $1,010. JACQUES MARIE MAGE SUNGLASSES, $850. OPPOSITE: SAINT LAURENT BLAZER, $3,690, AND SHIRT, $990. DANGER HAT, $40.


Feature - Brosnan


Feature - Brosnan


Feature - Brosnan

PARIS (LEFT) WEARS: DRIES VAN NOTEN COAT, $1,775. SANDRO HOMME X HELLY HANSEN SWEATSHIRT, $220. SANDRO TROUSERS, $295. JACQUES MARIE MAGE SUNGLASSES, $775. ADIDAS SLIDES, $45. JEWELRY, HIS OWN (SEEN THROUGHOUT). DYLAN WEARS: ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA JACKET, $3,895, AND TROUSERS, $1,790. Z ZEGNA TURTLENECK, $345. ADIDAS SHOES, $80. OPPOSITE, PARIS (LEFT) WEARS: PAUL SMITH SUIT, $1,800. VERSACE SWEATER, $695. JACQUES MARIE MAGE SUNGLASSES, $695. DYLANÂ WEARS: VERSACE COAT, $1,895, SHIRT, $495, AND PANTS, $695. JIMMY CHOO BOOTS, $1,095.


Feature - Brosnan

PARIS (LEFT) WEARS: 3 MONCLER GRENOBLE JACKET, $1,745. 8 MONCLER PALM ANGELS SWEATER, $645, TRACK PANTS, $645, AND SANDALS, $500. DYLAN WEARS: BOSS JACKET, $1,195, AND SWEATER, $228. ADIDAS TRACK PANTS, $65, AND SLIDES, $45. JACQUES MARIE MAGE SUNGLASSES, $775. OPPOSITE, PARIS WEARS: PRADA JACKET, $2,480, KNIT, $1,560, PANTS, $1,170, AND HAT, $340. ADIDAS SLIDES, $45.


Feature - Brosnan


DYLAN (LEFT) WEARS: TOD’S COAT, $5,475, AND PANTS, $645. MARNI VEST, $1,340. DAVID YURMAN RING, $1,350. PARIS WEARS: ETRO BLAZER, $2,610, AND JEANS, $590. VERSUS SWEATSHIRT, $495. BAILEY OF HOLLYWOOD HAT, $65. DAVID YURMAN BRACELET, $495, AND RINGS (LEFT TO RIGHT): SIGNET RING, $450, STONE RING, $575, AND JADE RING, $750. OPPOSITE, PARIS WEARS: SALVATORE FERRAGAMO JACKET, $890, WHITE SWEATER, $690, RED SWEATER, PRICE UPON REQUEST, PANTS, $830, AND BOOTS, $1,290. JACQUES MARIE MAGE SUNGLASSES, $795. DAVID YURMAN NECKLACE, $310, AND RINGS (LEFT TO RIGHT): CABLE RING, $2,900, JADE RING, $750, BEE RING, $450, HIS OWN, AND STONE RING, $575. GROOMING BY LUCY HALPERIN AT THE WALL GROUP USING CHANEL. SPECIAL THANKS TO THE MAYFAIR HOTEL IN LOS ANGELES.

It’s entirely possible that celebrity progeny out­ number palm trees in Los Angeles. But with their authentically good natures and (really) good looks, the Brosnan brothers—sons of actor Pierce Brosnan and his wife, Keely Shaye Smith—are getting noticed. In 2014, fashion designer Hedi Slimane tapped Dylan, now a willowy 21­year­old with chiseled features, for a Saint Laurent campaign. Shoots with the likes of Burberry and Vogue followed. Soon, Paris, a 17­year­old who is undoubtedly his high school’s resident dreamboat, wanted in. “He’s more into fashion,” Dylan says of his younger brother, who recently walked for Dolce & Gabbana. “He’s like, ‘Prada! Gucci!’…Um, I can’t even name a third one.” For C’s fall menswear shoot, set on the streets of Downtown L.A., the looks included layered Balenciaga jackets and Ferragamo sweaters: each sumptuous, cozy and completely at odds with the 84­degree August weather. Paris and Dylan spent the day joking with the photographer, snapping selfies and goofing off between takes. “Bros, your energy is pure!” shouted an admiring passerby at one point. The brothers, who grew up in Malibu, Hawaii and England before settling in L.A., are close, with opposing dispositions. Dylan is reserved and soulful, while Paris is outgoing and chatty—a difference underscored by their modeling styles. “I’m trying to work it and do all these poses,” says Paris. “My brother is more cool and collected.” Yet while both are enjoying their time in front of the camera, they ultimately envision their futures elsewhere. Dylan is majoring in cinema and media studies at the University of Southern California and he fronts an indie rock band called Raspberry Blonde. “Hopefully by the time I’m done with college I’ll have a record out,” he says. Paris, currently a senior in high school, is thinking he might want to be a cinematographer. Only one career path, it seems, is off­limits. “My dad is super supportive,” says Paris, “but he always tells us, ‘Don’t be an actor!’ ” • EVELYN C ROWL EY

