Page 1

exterior de sign — L I V E O P E N LY —


EXCEPTIONAL INTERIOR & EXTERIOR FURNITURE

Ecowood Collection at Williamsburg Edge, Brooklyn New York

I N T E R I O R • E X T E R I O R • C U S T O M

TRADE SHOWROOMS: MIAMI DANIA BEACH ATLANTA DALLAS HOUSTON SCOTTSDALE COSTA MESA SAN DIEGO CHICAGO NASSAU PANAMA CITY

Olympus Collection

for more than 16200 NW 49th Ave. Miami FL 33014 Phone: 305.823.3480 | www.pavilion-furniture.com

years


CONTENTS

36

TRENDS

.................

p6 | Turning

the tables

CURATE

.................

p14 | Outdoor

allure

Vision

................

p26 | Fabrics

and furnishings, wonderful waterscapes, plush plants

pro j ect

....................

p36 | Italian

inspiration, lush locale and outdoor oasis

RESORT

.................

p48 | Brown

32

Jordan Outdoor Kitchens brownjordanoutdoorkitchens.com p50 | OW Lee owlee.com p52 | Shademaker shademakerusa.com p54 | Skyline Design skylinedesign.com fusion

................. p58 | Posh

pillows

PROSE

.................

p62 | Every

inch counts

Cover: Kenneth Cobonpue, Dragnet Chair

exterior design | 3


Jul 29 - aug 2, 2018 Save the Date at LasVegasMarket.com


CONTENTS T I M E L E S S S T YLE One of my favorite types of pieces to write is a personality profile. Over the years, I’ve gotten to interview quite a few personalities: Bob Barker at his home in the Hollywood Hills (a stunning Spanish Colonial Revival style), Johnny Van Zant (lead singer, Lynyrd Skynyrd) on the tour bus, and Stuart Weitzman (famed shoe designer) by phone from New York.

e xt e r i o r de s ign — L I V E O P E N LY

SENIOR PUBLISHER John Emerick 336.605.3780 jemerick@casualliving.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michelle Patrick 336.605.1131 mpatrick@casualliving.com

Ranking right up there with them is Randy Trull. Randy is a legendary Glen Raven Sunbrella designer. And man, does he have style! For our interview he was immaculately clad in a cashmere tweed Brooks Brothers suit and Gucci loafers. Only he was chagrined that he’d leſt his silk orange pocket square at home and had to go with cream instead. His look was still flawless. Randy resonated with me because of his exuberant spirit, his jolly nature and his unbridled passion for design. He’s one of the rare few who has always believed in his art and refused to compromise. Imagine. Today, the octogenarian is still creating glorious fabrics for his firm Mfano, when he’s not enjoying sailing his yacht around the coast of Wilmington, N.C. What joie de vivre! We can all only aspire to live such a full and authentic life. And I can only hope that I captured a sliver of it on p. 26. Randy is in good company this issue in the Vision department. I must admit that I am personally obsessed with Philippine designer Kenneth Cobonpue, p. 30. Sometimes I catch myself daydreaming about his Blossom chair, shaped just like a large, round flower blossom, which swivels 360 degrees. (Kenneth, if you’re reading this, please send me one in bright red.)

EDITOR

And if you think you know what a concrete chair looks like—think again. Robert Remer truly pushes the boundaries of possibilities in the urban landscape. Just check out the chairs on p. 3 and the interview on p. 32. Come to think of it: That’s a good theme for this issue. Pushing the boundaries of possibility. Discover the new heights that outdoor melamine tableware has reached—and the materials used for the tables themselves—in Trends (pgs. 6–10). And ponder the curious collection of outdoor accessories and furnishings in Curate (pgs. 14–23). Finally, don’t miss Elaine’s Smith posh pillows on pgs. 58–61, which I’m constantly pinching myself that, yes, they are made for the great outdoors. (Once Elaine gave me the best compliment I’ve ever received. She said, “You know what? You’re the pillow. You’re the pillow of the industry.” No, my dear Ms. Smith, you are the pillow of the industry.) Enjoy this issue of Exterior Design . . . and imagine all the possibilities. □

WA Y N E T T E G O O D S O N Editor-in-Chief

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Waynette Goodson 336.605.1033 wgoodson@casualliving.com FEATURES EDITOR Jennifer Bringle 336.605.1007 jbringle@casualliving.com ASSISTANT EDITOR Alex Milstein ART DIRECTOR Cammie Collier SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Elena Strickler CONTRIBUTORS Tracy Bulla, Barrie Livingstone, Elaine Markoutsas, Laurie Rudd, Kathy Wall SALES ASSISTANT Pany Sengsouriya DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION Greg Schaftlein PRODUCTION MANAGER Rich Lamb 336.605.1074 DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR Mynda Bullock GRAPHICS SPECIALIST Ariel Perez DATABASE ASSETS & Jessica Byerly SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER WEB CLIENT SERVICES Dan Sage MANAGER DIRECTOR OF Chris Schultz WEB OPERATIONS WEB OPERATIONS SPECIALIST Randy Melton CO-DIRECTOR OF Melanie Bingham CREATIVE SERVICES CO-DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE SERVICES DIRECTOR OF EVENTS CONFERENCE & EVENTS PLANNER AUDIENCE MARKETING MANAGER

