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sby Carol Saviak photos by Ed Taylor

here are a number of literary masterpieces whose storylines feature an unlikely cast of characters, whose lives converge at a single moment in time, which changes each of their lives. The latest chapter in the life of St. Augustine’s historic Cathedral Building involves one such unusual trio of citizens and a pivotal conversation. In storytelling, one should always begin at the beginning. In this story, one of the main characters is actually a building: a skyscraper, in fact, which was designed as an audacious addition to St. Augustine’s skyline. In 1927, the same year as the opening of St. Augustine’s famed Bridge of Lions, National Bank commenced construction of St. Augustine’s first and only skyscraper. Its dramatic Mediterranean revival design and six-story stature typified the glamour of the 1920’s. The soaring columns, opulent marble teller stations and fresh floral bouquets delivered weekly by Olveros Florist were all features designed to impress customers. National Bank opened the doors of this architectural gem in 1928 and became the premier banking institution of St. Augustine. In 1939, this unique structure took on new life as The Exchange Bank Building. In the decades which followed, it has been called The Espinoza-Sanchez and The Atlantic Bank building. Throughout its history, the building has served as a space for art and cultural exhibits, community gatherings, and as a symbol of prosperity for the city. The historic building’s most recent financial anchor was Wells Fargo, which vacated the property in 2013 and left the building’s first floor marquee space to wait for its next potential tenant. This is the point in the story where our other actors enter the picture. Two members of the Cathedral Basilica’s capital campaign committee, Brenda Bushell, a professional sports and special events marketing consultant, and successful businessman and real estate investor, John Arbizzani, had become aware of the vacant space right next door to the Cathedral and decided to discuss the vacancy with Father Tom Willis. The Cathedral Basilica has a breathtakingly beautiful sanctuary, but at a practical level, the Church property lacks a large community space or hall to serve special event needs of its congregation. Bushell and Arbizzani met with Father Tom and informed him of the vacancy next door. Intrigued, Father Tom suggested the pair further research this potential opportunity for the church to lease the space and gain a much-needed community space. When the pair returned to share their research, Father Tom listened to the details. However, his response caught Arbizanni and Bushell off-guard. With a sparkle in his eye, he conveyed to the duo that he was not certain it was the right project for the Church to undertake while simultaneously


There’s Treasure

Everywhere! launching a capital campaign, but he thought an even better solution would be for Bushell and Arbizzani to lease the space and they could let the Church use it. Bushell recalls that they looked at one other in surprise, but decided “Why not explore it?” While undertaking their research and multiple visits to the vacant space, they were struck by the building’s stately grandeur. They began to see the tremendous possibility of reclaiming the property, and perhaps even take the space to its ultimate highest and best utilization. Conversations with local experts in hospitality and tourism pointed to a clear need and market demand for a space that could accommodate large wedding receptions and corporate events in St. Augustine’s downtown historic district. The initial

idea for what would become The Treasury on the Plaza was developed from these early conversations. A new corporation, The Grande Ballroom at Cathedral Place, LLC. was formed to formalize Arbizzani and Bushell’s unexpected partnership. Both Bushell and Arbizzani have experience renovating properties in St. Augustine’s historic district and were not daunted by the size or scale of the project. While Bushell’s professional resume has included working in sports marketing and special events for professional sports organizations such as the Miami Dolphins, Dallas Cowboys and Jacksonville Jaguars, she also has real estate experience. In fact, she and her husband, Tony, have renovated 8 properties in the historic district, including the well-known Casablanca Inn continued on pg 76 which they owned and managed for 14 years.


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Castaway Publishing, Inc PO Box 35 St. Augustine, FL 32085 904.461.6773 OCL@castawaypublishing.com Lura Readle Scarpitti

Managing Editor editor@castawaypublishing.com 904-325-5930

Brian Hornung

Art Director brian@rockitinteractive.com

Diana L. Garber

Ad Sales Director oclads@castawaypublishing.com 904-679-1550

LeeAnn Kendall

Advertising Consultant ads@castawaypublishing.com 904-501-3917

Voted St. Augustine’s Best “Every Year” 15 Years in a Row!