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SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.109.

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Feature - Brosnan


Feature - Clements

A GLOSTER OUTDOOR DINING TABLE AND CHAIRS FLANK THE POOL OUTSIDE ERIC DUFFY’S “BIRD STREETS” HOUSE DESIGNED BY KATHLEEN CLEMENTS AND TOMMY CLEMENTS.

High Life

Photography by

Shade Degges Writte n by

Martha McCully


Feature - Clements

For his house above Sunset Boulevard, Eric Duffy knew exactly who to call to give character to his “white box” on a hill: the mother-son duo the stars have on speed dial


Feature - Clements

High above Sunset Boulevard in the exclusive enclave known as the “bird streets” in Hollywood Hills West sits Eric Duffy’s private retreat—cloaked by a preponderance of eucalyptus and bamboo, and enclosed by a rustic concrete wall. “It’s super quiet and very tucked away,” says Duffy, an account executive at a printing and graphics company. “You kind of feel like you’re in a tree house—with a Palm Springs vibe.” Duffy enlisted the mother-son team at Clements Design for a gut renovation of the property in 2016. “The house was a white box with no character,” says

Clockwise from above: A WALTER DARBY BANNARD OIL ON CANVAS HANGS IN THE MASTER BEDROOM. DUFFY WITH HIS ENGLISH BULLDOG, SCOUT. THE LIVING ROOM IS FURNISHED WITH A CUSTOM SOFA BY CLEMENTS DESIGN, A STAG STOOL BY RICK OWENS AND AN ANTIQUE BENCH BY CHARLOTTE PERRIAND. Opposite: LEATHER T-CHAIRS BY WILLIAM KATAVOLOS PULL UP TO A FARM TABLE FROM GALERIE HALF IN THE DINING ROOM.

33


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Tommy Clements, whose brief from Duffy was to create a “cool and inviting pad.” The design duo—whose client roster is dominated by first-name celebrities including Ellen and Portia, the Jennifers (Aniston and Lawrence), Ringo, and Bruno (Mars, of course)— brought their love for natural materials and clean lines to the 3,500-square-foot dwelling among the trees.

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“There’s a peaceful, serene quality to it; it’s very masculine as well as soft.” —TOM MY CLE M E NTS The redesign began by swapping out the existing engineered wood floors for titanium limestone—a constant element that anchors the home’s color palette and extends from the indoors to the outdoors, encircling the pool and integrating the house into the foliage-dense setting. To counterbalance the cool hardscape, a warm pinewood was sandblasted and stained a rich espresso, then incorporated as floor-to-ceiling paneling in the master bedroom and used for all the interior doors. “The warmth of the wood contrasts with the smooth and slick stone floors, which we didn’t want to come off as cold,” says Tommy. “Pine is a softer wood, so when you sandblast it you get a lot of depth and texture, which is important to us,” he adds. The plywood bedside tables lighten things up. “We’ve started using plywood in an elevated way. We did desks and a bar in our own office out of plywood,” says Kathleen Clements. “It’s very important to have a bar in your office.” For Duffy, comfort was of tantamount importance: Tactile pieces and opportunities for repose abound, from giant modular ottomans that work as an inviting daybed in the lounge to boiled wool throws from local artist Michael Koch, C&C Milano pillows in varied shades of gray and a custom-made coverlet on the master bed.