Angie Moorefield Jennifer Kresl Heather Thompson Jessica Byerly

PROGRESSIVE BUSINESS MEDIA CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Matthew Slaine VICE PRESIDENT Catherine Silver GROUP PUBLISHER DIRECTOR OF SALES Lee Folger VICE PRESIDENT OF Tammy Overcash FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING VICE PRESIDENT Melinda Webster HUMAN REDSOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT

7025 Albert Pick Rd., Suite 200, Greensboro, N.C. 27409 336.605.0121, fax 336.605.1143 exteriordesign.com; progressivebusinessmedia.com SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES fax 818.487.4550, PO Box 16659, North Hollywood, CA 91615 The usage or reproduction of any content, facts, figures, research, and any other content published by FT Media Holdings LLC in any format is strictly prohibited without express written permission. Full terms and conditions of usage and reproduction can be found online.

exterior design | 5


TABLE setting

.........................................................................................................................................................................................

MATERIALS ARE TURNING THE TABLE ON OUTDOOR DESIGN BY ELAINE MARKOUTSAS

TRENDS

Paola Navone for Gervasoni

Tables—dining, cocktail and side tables that double as portable benches—are making fashion statements with daring form, color and texture. And that goes for tableware, too. With the current trend to design outdoor rooms as you might indoors, that means more eclectic and less matchy-matchy. Tables are the perfect opportunity to mix it up, especially when paired with chairs in contrasting materials. Table choices extend beyond teak, wrought iron, extruded aluminum, resin, outdoor wicker and glass to include concrete, porcelain, fire clay, acrylic and other blends. Finishes are shiny, matte, hammered and textured. And manufacturers are pushing the envelope with surprising combinations of materials, and new looks for basic elements like legs, table widths and edge treatments. The new looks range from rustic, as in the Marina porcelain plank tops available from OW Lee, which are inspired by ocean-

6 | exterior design

weathered driſtwood, to sleek black matte porcelain teamed with a white lacquered frame from Ligne Roset. Classic rattan looks modern with fresh, rounded edges in unexpected triangular shapes, low to the ground for a fashionable coffee table from the Italian brand Gervasoni. Or a weave of swirling stripes in shades of green rattan in small side tables from Dedon, topped with coordinating striped glass. In resin, the base of a table defies conventional form—unfolding like the petals of a flower from Janus et Cie. Another table from Minotti pairs with painted tubular steel poles arranged like a tripod to support its stone top. In addition, outdoor tableware has never been more exciting. Melamine has become more substantial—far from paper thin as it once was—more durable and much more stylish. Shapes and details like chunky rope borders are not unlike conventional stoneware. Delicate, intricately painted florals and even metallic gold details are so convincingly like porcelain; few would think twice about bringing them to the indoor buffet table, right alongside the good


LAS VEGAS

HIGH POINT

CHICAGO

Showroom C1284

InterHall 301

Showroom 15-110

www.skylinedesign.com/northamerica

.

info@skylinedesign.com


TRENDS

Retro meets modern style in the Solina melamine collection from Studio California. The stylized pattern is a complex overlay on a shadowy, almost grained, background with more owers. Its coral edges and bowl interiors are a fresh look for al fresco dining. Designed by Laurie Gates. gibsonusaoutlet.com

Besides its vivid color, the Cocotte low table and stool from Fermob gets points for versatility. The low table has a steel rod frame and removable aluminum top. The stool also doubles as a table and serving tray. fermobusa.com

8 | exterior design


china. Colors range from the most vivid—we love those happy brights come summer—to sherbet-y pastels, a smart selection of neutrals, and even black and white. Finishes can be matte or glazed, even replicating the popular reactive glazes we saw at the Tabletop Market in New York this year. Not only are there amazing fashion-forward patterns that cover the gamut of designs, from palms and splashy florals to geometrics and stripes—but also on-trend shibori indigo, terrazzo and marble looks. Even artwork from one of the 20th century’s most influential American painters, Robert Rauschenberg, is available via hand-painted and hand-applied decal on melamine. Makers now include traditional brands like Royal Doulton and Juliska (known especially for their romantic Bohemian glass) who have decided that melamine is a hot category. Some classic patterns—like the iconic Spode Christmas tree—now are available in a melamine version. And those kicky polka dots and stripes you crave from Kate Spade come in non-breakable models. Further, you don’t have to worry about these plastics. Look for assurances that they are BPA-free. (For a long time, a knock on melamine was its potential toxicity.) Drinkware has not been neglected, either. The range of shades is swoon-worthy, and you have your choice of sleek, smooth silhouettes, or fancier, more shapely glasses, even goblets that look like cut crystal. And just as in glassware, these acrylics are available in a variety of shades, from pastels to brights, as well as patterns including fun polka dots.