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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the publisher. All material is compiled from sources believed to be reliable, published without responsibility for errors or omissions. Castaway Publishing, Inc. assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photos.

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letter from the editor Dear Readers,

S

ummer’s here and I think we are all ready for a well-deserved break. Even though I love winter (mostly because it gives me the chance to break out one of my many pairs of cowboy boots on a regular basis), I think you’ll agree that there’s nothing better than donning a bikini (or, if you’re a guy, baggies), cover-up, sliding on a pair of slaps, grabbing the beach bag (and the kids, if you have ‘em) and heading down to the beach. Of course, you’ll want to look good while doing all that. The good news is that summer fashion is easy, light, airy, fun, colorful and ever-so comfy. There are no rules-just loose, what I would call, guidelines. Even so, there is a world of great fabrics, styles, textures and colors to choose from. It’s a little overwhelming (and who needs to worry about that when there is relaxing to do). To help you out, we asked the newest member of our team, fashion columnist and stylist Auretha Callison, to give us a few pointers on how to look cool and fresh when it heats up this season. She makes it a breeze to pull together the perfect look without making it look like you put in a lot of effort. The great thing is that every look you see on the pages of our Summer Fashion feature can be found right downtown on St. George Street at Fresh Produce. You ‘re certain to see something you like and now you know where you can get it as well. OK, I admit, this fashion thing is definitely more of a girl thing. To balance that out, what can be better (and more testosterone-driven) than marlin fishing? Arguably one of the most “manly” men, Ernest Hemmingway, was famous for his passion for the sport (and, well, a few books that he wrote in his spare time). Expert Angler and St. Augustine resident, Captain Don Combs gives us a first-hand look, along with some expert instruction and stunning images to accompany the story. Even if you don’t care one whit about the thrill of hooking into one of these magnificent creatures and fighting it, sometimes for HOURS, you have to check this out, if only for the beautiful pictures-truly amazing! Speaking of beautiful pictures, if you’re reading this right now, you couldn’t have missed the cover, which is an amazing panorama (taken by our own Ed Taylor) of the interior of the area’s most talked about thing since, well, maybe the fort! To see the entire thing, just open up the front page and back cover and, voila! There it is, in all it’s glory. As stunning as it is represented here, believe me when I say that it is nothing compared to experiencing that grand space in person. There’s a lot of curiousity surrounding the place and, since our job to tell you all the great stories of this area, we tell you this one starting on the inside flap-this treasure is actually VERY easy to find. There’s much more to cover in this month’s issue that we’re so excited about but the beach is calling-I’m wrapping this up, grabbing the Hawaiian Tropic and heading down to the shore. Hope to see you there! Hang loose! Lura Readle Scarpitti

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4 letter from the editor 6 from our mayor 11 history 23 home 28 gardening 29 waterfront 35 taste 40 spice 45 event 46 music 49 dance 52 worship 55 art 57 poetry 60 calendar 62 wine 63 finance 65 giving 69 theater 70 travel 73 golf

contents

on the cover “The grandiose interior of St. Augustine’s newest and most-talked about event venue makes the perfect cover for this month’s issue of Old City Life. We tell the long-awaited story of this stunning space starting on page two. Think you’ll agree when we say “It’s a true treasure!” Photo by Ed Taylor

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from our mayor

I SHOULD HAVE KNOWN! The price of being “sophisticated and worldly”

