Catholic Pic August 2023

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Celebrating
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Archbishop Paul Gallagher installed as Honorary Canon Diaconate ordinations
100 years
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From the Archbishop’s Desk

For the last seven months I have been Apostolic Administrator of the Diocese of Hexham and Newcastle in addition to being Archbishop of Liverpool. It has meant a lot of additional work and travelling which has left me feeling tired.

I have been afraid of neglecting our archdiocese whilst discharging this additional mission. Thankfully, although there were some difficulties to be managed, connecting with the north east in this way has brought many moments of joy; the countryside is stunningly beautiful in places and the people are full of faith and friendship.

Many years ago, I had a brief spell as parish priest of St Dominic’s in Newcastle which was when I got to know the northern saints like Bede, Cuthbert, Aidan, Winfred, and Benet Biscop who together left a Christian heritage which is still valued today in Lindisfarne, Jarrow, Durham, Hexham and Monkwearmouth. Being surrounded by the prayers of these ancient saints as well as the prayers of the people of the diocese has enabled me to carry out my mission.

On 19 July 2023, Bishop Stephen Wright was installed as bishop of Hexham and Newcastle. This marks a new beginning for the diocese, so I ask you to pray for him. My prayer is that our Lord will walk with this young bishop as he follows in the footsteps of these great saints to be a good shepherd and faithful servant of the faithful people of the Diocese of Hexham and Newcastle.

Monthly prayer intentions

The Holy Father’s prayer intentions entrusted to his worldwide prayer network for the year 2023:

World Youth Day

Let us pray that the World Youth Day in Lisbon will help young people to set out on the journey, witnessing to the Gospel with their own lives. www.popesprayer.va/

Editor Elizabeth Williams

Pictures

contents Contents: 4 Main Feature Liverpool’s proud Lourdes landmark 8 Sunday Reflections Liturgy and Life 9 From the archives Art in the service of religion 10 News News from around the Archdiocese 15 Cathedral Record 18 What’s On What’s happening in the Archdiocese 19 Profile Monsignor John Butchard 27 Animate Youth Ministry Taking inspiration from our pilgrim predecessors 28 Pic Extras Mums the word News from the KSC 29 Nugent News Uniting hearts and homes in the journey of adoption 30 Dialogue and Unity
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Nick Fairhurst www.nickfairhurstphotographer.com Sue Manning Editorial
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Liverpool’s proud Lourdes landmark

‘This was the first time there was a diocesan pilgrimage. There were people who’d gone before but they were individuals and different parish groups so 1923 was the first time a diocese went with an archbishop.’

The words belong to Monsignor Des Seddon, director of the Liverpool Archdiocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes, and the pioneering English diocese he is discussing is our own.

It was 100 years ago last month that Liverpool’s first official pilgrimage to

Lourdes took place, led by Archbishop Frederick Keating.

The centenary was marked in several ways during this year’s pilgrimage, which will be covered in our September issue. It was certainly fitting that the 2023 dates (21-28 July) should have mirrored almost exactly those of the inaugural pilgrimage, held between 20 and 28 July 1923.

Termed the ‘Lancashire Pilgrimage to Lourdes’ and staged 65 years after Our Lady’s apparitions to Saint Bernadette, it began with trains setting out from Lime

In July, the Archdiocese of Liverpool celebrated the 100th anniversary of its first official Lourdes pilgrimage.
Group photo from first Liverpool to Lourdes pilgrimage in 1923
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‘This was the first time there was a diocesan pilgrimage. There were people who’d gone before but they were individuals and different parish groups so 1923 was the first time a diocese went with an archbishop.’

1982 pilgrimage

Street, Preston and Chorley on the long journey to Newhaven, the Sussex port from which the pilgrims took a steamboat bound for Dieppe. While there was a Lancastrian contingent, all but 210 of the 1,390 pilgrims came from this Archdiocese.

By the time of their return, the name of a single sick pilgrim, Jack Traynor, was on many lips after word spread of a Liverpool man coming home cured of the

injuries sustained in World War One that had left him partially paralysed. ‘In 1926, the Lourdes medical bureau declared that “this extraordinary cure is absolutely above and beyond the powers of nature”,’ explains Mgr Des.

For the 1924 pilgrimage, the number of pilgrims had risen to 1,500 – among them Traynor, now travelling as a helper. By 1927 the Liverpool Hospitalite – an official organisation for brancardiers

(stretcher-bearers) and handmaids –had been founded in St John’s Parish, Kirkdale.

‘A real sense of belonging’

Spool forward a century, and Lourdes is still drawing pilgrims from our diocese today. Father Grant Maddock, whose first pilgrimage was in 1988, is not surprised. ‘It’s a little microcosm of what the Church should be and what society could be,’

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All Saints, Anfield pilgrimage to Lourdes 1971 2000 pilgrimage 1924 pilgrimage photo on display at St Francis Xavier Church
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SNAPSHOT: Lourdes in the 50s

‘This photo was taken on the bridge over the river near the Notre Dame des Sept Douleurs hospital. I am the little girl in my First Communion dress and I am with my mother, sister, cousin and aunts. Some are in their handmaid uniforms as they had just finished a shift in the hospital, helping in the refectory and doing the laundry and making beds.’

Therese Newton, Holy Family, Southport

SNAPSHOT: A marriage made in Lourdes

The 2019 pilgrimage was a life-changing experience for Clive Baines who travelled as an assisted pilgrim and returned home having met his wife-to-be. As he relates: ‘I was not intending to meet my future wife but God, through Our Lady of Lourdes, had other plans. I met Sheila in the lobby of the Hotel Solitude, where we were both staying.’ For Sheila herself it was just as improbable an outcome after several years of poor health and personal problems, and the recent loss of her mother.

‘My dear mum had encouraged me to travel to Lourdes,’ she explains. ‘Mum died in June, just six weeks before the pilgrimage, so I was in a state of shock and grief, and meeting a husband was definitely not on the agenda! Clive and I were finally married at St Patrick’s Church, Southport, on 28 April this year – so thank you to Our Lady of Lourdes.’

he reflects. ‘You meet people and see them with our Liverpool badge or lanyard and there’s always a smile, always that encouragement and a real sense of belonging.’

Speaking on his arrival in Lourdes for this year’s pilgrimage, Fr Grant highlighted the excitement of the Welcome Mass which marks the start of each Liverpool pilgrimage. ‘Seeing that sense of joy and anticipation, seeing people together for the first time with one ultimate aim, which is to bring our assisted pilgrims and present them to the Lord through Mary’s prayer,’ he says.

This sense of togetherness has endured since that very first pilgrimage when ‘Faith of Our Fathers’ was sung at Lime Street before departure.

Much else has changed, of course, and it is fascinating to chart the evolution of the Archdiocesan pilgrimage. Monsignor John Butchard, who has been on every Liverpool pilgrimage since 1968, is as good as guide as anybody.

1923 – The miracle of Jack Traynor

The most remarkable story from any Liverpool pilgrimage belongs to the very first – namely the tale of Jack Traynor, a World War One veteran left partially paralysed and stricken by epilepsy after being struck by machinegun fire in the Gallipoli landings. He had spent five years in hospitals between 1915 and 1920, and was initially denied a medical certificate to go on the pilgrimage.

To quote Fr Patrick O’Connor’s description in ‘Liverpool’s Miracle Man’, a CTS booklet, Traynor ‘was unable to walk or even stand, he was having frequent epileptic fits, he had three open wounds (one of them in his head) and he had no power of feeling or movement in his torn and shrivelled right arm.’

Remembering his early journeys, he says: ‘You went to Lime Street station and boarded one of two special trains which were on platforms 7 and 8, where the London trains still leave from.

‘There were special ambulance carriages on the English train left over from wartime into which people in wheelchairs and on stretchers could be loaded.’ After a ferry crossing of the Channel, another train took pilgrims down to southwestern France.

For Mgr John, pilgrimage director for 25 years until 2016, transport was typically the biggest source of anxiety. ‘The challenges have nearly always been how to get to and from Lourdes. You had a trauma every year – such as a rail strike in France or a dock strike in Calais.’

By the late 90s, the Liverpool pilgrims lost the use of a train for the English leg of their journey meaning the trip down to the Channel ‘involved coaches, which was a nightmare’. Before long, there was no train on the French side either

In Lourdes, Traynor’s fits continued yet he was ‘bathed no less than nine times’ and on the afternoon of 25 July in the baths, his ”paralysed legs began to kick about violently”. That same afternoon during the Blessed Sacrament Procession, the Archbishop of Rheims made the Sign of the Cross above him with the Monstrance and, in Traynor’s words, ‘my right arm, which had been dead since 1915, suddenly shot out’ as he blessed himself.

Both incidents were initially regarded as epileptic fits but not for long. The account continues: ‘Jack was examined by both the three pilgrimage doctors (Drs Azurdia, Finn and Marley) and by a team of doctors of all nationalities at the Medical Bureau in Lourdes. They all agreed that he was no longer paralysed in the lower part of his body, that although the muscles on the right side of his chest had been destroyed he was now able to use his right hand and arm [and] was now completely free from epileptic fits.’

Thousands turned up at Lime Street to see Traynor on his return and he would go back Lourdes for many years afterwards, serving as a brancardier with the pilgrimage.

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as air travel took over. ‘The relationship between the Liverpool pilgrimage and the Friends of John Lennon Airport has been very fruitful,’ notes Mgr John.

Other changes have occurred in Lourdes itself. The hospital which has traditionally housed Liverpool’s assisted pilgrims , the Accueil Marie Saint-Frai, was rebuilt in the mid-90s. It meant a sad adieu to the old open courtyard which was such a popular gathering point.

However, Mgr John explains: ‘The care we can give our assisted pilgrims is much greater now. The old St Frai was wonderfully welcoming but they squeezed in as many as they could. Literally there was just room to stand up between the beds.’

With advances in medical care, meanwhile, a good portion of assisted pilgrims who in the past would have required hospital care are able to stay in hotels with friends and family.

Music and youth

Another major piece of today’s pilgrimage is the Liverpool Archdiocese Youth Service. This came into being in the mid-70s, established by Fr Pat Harnett. Their involvement in the pilgrimage began soon after.

Mgr John explains: ‘One year we were

short of fit, young brancardiers and Fr John Magee, then director of the pilgrimage, said, “How about some young people coming to supplement with their youth and vitality the efforts of the older people in pulling wheelchairs?” That was the beginning. And it grew and grew.

‘At first they kept to themselves and just appeared when we needed help with wheelchairs but now the integration between all sections of the pilgrimage is a joy to behold.’

The late 70s brought the addition of another piece of the jigsaw, the Lourdes music group, which had begun life as a parish group at St William of York in Thornton. The group would play at Speke airport on the day Pope John Paul II flew into Liverpool in 1982.

Mgr Des says: ‘There was a nice mix of traditional and modern folk music and it brought a different sense to the celebrations. Assisted pilgrims tell us the music makes a big difference to them.’

Fr Grant has music director on a Lourdes CV which also includes Liverpool Youth pilgrim and brancardier. He is keen to underline how his early pilgrimages helped nurture his calling to the priesthood. ‘It affected my vocation and focused it more because it gave me a different way of being able to pray.