Czech glassware manufacturer Juliska has expanded to dinnerware, including melamine for the outdoors. The Oceanica pattern from the Al Fresco Collection features a seashell mosaic pattern in hues of blue and coral that will add instant flair to the pool party or patio dinner. juliska.com

Elevating the style quotient for outdoor tables is breezier than ever. The only hard part is homing in on your favorites. □

The clever half-sphere Barton table rests on short, jaunty legs. It resembles a molcajete, a stone tool used to make tortillas. Made of concrete, the table (shown in slate, a darker gray) is part of the WON (Weather or Not) collection from Mr. Brown London. mrbrownhome.com exterior design | 9


Classic design adds sophistication to the outdoors in a pair of Circles tables by Maria Jeglinska for Ligne Roset. The quartz gray lacquered steel base has a matte white, marble-eect stoneware top and comes in two sizes, 17 and 25 inches. ligne-roset.com

TRENDS

A watercolor look in tonal shades of black, gray and white give the Savannah Floral collection from TarHong an artistic look in dishwasher safe, BPA-free melamine. tarhong.com

10 | exterior design


Etna Collection • Lake Como, Italy

Breathtaking Outdoors. Inspiring Indoors. F U RN I T U RE | LU X U RY FA B RI C P RO D U C T S | O RNA M EN TA L VA S ES | CO RD LES S LI G H T I N G

SEASONALLIVING.COM

512.544.5738


COLOR.

DESIGN. 203.626.5625 | brownjordanoutdoorkitchens.com | 1 Grand Street, Wallingford, CT 06492 BROWN JORDAN is a registered trademark of Brown Jordan International, Inc. and is used under license to CT Acquisition, LLC.


STYLE.

INNOVATION.


OUTDOOR ALLURE BY TRACY BULLA

................................................. Each season, designers up the ante in terms of exterior offerings with maximum sophistication and ingenuity. Look for gorgeously executed texture, sculptural silhouettes and artisanal appeal.

OTTOMAN EMPIRE

CURATE

Paola Lenti’s masterful use of color reaches new heights in the Spezie outdoor pouf. Craſted from Lenti’s signature Kimia fabric, the removable cover boasts deluxe texture in the form of hand-embroidered flat rope braids for couture-style customizable embellishment. ddcnyc.com

14 | exterior design


C APTI O N TI TLE BALT IC COLLECT ION

Caption Information Here The Real Flame Baltic Collection sets the perfect mood for your clients and guests. Earth tones like Kodiak Brown and Glacier Gray beautifully integrate with most any outdoor setting. realflame.com

exterior design | 13


CURATE 16 | exterior design

SECRET GARDEN

From Paola Lenti, the Greenery double-sided modular wall encourages the creation of a stunning, individualistic garden for both indoors and out. Boasting an integrated watering system, the steel-framed structure permits ora and foliage to be arranged eortlessly and features removable containers stacked within the frame. ddcnyc.com


ENCHANTED FOREST

Consummately crafted in lacquered steel, the Arbre chair from Joy de Rohan Chabot proffers a leafy, sculptural seat. Each distinctive colorway is inspired by a corresponding season. joyderohanchabot.com

exterior design | 17


ICONS BY DESIGN

CURATE

Designed by Richard Schultz for Knoll, the 1966 Collection set the standard for modern outdoor furniture. Re-engineered to suit contemporary lifestyles, the collection incorporates stainless steel and other modern elements, as well as six new bright powder-coated finishes. knoll.com

FINE ART

Wendy Concannon’s limited run art photographs are now available in fully weatherproofed outdoor editions. Abstract Square No.1 blends color and shape for an exciting, effusive aesthetic. wendyconcannon.com

18 | exterior design


L I G H T FA N TA S T I C

Foscarini’s fully flexible Uto outdoor lamp allows the user to interact completely and redefine its function with a gentle touch. A polycarbonate screen protects the bulb, while the thermoplastic elastomer body acts as a diffuser for a luminous quality of light. foscarini.com

exterior design | 19


T R AY C H I C

CURATE

T’nalak, a traditional cloth hand-woven of abaca fibers in the Philippines, gives the Emily trays from Made Goods a meticulously craſted profile. Each tray is naturally dyed to create a glorious ombre effect. madegoods.com

TRUE BLUE

Designed by Thomas Dariel for Cappellini, the aptly named Blue candleholders reveal a bold and playful spirit. The rounded, slender form is cast in laminated metal with a durmast veneer base. cappellini.it

20 | exterior design


IN FULL BLOOM

The Bouquet tables by Kenneth Cobonpue highlight a delicately rendered floral relief pattern. Crafted with a resin top and a stainless steel base, the floral form evokes the sublime beauty of nature. kennethcobonpue.com

exterior design | 21


SOLID STONEWARE

CURATE

In spite of its solid stoneware top, shown in anthracite metal, the 71-inch-long, 39-inch-wide Dehors table by Fattorini Rizzini + Partners for Ligne Roset is visually light. The base is white lacquer and the slender four legs are quarter-turned for dynamic asymmetry, which also optimizes leg room. ligne-roset.com

GO LD DOT S

Lemonade, iced tea or margaritas will look festive in this gold dots acrylic covered pitcher from Kate Spade New York. The brand’s signature dots and stripes also pop in black on white in melamine plates and bowls in the Raise A Glass collection. katespade.com

22 | exterior design


xxx

xxx

S C I N T I L L AT I N G F O R M

Gold Leaf Design Group’s Spyro art blends mathematical curves and refined shapes to create a mesmerizing wall display. Made from outdoor-friendly stainless steel, the gleaming disc design is striking when used singularly and stunning in group combinations. goldleafdesigngroup.com

exterior design | 23


ATLANTA

3-A-2

|

LAS VEGAS C395

|

OWRUGS.COM/TOMMY


Invite your customers to experience island-inspired living at its finest through the refined yet casual Tommy Bahama area rug collection. FURNITURE AVAILABLE AT TBFURNITURE.COM