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Duffy, who has worked with Clements Design on past residential projects, says he “trusts them implicitly.” Indeed, the Clements consulted on their client’s art collection (a white abstract oil-on-canvas painting by Walter Darby Bannard in the master bedroom is particularly prized) and oversaw the landscaping. “After all, the house has 140 slabs of stone,” says Duffy. “But they made it incredibly warm, while still being sleek and modern.” •

Feature - Clements

Together, the Italian linens and earthy wood adhere to a tight, monochromatic palette. “There’s a peaceful, serene quality to it; it’s very masculine as well as soft,” says Tommy. The tree house feeling is most palpable in the dining room, where original floor-to-ceiling glass walls provide a true sense of being “perched.” The kitchen and dining areas were reconfigured to create separation between them, accomplished with sliding pocket doors that can be open or closed depending on what kind of entertaining is happening. “I see the appeal of the open kitchen,” says Tommy. “But more and more, people want the option to not have so much openness. There’s something nice about creating separate spaces in a house.” Sheer linen window treatments temper hard lines without obstructing the verdant view, interspersed with city lights. Fashion-cum-furniture designer Rick Owens created the brass plates on the table, juxtaposed by a Chris Brock ceramic vase that sits on a sideboard, also made of titanium limestone. Clockwise from right: THE MEDITATIVE INTERPLAY OF TITANIUM LIMESTONE AND WARM PINEWOOD. A SUN-DRENCHED GUEST BEDROOM. AN AGAPE TUB IN THE MASTER BATHROOM. Opposite, from top: VINTAGE SCONCES BY CHARLOTTE PERRIAND AND AN R.W. ATLAS FAUCET BY WATERWORKS PAIR WITH A MARBLE SINK BASIN TO SET AN ELEGANT TONE IN THE POWDER ROOM. A PAIR OF “PREFACTO” ARMCHAIRS BY PIERRE GUARICHE AND A TABLE LAMP BY GAE AULENTI ADD PERSONALITY TO A CORNER OF THE LIVING ROOM.


C FOR MEN

SCOOTER WARS CONTINUED FROM P.76

For anyone who hasn’t ridden one yet, designs vary slightly from company to company, but they all work the same way. Using an app, you unlock a vehicle by scanning a QR code between the handlebars. After the $1 rental fee, they cost, say, 15 cents per minute, and can be left anywhere once the destination is reached. This last point is much to the chagrin of the vehicles’ detractors, who brazenly destroy them—setting scooters on fire, dropping them off four-story buildings, hanging them from trees and burying them in sand—with little apparent fear of getting in trouble with the law. The Instagram account @birdgraveyard, with more than 40,000 followers, showcases the aforementioned acts, bringing a new meaning to the spoils of war. Vandalism aside, as scooters have appeared in more and more cities, the primary obstacles are still red tape and regulation. In August, Santa Monica announced a 16-month pilot sanctioning the scooters. As happened in San Francisco, it appeared at first that Bird and Lime would not make the cut because they were left off the short list of contenders. In response, the duo staged a 24-hour détente. The “day without a scooter” protest at city hall in Santa Monica created sufficient pressure to do the trick. Two weeks later, both were selected, along with Lyft and Uber-owned Jump, for the pilot. The quartet will operate 2,000 scooters and 1,000 bikes between them; each has also agreed to pay a $20,000 annual operator fee, plus $130 per device. Euwyn Poon is the co-founder and president of Spin, a smaller San Francisco startup that operates in 19 U.S. cities and was one of the companies excluded from the Santa Monica pilot. He says the decision to overlook his powerful rivals’ behavior was tantamount to rewarding companies for “disrespecting cities.” He adds: “It’s hard to keep count, but we have recorded 33 separate rogue launches across the United States. It concerns us that our competitors are trying to distort the public process by inviting users to rally at unrelated city council meetings, spamming public servants, and asking forgiveness for antagonizing cities.” For its part, Bird claims to have learned from its mistakes. It will blitzkrieg no more, says David Estrada, Bird’s head of public policy: “The amount we’ve learned about how to work with cities is