‘It opened my eyes to seeing that Church wasn’t about what happened in the building but what happened in life and how we reflect Christ in our actions and words. That is where we really encounter Jesus in one another.’

These reflections resonate with Pat Murphy, a member of Liverpool Hospitalite whose family connections to Lourdes date back to the late 1940s. ‘A lot of friendships have been made in Lourdes, a lot of marriages have come out of Lourdes too – on the youth coaches, in the Hospitalite team. And a lot of vocations too.’

She goes on: ‘I remember hearing one of the Hospitalite team saying, “I need this week every year just to regroup as my prayer life is getting quite dry. I need to come here”.’

And they keep on coming. If his chief concern as pilgrimage director today is the cost involved for pilgrims, Mgr Des is encouraged by the presence in Lourdes this year of 50 new Hospitalite members. Or hospitaliers as they are now known after the roles of brancardiers and handmaids became integrated.

‘It’s very heartening that people still want to be helpers in Lourdes,’ says Mgr Des of the enduring pull of this centuryold pilgrimage. There really must be something in the water.

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St Patrick’s Liverpool 8 pilgrimage to Lourdes in 1925 led by Fr Timmons – Jack Traynor, parishioners and school teachers are in the photo

On a liturgical note

Here in Italy a great deal is made of the Solemnity which we keep on August 15 – the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. As well as being a great religious festival, it also marks a few days of ‘down time’ in the midst of a very hot month

The Mass on the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin has a lovely preface, the first part of the Eucharistic Prayer for that day, which speaks of Mary as being unique amongst all women, unique amongst all humanity, as being protected from the stain of original sin, the original rebellion against the will of the Father; she is the one who most perfectly gave herself in love and service to her God; ‘let it be done to me according to your will’

It continues:

“For today the Virgin Mother of God was assumed into heaven as the beginning and image of your Church’s coming to perfection and a sign of sure hope and comfort to your pilgrim people.”

The purpose of these words is not simply to be a gathering together of what it is that the Church believes about God’s work in and through

Mary, but also to be an encouragement and a spur for our own lives today and here, wherever we find ourselves. If Mary’s Assumption is to be an image of our own ‘coming to perfection’ then we should aim to achieve that perfection, under God’s grace, by our words and our actions TODAY. Even this is an examination of conscience – how TODAY have I sought to follow Mary in here self-giving, how TODAY have I acted with a perfection of grace and of love, how TODAY have I shared Christian hope and comfort with others by how I have lived?

The Assumption would be a good day to commend ourselves to the prayer of the Blessed Virgin, asking that she will inspire us and assist us in our daily Christian living:

Beneath your compassion, We take refuge, O Mother of God: do not despise our petitions in time of trouble: but rescue us from dangers, only pure, only blessed one.

Buona Festa – happy Feast

Sunday thoughts Mgr John Devine

The death of Canon Brendan Alger after 33 years on the Isle of Man has brought home to me that a priest never retires, even when retired. It is not only because he continues to celebrate Mass.

Ordination is a sacrament, a sign of the Lord’s presence, the whole community. The Lord uses his priests through their weaknesses and failings; when they are strong and healthy; when they are sick; when they are dying.

A remarkable number of people have shared with me how Canon Brendan accompanied them at difficult times in their lives. He did so quietly and discreetly. In his later years Brendan suffered with his eyesight and with mobility problems. He was always appreciative of the Health Service. On hearing of his terminal diagnosis over a year ago, Brendan faced death calmly and without fear, refusing any dramatic medical or surgical interventions. He talked about his impending death. On his last visit in May, Archbishop Malcolm visited Brendan at home and personally gave him the Sacrament of the Sick. That meant a lot to him. In his final months he was forever saying thank you. When no longer able to celebrate Mass, the devotion with which he received Holy Communion was an inspiration.

Love is the only way

My great aunt Lizzie had a hard life. She was rejected by her family in the 1890s because she had a child outside marriage. She eventually married a man called John Sloan Barclay and they settled in Bootle. Lizzie gave birth to six daughters, one of whom died at the age of 10. The five girls who were left were all diagnosed with mental-health issues and so home life was hard.

Lizzie hardly ever got any time to herself. One day a neighbour found her crying on the front step and told her to go and put on her best hat and coat and go into town. Lizzie went and began to wander down Bold Street. John Sloan Barclay was very generous, and one thing Lizzie did not lack was money. She decided a new pair of shoes was the order of the day, so she went into a shoe shop and began to look around.

He would repeat three times: ‘O Sacrament most Holy, O Sacrament Divine, all praise and all thanksgiving be every moment thine.’

He always expressed his thanks that he was in no pain or discomfort. He talked calmly about his funeral arrangements and the disposal of his belongings. He never complained. A small group of devoted friends ensured constant support. When he could no longer play cards on Fridays at the Columba club, his partners ensured that he continued to play Canasta at home. Brendan’s sharp mind enabled him to beat his friends to the very end.

On the Saturday afternoon before he died, I celebrated Mass at his bedside. He wore his priestly stole so that he could concelebrate the Mass. Drifting in and out of consciousness, his lips moved with the sacred words. He received a small piece of the Sacred Host and sipped the Precious Blood before sinking back into his pillow.

The following day he encouraged those around him with the words of Saint Paul: ‘I want you to be happy, always happy in the Lord; I repeat, what I want is your happiness’ (Philippians 4:4). On the Monday his friends recited the Prayers for the Dying. Within 15 minutes he had gone to God. May he rest in peace.

A little boy aged about 10 was standing outside the shop, peering through the window. He was a typical Liverpool street urchin – barefoot, coatless, and blue with the cold of a dank November day. Lizzie noticed him and was moved with what I would call compassion. She stepped out of the shop and took the boy back in. She asked the shocked assistant to get half a dozen pairs of socks for the boy. Lizzie then bought him a pair of shoes. Lizzie left that shop having bought herself a new pair of shoes and found a new song in her heart. She left behind a very surprised assistant and a delighted little boy.

We are to love, because God has first loved us. We are to allow the lavish love we have received to pour out from us in word and action that makes a radical difference in the world we live in. When you read Matthew’s Gospel, which is the Gospel we’re reading in church on a Sunday, you discover in it an invitation to radically follow Jesus because of love.

It is in this Gospel that we have the beatitudes and the invitation not to judge, but to love our enemies and do good to those who hurt us. These are hugely radical demands but we can respond because God has first loved us.

I think it is so hard for most of us to believe in a God whose justice is, in fact, unconditional love. We are much more comfortable with having to earn love. We do not know what to do with a God who breaks the rules and loves everyone without exception. We certainly do not know what to do with the invitation for us to do the same for others.

Matthew’s Jesus invites us to open our hearts to this God and then to follow, knowing that we can trust God with our lives, whatever may be thrown at us.

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from the archives

Art in the service of religion

Art galleries and supermarkets have one thing in common: they are constantly changing things around to keep you on your toes. The Metropolitan Cathedral, like most cathedrals, has enough artwork to warrant the description of an art gallery.

Many tourist visitors, of course, come just to see the stained glass, the carvings in the chapels, Sean Rice’s statue of Abraham, or the Mayer-Marton mosaic that once graced the church of the Holy Spirit in Ford. Two notable sculptures have been newly relocated to the premises of the Archives within the Cathedral: they are abstract designs in wood by Ernst Müller-Blensdorf.

Müller-Blensdorf twice fled the Nazis, who disapproved of his art. Born in Denmark in 1896, he was educated in Germany and after the First World War studied sculpture at Düsseldorf Academy. He created several public monuments and sculptures and in 1930 was appointed Professor of Sculptural Art at Wuppertal Academy. When the Nazis declared him a “degenerate artist” and ordered that all his work be destroyed, he moved to Norway. One adventurous step ahead of the invading Germans, he escaped to Scotland in 1940, only to be interned on the Isle of Man as an enemy alien. Released the following year, he settled in Somerset. He taught in local schools while continuing to work as an artist and sculptor, exhibiting his works in venues as diverse as Leicester and Monte Carlo. Having been at various points in

his life Danish, German and Norwegian, he became a British subject in 1947, and died in June 1976.

Blensdorf’s early work was usually in stone, ceramics and stucco work. On moving to Somerset he turned to using wood, creating works in mahogany, walnut and sycamore, and discovering that local elm trees provided ideal material for his artistic expression. “Most kinds of wood”, he observed, “will split and crack in the process of drying out. But after some observing and testing, I found that elm trees stand up admirably to this. When fresh the wood is very soft and easily cut, and it hardens during the process of carving to become as hard as the hardest

The abstract sculptures now at the Archives, “Angel”, from 1958, and “Prophet”, from 1961, were created in elm wood. Since Dutch elm disease devastated British woodlands in the 1970s, it is much harder to find the wood to carve. The sculptures were given to the Metropolitan Cathedral by Ernst Müller-Blensdorf’s widow and daughter in 1984 and were formerly sited in the Baptistry. The Cathedral is believed to be the only place in the north west of England where the sculptor’s work is on public display.

They really ought to be seen in the round, in the same way as we might explore a tree trunk. The holes are part of the rhythm of the sculpture, intended to generate curiosity in the onlooker to see the other side. “The holes I make”, said Blensdorf, “are always an integral part of the design”. “Angel” especially was created with the intent of making the grain of the wood “prominent in the movement of the sculpture”. There is a religious element to most of Blensdorf’s works: an artist, he said, is someone “who translates spiritual emotions and ideas into visible bodily form”; he believed that “a material form without spiritual expression is no work of art, but simple handicraft.” Come and judge

Neil Sayer, Archdiocesan Archivist “Prophet” Ernst MüllerBlensdorf
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“Angel”

News diary

If you’ve got any news from your parish that you’d like featured e-mail us with the details at: catholicpictorial@rcaol.co.uk

Archbishop Paul Gallagher returns to Liverpool for installation as an Honorary Canon

His Excellency Archbishop Paul Gallagher has returned to Liverpool to be installed as an Honorary Canon of the Metropolitan Chapter of Liverpool during a Capitular Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral.

Archbishop Gallagher returned to the city from the Vatican in a brief visit from his role as the Secretary for Relations with States for the special Mass celebrated by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP.

Parishioners from across the archdiocese, including those from his former parish, attended the Mass.

On receiving the honour, Archbishop Paul declared: “In taking up the office of honorary canon of this Cathedral Church, I promise that I shall always remain in communion with the Catholic Church, both in the words I speak, and by my mode of action. With great faithfulness and diligence, I shall fulfil the duties which are mine regarding the universal Church and the particular Church in which I am called to exercise my service according to the prescriptions of the law.”

Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP said: “It was a truly remarkable occasion welcoming +Paul back to his home diocese for him to receive this honour. We wanted to acknowledge the

good things he has done in his career. He is still very much part of the Archdiocese of Liverpool and this honour is one way we can show him that.”

Archbishop Paul is originally from Liverpool and was ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Derek Worlock in the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King on 31 July 1977.

His first appointment was as assistant priest in Holy Name parish, Fazakerley, where his duties included chaplain to the then Fazakerley Hospital, now University Hospital Aintree.