I

consider myself a fairly “sophisticated and worldly” person, (just don’t ask my wife Jane for her concurrencesince she is far more sophisticated and worldly than I). Jane has traveled in Europe much more than I because all of her family is from England and Ireland, and only one generation ago! But I tend to think that people are people and most folks are pretty much the same, even if you can’t understand a word they are saying. Smiles and hand gestures can always get you through most situations and if not I can always draw a picture Anyway, Jane and I were traveling in Spain recently (if that’s not “sophisticated and worldly”, I don’t know what is!) and were picking out a restaurant in Barcelona to try some of their fabled seafood. Being from Florida, we fancy ourselves as seafood experts, so I wanted to see if the Barcelonians could hold their own against the Sunshine State (turns out, they canit’s pretty darn good seafood over there!). We had the hotel call for reservations at 9 and they came back and said they couldn’t do 9, but was 8:30 okay? We said yes, imagining that we were being slid in right before the popular time (eating at 9 is a little more “sophisticated and worldly” but since we didn’t know anyone over there, we weren’t embarrassed to eat at what they must consider the “early bird special” slot of 8:30). We all jumped in a big cab and headed to the restaurant. We were traveling with other “sophisticated and worldly” friends, Dr. Todd and Katherine Batenhorst (he’s of German extraction and she is a twin, which is really foreign) and Dana and Carol Ste. Claire (he is French, Turkish and American Indian and Carol and I just roll ours eyes when he waxes poetic about his diverse heritage). I felt in safe company as we arrived at eight ten for our eight thirty reservation. As we got out of the cab, we were greeted by name and immediately ushered upstairs to a private but empty dining alcove with table cloths, silver and crystal-the whole works. “I shoulda known!,” but none of our radar went off and we were having such a good time and being treated so well! We just went with it and settled into our comfy chairs. Immediately, we were attended to by a sprightly gentleman who reminded me of the ringmaster in a circus. He asked about our wine choices but offered no wine list. Rather he suggested a wine that he said, and I quote, “It’s not the most expensive offering nor the cheapest-it’s a mid-range price and is an excellent bargain!” We all just smiled and nodded…and it was impeccable, BUT… “I shoulda known!” Next, he brought out a tray (or, should I say, a hog trough?) of live seafood: lobsters, prawns, fish and “elvers” (baby eels, like on the reality show!). He suggested we all have a little of each and…we all just smiled and nodded while he said “I will take very good care of you and you will have a most amazing dining experience!” First. he brought a platter of “jamon”. Now that’s Spanish

By Joseph L. Boles Jr.

for ham, but not just any ham. It comes from a black pig that eats nothing but cashews and it’s the best thing I ever put in my mouth! It arrived with two platters of Barcelona bread (slices spread with olive oil and hand-rubbed with ripe tomatoes). Then came the “elvers” (baby eels), which then became the new best thing I have put in my mouth until the lobsters, prawns, clams etc…you get the idea! Then, more wine…and when we thought it was all over, he brings out this dessert proclaiming, “The Chef has created a special dessert for you!” and with all the pomp and circumstance of a State dinner, he presents this Spanish Galleon made of fresh fruit in a sea of “Catalan cream” (which is akin to crème brulee, even down to the caramelized sugar)…and we all just smiled and nodded. It disappeared in short order. Then came the appertiff glasses and several bottles of some kind of nectar of the Gods (I would have sworn!) and before we knew it, we were done! Just a mere three hours of gustatory heaven and incredible conversation and fun! In my best Spanish, I held up my hand and said “La cuenta, por favor” (“the check please”). And it was there on a little silver plate right at my left hand. Well, I looked down at it and my left hand began to quiver a little. I put on my glasses and both my hands quivered a little. I grabbed the check with both hands and gripped it tightly as I quickly converted the euros to dollars in my head. Then I quickly converted the euros to dollars on my phone’s calculator and it just got worse. I swallowed and whispered to Dr. Todd the amount of the damage. He said, “Maybe they’ll just take Katherine instead?” Without a pause, I said “I will just put it on my card and we will square up later.”…but “I shoulda known.” “I shoulda known”-when we had the hotel make the reservations they would tell them we were tourists. “I shoulda known”-when we arrived and they greeted us and took us to a private dining room that we were about to get the “special treatment.” “I shoulda known”-when we saw no menus and heard no prices mentioned that we just might be looking at a hefty bill. “I shoulda known”-that a reality show about baby eel harvesters getting 1,500 dollars a bucket, that they were going to be expensive. So, I’m not going to give you the total (out of our embarrassment) but I will say this about part of the meal: I don’t know how a cup of baby eels can cost 180 American bucks! And I will say that the dessert boat with the Catalan cream ocean was worth every one of those 200 greenbacks we paid. “And to think we didn’t even order it!” The Chef had made it “special” for us...bless his heart! But since that night, every other meal in Europe and back here at home seems like a bargain! I wonder how long that feeling will last? OCL