W

hen I first saw Randy Trull, he was barreling down the hallways at Casual Market Chicago, clad in head-to-toe pink linen. He was toting a cane, with a brace on one ankle, thanks to a fall on his yacht. Despite his infirmity, Trull had picked up a lot of speed, and his “handler” and Mfano Fabrics VP, Ed Glazier, could barely keep up with him, dutifully trailing behind with his arms full of materials and papers flying. They made quite the pair. The next time I saw Randy during market, he was wearing monochromatic white. And I thought: Who is this man? First, he’s a Southern gentleman, originally from Raleigh, N.C. At 87 years young, his mischievous blue eyes are always aglow. A textile designer for more than four decades, Trull graduated from Parsons School of Design in 1954. He launched his career at Kandell Fabrics in New York, which afforded him travel to the south of France, where he vacationed with Yves Saint Laurent, the Rothschilds, and the Duke and Duchess of England.

VISION

While he dabbled in two menswear lines, his focus always returned to fabrics and home furnishings. Croscill/Kahn, Fieldcrest Cannon, Bates Bloomcraſt, Larry Kravet, Luther Travis, Trull/Travis, Sears of Canada, Spiegel, Cameo Curtain Company and Montgomery Ward, to name a few.

26 | exterior design

But in the world of exterior design, he’s perhaps best known for his stint at Glen Raven designing for Sunbrella and now as a partner at his own firm, Mfano Fabrics, with designer John Miller. Based in Wilmington, N.C., Trull divides his time between fabrics and his latest boat, a 52-foot Hatteras motor yacht, the R. Holland, which he drives himself. At the High Point Market, this reporter tried to conduct an interview, but truthfully, Randy talked for two hours about, well, whatever he wanted to talk about. And man, can he tell some good stories. So here’s an attempt to bottle up those singular tales into a Q&A, magazine-style. Whew! What was your first fabric project? In 1956, the biggest, hottest thing was silks from Thailand. And I thought, “That’s a good look,” and I did a plaid and a stripe and a solid. I was hoping to get the silk look in a cheaper fabric, and I used a shiny rayon yarn. We called it The Siam Collection. It was my first experience trying to develop something for fabric, and there was so much I didn’t know. Kandell Fabrics in New York was the corporation, owned by Mr. Jerome Kandell.


Up

for the Cha lle n ge RANDY TRULL WEAVES A NEW YARN AT MFANO B Y WA Y N E T T E G O O D S O N

exterior design | 27


VISION

One day Mr. Kandell called me into his office and said, ‘What do you think of these fabrics on the wall?’ I said, ‘That’s good, and that’s bad, but this one, I can fix.’ I was brutal in my opinions. And Kandell said [horrified], ‘Those are by Robsjohn-Gibbings of ‘Good-bye Mr. Chippendale’!’ He was a major interior designer charging $100,000 in the 1950s. So I went back to the showroom, and an hour later, Mr. Kandell told me to go back to Gibbings and remake the things so he could sell them. But Gibbings only did real silks and linens. So I went to Gibbings’ apartment, and he said, ‘Young man, write your name as R. Holland Trull.’ When I leſt his office, I thought I had arrived. I’d gone from 72nd and Madison to 5th Avenue and 57th Street as ‘R. Holland Trull.’ I even changed the signature on my checks. But no one knew me as ‘R. Holland Trull.’ One of the founders of the NSID (National Society of Interior Designers), Michael Greer, was a major, successful designer in the 1950s and ’60s. He was president, and I was international product director (and also a founding member). He introduced me once, ‘This is R. Holland Trull but everyone knows him as Randy.’ Then it was my turn, and I said, ‘This is Michael Greer, but he’s known to us as just Mike.’ That was the beginning and everything fell into a sequence of events that I truly didn’t think I realized. Everything was always a challenge. My whole life has been a challenge. I can always think of something else, some other way to do things.

28 | exterior design

Can you give us an example? I designed and selected fabrics for Mr. Kandell, and I had a brilliant idea: I ordered 3,000 yards of mattress ticking at 49 cents a yard. I bought stripes and printed flowers on top. Back then, nobody did that; all mattresses were striped. And he said, ‘That’s a piece of junk. I’ll never put that in the line.’ Well, I had already printed 3,000 yards! And I thought, ‘I’ll be fired instantly.’ At the time I had an antique store, Tressard, in New York, and I told my partners, ‘We’re going into the fabric business.’ And I bought back all 3,000 yards. Then I was out to lunch with Ethel Merman, and she said, ‘Randy, you’ve got to have a gimmick.’ And I thought, ‘She’s right!’ So I went to 2nd Avenue and 12th Street, and I went to the stage door, and I said to this actress, ‘I want you to model mattress ticking in a fashion show.’ And she said, ‘Just don’t tell anyone my measurements.’ At the time, I was national program director for NSID and we had a luncheon fashion show. It was home furniture fabrics ready-to-wear, and each company, like Schumacher, made a dress. I did mine in the mattress ticking and introduced it, ‘Now here’s Miss ‘Once Upon a Mattress’ Carol Burnett modeling Tressard.’ It launched the company because she came out on the runway in a coat of stripes and opened it and there were the printed flowers inside, and she really