Pope Francis appointed him as Secretary for Relations with States on 8 November 2014.

Congratulations Peter, Martin and James

Congratulations to Peter Ross, Martin Fyles and James Finnegan who were all ordained into the diaconate in the same week as part of their journey into the priesthood.

Peter Ross, from St Margaret Mary’s parish was ordained as a deacon by Archbishop Bernard Longely at St Mary’s College, Oscott on Sunday 2 July.

Martin Fyles from Our Lady of Lourdes & St. Joseph, Southport and James Finnegan also from St Margaret Mary’s parish were ordained at the Palazzola in Rome on Wednesday 5 July.

Peter said: “The ordination was a beautiful occasion and I was delighted to be joined by my family, some priests from the archdiocese and also six parishioners from my home parish who have been a really big support to me.

“The moment I loved most about the day is walking into the chapel and hearing the entrance hymm Come Down O Love Divine which is my favourite hymn. I also felt very moved by the Ordination Rite.

“Another special moment was when Archbishop Longley mentioned in his homily that the pulpit at Oscott is one that John Henry Newman has previously preached from.”

Since his ordination, Peter has been back in Liverpool for the summer. He added:

“I’ve been helping out with Masses at St Margaret Mary’s as well as doing funerals and benediction. I’ve been preaching too which I absolutely love.

“I’ve also travelled to Lourdes with coach 5 as part of the archdiocesan pilgrimage.

It was brilliant to be there as part of the centenary year celebrations.”

After the summer, Peter will return to Oscott to complete his final year of seminary which will include working at a parish in Maryvale at weekends.

Fr Ron Johnson, vocations director at the Archdiocese of Liverpool said: “It was wonderful to join Peter, Martin and James at their ordinations and it was particularly special that they happened in the same week.

“The occasions were filled with joy and everyone came together to rejoice in all the Lord has been doing in their lives to bring them to this point.

“I would like to thank Peter, Martin and James for their hard work and dedication getting them to this point, but also to thank their families, the seminaries, their home parishes and the parishes where they have been on placement who have all played a key role in supporting and encouraging them to get to this point.”

Peter Ross L-R James Finnegan and Martin Fyles
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Archbishop Paul Gallagher (centre) with the chapter of Canons.

New deacons ordained at Metropolitan Cathedral

On Sunday 16 July, Peter John Renwick, Justin Malewezi Jr and Brendan Kelly were ordained as deacons at a Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King.

Clergy, friends, family, and parishioners of the deacons joined together for Mass celebrated by Bishop Tom Neylon.

Deacon Peter, from the parish St John Vianney, Halewood, who is a retired telecommunications worker, said: “I am happily embedded in the life of the parish at both St Mark’s and Holy Family churches.

“As I take up my role as deacon there, I will never forget the quote from St Augustine. ‘Work as if everything depends on you, pray as if everything depends on God.’”

Deacon Justin is a native of Malawi in Africa. He serves in the parish of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs and St Swithin’s, as well as the Likuni Parish back home in Malawi.

His father is the late Justin Malewezi, a senior politician in Malawi who served as vice president from 1994 to 2004.

On his father, Justin said: “My father taught me from a young age that ‘as a community, we need to look after each other’ and that ‘every person in society is valuable and should be respected.’ This is something I will live by in my role as a deacon.

“These values are important to me as I interact with people from diverse backgrounds. My wife, Emmie, and I strive to teach our children, Leoni and Maya, the importance of these values.

“For the past four years, they have been serving God by singing at Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral.”

Since his arrival in the UK, Justin has taught at both primary, secondary and college level at different institutions in England. Currently, he a lecturer at Edge Hill University.

Deacon Brendan works as a chaplain at Cardinal Heenan High School and serves in the parish St Mary’s Lowe House, St Helens.

He is of Irish descent and married to Paula, and has three children Katie, Eoin and Pearl.

Of his ordination, he said: “I consider it a great honour to be ordained a deacon and feel called to serve the Church. Jesus is our role model for service, he gave his whole life to save us from sin and death.”

Fr Chris Fallon, Director for the Permanent Diaconate, said: “It was an occasion full of joy.

“We welcome the three of them into their new role and keep them in our prayers as they continue their work in their parishes and the wider community.”

St Paul & St Timothy parish given LiveSimply Award

Archbishop Malcolm McMahon recently presented the parish of St Paul and St Timothy in Liverpool with the CAFOD LiveSimply award.

The LiveSimply award is an opportunity for Catholic communities – parishes, schools, religious orders and chaplaincies – to respond to Pope Francis’ invitation in Laudato Si’ to “work with generosity and tenderness in protecting this world which God has entrusted to us.”

The parish has been working to achieve the award since the 2020 lockdown, when they first came together as members of the Laudato Si’ Circle.

Mike Glover, the parish’s CAFOD volunteer, said: “As members of the Laudato Si’

Circle, we were led to reflect on how our lifestyle was contributing to the ecological crisis.

“We heard afresh the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor. These demanded a personal response and a desire to involve our parish community in addressing these issues.

“CAFOD’s LiveSimply Campaign, with its guidance

on how we could live more simply and in solidarity with the poor and in a more sustainable way, has proved to be a most practical tool in highlighting in various ways how we personally and as a community could respond.

“It has been a remarkable success both in raising awareness in our parish and inspiring most generous,

practical responses whenever this was needed.

“The award is not the end but simply an encouragement to continue on the path of ecological conversion.”

The LiveSimply award is earned by communities and schools who can show how they have been living simply, in solidarity with people in poverty and sustainably with creation.

The award celebrates what you have already done and inspires you to do more. It helps your community to live, not just more simply, but also more fully.

If you would like your parish to put their faith in to action and sign up to the LiveSimply award, visit cafod.org.uk/ livesimply

news diary
Archbishop Malcolm presents the LiveSimply award to the parish of St Paul and St Timothy
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Photo: Sue Manning

Gateacre parish takes part in Ignite

Eighty people involved in ministry at Our Lady of the Assumption Parish, Gateacre took part in a day called Ignite.

The day was for those actively involved in the parish community as a way of putting the diocesan Synod and parish vision into action.

Fr Stephen Pritchard explained: “The day’s aim was centred around three words. Celebrate, inspire, equip.

“To celebrate the good news of our parish and all the people who serve, to be inspired to answer the call to share responsibility in leading through the next stage of the mission God has entrusted to us, and finally to be better equipped for the next stage of the journey of the parish.”

Matt Regitz, from Texas who works in parish renewal and Jordan Kelly, from Brentwood, gave the main input. Both are from Divine Renovation – a company that helps parishes unlock the potential that lies within them.

They also support parishes to reclaim their purpose and take whatever steps that can

be made to move from maintenance to mission.

Parishioner Clare O’Brien said: “The input from Jordan and Matt made me realise how the Church can move forward and be spiritual and open to worship and prayer but within a Catholic tradition and celebrating and connecting with the Sacraments that we have.”

While for Shirley Green it was the emphasis in the input of being a Church outside in that struck her. She said: “Jordan and Matt challenged us as a parish to change our focus and instead of trying to bring people inside to Church. We

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should look at new ways to be a Church to people outside.”

Bishop Tom Neylon spoke at the day, he shared about his own experience of the Covid-19 pandemic and in this new time encouraged people to think big, that this is God’s Church and God has a plan bigger than our own.

The afternoon workshops were led by parishioners from St John Stone’s, Woodvale and St Agnes and St Aidan, Huyton as well as Our Lady’s parishioners. They focused on a healthy parish that has shared leadership, excels on Sundays and evangelises.

Music and worship were wonderfully led by One Hope Project, a Catholic creative collective.

Helen Reynolds said: “The thing I am taking away is, the mission has never changed but the methodology does.”

Finally, summing up her experience, Karen McCoy said: “Overall, the day has given me renewed hope that with the guidance of the Holy Spirit we as a parish are journeying together.”

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news diary Catholic Pictorial 12

Education Department holds annual thanksgiving Mass

On Wednesday 12 July, the Archdiocese of Liverpool’s Education Department held their annual thanksgiving Mass at the St Margaret Clitherow Centre.

The Mass, celebrated by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP, recognised those working in education throughout the Archdiocese who have retired this year.

The Mass was also attended by students from St John Bosco Arts College, as well as other people within the archdiocese.

During the Mass, former diocesan school worker Cath O’Leary was presented with a Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice – which translates as For The Church and the Pontiff. The honour is a decoration of the Holy See, which is given for distinguished service to the Catholic Church by lay people and clergy.

Cath worked at the archdiocesan offices until her retirement back in April. Before then, she spent many years working in Catholic Education throughout the archdiocese.

In total, Cath spent 40 years working in Catholic Education in a variety of roles. She served as a teacher, headteacher, governor and in the council, before moving to the Education Department at the archdiocese.

When she was given the medal, Fr Sean Riley, who concelebrated the mass, read a letter from the Vatican.

He said: “The insignia of the Venerable Cross, established for those who are distinguished in their outstanding work and zeal, Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice – for the Church and the Roman Pontiff.

“At the same time, granting her the faculty of being decorated with the said gold medal.

“From the Vatican on 3 May 2023, signed Monsignor Roberto Campisi, Assessor (for general affairs) Secretary of State.”

Cath was then presented with the medal by Archbishop McMahon.

Upon receiving her award, Cath said: “I was totally unaware that I was to receive any sort of award. The secret was well kept!!

“At the Mass I was aware that there would probably be some mention of me. However, I was stunned, shocked and very surprised to be given such recognition.

“When I had time to absorb all that had happened, I was very honoured that my work over the years was seen to be worthy of such recognition. All that happens in education is because of the collaboration and positive teamwork of all concerned. This award recognises all those partnerships and I thank everyone I have worked with throughout my career who have made this possible.

“What does the future hold? I am not sure. I am not a planner. I like things to evolve naturally. I am however still involved in schools in various capacities and this together with more time to devote to family and recreation will be welcome.

“I would like to express my appreciation to all involved in enabling me to receive this award. It means more than I will ever be able to express.”

Director for Education Joan McCarthy added: “It was an honour to see Cath receive the medal.

“It’s a testament to all her hard work in Catholic Education over the years, both in the archdiocesan offices, and around the different schools she has worked at.”

St. Michael’s RC Primary School visits cathedral

Recently 70 children from St. Michael’s RC Primary School, Widnes, visited the Metropolitan Cathedral with their teachers and parish priest Fr. Mark Moran.

Many of the children had never been inside the cathedral before, and when Dean of the Cathedral Canon O’ Brien greeted and welcomed them, he reminded them that this cathedral was theirs and it belonged to them. The children were thrilled to think that they had ownership of such a big church. After a good look inside and a run around the outside, the children all agreed that this was a wonderful house for Jesus to live in, in the heart of the city.

Fr. Mark then celebrated Mass at 12.15pm in the Blessed Sacrament Chapel, which was a privilege for everyone as the awe and wonder on the children’s faces was joy to behold.

Reflecting on their visit, the children said they “loved it” and promised to come back soon.

Fr. Mark said: “The cathedral belongs to us all and the children needed to know that. It was such a wonderful experience for them to see our wonderful cathedral in all its glory”.