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Treasure of St. Augustine

A revival of a classic structure

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Cool Looks for a Hot Summer

Fresh styles from Fresh Produce

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Feeling Blue

Captain Don Combs takes in us search of Blue Marlin...off St. Augustine

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Chill Out

With some homemade gourmet popsicles

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Under the Streets

History found below

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Guana Sunrise Photo by Hookey Hamilton 8

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history

Oldest Streets in oldest city

reveal architectural treasures story by Rhonda Parker

A

s America’s oldest City marks the anniversaries of attacks by the English privateers Sir Francis Drake and Robert Searle in late May and early June, archaeology and historic research in the area south of the Plaza de la Constitución continues to put into perspective the significant role the tiny, fledgling settlement of St. Augustine played in a clash of empires for dominance of a newly discovered continent and a New World. “We have to consider that Drake attacked this little settlement of just over 300 people with 22 warships and several thousand troops,” said William Kunze, who portrays both Searle and Drake in local reenactments. “He’d been searching the coastline and may have given up, if not for the sighting of a Spanish garrison soldier who happened to peer over the treetops from a wooden watchtower.” Standing on a sidewalk near the corner of King and Aviles streets with City Archaeologist Carl Halbirt, I watch as visitors and residents alike hurry past the historic markers and bronze plaques south of the plaza to get to the art galleries, shops and sidewalk cafes that characterize the charming character of this oldest part of our city. “People don’t often stop to think about what’s in the ground beneath their feet, but here in St. Augustine, every step crosses centuries,” says Halbirt. He points out to me the four round bronze markers set into the sidewalk that denote postholes uncovered in the 2010 renovation of Aviles. According to a map by 16th century cartographer Baptista Boazio, a church called “Los Remedios” once straddled the head of Aviles. An uncovered burial ground containing both Spanish and Christian Native American burials may extend from beneath what is now the Galleria del Mar and A1A Ale Works to beneath the O.C. White’s parking lot and Charlotte Street, where more early burials have been discovered. From what they’ve been able to deduct by comparing archaeological evidence with early maps and documents, Halbirt says the city, based upon the early 1572 plat map, encompassed a four-block square running roughly from Marine Street and the former bayfront, west to St. George Street, and south to Bridge Street. The oldest city streets would have included Aviles and Charlotte, bisected by Cadiz, Bravo and Artillery Lane. The locations of a wooden watchtower and the first of a series of wooden forts as depicted by Baptista Boazio’s map are not confirmed, but past and ongoing digs in and around the plaza area have revealed many clues. Postholes of a circular structure that could have been a watchtower near the plaza’s World War II Veteran’s monument, and a possible wooden stockade type structure near the Trade Winds Lounge and the American Legion building were uncovered just this year. By royal decree and European tradition, all Spanish towns were ordered to have a central plaza. Buildings like the church, government administration building and market traditionally faced the public plaza. Said Halbirt, “Because our plaza has been a public