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tremendous. What we do generally now is, rather than launch with a large number of scooters, we really start small.” Lime has also pledged to play by the rules. Contee says: “First and foremost, we’re going to always do things according to regulations. We only work in collaboration with cities.” Yet issues remain. One of the most difficult? Liability. Estrada says the biggest opponents when Bird comes to a new place are the city attorneys, who are generally worried about being on the hook if people get hurt. Bird, extraordinarily, has agreed to assume all that risk, which will only grow should VanderZanden achieve his rather heady ambitions of transforming transport the world over. “We immediately agree to indemnify cities in cases of liability,” Estrada says. “We put them on our certificate of insurance.” The company has handed out thousands of free helmets, yet it has also fought a move to make them a legal requirement. (The company argues that riders of electric vehicles—bicycles and skateboards, specifically—are not required to wear a helmet, so why should they be singled out and fined up to $200? Bird’s machines have a top speed of 15 miles per hour.) In a potential glimpse of a future that is less Wild West and more measured, Bird has also created “no-ride” zones, including some parks and residential areas, that it shades red on its app, denoting where riders should refrain from riding or leaving scooters. VanderZanden says the company is working on technology that will send a push alert to riders and remotely slow down their scooters as they near a restricted area. The scooter war will only get more interesting from here. Segway-Ninebot, the Chinese company that makes most of the world’s e-scooters, including for Bird, Lime, Spin and others, says that until VanderZanden’s brain wave last summer, they were a niche product with tepid demand. A year later? Segway-Ninebot has quintupled production so that it can now pump out 250,000 scooters per month. Strap in. It could be a bumpy ride. •

Runover

“YOU FEEL MOST ALIVE WHEN YOU’RE ON THE EDGE” CONTINUED FROM P.87

and adopted a hippie lifestyle, traveling around America from Colorado to Virginia, Wyoming, Alaska and as far

away as Haiti, bunking in communes with actors, artists and musicians. They would return to Louisiana to visit their Cajun grandparents, spending summers in their one-bedroom house. The Leto brothers became wild and tough as they grew up, breaking into warehouses, dabbling with drugs. “Some kids went and did summer camp; we went and stole your car,” he once told The Sunday Times. In 10th grade, he dropped out of school for a while, before steering himself out of a nosedive and returning to Emerson Preparatory School in Washington, D.C., finding his salvation in art. It was while at The University of Arts in Philadelphia that he fell in love with directing, and he subsequently moved to New York to study film at the School of Visual Arts. When he moved to Los Angeles in 1992, at age 19, it was to pursue a career as a director, supported by part-time acting. Today L.A. is not only the movie capital of America, but a hub for space and tech innovation—both fields that Leto is invested in either emotionally or financially. He has been an investor in more than 60 companies, at last count, including Uber, Spotify, Airbnb, Slack, Robin Hood and Headspace. In 2011, he launched VyRT, an online platform for live-streaming events, and he founded The Hive, a digital marketing and social media agency. Like Elon Musk, who partially inspired Leto’s God-like character Niander Wallace in 2017’s Blade Runner 2049, Leto has few qualms about the automated future. “Maybe we need [artificial intelligence] to tell us how to make decisions, because we’re not making very good decisions on our own, are we?” His band came up with the name Thirty Seconds to Mars 20 years ago, in 1998, when travel to the red planet was still science fiction, rather than a future reality. “We’re going to have to become an interplanetary species in order to survive, if we hope to have future generations, because we can’t satiate our appetites enough to stop us [from] destroying the most important asset that we have, which is the planet,” Leto says. “We’re absolutely running toward the edge of the cliff here. I think it’s inevitable.” Notwithstanding these future projections, in the near term, Leto has had to step back a little from technology, namely his smartphone. “I’ve actually learned to become less reliant on my phone, namely because it’s been contributing to body pain,” he explains. “It’s probably the stress and pressure and the phone being

FALL/WINTER 2018


the source of my workload. My body was screaming out for some peace.” Surely the discomfort is negligible compared to what he has actively self-inflicted for his roles, but there are even signs that his taste for that is waning. He says he is looking forward to making more “crowd-pleaser” films; next up, he’ll play the antihero vampire Dr. Michael Morbius in Sony Pictures’ upcoming Marvel-based spinoff Morbius. It doesn’t sound that light. “I think it sounds like a lot of potential fun,” he says. But he doesn’t do fun. “True, I don’t do fun!” he admits with a laugh. “But I think I deserve it now at this point. God knows I’ve depressed enough audiences. I don’t mind making a film that has the potential to make audiences really happy. And sometimes it’s just great to go to the movies, get some popcorn, [and] watch something ridiculous and over the top.” Is it time for his reinvention as a romcom lead? “I would [do one] in a heartbeat,” he says. “I’d like to do the opposite of a ‘McConaughey.’ Remake all of his romantic comedies. Or just do rom-coms on the beach in Hawaii…Elvis Presley movies, man! Because as you get older, why would you want to suffer more? All my old agents are probably rolling over saying, ‘Why couldn’t he have done this 20 years ago?’” But he is most excited about playing a personal hero of his in an upcoming biopic being written by The Wolf of Wall Street’s Terence Winter: “Andy Warhol has always been an inspiration to me. I think his greatest work of art was himself. If I was braver, I love the idea of making yourself your greatest work of art. He became who he dreamed of being,” he says. Then, as if describing himself, he adds: “He was a self-made, self-created enigma.” •