camped it up. I even had shoes made and covered in the ticking. I guaranteed that it would shrink and that you couldn’t wash it and at $9 a yard, we sold all of it! Carol and I became good friends. Her first big purchase was a mink jacket, and I bought my first car, a 1959 Buick convertible, with red leather. It was plastic, but I called it leather. Who has influenced you design-wise? I don’t think I’ve ever thought about the names of the designers. I look at fashion magazines. I’ve always felt that ready-to-wear came out ahead of home furnishings. If they did green in 1960, then home furnishings did it in 1962. It was more the fashion industry that influenced me. And it still happens to me. Take the new cheetah print. We did it in black, blue and green. Black and white, beige and white. But I first saw it in Vogue, a beige cheetah coat. So I did blue and green cheetah. But it was a challenge. How could I do something new and get it developed? This is 100% solution-dyed acrylics. You also have to do beige and neutrals because they always sell the best. I think Richard Frinier for Brown Jordan is one of the finest designers in the industry. And Patti [Frye] is the most talented textile designer for casual furniture. That line [Lane Venture] always looks good. She’s just got that touch. What is your biggest claim to fame? Dupoine for Glen Raven. That’s their biggest pattern. Almost every company uses that in some form. Also, casual furnishings people had never railroaded fabric, and I explained it to them. I said, ‘You’ll save yardage and you’ll get much more cuttage and use.’ The home furnishings industry knew about it, but not the casual fabrics. [With railroaded fabric, the pattern runs perpendicular to the bolt, turned 90 degrees and spanning from one end of the roll to the other. This allows the fabric to be cut at any width without the need for seams, lending it a clean look.] Back when I was doing bedding, I decorated the bed with three pillow shams and three decorator pillows, and I started a trend. It changed the whole business. But I never thought about starting a trend. When you come up with something, you don’t realize it could turn into something dramatic. Anyone who doesn’t like all those pillows on the bed, they can blame me! Tell us about your time with Glen Raven. When I joined Glen Raven in the late ’80s, they were only doing stripes and solids, and I said I wanted to do jacquard. They said, ‘No one will buy that; it’s too expensive.’ So I put together a collection with Mark Grigalunis, then vice president of Sunbury. We did a whole jacquard program, and

we took it to Larry Kravet, and Larry gave me an order. So I called up Glen Raven and I said, ‘I have an order, but I don’t know what to do with it because I’m not an order-taker.’ They said, ‘Well, how much is it?’ And I said, ‘$526,000.’ It was the first order for jacquard. At my retirement party at Glen Raven in 2000, Mr. Gant [former CEO Allen Gant Jr.] said I changed the whole concept of Sunbrella; I helped take it from 10% to 90% of Glen Raven’s total volume. I’ve always talked too much, so when it came time for my retirement speech, I said I’d let someone else do the talking for me. Then I pointed toward the back of the room, signaling them to press play, and Frank Sinatra’s ‘I Did It My Way’ came on. Everything was a challenge. I don’t think anybody saw the way my mind was working. I was a bit flighty—just to be truthful. They were never sure of what I would say or do. What’s your design philosophy? I look at things and ask how it’s useful and is it workable. Does it work with a coordinated room? Most designers of fabric, they just know fabric. I’ve never thought about it like that. I look at something and I think, ‘Is it useful?’ Every time I make a mistake, I’m too wound up in the fabric. Someone once told me I’m a great salesman, and I said, ‘No, I’m a designer.’ There’s a difference between me and a salesman. A good salesman can sell anything. I couldn’t do that. I can only sell something I’m a part of, that I’ve created. I can sell things that I’m emotionally or physically connected with because it’s a part of me. What would you like to do next? When you’re 87, and you’ve been basically every place in the world, when you get up in the morning, you think, ‘Well, I’m still here.’ My closest friend, Matthew Sergio, died about a month ago [August 14, 2017]. He and I went to Parsons together at age 19, about 65 years ago. I was the Southern boy, and he was a Yankee from New York . . . I’m still part of the family . . . [He becomes quiet and reflective.] One doesn’t always get to choose in life. Matthew died; he was six months younger than me. He always said, “It doesn’t matter how old I get, you’ll always be older than me.” . . . As for me, I can still do a new company, Mfano. I can still look at it, feel it, and make it work, until I kick the bucket. At this point, two hours into the interview, Trull rares back and looks at me as if he’s just seeing me for the first time. “I like you!” he exclaims, as if he’s surprising even himself. “We should hang out some time.” Anytime, Randy. It would be my pleasure. □