Drake’s 1586

raid on St. A

ugustine, Boa

zio map

space for so long, there are many areas that have never been excavated.” Because the city archaeology ordinances mainly allow for a test excavation when there are projects pertaining to utilities, new construction or renovations to existing structures, Halbirt must wait for the call. The renovations in 2010 to beautify Aviles Street offered just such an opportunity for Halbirt and volunteers from the St. Augustine Archaeological Association. This location is where the city became permanently rooted after abandoning previous settlements at the Fountain of Youth and Mission de Nombre de Dios after the Pedro Menendez landing. The location of a brief settlement on Anastasia Island has never been identified. According to SAAA president Nick McAuliffe, the hope is that an ongoing project to place markers at significant sites will make visitors and the community more aware of the history beneath their feet. “Archaeology experts can walk down the street and visualize what things looked like back then but the rest of us need help, “ said McAuliffe, who spoke during the 2012 unveiling of the Los Remedios plaque and bronze sidewalkarers. In 2011 the group worked with the city and the Sisters of St. Joseph to place a marker visible to passersby on (south) St. George Street at the site of what was America’s first European style hospital, known as Le Soledad or “Royal Hospital”. This area was excavated in the 1970s by Dr. Kathleen Deegan of (more })


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the University of Florida and is also the site of a church and burial ground containing over 500 individuals, including Spanish, British, African and Native American burials. During the 2010, Aviles digs, 13 to 15 historic roadbeds were uncovered by Halbirt and his team, along with charred layers that could be evidence of the town’s early trials: these included a 1572 Indian attack and Drake’s 1586 raid when the English not only pilfered the church, but thoroughly burned the settlement. They even uprooted the orange trees that had been brought from Spain and tossed them into the bay. The weeklong sacking of the town by Robert Searle and his buccaneers in 1668 left almost half of the inhabitants dead. Then, after failing to conquer the newly built Castillo de San Marcos following a siege that lasted 58 days, British troops again burned St. Augustine to the ground in 1702. “It’s like pages in a mystery book,” Halbirt said. “To the trained eye each layer tells a story. We have historical accounts, written history, maps and letters but there are still gaps. Like pieces of a puzzle, archaeology helps us confirm and connect what we know about the early history and inhabitants. We find things, but it is up to us to learn where each piece fits in the historical record.” After hundreds of years of human habitation and disturbance, artifacts can be jumbled together yet span centuries. Among objects unearthed on Aviles in 2010 were a nineteenth century bone toothbrush, a sixteenth century boot spur, a fine brooch inlaid with garnet stones, nineteenth century toys, and a ceramic lid to a vessel topped by a tiny figurine. Along Aviles and Charlotte Streets, every small museum, gallery and storefront is like a flipbook of St. Augustine history. We pass the entrance to the Spanish Military Hospital, where a tour group has assembled to learn about the medical practices of the second Spanish period (1784-1821). While the architecture along this block with its quaint cafes and galleries is distinctly 1920s-1950s Americana, Halbirt speculates that beneath is the possibility of more graves, perhaps an early open public space, or the tracings of more mud and thatch structures. In the next block, the intriguing beam-and-post high rise with its charming balconies and window boxes, is actually the former Hamblin Warehouse.(a site now known as the Holiday House), dating back to the 1880s. The adjacent structure, currently housing the St Augustine Historical Library, was once home to Civil War hero, Kirby Smith. Then there is the Ximenez-Fatio House ,where recovered objects on display at the visitors center include items spanning the centuries; from Native American pottery shards to Mrs. Fatio’s high Victorian dinnerware. One item found on the property during an excavation is a rare 16th century charm called a Carvaca cross, said to protect newborns and ward off a sundry of evils including lightning strikes and rabies. The property itself appears on the earliest plat map (1572) of the town. At the intersection of Bravo and Aviles, we come to what might actually be the oldest structure in the city, the Father Miguel O’Reilly house (circa 1691), owned and operated by the Sisters of St Joseph. Across the street, we pause at an ancient park run by the Old Town Merchants Association, where Halbirt talks to me about the volume 8