JOIN THE BAND p.46 Local Authority LA Anarchy Patch jacket, Maxfield exclusive, $2,195, Maxfield, Malibu, 310-270-9009; maxfieldla.com. Daniel Patrick Slim Track pants in red and ivory, $300; danielpatrick.us. Prada black Belt bag, $895; prada.com. John Varvatos brass cuff with rounded thick chain design, $298, John Varvatos, San Diego, 619-452-2666. Palm Angels black distressed Flames sneakers, $561; farfetch.com. Billy Los Angeles green work pant, $330, Barneys New York, Beverly Hills, 310-276-4400; barneys.com. Canali green leather belt, $295, Canali, Beverly Hills, 310-274-2085. Kiton Chelsea boot in croc, $15,959; kiton.it. Dolce & Gabbana blue and gold Jacquard clutch, $1,875, Dolce & Gabbana, Beverly Hills, 310-888-8701. Furrer Jacot award-winning Snakebone 18-karat white and rose gold ring, from $2,760; furrerjacot.com. MIDNIGHT HOUR p.48 Baume Custom Timepiece Moonphase, $630; baumewatches.com. Rolex Oyster Perpetual Submariner Date 40 mm, Oystersteel and yellow gold, $13,400, Rolex, San Diego, 858-453-9996; rolex.com. Montblanc Star Legacy Moonphase 42 mm, blue alligator-skin strap, silvery-white dial and stainless steel case, $4,200, Montblanc, S.F., 415-403-4000. Weiss Limited American Issue Field watch with blue dial, $1,995, and navy genuine horween shell Cordovan strap, $200; weisswatchcompany.com. Van Cleef & Arpels Midnight Planetarium 44 mm Poetic Complications set in 18-karat rose gold, price upon request, Van Cleef & Arpels, Costa Mesa, 714-545-9500. Jaeger LeCoultre Reverso Tribute Small Seconds, $7,950, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Beverly Hills, 310-734-0525; jaeger-lecoultre.com. Shinola Lake Michigan Monster Automatic Dive watch, $1,250; shinola.com. Panerai Luminor Due 3 Days Automatic Titanio 45 mm, $11,200, Panerai, Costa Mesa, 714-481-7188. Vacheron Constantin Overseas Dual Time, 41 mm in stainless steel, $25,400; vacheron-constantin.com. IWC Portugieser Chronograph Edition 150 Years with a stainless steel case, automatic, self-winding, and black alligator leather strap, $7,150; iwc.com. Piaget Polo S watch, $11,200, Piaget, Beverly Hills, 424-332-4280. Cartier Santos de Cartier watch, medium model, 18-karat rose gold, with interchangeable leather straps, $17,900, Cartier, Beverly Hills, 310-275-4272; cartier.com.