exterior design | 29


T FANTAST I C

FORm S

KENNETH COBONPUE LOOKS TO NATURE TO INSPIRE HIS STRIKING FURNITURE DESIGNS

VISION

BY JENNIFER BRINGLE

hree decades ago while studying industrial design at the Pratt Institute in New York City, Philippine designer Kenneth Cobonpue got the opportunity to apprentice in a leather and wood workshop near Florence, Italy. There, the budding designer discovered his true passion—home furnishings. In the decades since, Cobonpue has earned international acclaim—along with a slew of awards—for his bold designs featuring soſtly flowing lines, larger-thanlife silhouettes and chunky weaves influenced by the natural world. We recently caught up with Cobonpue to talk about what sparks his creative fire and why outdoor spaces are important. What inspires your design aesthetic? I draw inspiration from everything—from the most mundane things to the most exciting locales I’ve visited, with nature always at the center of it all. I’m inspired by the way that branches, leaves and foliage contain space and filter light, how flowers bloom in the sun, how blades of grass dance with the wind. Nature has a perfection to it that simply cannot be replicated, so my work is an interpretation of nature’s exquisite beauty. How do you play with shape and form to create pieces with a distinctive look? Nature surprises us with random and beautiful forms, yet the simplest forms can ultimately lead to the best designs. The pieces people love are always the ones with simple shapes that even a kid can draw, or those that turn you into a kid again. How do you approach designing for the outdoors as opposed to indoors? I believe that the outdoors should be an extension of indoors. I want to blur the lines between indoor and outdoor living, because people live, relax and entertain guests in both spaces. How have innovations in outdoor materials affected your design process?

30 | exterior design


Outdoor furniture has always been characterized by woven and molded plastic, and people have grown tired of the artificial look. There is a current trend that uses soſter materials like fabric, but the Holy Grail is figuring out how to successfully render natural materials like bamboo, wood and fabric truly weatherproof. What’s the single most impactful way to create visual interest in an outdoor space? It’s impossible to compete with the beauty of nature, so

instead of fighting it, I design my outdoor pieces to look like an extension of nature, which is why my work has a very transparent and organic feel. What do you see in the future of outdoor furniture design? I see lots of new innovations being incorporated into outdoor furniture, like invisible technology, lighting, audio systems and even artificial intelligence, producing designs that we wouldn’t have thought possible for outdoors. □

exterior design | 31


A Organic

i n des i gn & nature ROBERT REMER CREATES OUTDOOR “LIVING” ART

VISION

BY LAURIE RUDD

merican sculptor Robert Remer defines the concept of outdoor living in an entirely new and unique manner. Organic in design and content, Remer’s body of work commands attention—and watering— in outdoor and indoor spaces worldwide. Remer’s artistic perspective encompasses lush plants and the cool feel of industrial elements. From furniture to containers, wall art to seating, his pieces spring from his ideas or from his team of artisans. Then they take the form of galvanized steel armature coated with multiple layers of increasingly fine resin-fortified cement. His work is available through his Opiary studio (opiary.com). Remer’s quiet demeanor disguises his undeniable passion for nature and his overwhelming desire to create fanciful and functional outdoor “living” art. What inspires your sculptural designs? I am inspired by nature and the combination of natural and man-made forms. The idea underneath all my work is natural in form as well as in the components or plantings found in the finished piece. I also draw inspiration from great works of art throughout the world and art history. It is all inspiring to me. I work sometimes to update something that has been done in another medium or period to the materials and style of my work. Recently, we are getting more and more into geometry and incorporating it into pieces. Another area we’re developing features a crystalline-like form within the design. Are the plants a consideration throughout the design process? The plants are important from the very conception of the piece. I am definitely thinking about the type and range of plants when I am designing. Part of the concept also includes giving enough space for not only the plantings, but to work in accommodation for irrigation into the piece. Are you seeing more clients interested in functional pieces? We create a wide variety of products from outdoor furnishings to the more sculptural planters, with customers drawn to both. I have created

32 | exterior design


everything from architecture to landscape designs that incorporate the same naturalistic style. Are your customers motivated most by the green element or the sculptural quality of your work? They both work in concert, interacting and dancing together—it’s not one or the other. For urban areas, there is a lot of interest in green design and bringing plants into outdoor areas that do not typically include nature. Our customers look to break down the barrier between indoor and outdoor. They do not want to be locked into one world. Do your pieces work in groups or alone? I have collectors interested in individual pieces; but there are also those who have whole spaces dedicated to incorporating everything from furniture to containers. One grouping was a chess set garden of my work, and the pieces could move. Once moved, they created a new landscape to be newly appreciated. ▥ exterior design | 33


ITALIAN

INSPIRATION

36 | exterior design

FASHION AND FUNCTION MEET IN THIS MILAN ESCAPE BY JENNIFER BRINGLE

Photo credit Nick Johnson

PROJ E C T

Bold colors and sleek silhouettes bring a modern flair to the 15th century Chiostri dell’Umanitaria.


exterior design | 37


W

hen designing an outdoor space in one of the world’s fashion capitals, the city’s sense of style seems to naturally permeate the project. That certainly was the case for Paola Lenti’s team at the Chiostri dell’Umanitaria in Milan. Surrounded by lush gardens, the historic event space dates back to the 15th century. Today it annually plays host to furniture installations showcasing the talents of Italian designers. Lenti turned to Italian fashion designer Marella Ferrera— who also designs furnishings for the company—to work on the project. Her stylish influence translated to spaces filled with bold color and texture that marry the indoor rooms with those outside. “We create dialogues between indoor–outdoor environments using colors, materials and finishes, and never try to impose any specific design,” Lenti says. Elements from the indoors—rich handmade weaves, luxe textural fabrics and plush rugs—easily transition to the exterior thanks to performance fabrics and fibers. “There are some significant and inherent challenges in designing an outdoor environment, since we must guarantee a higher level of durability,” Lenti says. “Especially in today’s pollution-rich climate, the challenge isn’t in finding materials that endure, but rather eco-friendly materials that endure.” A reverence for the natural world extends beyond just an acknowledgment of the outdoor environs surrounding their furnishings. For Lenti and her team, environmental stewardship is an integral part of their business and design philosophy. “We demand that our products offer an enviable level of performance and quality, and never at the expense of the world around us,” Lenti says. “We believe it is our duty to ensure high performance materials and products, while always staying respectful of life and nature. Environmental sustainability is a central part of the brand’s story.” □

38 | exterior design

This lava stone tile sets a soothing vibe for the ancient event space.