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artifacts found inside the Cofradia Well. (if you visit, make sure to take a moment to read the marker). According to Halbirt, the thrill of discovery never gets old. “I try to remember that archaeology is about people. Each object we find represents a human being and a moment in time. Every sliver of bone, bit of broken jewelry, or shard of pottery is a clue that tells us about events and daily life as the people here experienced it.” He confesses to imagining some interesting scenarios as he digs. Excavation of a well in another part of the city led to the findings of a pair of eyeglasses and a broken candlestick. “I imagine some guy like me stumbling around in the dark after dropping his candle, then peering into the well after it and losing his glasses too.” Due to its coquina construction, the Cofradia Well in its present form is thought to date to the mid to late 1600s. However, findings in 1990 of a large amount of 17th century furniture and household items in the well could speak of someone who fled in a hurry, tossing their valuable items down the well for safe keeping. “This could have been due to the Searle pirates’ sacking of the city, but in that period there are a lot of calamities to choose from. What is certain is someone never returned for their belongings.” A find that Halbirt considers among his most significant also tells of a quick escape. Pausing before the rear entrance on Charlotte street to the Art Association building, he discusses the excavation during the building’s renovations in 1998, in which an area of undisturbed layers, dating back to Drake’s raid revealed a humble home with items found in-situ (still as they were left). Or, what archaeologists call a “defacto find”. “There may have been dinner on the table,” explains Halbirt, noting that the collection of artifacts unearthed contained cooking pots, chicken bones, utensils and food preparation items found scattered about, left perhaps by the Drake marauders. In fact, the dig represents the largest collection to date of 16th century pottery and ceramics to be found together in one location. Fortunately, after being painstakingly reassembled by volunteers, many of these same artifacts are now on display as part of the gallery’s permanent exhibition. OCL

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Ashley & Jared June 22, 2013

Beverly Bennett Photography

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SUMMER FA S H I O N N

ew to St.Augustine, I was over the moon with styling my first fashion shoot at the stunning Seranata Beach Club. The Bohemian Chic style came from our local Fresh Produce, which is full of finds for an eclectic mix of women. Summer Fashion is indeed about comfort.  What we feel on our skin connects us with the visual beauty of nature.  Cool cottons, linens and fabrics with an open weave allow the wind to move through, giving our skin precious contact with air.  What we wear has a textural  importance as we need fabrics that feel light on the skin and respond well to light, wind and water. I look forward to seeing you out and about, enjoying nature with clothes that feel good to live in. -Auretha Callison, OCL Fashion Stylist Location: Seranata Beach Club Photographer: Tucker Joenz Clothes and Accesories: Fresh Produce Hair: Panache Model: Stephanie Lee


Bohemian Chic, full of relaxed comfort, is one of my personal favorite  timeless  looks. I took  an ethnically detailed cooling cotton blouse, warmed it up with  layers of beads  and braided  an  ikat-ish  print scarf through Stephanie’s hair  to keep  it out of her face in the wind.  Scarves are a wonderful and under-used way to keep hot hair off the back of the neck. Embroidered Tunic $59 Green Drop Necklace $89 Scarf $29


A lightweight Poncho becomes modern  and flattering  with a slimming  chevron pattern. Thrown over simple shorts or jeans, it revamps from day to evening in casual style.    A smooth cool stone and silver ring bring the focus to the hand rather than earrings  in long hair for a lighter summer style. Peruvian Hoodie $69 Summer Sky Ring $81 Saddle Ring $93


Dress up a colorful print swimsuit (model’s own suit) for a Boho look when temps drop below sweltering.  Indian top stitching and mirroring ethnic beaded earrings make this blouse sing sexy. A classic large braided belt rides the hip just right and not too tight. Boyfriend Shirt $69 Relaxed Denim Crop $79 Fishtail Belt $58 Pink Teardrop Earrings $19


It’s time again to show our skin with clothes that breathe. Baring a confident belly is back in fashion and looks best with a strong, simple color palette for structure.   Aqua, silver and white reflect the light and feel of summer. Button Front Knit Cardigan $85 Godet Maxi Skirt $79 Scarf $29 Starfish Earrings $9 Starfish Bracelet $36 Double Starfish Necklace $24 Sandals $29