The children and staff would like to thank the Dean and all who were so welcoming and kind to them when they visited.

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Photo: Sue Manning
13 Catholic Pictorial
Cath O’Leary was presented with a Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice

Carmel College student wins debating competition

‘I hate football’ is an assertion bound to spark discussion in a city like Liverpool – and fittingly enough, it was the title of the winning entry in a recent schools’ debating competition at Liverpool Hope University.

Schools from the archdiocese and beyond came together to take part in the competition and the winner was Keira Smith of Carmel College from St Helens, with her football-related speech.

Organised by the Catenians, the event took place on Friday 24 March at the university chapel with speakers addressing an audience of around 100 – including Archbishop Malcolm McMahon and the Bishop Emeritus of Hallam, John Rawsthorne. Archbishop Malcolm presented the prizes with the assistance of the Catenians’ provincial president, John Gannon, and Keira Smith, the above-mentioned winner, received from the Archbishop the prize of the Hope Shield along with a cheque for her college.

The runner-up was Kostas Kuklys of Cardinal Allen Catholic High School (‘Addiction is not a choice’) while third place went to Aymon Han of the Chester Catholic High School, who gave a speech titled ‘A country’s policy on educating girls impacts its political, social and economic outcomes’.

The other competing schools were Archbishop Beck Catholic College, St Francis Xaxier’s College, St Edward’s College and St Anselm’s College, Birkenhead, and all contestants received a certificate and Amazon voucher.

The judging panel comprised Brother Bernard Fyles of St Helens circle, Judith Daley, a retired circuit judge, and John Dove, a senior crown prosecutor.

Charles Boulton, organiser of the event, said: ‘As always the quality of the speeches was high and they provided a broad range of topics for our appreciative audience. Thanks are due to the Archbishop for his encouragement to the speakers and his enthusiastic support of circles throughout Province 4, and also to our sponsors, Mike and Anne Vickers of Chester circle, who generously sponsored the competition through their building company, Leverage Projects.’

For any young Catholics aged between 16 and 25 who would like to go to Lourdes, do you know there is the possibility of a helping hand from the Catenians?

The Catenian Bursary Fund has made a major contribution over the years in supporting young helpers on the Liverpool Archdiocesan Pilgrimage. Would-be applicants are not limited to the main diocesan pilgrimage either – those looking to travel to Lourdes on their own or with the HCPT or in a role assisting on the Jumbulance can also apply. As well as 16 to 25-year-olds, the fund is also open to those turning 16 in the next academic year.

To find out more visit: https://catenianbursary.com/lourdes-awards/

Second care for creation workshop delivered in Wigan

A second care for creation workshop has been delivered in the Wigan and Leigh following deanery preparations during Laudato Si’ week in May.

Pablo Guidi, archdiocesan Catholic Social Action Coordinator joined forces with parishioners Linda Morris, Justine Silcock and Steve Atherton to educate and enthuse people to take up environmental action in their parishes.

The workshop focussed on the Laudato Si’ Encyclical and explored the nature of environment. It was attended by parishioners from Our Lady’s, Bryn; St. Catherine & All Saints, Golborne; St. Lewis, Croft and St Oswald and St Edmund, Ashton-in-Makerfield; St Josephs.

Pablo said: “The workshop was a great success. We trained the 15 parishioners who will now go on and train other parishioners to care for our common home so together we can take up environmental action that will make a difference.”

Confirmations at St Wilfrid’s Widnes

On Tuesday 11 July, Bishop Tom Williams confirmed 20 young people at St. Michael’s Church in Widnes.

It was a wonderful celebration, filled with joyful prayer. Music was supplied by the staff and children of St. Peter and Paul Catholic College.

Fr. Thomas Clarke, said, “Thank you to all who made this celebration so joyous including the families, school and parish communities. And thank you to the young people, may the Holy Spirit inspire them to stay close to God and His Church throughout their lives.”

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Catholic Pictorial 14

Cathedral Record

For those of you who have not visited the cathedral site recently, a major project has begun to rectify the considerable problems on the roof and structure of the buildings on the Piazza at the bottom of the steps.

Celebrating refugee week at Irenaeus

Here at Irenaeus, we endeavour to live by the code of values passed down to us by our fathers and others, in faith, from Abraham and Sarah to the present day in the documents of Vatican II.

One of most important traditions we adhere to is that of welcoming the stranger to our home. Here our doors are open to all, whatever race, creed, gender, or status. In so doing we have been challenged, our preconceptions torn apart, our eyes and hearts opened, and our minds blown apart with wonder at the beauty and diversity of God’s creation. We have been blessed because now those strangers have now become our friends and our lives enriched by them.

To celebrate Refugee Week, we invited people to join us in a morning of prayer, discussion and sharing over a bowl of soup and a roll, followed by home-made cake.

Fr Chris Thomas opened the morning, speaking of the make-up of his own DNA and how interconnected we all are in our humanity.

Francesca followed with some Godly Play opening our minds to what it is like to leave your home because of circumstances beyond your will or control. What few possessions you could carry and what to leave behind. Also, the trauma of the journey to strange and often alien land such as ours.

Andre from Nigeria, an asylum seeker who is now resident in our country, spoke to us about his heartbreaking journey of a few years, the hopes and difficulties, the pain and loneliness that brought him to this present day. One could only admire his courage and endurance and ask his forgiveness for the difficulties and inhuman laws we in the western world put in his path.

Fr Peter Morgan, who is known to everyone in Merseyside for the immense work he has done on behalf of refugees, both male and female, who like Andre have made this journey to our shores in search of a life everyone on this planet is entitled to, and the difficulties they have faced.

The morning ended with a poem of a murdered trafficked African girl in Italy and a song from us affirming our faith and commitment to the mission entrusted to us.

In this dark time in our country where the values we believe in are not often shared by our government, the most heartwarming and hopeful sign was the amount of people who cared enough to come and join us in this celebration. They were not just spectators but participators in the pain of these strangers to our shores.

‘The darkness shall not prevail; the light of dawn will come.’

Just last week the new graphics have been added to the external hoardings to offer clearer directions and will enhance what is now a major worksite surrounding the former piazza café and shop and garden area. The big digging machinery has been on site for just over a month and we are now able to see the full state of the roof of the building and some of the condition of the steel structure and the damage that water ingress has made to the building. This work of uncovering and stripping out damaged and defective materials will continue until the end of October. We are now having to start to prepare plans for whatever building will replace the former café and gift shop.

I have shared with Archbishop Malcolm and the Diocesan Trustees a basic wish list from the Cathedrals perspective. This includes a new shop and café/restaurant. But would need to also include some form of cathedral welcome desk and place for Information at the street level. Also the possibility of a lift from the ground up to the cathedral level.

Then there are questions such as should the cathedral offices be located within this building? Further requirement for space would require the need for another floor! Then there is the question as to whether the diocese or the cathedral will have any other needs or requirements for the future that we would need to accommodate on this site.

All of this is having to be considered at present weighed alongside the considerable costs that we have already incurred on this site and the future costs of a major rebuilding programme. As we move forwards we hope in the near future to put together a display with photographs of what has been done so far on this site and also with some first attempts of possible plans and layouts for a replacement building.

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Pastoral ponderings

Living Catholic Social Teaching and Shaping a Change

It was somewhat embarrassing to see a massive picture of myself on the front page of the Catholic Pic last month–I thought it was bad enough having a small picture of my face at the top of my monthly piece!

Since my ordination, I’ve moved to St George’s Maghull, where I am on placement as a deacon, finishing my preparations for priesthood. I’ve only just arrived but have been made to feel very welcome. My mum and dad both went to school here, so I’ve heard a lot about the place, but that was a long time ago now. I’d never really been here before, so I’m looking forward to exploring and getting to know the people and the area.

Since being here I was actually able to meet some of the candidates for the permanent diaconate who were here for a day of formation–including the three who will have been ordained in the middle of July. As a transitional deacon, it was interesting to see a bit of a different experience of diaconate and think about what is the same and what is different in the way we live it out.

I am also in the middle of travelling around to attend different ordinations. I was honoured to be invited to deacon at a couple of ordinations this summer–one ordination of deacons, and one of priests. It’s always nice to be able to attend an ordination, catch up with people, and take part in the celebrations. If I’m not mistaken, there should be six more deacons in the archdiocese after July, three permanent deacons, and three who will go on to be ordained priests next year. Right now, the priority for me is to get as much practical experience as possible before I become a priest and get thrown in at the deep end. I’ve got a few baptisms booked in already, and am looking forward to being able to baptise without the stress that comes with my lack of experience. I’ve noticed that I’m already a lot less nervous about preaching, which used to scare me a little, as I may have mentioned before… it’s all starting to feel very real now, as I begin doing a lot of what I’ve been preparing to do for years.

On Thursday 6 July, people from across the archdiocese came together in support of our Shape the Change event.

The Catholic social action conference, held in partnership with Nugent and the Justice and Peace Commission, focused on the three themes of refugees, cost of living, and environment.

The first speaker of the day was Julie Kashirahamwe from Our Liverpool. She talked about how the goal was to make the city a friendly, migrantwelcome one. To do that, Julie elaborated on the council’s grant programme, which allows people access to vital services.

Up next was Dr Naomi Maynard from Feeding Liverpool, which helps to ensure everybody has access to food, no matter what their budget or location is. To help combat this, they had launched a couple of initiatives, like Queen of Greens. This involves working with greengrocers, etc. and taking food to vulnerable areas.

The final speaker of the morning was Dr Emma Gardner, Head of Environment at the Diocese of Salford. She gave a talk on the environment, and what we can do to protect the earth against climate change. The group then divided into workshops ranging from welcoming displaced people to care for creation.

After lunch, everyone returned to the main hall, where author Frank Cottrell-Boyce was waiting to give a speech on storytelling. His main message was that: “Joy should be at the centre of every story we tell.” The proceedings were then ended by Archbishop Malcolm McMahon OP. The day brought together organisations in the archdiocese who have been influenced by the Gospel and Catholic social teaching. It is their shared belief in social justice that will inspire partnership working, and a commitment to future collaboration. If you would like to find out more about the network, contact Pablo (archdiocesan Catholic social action coordinator) for further details on 0151 522 1042 or p.guidi@rcaol.org.uk

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17 Catholic PictorialCatholicPictorial 11 McCallum & Tritton & Sons Independent Family Funeral Directors 0151 931 2002 www.mccallumandtritton.co.uk

what’s on

Tuesday 1 August – Sunday 6

August World Youth Day in Lisbon.

Tuesday 1, 8 and 22 August

‘Movement to heal’ will be held on Tuesday 1, 8 and 22 August at 1.152pm at the Irenaeus Centre, 32 Great Georges Road, L22 1RD.

Gentle movement for all ages, abilities, disabilities and is dementia-friendly. All are welcome to join in and move our

Looking ahead

September 2023

Friday 22 September

The Choral Pilgrimage 2023, a watchful gaze at 7.30pm at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King.