This chunky woven chair is made of waterproof silicone-covered yarns.

exterior design | 39


L USH LOC ALE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT FERNANDO WONG RENEWS A PALM BEACH SHOW HOUSE

PROJ E C T

BY JENNIFER BRINGLE


exterior design | 41


For more than 40 years, some of the nation’s most celebrated interior designers have lent their talents to the Kips Bay Decorator Show House, a charitable endeavor in the Big Apple benefiting the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club of New York City. In 2017, the initiative expanded south to Palm Beach, Florida, where the inaugural Kips Bay Palm Beach Show House brought nearly 20 designers together to outfit a 1925 Mediterranean Revival home.

vintage-looking custom umbrellas from Santa Barbara Umbrellas, as well as retro furniture lines from Brown Jordan to keep the 1920s feeling going.” The color palette mirrored the natural surroundings—punchy citrus hues, verdant greens and soothing sea-inspired blues.

For the outdoor spaces, celebrated landscape architect and designer Fernando Wong drew inspiration from the property’s historic elegance to create exterior looks exuding 1920s cool and old Florida charm.

Amid the lush plantings, Wong created a focal point with a massive circular mirrored sculpture by artist David Harber, whose outdoor works grace some of the world’s most prestigious addresses. This particular piece reflects its vibrant green surroundings while lending a contemporary touch to the vintage-inspired design.

“The Mediterranean Revival design of the house is a very old Florida style of architecture, so we took our cues from that when we designed the landscape and when we did the furniture,” Wong says. “We chose

“We also used very bright Florida colors such as blue, pink and turquoise, and of course lots of tropical plants and palms,” Wong says. “All of these things are a loving homage to old Florida.” □

42 | exterior design


Design begins here

With curated collections of casual furniture, outdoor décor, coastal

Select Showrooms Open Year Round

collections and much more. The select resources you seek—known

Monday – Friday, 10 a.m.– 4 p.m.

and new—in a single location. This is AmericasMart. Where global style trends and sourcing opportunities are yours to discover. Learn More at AmericasMart.com/OYR

@AmericasMartATL | #AtlMkt PHOTO: CASTELLE

Design. Redefined. 800.ATL.MART | TO THE TRADE | © 2018 AMC Inc.


LISA KAHN DESIGNS A TROPICAL SANCTUARY FOR A FLORIDA HOME

PROJ E C T

B Y K A T H Y WA L L

OUTDOOR

OASIS


exterior design | 45


All of the homes in the beautiful Port Royal neighborhood of Naples, Florida, are built on a system of waterways that connect to the Gulf of Mexico, and this property is no exception. This new construction project started with a request from the owner to create an environment—both inside and out—that would have hints of Bali and other far-flung tropical destinations. He was looking for an escape from his busy life and business.

She used the same material to craft planters and fountain spillovers around the pool area and in the front of the house. Some of the limestone is smooth and honed, and some of it is chiseled and textured—the juxtaposition of the two gives a subtle, tone-on-tone, layered effect. Kahn selected a handmade glass tile for the pool that pulls in some of the colors of the Gulf and allows, at a certain time of day, the infinity edge of the pool to blend with the waterway that runs behind the house. Dark, stained cypress tongue-and-groove boards on the ceiling give a sense of warmth and intimacy to the covered spaces and then tie into the wood flooring throughout the inside of the home.

The entire back of the home opens up to the outdoor living and entertaining spaces, so Lisa Kahn of Lisa Kahn Designs set about weaving the inside and outside together in a way that would be nearly seamless, flowing together both visually and in their functionality. Her goal was to create a sanctuary-like environment for the family, one where they could be surrounded by peace, tranquility and harmony.

The outdoor kitchen is equipped to be a full, working kitchen and allows the cooking to be done as easily outside as it is inside. Placed just beyond the door from the main indoor kitchen, the outdoor space allows for the easy transfer of food and beverages, making it usable on a daily basis—not just for special occasions. Overall, the outdoor areas of this home are designed to nurture with the relaxing sound of water spilling into the pool, the coziness of a fire pit, the comfort of soft, cushioned seating, all surrounded by lush plants and trees—a true tropical sanctuary. □

For the patios and balconies, Kahn selected shellstone, a creamy limestone that is embedded with fossils of shells and sea creatures.