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SONS p.92 Paris wearing Balenciaga black calfskin Layered jacket, $5,400, and black wool long sleeve turtleneck, $1,790. Dylan wearing Balenciaga black calfskin Layered fringe jacket, $5,800, and Fluo Green polyamide hoodie turtleneck, $1,050, Balenciaga, Beverly Hills, 310-854-0557. p.94 Dylan wearing Coach 1941 Western Embellished jacket, $1,800, Rodeo Souvenir jacket, price upon request, leather pants, $995, and low-top sneakers, $275, Coach, Beverly Hills, 310-247-1309. Berluti blue wool turtleneck, $1,010, Berluti, Beverly Hills, 310-274-2085. Jacques Marie Mage Parker Copper sunglasses, $850; jacquesmarie mage.com. p.95 Dylan wearing Saint Laurent blue teal velvet blazer, $3,690, and black silk shirt with Yves collar and detailed design, $990, Saint Laurent, Beverly Hills, 310-271-4110; ysl.com. Danger Pork Pie, $40; hats.com. p.96 Paris wearing Paul Smith burgundy Prince of Wales check wool suit, $1,800, Paul Smith, L.A., 323-951-4800. Versace Tartan wool sweater, $695, Versace, Beverly Hills, 310-205-3921; versace.com. Jacques Marie Mage Willem Noir sunglasses, $695; jacquesmariemage.com. Dylan wearing Versace Tartan wool coat, $1,895, Tartan print shirt, $495, and Tartan wool pants, $695, Versace, Beverly Hills, 310-205-3921; versace.com. Jimmy Choo Sawyer black patent Chelsea ankle boot, $1,095, similar styles available, Jimmy Choo, Beverly Hills, 310-860-9045; jimmychoo.com. p.97 Paris wearing Dries Van Noten Multicolor cotton coat, $1,775, Opening Ceremony, L.A., 310-652-1120. Sandro Homme x Helly Hansen sweatshirt, $220, and Sandro wool trousers, $295, Sandro, Beverly Hills, 310-2810083; sandro-paris.com. Jacques Marie Mage Eluard Marine sunglasses, $775; jacquesmariemage.com. Adidas Adilette slides, $45; adidas.com. Dylan wearing Ermenegildo Zegna Couture corduroy jacket, $3,895, denim trousers $1,790, and Z Zegna wool turtleneck, $345, Ermenegildo Zegna, Beverly Hills, 310-247-8827; zegna.com. Adidas Gazelle shoes, $80, adidas.com. p.98 Paris wearing 3 Moncler Grenoble jacket, $1,745, 8 Moncler Palm Angels sweater, $645, track pants, $645, and sandals, $500; moncler.com. Dylan wearing Boss yellow jacket, $1,195, and ivory sweater, $228, Boss, Beverly Hills, 310-887-5555; hugoboss.com. Adidas track pants, $65, and Adilette slides, $45; adidas.com. Jacques Marie Mage Eluard Marine sunglasses, $775; jacquesmariemage.com. p.99 Paris wearing Prada jacket, $2,480, knit, $1,560, pants, $1,170, and hat, $340, Prada, Beverly Hills, 310-278-8661; prada.com. Adidas Adilette slides, $45; adidas.com. p.100 Dylan wearing Tod’s City coat, $5,475, and Classic pants, $645, Tod’s, Beverly Hills, 310-285-0591. Marni vest, $1,340, Marni, L.A., 323-782-110. David Yurman Pavé Pinky ring with black diamonds, $1,350, David Yurman, Beverly Hills, 310-888-8618; davidyurman.com. Paris wearing Etro blazer, $2,610, and jeans, $590, Etro, Beverly Hills, 310-248-2855. Versus Checkerboard half-zip sweatshirt, $495; versace.com. Bailey of Hollywood Telemannes braided pork pie hat, $65; hats.com. David Yurman extra-large Box Chain bracelet, $495, Streamline signet ring, $450, exotic stone signet ring with pietersite, $575, and Petrvs Scarab ring with black jade, $750, David Yurman, Beverly Hills, 310-888-8618; davidyurman.com. p.101 Paris wearing Salvatore Ferragamo wool zip jacket, $890, white wool and cashmere sweater, $690, red cashmere sweater, price upon request, wool pants, $830, and boots, $1,290, Salvatore Ferragamo, Beverly Hills, 310-273-9990. Jacques Marie Mage 1962 Antique sunglasses, $795; jacquesmariemage.com. David Yurman medium Box Chain necklace, $310, Cable Classics signet ring in 18-karat gold, $2,900, Petrvs Scarab ring with black jade, $750, Petrvs Bee signet ring, $450, exotic stone signet ring with pietersite, $575, David Yurman, Beverly Hills, 310-888-8618; davidyurman.com.

Shopping Guide

SHOPPING GUIDE COVER Gucci Ecru panama wool mohair formal jacket, $3,400, azure-white ’70s striped shirt, $780, Ecru panama wool mohair formal pants, $1,500, and tulle pants, $450, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451. John Hardy Naga bronze signet ring with black rhodium plating, $450, John Hardy, L.A., 310-203-9690; johnhardy.com. TABLE OF CONTENTS p.24 Dylan wearing Saint Laurent blue teal velvet blazer, $3,690, black silk shirt with Yves collar and detailed design, $990, and blue teal velvet trousers, $1,290, Saint Laurent, Beverly Hills, 310-271-4110; ysl.com. Danger Pork Pie, $40; hats.com. Jimmy Choo Sawyer black patent chelsea ankle boot, $1,095, similar styles available at Jimmy Choo, Beverly Hills, 310-860-9045; jimmychoo.com.