The Sixteen’s 2023 Choral Pilgrimage tour celebrates the work of one of choral music’s most treasured composers – William Byrd. 400 years after his death, his music still moves, inspires, and has relevance in today’s world. This concert will explore some of his most emotional works, introducing the music of his influences and colleagues, and bringing his legacy firmly into the modern day with the world premiere of two beautiful pieces by Dobrinka Tabakova. Book now: thesixteen.com or by calling 0333 010 2850

Friday 22 September

Women’s weekend at The Irenaeus Project, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. A weekend long event celebrating the lives of women that have gone before us. For more information, please contact jenny@irenaeus.co.uk or phone 0151 949 1199

bodies to inspiring music. Participants can be seated or standing. For more information, email jenny@irenaeus.co.uk

Thursday 17 August A Level results day

Friday 18 – Sunday 20 August

Dennis Hardiman and Rose Hanley are organising a 50th reunion on the weekend of Friday 18 - Sunday

Saturday 23 September

Lecture on Nicholas Breakspear, the only English Pope, by Adrian Waddingham CBE, 11.00am – 1.00pm at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King.

The Cathedral Friends are delighted to welcome Adrian Waddingham CBE to give an illustrated talk on Nicholas Breakspear. For more information contact c.hanlon@metcathedral.org.uk

Friday 29 September to

Sunday 1 October

Praying with the Saints weekend retreat at the Christian Heritage Centre, at Stonyhurst. Praying with St Thérèse of Lisieux led by Canon John Udris. Details: https://christianheritagecentre. com/events/praying-with-the-saints/

Saturday 30 September

Eucharistic Minister Training at The Irenaeus Project, 32 Great Georges Road, Waterloo, L22 1RD. For more information, contact jenny@irenaeus.co.uk or phone 0151 949 1199

October 2023

Tuesday 10 October

‘Time out on Tuesday’ at the Cenacle from 10.30am to 4.00pm. Suggested offering for the day – £10, bring your own lunch; tea/ coffee provided. No booking

20 August 2023 for those students who left Christ’s College in 1973. On Saturday 19 we will celebrate with a gala dinner on the Liverpool Hope University campus. Accommodation is also available to book on-site. If you are interested in attending, please contact the Alumni Office at Liverpool Hope for more details by emailing alumni@hope.ac.uk

Thursday 24 August GCSE results day

required. Take a break from your daily routine and have some space to reflect and be still and be refreshed. Details: Sister Winifred Morley, Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Tel: 0151 722 2271

Email: morleywinifred6@gmail.com

Thursday 12 October

The Priests live in concert, 7.3010.00pm at the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King. The popular trio return to Liverpool to celebrate the centenary year of the Liverpool Lourdes pilgrimage, and the work of the friends of the Metropolitan Cathedral. With guest soloist Danielle Thomas, and musical director Stephen Mannings. For queries, email thepriestsliverpool@ hotmail.com, for tickets, go to ThePriestsLiverpool.eventbride. co.uk (booking fees may apply), and for group bookings phone 07860 129589 (Admin fee may apply)

Saturday 28 October

‘Come apart and be still.’ Quiet Saturdays at the Cenacle from 10.30 am to 4.00pm. Suggested offering for the day – £10, bring your own lunch; tea/coffee provided. No booking required. Details: Sister Winifred Morley, Cenacle, Tithebarn Grove, Lance Lane, Liverpool L15 6TW. Tel: 0151 722 2271

Email: morleywinifred6@gmail.com

August Website at w ww.liverpoolcatholic.org.uk Catholic Pictorial 18

The Lourdes stalwart Monsignor John Butchard by

For a quarter-century before his retirement as a priest, Monsignor John Butchard was director of the Liverpool Archdiocesan Pilgrimage to Lourdes. Even today it is impossible to imagine a pilgrimage without his gently smiling presence. As he affirms: ‘It has been the centre of all my priestly life. I’ve not missed a year since 1968.

‘Every year of my priesthood has been divided into before Lourdes and after Lourdes. I’ve never had a holiday in July or early August as it’d conflict with going to Lourdes. It has just been my life.’

An archdiocesan priest since 1966, Mgr John first visited the shrine on a school pilgrimage from St Edward’s College in 1954. ‘I was just bowled over by it,’ he says. He returned in 1968 with his mother, Joan, a one-time Catholic Pic columnist who travelled as an assisted pilgrim. ‘She stayed in the Saint-Frai hospital. It meant a lot to both of us.’

From his mother, he gained an appreciation of the international dimension of Lourdes. ‘Whenever she went, she used to get to know people from all over Europe and would haul me in to talk to them! I love the International Mass. I love the Torchlight Procession. I love the afternoon procession of the Blessed Sacrament. They’re common to all people in Lourdes at any one time and really very prayerfully managed.

‘The one which has most emotion is the Torchlight Procession. The sight of the Rosary Square filled with people holding lights as the daylight goes away, singing and praying, I find very moving.’

Mgr John’s knowledge of Lourdes guarantees a flow of fascinating details. As he points out, in 1954, the year of his first visit, every service was in Latin. By 1968, Lourdes was adjusting to the fact that ‘people wanted to have their services in their own language and that was a terrific change for them.

‘There was no planning in advance. You found out where Mass would be the following day, if you wanted it in English. After lunch each day, the pilgrimage directors went and had a cattle market for the time and place. Now you know almost 12 months in advance’

The care of the sick – or assisted pilgrims, as they are called today – has evolved too. ‘The minimal information we had on people’s medical conditions would frighten the medical team now. At the same time, pilgrims would never think of claiming against pilgrimage authorities for lack of due care or attention whereas it is not unknown now.’

For many years, he explains, the doctors and nurses who supported the pilgrimage – providing much-loved stalwarts such as the late Sister Kathleen Duffy – came from the Providence Hospital in St Helens, a place established by the Poor Servants of the Mother of God.

‘The way in which pilgrimages are managed by health services is changing all the time,’ he continues. ‘More and more people make their way to Lourdes and stay in hotels where, with the help of family and friends, they can cope in a way they couldn’t have done when I first started going when they needed the support of Hospitalite and more specialised services.’

The flow of memories goes on. One minute he is recalling the old St-Frai, crowded but ever-welcoming. Yet today, as he notes, assisted pilgrims can gather to eat in a dining room, rather than in their beds.

And he smiles at the thought of the old pilgrimage train with its ‘minimalist’ approach to health and safety typified by the gas boilers in the guards van which provided hot tea to a thirsty queue.

As a new priest, Mgr John had served at St Luke’s, Whiston, where a spell as chaplain to the local hospital ‘gave me an exposure to the sick’. From 1968-90 he was at Upholland College, first working with the junior seminarians before 16 years as bursar. He was later parish priest at St Joseph’s, Penketh (1990-2000) and Holy Rosary, Old Roan (2000-16). The constant through all of this was Lourdes. And it remains so. There is one place above all that draws him back. ‘As far as I’m concerned the Grotto is the most important spot. That just feels holy. Special. A place where somehow prayer is easier and you feel as though it’s being heard. It’s a strange feeling. Everything else is an accessory to that.’

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Faith Primary Academy awarded School of Sanctuary status

An Everton primary school is celebrating after achieving the School of Sanctuary award, in recognition of its dedicated work around inclusion

Schools of Sanctuary is a national network of over 400 primary and secondary schools, nurseries and sixth forms all committed to creating a culture of welcome and inclusion for everyone, especially those seeking sanctuary.

Faith Primary Academy, which is part of All Saints Multi Academy Trust, has been praised for its welcoming, calm and safe environment which is tangible throughout the school.

The academy currently has 217 pupils, 40% of which are learning English as an additional language (EAL), in addition to this 50% of children have special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), meaning that it is essential that Faith Primary Academy provides

a learning environment that allows children to not only achieve but to flourish.

Leading on securing the accreditation was Faith Primary Academy’s deputy headteacher, Miss Danielle Fox. She said: “Inclusion is valuing and nurturing every individual and equipping them with the tools to reach their potential and become positive contributors in society.

“As a school, inclusion is at the very core of everything we do. We believe that if we get inclusion right, everything else will follow.”

Headteacher of Faith Primary Academy, Miss Sarah Williams, added: “We are absolutely thrilled to have been awarded School of Sanctuary status. We have been working hard to achieve this accreditation and it is wonderful to be recognised for our efforts.”

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Catholic Pictorial 20
Proud pupil from Faith Primary Academy

Transforming lives at St Joseph Catholic Multi Academy trust

St Joseph Catholic Multi Academy Trust (SJCMAT) recently held its annual trust conference entitled ‘Transforming Lives’. The conference is a unique experience for all staff to come together and share best practice in transforming the lives of everybody by bringing the trust together as one unique family.

As the title suggests, the focus of the conference was to transform the lives of all who work, learn and are involved within the Trust. Staff progression, success and opportunities were at the heart of this year’s conference, with opportunities to collaborate with other members of the Trust and take part in exciting and informative CPD, “The quality of CPD is amazing!” – Michelle Forrest, Holy Spirit Headteacher.

SJCMAT places great emphasis on staff development, and this year’s conference reflected the staff’s desire to transform all lives, especially the children that they teach.

By supporting staff with their development, the Trust is giving its children the best possible learning experiences. Staff were given a selection of courses that they could follow in things that interest them and areas that they felt they needed some guidance in. Staff could choose from a wide range of workshop sessions, from ‘Ark Maths at Primary’ to ‘Looking at Scripture Through Art’.

The trust plans to hold a similar conference each year, bringing together all members of their unique family to support, share and collaborate.

August is an important month in the educational cycle. Our Year 11 and Year 13 students have left school but are not quite yet in sixth form or university. For them the new fall is not yet born as they await to start their new journey.

On August 17 our Year 13 students will receive their results and will find out the next stage of their educational or work journey. The following week, 24 August, is GCSE results day and another day of celebrating and anticipation for the future.

The media will be full of stories of successful pupils, tearful parents and proud schools. No doubt there will be the annual speculation about how the results are going up and the debate on whether the exams are getting easier. This debate saddens me as it attempts to deflect from the achievement of our young people. They have coped with a pandemic, substantial cuts in education, industrial disruption and a difficult world of social media.

There is an old Irish saying “Mol an óige agus tiocfaidh sí”, translated into English it means “praise the youth and they will flourish”. So, during this month of August let us give thanks and praise our young people. Please pray for success in the next stage of their life journey. I pray that they will never lose their awareness of the love of God for them and live their lives as witness to Christ. Perhaps they will come back and work in the Archdiocese of Liverpool if we continue to praise them.

‘August rain: the best of the summer gone, and the new fall not yet born. The odd uneven time’. Sylvia Plath

Andrea Provan, teacher of PE at St John Bosco Arts College

Many teachers will say they were inspired to enter the profession by a teacher they had in school and for Andrea Provan, she is no exception.

“My PE teacher was the person who inspired me,” Andrea explains. “For me, school wasn’t my favourite place but he was the one who pushed me to do things, for example when everyone was deciding to go to university, and I didn’t think that was something I wanted to do, he had a chat with me and explained what my other options are.”

As a child, Andrea and her family moved around as her dad was in the army. She has lived in Scotland, Yorkshire and Cyprus – where her parents still live now. From Year 4 up until Year 13, she went to school on the beautiful Mediterranean island.