46 | exterior design


Introducing the new

Pendleton Collection ÂŽ

Five New Fabric Stories | Las Vegas Market C1301

ÂŽ


el em ent

RESORT

of pr e s t ige

B

48 | exterior design

randed residential communities are hot! They offer buyers a sense of security, an element of prestige, a holiday home and luxurious living. Designers are tasked with including best-in-class amenities for both individual units, as well as shared community spaces. Brown Jordan Outdoor Kitchens answers the call with the perfect outdoor amenity packages for branded residential communities. Encompassing both individual units, as well as common areas, the confluence of style, color, function and craſtsmanship offers solutions to any space, every design and your motif. Available in dozens of styles, hundreds of sizes and seemingly limitless colors, Brown Jordan Outdoor Kitchens are at home in the finest residences, luxury multifamily developments, hotels, resorts and branded residential communities. □

®


exterior design | 49


RICH

COLORS AND

PATTERNS

RESORT

DEFINE ICONIC PENDLETON® FABRIC COLLECTION

it back and soak it in. The rich artisanal heritage of three distinct brands—Pendleton®, Sunbrella® and OW Lee—come together in a distinctive fabric collection designed by Pendleton, manufactured by Sunbrella and dressing quality OW Lee frames across several of their lines. The aesthetic appeal and enduring performance of this all-new Pendleton Fabric Collection create an instant classic definitive of true curated products. □

50 | exterior design


exterior design | 51


THE IMAGINATION OF OUTDOOR FASHION

RESORT

THE PRACTICALITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE

F

or over a decade Shademaker has been the premier line of hospitality shade products for the finest restaurants, resorts and country clubs around the world. We offer a complete line of architectural shade solutions to create a beautiful, sophisticated outdoor environment. Our best-selling side post, Orion, rotates 360° and is the ideal solution for most commercial applications. This style offers a simple crank liſt system and detachable canopy structure for storage. Use of the Mount Kits provide substantial cost savings and creates the preferred small footprint. □

52 | exterior design


exterior design | 53


... baby it's cold outside.

FURNITURE FOR

ALL SEASONS 54 | exterior design


Halo by Skyline Design

Brafta by Skyline Design

exterior design | 55


TH

ANNI

VERSA

Celebrating 25 years of business... Uwharrie Chair is known for high quality outdoor furniture that is made to stand the test of time. Our entire collection is offered in both Pine and Polymer. We are family owned and proudly made in the USA. With our wide variety of products and our drop-ship capabilities, we are the right choice for all your outdoor living needs.

56 | exterior design

RY


Uwharrie Chair Company

a lifestyle for a lifetime...

exterior design | 57


Posh Pillows .............................................................................................................

ELAINE SMITH MERGES FASHION AND FUNCTION IN HER ELEGANT PILLOW COLLECTION

FOCUS

Taking cues from the runways of Paris, Milan and New York, accessories designer Elaine Smith marries high design with high performance for her eponymous pillow line. Classic navy gets an elegant upgrade paired with of-the-moment metallics. On-trend geometrics and stripes join subtly textured weave patterns to create pillows stylish enough for the indoors. Yet they’re also perfectly suitable for outdoor use, thanks to performance fabrics.


exterior design | 59


FOCUS


Left: Soothing blues—from spa and turquoise to cobalt and indigo—mingle with metallics and charcoal gray to elevate the poolside scene, all in fabrics that resist water and chlorine, obviously. Above: Textural details, such as this rope weave, add a luxurious touch to Smith’s pillows, making them just as at home indoors as they are outside.

exterior design | 61


EVERY INCH COUNTS...

ESPECIALLY IN A LUXURIOUS OUTDOOR AREA

PROSE

BY BARRIE LIVINGSTONE

W

62 | exterior design

ith space in our ever-crowded planet always at a premium, every inch counts. And with property prices soaring, one would be foolish to not utilize all of the nooks and crannies surrounding a property. Outside every window can be a view, even if it’s looking at a side fence or a wall. You can create a view or a focal point by hanging an object at eye level. It can be anything that complements the exterior of the home or something that can draw the design of the room outwards, from a collection of horseshoes if you’re in a rustic area to a branch or piece of driſtwood you find while on a walk. The focal point can also be as elaborate as a wood or iron wall hanging or a planter with a hanging plant in it. I just hung a series of succulents in self-hanging pots that instantly draws the eye to it. I have also used an old lifeguard ring outside

a bathroom window. Signs are also popular and a way of injecting humor. Areas in between buildings can be turned into magical, thought-provoking pathways. This outdoor lounge in Malibu (shown) is a prime example. It was created in between a garage and a house. The steps go up to a guest house above the garage. Under the steps, a built-in ledge was made to sit on, and outdoor seating cushions make a long sofa. The addition of an exterior rug, two chairs and a small, round wooden table, accented with wall hangings and accessories, complete a casual, yet sophisticated, look. It’s perfect for an evening drink or a place to sit and enjoy coffee in the morning. By utilizing every inch of space, your clients will love it, and the building will also smile back at you by looking its best. □


Showrooms and Markets: Vegas, C-458A | High Point, SAMS M-3060 | Chicago, 7-2018 11 Industrial Drive, Coventry, RI 02816 | 800-809-3114 | sales@seasidecasual.com | www.seasidecasual.com


Design + Performance and Legendary Performance Fabrics are trademarks and Sunbrella is a registered trademark of Glen Raven, Inc. ™ ®

L EG E N DA R Y PE R F O R M A N C E FA B R I C S SU N B R E L L A .CO M

FA D E PR O O F / E A S Y C A R E / B L E AC H C L E A N A B L E

Profile for Exterior Design

Exterior Design January 2018  

The 2018 issue of Exterior Design, covering the best in outdoor design. Live openly.

Exterior Design January 2018  

The 2018 issue of Exterior Design, covering the best in outdoor design. Live openly.

Advertisement