“YOU FEEL MOST ALIVE WHEN YOU’RE ON THE EDGE” p.79 Gucci black-multicolor formal jacket with allover sequins embroidery detail, $23,000, cotton T-shirt, $480, red-black-beige heavy vintage wool check formal pants, $980, and leather sole moccasins in black leather with oval enameled detail and metal GG, $950, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451. p.81 Dolce & Gabbana red hoodie with patches, $2,595, and red pants with patches, $1,295, Dolce & Gabbana, Beverly Hills, 310-888-8701. Gucci ivory-red Oceany knitted beanie, $310, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451. Christian Louboutin Aurelien multi-fabric sneakers, $1,195; christianlouboutin.com. p.83 Gucci Shamrock-ivory Flora gothic printed wool formal jacket, $3,980, Shamrock-ivory Flora gothic printed wool and silk shirt, $1,380, and Shamrock-ivory Flora gothic printed wool formal pants, $2,280, Gucci, Beverly Hills, 310-278-3451. p.84 Louis Vuitton chunky rib slit roll neck sweater, and flight suit, prices upon request, Louis Vuitton, Beverly Hills, 310-859-0457; louisvuitton.com. p.86 Michael Kors faux fur coat, $2,498, and T-shirt, $59; michaelkors.com.

PHOTO FINISH p.110 Louis Vuitton Monogram denim jacket, T-shirt, slim jeans, black leather belt, and Tattoo sneakers, prices upon request, Louis Vuitton, Beverly Hills, 310-859-0457; louisvuitton.com.

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LOUIS VUITTON JACKET, T-SHIRT, JEANS, BELT AND SNEAKERS, PRICES UPON REQUEST. JEWELRY, SHAMEIK MOORE’S OWN.

SHAMEIK MOORE Actor

“Being able to represent Spider-Man is powerful,” Shameik Moore says of voicing the first Afro-Latino Spider-Man in Sony’s upcoming animated film Spider-Man: Into the Spider Verse, which hits theaters in December. Following his memorable turn in Rick Famuyiwa’s 2015 critically acclaimed Sundance comedy Dope, the 23-year-old was cast as Miles Morales, who takes on the identity of Spider-Man following Peter Parker’s death. The film also presented the actor/singer/rapper/dancer with the opportunity to work alongside the likes of Nicolas Cage, Hailee Steinfeld, Lily Tomlin, and Mahershala Ali. While they voiced their characters separately, there was one benefit to recording solo. “I showed up in sweatpants,” he jokes. Moore has come a long way from doing dance battles at age 12 in his hometown of Atlanta. Even then, he knew that he was onto something. “I was battling 23-year-old men,” he says, “and I was winning.” Next up, Moore—who also starred in Baz Luhrmann’s Netflix series The Get Down—has several projects on the horizon including Cut Throat City, a Hurricane Katrinaset heist movie directed by RZA and starring Eiza González, as well as the James Francodirected indie drama The Pretenders. Despite a full plate, Moore is already looking ahead. “What I really want is an action movie,” he says. “I want to be in a 007/Jason Bourne-meets-Harry Potter and I Am Number Four film. I’m not content. I feel very hungry.” • L IN DZ I SC H A RF

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Photo Finish

MARK GRIFFIN CHAMPION Styling by REBECCA RUSSELL

Photography by

HAIR: PETE LAMDEN. MAKEUP: JO STRETTELL AT TRACEY MATTINGLY USING JILLIAN DEMPSEY. NAILS: EMI KUDO AT OPUS BEAUTY USING CHANEL LE VERNIS. FASHION ASSISTANT: MOLLY DOWNING. SEE SHOPPING GUIDE FOR DETAILS, P.109.

PHOTO FINISH


T:7.125”

Lightning strikes twice. The 2019 S-Class Coupe and Cabriolet. Just when you thought that no car could equal the engineering brilliance of the S-Class, the bar is raised again. And again.

Visit your local Mercedes-Benz Dealer for a test drive today. 2019 S 560 Coupe shown in Iridium Silver metallic paint and 2019 S 560 Cabriolet shown in Selenite Grey metallic paint. Optional equipment shown. ©2018 Mercedes-Benz USA, LLC For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

HEADLINE: 21 pt. • BODY COPY: 9 pt.

T:9.875”

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