With the support of her favourite teacher, Andrea realised that sport was what she loved and took that further to study sport science at Liverpool John Moores University.

She adds: “When I finished my degree, I didn’t really know what to do with it, but I realised that I would love to have the same effect on children that my teacher had on me. I wanted to be there for those who may not want to be in school and to be that person that they can speak to and rely on.”

Since then, Andrea has done a PGDE in physical education and has recently completed a master’s in education practice. Her future goal is to embark on a doctorate in education.

Having just finished her second year as an ECT (early career teacher),

Andrea is relishing in her role as a PE teacher at the Croxteth secondary school.

“Before I joined, I was very familiar with John Bosco Arts College because of its fantastic reputation in the city and, of course, the PE facilities are second to none – I really couldn’t miss the opportunity of working here. As soon as I met the headteacher, Mr Gidman, and other members of staff I knew this was the school for me,” she comments.

Her position also encompasses the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award which she is extremely passionate about and is keen to encourage participation from students in Year 9 and above.

Andrea says: “We have had 21 students complete their bronze award in Rivington recently and they absolutely loved it. They’re so eager to do their silver award already!”

As a new teacher, forming meaningful relationships with staff and students can take some time but for Andrea, she found that St John Bosco Arts College welcomed her with open arms which she puts down to the school’s shared values of Love, Faith, Community, Respect and Hope.

“I have great relationships with other departments and that doesn’t always happen in schools,” Andrea concludes. “If there is good staff morale, then this filters down and in turn, you have happy children who love coming to school. I find this really helps spread the

“Having respectful relationships is particularly key in teaching because if you show the children respect, they will give it back to you and that’s what you want to instil from a young age.”

C Change conference returns for the second year

The highly anticipated C Change Conference 2023 is set to take place on 21 September. This event aims to inspire educators, students, business and community leaders by showcasing cutting-edge practices in creativity across schools and communities.

The C Change Conference 2023 offers a unique platform to share ideas, insights, perceptions, and experiences while fostering connections with like-minded individuals passionate about driving creative change. Attendees will have the opportunity to shape the future of education and contribute to a collective vision.

Creativity Collaboratives is part of a pilot research programme, aiming to build networks of schools to test a range of innovative practices in teaching creativity, with all learning shared to facilitate system-wide change.

Across England, eight lead schools are working with a network of schools in their local area to cascade learning. St Bernard’s RC Primary and Nursery School, part of the Holy Family Catholic Multi Academy Trust (HFCMAT), is the lead school for the North West.

Renowned keynote speakers will be in attendance, including Sir Nick Serota, Chair of Arts Council England; Professor Bill Lucas, Director of the Centre for Real-World Learning (CRL); renowned TV producer and screenwriter Sir Phil Redmond, an ambassador for the creative industries, and Dr Debra Kidd and Hywel Roberts.

Another addition will be Ashleigh Nugent, a much-loved poet and author of the recently released book Locks. Ashleigh will be talking about his experience of education and creating some live poetry throughout the day.

The aim of the day is to bring people together to discuss a fresh approach to creativity, culture and community.

Emily Reid, project lead for the C Change, said: “We can’t wait to welcome people to the conference in September. The work that has been happening across our schools is inspiring and we look forward to sharing it with delegates.”

An interview with...

St Mary’s pupils shine on stage

St Mary’s College Preparatory School put the spotlight on the achievements of its pupils over the last 12 months at a special event in Southport recently.

The Atkinson arts centre on Lord Street was the venue for the junior prize-giving ceremony organised by the Blundellsands primary school.

The VIP guest at this year’s event was former professional footballer and ‘Lioness’ Isobel (‘Izzy’) Christiansen who ended

her career with Everton before retiring at the end of last season. Prior to that Izzy played for Blackburn Rovers, Manchester City and French club Olympique Lyonnais where she was part of the team that won the French league title and the UEFA Women’s Champions League in 2019.

In her speech, Izzy focused on the theme of resilience and the idea of never giving up.

Elsewhere at the event, the audience heard that the preparatory school had again achieved excellent academic results during the year.

They watched pupils collect prizes and awards recognising their success in a wide range of extracurricular activities including music, drama and sport.

Guests also enjoyed a series of choral and instrumental performances that once again highlighted the talent and creativity of pupils at St Mary’s Prep.

Headteacher of St Mary’s Preparatory School, Mr Jonathan Webster, commented: “This evening is very important for the school because it gives all our families the opportunity to gather and celebrate the achievements of our pupils in their many endeavours over the past year.

“It is our belief that every child has their own excellence and as a school it is our role to help them find and nurture it.

“I believe that on nights like this, we get the chance to allow the children to celebrate their personal growth, no matter what area it is in.”

St John Bosco Arts College welcomes new deputy headteacher

St John Bosco Arts College has announced the appointment of a new deputy headteacher, Anne Lunney. Anne will officially join the school at the beginning of the 2023/24 academic year.

After starting her teaching career at a Salesian school, Anne is thrilled to be reconnecting with her Salesian roots. She said: “The sense of togetherness and community is what makes a Salesian school so special.

“Joining a school that ‘together – inspires each other to flourish in faith and love’ wholeheartedly resonated with my values.”

Anne highlighted how her early career shaped her into the educator she is today. “I spent 11 years at Savio Salesian College, in Bootle. I experience first-hand the charism of Don Bosco and how this helps shape our young people,” she said.

Reflecting on her career, Anne shared that the one takeaway from her time at Savio was that to enable students to live a full

life, they must know they are loved across the school community.

When asked what her favourite part of her job is, Anne said: “I love the job I do, and there is nothing better than seeing a student develop, learn, grow and flourish with the knowledge that the school community has contributed to that development is a feeling unlike any other.”

Anne joins St John Bosco Arts College from Broughton Hall Catholic High School. Anne said Broughton Hall will forever hold a special place in her heart and she will cherish all the memories and friends she made along the way. Anne wishes the school and the community it serves the very best of luck for the future.

Darren Gidman, headteacher at St John Bosco Arts College, said: “We are delighted to welcome Anne into our senior leadership team. Anne’s experience, coupled with her Salesian roots will undoubtedly help her thrive here at Bosco.”

education news
23 Catholic Pictorial

Liverpool students set sail on a tall ship voyage from Penzance

12 students recently sailed from Penzance to Birkenhead, embarking on an opportunity of a lifetime.

St Francis Xavier’s College (SFX) was invited by the Merseyside Adventure Sailing Trust (MAST) to participate in its Sir Ken and Lady Dodd Tall Ship Experience. This year, SFX invited its neighbouring schools, St Julie’s Catholic High School and Gateacre School to join the trip. Six students from SFX, four students from Gateacre and two students from St Julie’s took part in the voyage.

MAST is a charity founded by Jim Graves B.E.M that provides opportunities for young people to develop their full potential and improve their mental health through sail training.

After a long drive down to Penzance from Liverpool the day prior, the voyage began on 10 July. Before departing, students were provided with the necessary health and safety training and partook in teambuilding exercises to get to know their new crewmates.

On-board, they worked together to support the operation of the ship each day, developing their sail skills.

After five days at sea, the SFX, St Julie’s and Gateacre students arrived back in Birkenhead at Vittoria Dock on 14 July at around 10am.

The experience acted as a positive intervention for the young people involved as they were able to enhance their teamwork, communication, and resilience in a unique and exciting way.

David Hayes, headteacher of St Francis Xavier’s College, commented: “Our students had a fantastic time taking part in the Sir Ken and Lady Dodd Tall Ship Experience. It has been a pleasure to hear about the new relationships they have formed with others in addition to the impressive skills and knowledge that were taken away from it.

“Thank you to MAST for providing this exciting opportunity for our young people, the mentorship they have received is excellent.”

One muti academy trust’s commitment to reading for pleasure

St Joseph Catholic Multi Academy Trust (SJCMAT), a group of seven academies across Merseyside, has pushed reading to the top of its agenda with transformative staff development supported by the Department for Education (DfE).

Instilling a love of reading at a young age lays a foundation for success at all levels. Reading for pleasure allows children to build their vocabulary, broaden their general knowledge and develop their cognitive abilities, allowing them to make greater progress across the curriculum.

SJCMAT is working hard towards its strategic priority of supporting every child to learn to read and become a frequent reader for pleasure.

To this end, staff recently took part in ‘Reading for Pleasure: Transforming your school’s reading culture’, an evidencebased professional development course funded by the DfE, giving staff the tools to transform their schools’ reading culture

and become advocates for reading for pleasure.

Since completing the course, staff have implemented positive changes, including building new libraries, organising book swaps and embedding opportunities for reading for pleasure throughout the school day.

Frank Cottrell-Boyce, children’s author, has also been involved in delivering the programme and has formed strong links with The Trinity Catholic Academy, a primary within the SJCMAT family. CottrellBoyce is helping to build a free-standing community library in the playground to encourage parents and pupils to read together.

Julian Tegg, course leader of the ‘Reading for Pleasure’ programme, said, “We’ve thoroughly enjoyed working with such a passionate and engaged group of colleagues.

“It was really inspiring hearing about how everyone has developed reading in their

school. We’ve learned as much from them as they have from us.”

This is just the beginning of a culture shift across SJCMAT which will set children up for success in education and beyond.

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Catholic Pictorial 24
Frank Cottrell-Boyce with pupils

Olympian offers words of wisdom to St John Bosco Arts College students

Former track and field athlete and fourtime Olympian, Christine Ohuruogu MBE, joined St John Bosco Arts College at the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral for its annual awards celebration.

The Olympic gold medallist addressed the packed cathedral, sharing an inspiring speech with students. Christine said: “People always ask me what my secret to success is and the answer is there is no secret recipe to success. Hard work, focus and discipline are what helped me flourish in my career.

“If I could give you three pieces of advice it would be to back yourself, always be your own strongest advocate. If you have a strong belief in yourself and what you can achieve, you can give yourself the best possible opportunities.”

Christine Ohuruogu MBE is Britain’s most successful female athlete. She won the 400m at the 2008 Olympic Games, 2007 and 2013 World Championship and 2006 Commonwealth Games. She won silver in the 400m at the 2012 Olympic Games and 12 medals in the 4x400m at Olympic, World, European or Commonwealth levels.

Christine was keen to share her experiences as a successful female in the sporting industry with the next generation. The annual event celebrated the achievements of pupils across the school. Key Stage 4 pupils accepted subject prizes and Key Stage 3 pupils received recognition for their hard work and commitment.

For those who completed GCSE and A-levels during the 2021/22 academic year, it was a chance to receive their certificates. Some students also received school trophies for their outstanding achievements, dedication and commitment to St John Bosco Arts College.

The heart-warming afternoon was closed by the whole school, who joined together for the school hymn.

Darren Gidman, headteacher at St John Bosco Arts College, said: “Our school community is built on nurturing and celebrating the dreams and talents of our students, in the spirit of St John Bosco. “As another year ends, it is an opportunity to reflect on a fantastic year at St John Bosco. There have been so many outstanding achievements, and each one deserves recognition. The awards celebration is our chance to come together and share in each other’s success.”

Local academy’s transformation praised by Catholic Schools Inspectorate

Holy Spirit Catholic Academy in Bootle has received a glowing report after its most recent inspection by the Catholic Schools Inspectorate on behalf of the Archbishop of Liverpool.

The findings of the inspection, which was carried out in June 2023, were overwhelmingly positive, concluding that Holy Spirit is a ‘Good’ school. Inspectors noted that “Christ is at the centre” of the academy and that there is a “palpable culture of welcome for all.”

The inspectorate’s report described in detail the positive, engaged pupils who attend Holy Spirit Catholic Academy. It noted that “pupils are highly engaged in

their learning and enthusiastic to share what they know and can do” and that they “seek out ways to be kind to each other.” Warm relationships were said to create a “strong and apparent sense of community” within a “safe and caring haven.”

This report has come after a turbulent few years for Holy Spirit Catholic Academy. After being placed in special measures by Ofsted in 2019, the school experienced a period of unstable leadership which was felt throughout the community.

However, Holy Spirit found stability in 2022 when it joined St Joseph Catholic

Multi Academy Trust (SJCMAT) and appointed a new permanent headteacher, Mrs Michelle Forrest. Mrs Forrest was described as a “powerful force for positive change” by the Catholic Schools Inspectorate, and SJCMAT was credited with “supporting the school well in providing opportunities for members of staff to develop spiritually.”

“Holy Spirit is transforming!” said Mrs Forrest. “The whole Holy Spirit team is committed to ensuring that every member of our school community thrives and achieves their potential. I firmly believe that we are now in a position to make that happen.”

education news
25 Catholic Pictorial

Education Matters by

Education

Ensure Every Family Has A Happy Summer Break

The summer holidays are finally here, and while many of us are looking forward to exciting times with family and friends, sadly for some families this is a time of worry, upset and anxiety.

Before they can even begin to think about fun-filled days out, throughout our region there are families who will be wondering how to feed their children during the long summer break, without the support of free school meals.

Thankfully, there are a number of initiatives designed to support struggling families. I wanted to use this month’s contribution to highlight some of these in the hope that others will do the same.

The BBC Good Food Guide have produced a helpful list of cafes and restaurants where children can eat for as little as £1 or in some cases for free (see the link below): https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/news-trends/news-trendskids-eat-free

These include most of the major supermarkets and as such most families will hopefully live within a relatively short journey from somewhere suitable, to get an affordable hot meal for their children.

But food isn’t a luxury, it’s a necessity. Why should children whose parents are struggling financially not expect to have some fun too?

We all know that when the weather is good there are plenty of relatively inexpensive activities families can take part in: visits to the park or beach, nature walks etc. What can they do when it’s “typical British summer weather” though?

Across our region we are blessed to have some amazing museums, libraries and galleries – most of which are free to visit. These are a great place to start, as once you’re there you’ll find lots of helpful staff willing to suggest other free activities and venues.

If you know people who are struggling this summer to provide for their children, please reach out to them or encourage them to reach out to their local parishes.

It’s incumbent on us all to ensure the most innocent in our society, our children, have a happy, care-free summer.

Satis Education is an ethical business with a percentage of profits invested in projects to support vulnerable families. For more information contact support@satiseducation.co.uk

Mission Week at Maricourt: Be The Change!

Staff and students at Maricourt Catholic High School marked the countdown to the end of the summer term with a ‘Mission Week’. Maricourt chose to reflect on the Mercy Values which underpin all it does as a school – compassion, service, justice, hospitality, respect and courage.

Mission preparation began with a whole staff INSET on Catholic life and ethos, where staff were invited to reflect on their reasons for joining Catholic education and the role they play in forming the character of the young people at Maricourt.

Maricourt was supported by the Animate Team who led presentations with each year group on the theme ‘Be the change’. This was followed up with smaller group sessions, where through a range of games and experiments, students were invited to think more deeply on how the Mercy Values can guide them in their lives.

The curriculum was collapsed for the whole week, and departments enthusiastically took up the challenge of producing lessons which showcased the Mercy Values in each subject area.

Students explored justice in their maths lessons through a fair-trade game.

The technology department collaborated to produce and package delicious baked goods for the Summer Soirée and for residents in the local care home, showcasing hospitality.

RE, English, history and PE explored how the six values are lived out in the world and identified individuals who embody these qualities in the school community by sharing affirmations.

The closing liturgy, led by Mrs Landor, gave students the opportunity to reflect on how they could utilize their learning over the course of the Mission Week to become “shining lamps, giving light to all around us.” (Catherine McAuley)

Some incredible pieces of work were produced by students, and Maricourt looks forward to showcasing these around school next year.

youth ministry

pilgrimage could not exist. It has been their energy and enthusiasm and witness that have allowed the pilgrimage to grow.

Taking inspiration from our pilgrim predecessors

By the time you read this, the Lourdes pilgrimage will be over. As I write, however, we are still a couple of weeks away.

In these last few weeks before the pilgrimage, we have been thinking about how best to explore the theme of Lourdes this year. As you may know, the theme for 2023 is a continuation of the one from last year. Then, we were asked to reflect on the idea of ‘Go and tell the priests’. This year’s theme is ‘Go and build a chapel’.

The Youth Pilgrimage has interpreted that final word a little bit differently, moving away from the idea of a chapel as a building to think more about the building of the Church. That is, we are thinking about the whole nature of what our faith calls us to: called to build the Church here on Earth.

For us, this makes some sense as we are also thinking this year about the centenary of the Liverpool Archdiocesan pilgrimage. And so we are fortunate enough to be able to look back on 100 years of history and pilgrimage, and to think about how the Church in our diocese has been built on the foundation stones of past pilgrimages and the various individuals that have taken part in them.

Although this may have always been there at the back of my mind, I had not stopped to think too much about how the Lourdes pilgrimage might have shaped the Church that is our own Archdiocese of Liverpool. Yet in finally giving some thought to this, I have been able to

see all those different individuals and events that have helped shape where we are as a Church today.

From my own point of view, it is good to look back and see how the Youth Pilgrimage has grown and developed over the years. For that I can give thanks to all those directors of the Youth Pilgrimage who came before me and made it what it is today.

I am also grateful to all the coach leaders and staff who assume the responsibility of caring for and ministering to the young people who wish to travel to Lourdes on pilgrimage. Without them, the

Perhaps most of all, it is right to look back on all those young people who, over the years, have taken a step into the unknown, have ‘put out into the deep’ and taken up the invitation of the Blessed Virgin to go to Lourdes on pilgrimage. In many cases it is those young people who have grown and matured into the staff, leaders and chaplains who, in their turn, act as witnesses to a new generation of young people.

And so, as much as I have looked forward to the pilgrimage this year, I am very much aware of the need to look back as well. If the theme of Lourdes is based around building then, surely, it is right to think of us as builders constructing the Church around us. As we are told, we can be ‘living stones’ building the Kingdom of God in our communities.

This time of reflection before Lourdes, therefore, has allowed me to think a little bit more about my place in that building of the pilgrimage and of the Church in our diocese. I would like to think that beyond a pilgrimage – and beyond the narrow confines of speaking about Lourdes in particular – there is something of merit for us all in taking time to reflect on those who have been before us in our Church here in Liverpool, and who have allowed us to be where we are now. Perhaps we can give thanks for their lives and for all they have done for us. And, maybe just as importantly, pray that we can take on the mission left us by them and continue to be those ‘living stones’ building the Church around us.

Please be assured of my prayers from Lourdes for all of you building the Church in your own ways in the diocese.

27 Catholic Pictorial

Mums the Word

Congratulations to the four seminarians from Liverpool celebrating their Ordination to the Diaconate. We are very proud of you all. As documented in last month’s Pic, Hugh Donleavy was the first to be ordained on 26 May, followed by Peter Ross, James Finnegan and Martin Fyles in July Our prayers for vocations to the priesthood seem to be working. Best wishes to them and their families.

At St Margaret Mary’s foundation, they are feeling very proud of one of their members, Marian Begley. For the last 25 years Marian has volunteered for numerous charities, including working with the sick at Lourdes each year. She was nominated for an Irish in Britain Volunteer award – and finished as a runner-up in the Outstanding Individual Volunteer category. At the awards ceremony at the Irish Cultural Centre in Hammersmith, she was given a trophy and a certificate that she said she would treasure.

A century of service News from the Liverpool province of the Knights of St Columba

Cathedral stages National Memorial Mass

June was a unique experience for the Knights in Liverpool with so many significant events coming together in one weekend.

We had the feast day of our patron, Saint Columba, celebrated with Mass at St Columba’s Parish Church in Huyton on Sunday 11 June and a gala provincial dinner held two nights before. Sandwiched between, as the highlight of the weekend, was the National Memorial Mass for deceased members at the Metropolitan Cathedral on Saturday 10 June.

We have been asked to support the ‘No child left behind’ campaign calling on MPs and the government to extend free school meals to every child in primary school. We are asked to pray for the 4.2million children who live in poverty in the UK according to campaigners, and for all those who go to school hungry. More details can be found at: www.nochildleftbehind.org.uk.

Most of our foundations have closed for the summer break. I wish you all a happy holiday and look forward to meeting up again in September. We have our bi-monthly Mass on 6 September at All Saints, Anfield.

Though this was a national event it was pleasing to see the offertory procession led by two local widows, Dorothy Connell and Patricia Fitzsimons. Behind them in our accompanying photo (above) are Brothers Charlie McCluskey, a past supreme knight, and Brendan McCann, supreme knight of the Irish Knights of St Columbanus. In the last row are Brother Peter Sims-Coomber, a former supreme director, and Jane Woods, daughter of Pat Hudson, another past supreme director.

Memorial books containing the names of all deceased members since the inception of the order are housed in the St Columba Chapel at the cathedral and are brought out in procession and laid on the altar during each Memorial Mass. They can be seen being carried to the altar in the photo.

n We are glad to report the Ordination to the Permanent Diaconate of Brother Justin Malewezi, grand knight of council 584 here in Liverpool. He was ordained during Mass at the Metropolitan Cathedral on 16 July. We congratulate Bro Justin who has not only worked extremely hard in the pursuit of his calling to the diaconate but also as grand knight of his council while at the same time supporting underprivileged children back home in his native Malawi.

n It is with much sadness that we report the death of Brother Donald McGair of council 64, Ormskirk, on 10 June, just a few months short of his 94th birthday. The funeral Mass of this long-serving and much-esteemed brother was held at St Annes’s Parish Church on 28 June. We extend our deepest sympathy to his family at this sad time.

Websites: w ww.ksc.org.uk

www.kscprov02.weebly.com

Email: dpokeane@aol.com

Pic extras Catholic Pictorial 28

Nugent Adoption: Uniting hearts and homes in the journey of adoption

In a world where every child deserves a loving home, there is a powerful truth we must confront; not all children have an equal chance of finding their forever families. Over half of children (59%) waiting for permanent homes belong to certain groups where it takes an average of eight months longer to be adopted. This includes children aged five or over, those with additional and/or complex needs, brother and sister groups, and those from black and mixed heritage backgrounds.

To address the prolonged waiting periods these children endure, ‘You Can Adopt’, Nugent and other adoption agencies across England unite in a collective campaign. Our Mission? To shine a light on the remarkable circle of support available to adopters and, in doing so, connect these resilient parents with the children who often wait the longest for their dreams to come true.

Over the years, the adoption process has undergone a remarkable transformation. It has become simpler, quicker, and more supported than ever before. Just ask Jenny*, a proud adopter who chose Nugent Adoption to fulfil her dreams of building a family. Sharing her heartfelt adoption journey, Jenny* couldn’t help but emphasise the incredible support she received from the Nugent team:

“I adopted my amazing son seven years ago as a single adopter. It was the best thing I have ever done and consider it

to be my biggest achievement in life. It was an intense process but completely worth it.

“I then met my now husband a few years later. We decided we would like to adopt another child together to provide a sibling for our son, who has a great understanding of adoption… and is proud to say he is adopted. We also wanted to experience the joy of adding a new little member to our family.

“The experience was very different for me this time; I was adding to our family rather than creating a family. There were other things to consider, and I had different feelings. Our social worker, Paula, has been amazing and I don’t think we would have stuck through the process without her. She guided us through dealing with these different considerations and feelings. We are expecting our little girl to come home soon I’m sure there will be lots of new challenges, but we are excited for our new adventure together. Knowing we have that ongoing support from Nugent is invaluable.”

With close to 2,000 children waiting to be adopted in England, the chances are if you can provide a safe, stable, loving home, you can adopt.

If you have any questions and would like to find out more about adoption, you can contact our friendly team on 01744 613 041, email adoption@wearenugent.org or visit nugentadoption.org.

*Name has been changed.

Reflecting on the success of the Good Shepherd Masses

A heartfelt thank you to the amazing 1,900 pupils who attended the recent Good Shepherd Masses held at the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral and St. Mary’s Church in Leyland. Both events were an overwhelming success and filled our hearts with gratitude and appreciation.

Our Good Shepherd appeal is one of the oldest charity appeals in the UK. With its origins with our founder Fr James Nugent and built around children helping children, the appeal has helped support families struggling to support themselves in difficult times for over 121 years.

This year, the Good Shepherd Appeal revolved around the theme of ‘The Good Samaritan: love thy neighbour.’ We aimed to spread the message of the importance of loving one another and showing care and compassion through acts of kindness. Primary and secondary schools from across the archdiocese wholeheartedly embraced this theme, and their creativity in raising funds for Nugent was truly remarkable. They came up with incredible ideas that their friends and staff could take part in.

Year after year, Nugent’s Good Shepherd Masses offer a remarkable platform to express deep appreciation and celebrate the outstanding efforts of the incredible students who tirelessly raise funds for Nugent. Their unwavering support and dedication to Nugent’s Good Shepherd Appeal is truly remarkable and inspiring. The funds raised through the schools’ generosity and hard work will make a tangible difference in the lives of children and families facing challenging times. We are privileged to have such compassionate and dedicated students in our community.

Let us continue to nurture a spirit of kindness, love, and compassion in everything we do. Together, we can create a brighter future for those Nugent care for, educate and protect across our communities.

29 Catholic Pictorial

Dialogue and Unity Renewing the mission of Strawberry Field

and spiritual elements. Its visitor exhibition explores the site’s history and the magnificent contribution of the Salvation Army to British society. It is a place too of spiritual exploration, retreat and pastoral care, a place where you can take time to rest and refresh yourself.

Major Kathy Versfeld is the mission director and her husband, Major Allister Versfeld, is the development officer as well as serving as the Salvation Army’s ecumenical officer for the area.

New bandstand opening

It was in 1934 that the Salvation Army received the gift of Strawberry Field – a Victorian house in leafy grounds off Beaconsfield Road in south Liverpool. Two years later it was opened as a children’s home for girls, later taking boys as well. From then on, for nearly 70 years, it gave some of Liverpool’s most vulnerable children a refuge – a safe, calm and spiritual home.

It was in these grounds that a young John Lennon, who grew up around the corner on Menlove Avenue, came to play. Those days inspired his work in the Beatles with Strawberry Field – written in the singular – immortalised in the song ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ in which Lennon explored those more innocent days of escape which contrasted with the later complexities of a life lived in the public gaze.

Much like the Cavern Club and Penny Lane, Strawberry Field is a jewel in Liverpool’s Beatles crown. Yet despite the hundreds of thousands of tourists that come to the city each year, this piece of local history was never previously open to the public. Since the Salvation Army took the step of renovating the site, however, the famous red gates have opened at last – and it is not only Beatles fans feeling the benefits.

With a creative approach to social care and inclusion, Strawberry Field is

perpetuating its legacy of support through a new training hub for young people aged 18-25 with learning difficulties and other barriers to employment. Its ‘Steps to Work’ programme combines education and work placements, including opportunities on site in both the shop, selling a range of Beatles memorabilia, and the Imagine More Café. There is an initiative to grow fruit and vegetables and to source local items wherever possible, demonstrating a commitment to sustainable and responsible tourism.

All in all, the Strawberry Field site weaves together educational, cultural, heritage

In September, Strawberry Field will celebrate the official opening of its new bandstand with a thanksgiving and dedication service. The bandstand is in the shape of a Salvation Army drum and is a gift from Cliff Cooper, an honorary patron of Strawberry Field and CEO of the Orange Amps music company. Commissioners Anthony and Gill Cotterill, territorial leaders for the Salvation Army in the UK and Ireland, are due to officiate at the service.

Any Pic readers yet to see Strawberry Field should pay a visit. They will find a new exhibition dedicated to the story of the place, the song and John Lennon’s early life, along with the café and tranquil gardens. There are also opportunities to volunteer. To learn more, call 0151 252 6130 or visit www.strawberryfieldliverpool.com.

Catholic Pictorial 30
Keeping you up­to­date with all the news from around the Archdiocese online at: www.catholicpic.co.uk You can follow us on social media at: @PicCatholic Plus you can subscribe to the Pic Postal subscriptions are available as follows: • • • £9.50 for 3 issues (3 month subscription) £19 for 6 issues (6 month subscription) £37.50 for 12 issues (annual subscription) POSTAL: To take out a postal subscription please email enquiries@cpmmmedia.com or call 0151 709 7567 DIGITAL: You can also subscribe to a digital version on the Pic by emailing enquiries@cpmmmedia.com or call 0151 709 7567 31 Catholic Pictorial

Come and say hello.

At St John Bosco Arts College, our open evening is more than just an opportunity to take a look around our state-of-the-art facilities. It’s a chance to find your place, reach your goals and realise your potential in Love, Faith, Community, Respect and Hope.

Open Evening Thursday 21st September 4pm -7pm

stjohnboscoartscollege.com

Articles inside

Dialogue and Unity Renewing the mission of Strawberry Field

2min
pages 30-31

Nugent Adoption: Uniting hearts and homes in the journey of adoption

3min
page 29

Cathedral stages National Memorial Mass

1min
page 28

Mums the Word

1min
page 28

Taking inspiration from our pilgrim predecessors

2min
page 27

Mission Week at Maricourt: Be The Change!

1min
page 26

Education

1min
page 26

Local academy’s transformation praised by Catholic Schools Inspectorate

1min
page 25

Olympian offers words of wisdom to St John Bosco Arts College students

1min
page 25

One muti academy trust’s commitment to reading for pleasure

1min
page 24

Liverpool students set sail on a tall ship voyage from Penzance

1min
page 24

St John Bosco Arts College welcomes new deputy headteacher

1min
page 23

St Mary’s pupils shine on stage

1min
page 23

C Change conference returns for the second year

1min
page 22

Andrea Provan, teacher of PE at St John Bosco Arts College

2min
page 22

Transforming lives at St Joseph Catholic Multi Academy trust

2min
page 21

Faith Primary Academy awarded School of Sanctuary status

1min
page 20

The Lourdes stalwart Monsignor John Butchard by

3min
page 19

what’s on

2min
page 18

Living Catholic Social Teaching and Shaping a Change

2min
pages 16-17

Celebrating refugee week at Irenaeus

3min
page 15

Confirmations at St Wilfrid’s Widnes

1min
pages 14-15

Second care for creation workshop delivered in Wigan

1min
page 14

Carmel College student wins debating competition

1min
page 14

St. Michael’s RC Primary School visits cathedral

1min
page 13

Education Department holds annual thanksgiving Mass

2min
page 13

Anya and Aria dream of having their own café

1min
page 12

Gateacre parish takes part in Ignite

1min
page 12

St Paul & St Timothy parish given LiveSimply Award

1min
page 11

New deacons ordained at Metropolitan Cathedral

1min
page 11

Congratulations Peter, Martin and James

1min
page 10

News diary

1min
page 10

from the archives Art in the service of religion

2min
page 9

On a liturgical note

5min
page 8

Liverpool’s proud Lourdes landmark

7min
pages 4-7

From the Archbishop’s Desk

1min
page 3

Dialogue and Unity Renewing the mission of Strawberry Field

2min
pages 30-31

Nugent Adoption: Uniting hearts and homes in the journey of adoption

3min
page 29

Cathedral stages National Memorial Mass

1min
page 28

Mums the Word

1min
page 28

Taking inspiration from our pilgrim predecessors

2min
page 27

Mission Week at Maricourt: Be The Change!

1min
page 26

Education Matters by

1min
page 26

Local academy’s transformation praised by Catholic Schools Inspectorate

1min
page 25

Olympian offers words of wisdom to St John Bosco Arts College students

1min
page 25

One muti academy trust’s commitment to reading for pleasure

1min
page 24

Liverpool students set sail on a tall ship voyage from Penzance

1min
page 24

St John Bosco Arts College welcomes new deputy headteacher

1min
page 23

St Mary’s pupils shine on stage

1min
page 23

C Change conference returns for the second year

1min
page 22

Andrea Provan, teacher of PE at St John Bosco Arts College

2min
page 22

Transforming lives at St Joseph Catholic Multi Academy trust

2min
page 21

Faith Primary Academy awarded School of Sanctuary status

1min
page 20

The Lourdes stalwart Monsignor John Butchard

3min
page 19

what’s on

2min
page 18

Living Catholic Social Teaching and Shaping a Change

2min
pages 16-17

Celebrating refugee week at Irenaeus

3min
page 15

Confirmations at St Wilfrid’s Widnes

1min
pages 14-15

Second care for creation workshop delivered in Wigan

1min
page 14

Carmel College student wins debating competition

1min
page 14

cathedral

1min
page 13

Education Department holds annual thanksgiving Mass

2min
page 13

Anya and Aria dream of having their own café

1min
page 12

Gateacre parish takes part in Ignite

1min
page 12

St Paul & St

1min
page 11

New deacons ordained at Metropolitan Cathedral

1min
page 11

Congratulations Peter, Martin and James

1min
page 10

News diary

1min
page 10

from the archives Art in the service of religion

2min
page 9

Love is the only way

2min
page 8

On a liturgical note

2min
page 8

Liverpool’s proud Lourdes landmark

7min
pages 4-7

From the Archbishop’s Desk

1min
page 3
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