Clean lines and muted tones stage a backdrop for spectacular accessories (model’s own necklace) .This happy coral pink, woven bag makes a great bag for summer and will go almost everywhere with anything. Hess Top $55 Boca Skirt $54 Summer Sky Ring $81 Saddle Ring $93 Braided Belt $51 Large Stripe Bag $68 Teardrop Earrings $46


Fresh at 30

T

hirty years ago this June, clothing retailer Fresh Produce began as a simple concept. Mary Ellen Vernon and her husband Thom introduced their custom created t-shirt designs at the ’84 Olympics in Los Angeles. But “simple” turned into a big success. After a fruitful two-week venture, the couple formed an official LLC and Fresh Produce was created. Among the company’s hallmarks: its commitment to producing the majority of its product line in Los Angeles where the brand was born. To commemorate the 30th milestone, Fresh Produce is launching its Legacy Collection featuring favorite styles in the vintage hues of Butterscotch, Watermelon, Tile and Sand. A redesigned commemorative tee inspired by an original t-shirt design will be offered as a gift with purchase during the month of June. The “Sun Surf Sand” tee reflects the spirit of the brand today. In June, in-store and online, you can register to win a girls’ weekend getaway to sunny Carpinteria, California. The winner and three friends will enjoy a weekend at The Carp Cottages (CarpCottages.com), the retro beach cottages owned by Thom and Mary Ellen. If that weren’t enough to mark 30 years of creating clothing to make women feel comfortable, confident and inspired, Fresh Produce is hosting a birthday event in its stores June 28th – 30th. “When women visit our store, they feel as if they’re shopping with a best friend,” says Mary Ellen Vernon, Fresh Produce founder. “We’ve spent 30 years uplifting women with our colorful clothing and are so proud of this milestone we’ve reached. We look forward to being a part of women’s lives for the next 30 years.” Fresh Produce has evolved into a lifestyle for women who want to enjoy the Fresh Produce attributes of vibrant colors, season-less prints and effortless styles all year ‘round. Essentials including cardigans, jackets, sweaters and denim offer layering options, while sundresses, tunics, shorts and beach cover-ups in bright colors and lively prints round out a wardrobe that evokes a relaxed mindset that allows women to channel the coastal lifestyle every day no matter where they might live.

SHINE ON

During the birthday month, Fresh Produce is also encouraging women to take time to shine, whether it’s volunteering in your local community or planning a getaway to reconnect with old friends. Fresh Produce is supporting its employees to shine as well, encouraging them to spend corporate-allotted volunteer hours giving back to the local communities in which Fresh Produce operates, from the headquarters in Boulder, Colorado to the sunny shores of St. Augustine. From its humble beginnings as a t-shirt company in 1984, Fresh Produce has since evolved into a coastal-inspired clothing company that inspires others to shine and live a colorful life. Today, shoppers can find Fresh Produce clothing at the boutique on St. George Street as well as across the country and online at freshproduceclothes.com. 22

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home

SaintAugustineLiving

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n a garage-sized salt marsh lot just south of town, sits a vertical, three-story masterpiece of a home designed by the husband and wife architect/artist team of Peter Rumpel and Roxanne Horvath. The building and design were anything but easy. “The footprint, is the size of a two car garage. There’s a conservation easement on the marsh side so you can’t go further out, you can’t fill in: you can’t do anything. So, we went up,” explained Rumpel. Spoonbill silhouettes on steel gates, fused glass tiles that recreate the spectacular marsh views and glorious ribbons of light all combine to create an entry experience that sets the tone for the entire house. Every detail is just as thoughtfully designed. An office mezzanine with intricate ship’s ladder follows the undulating curves of the porch and sea wall and every room (with the exception of one of the bathrooms) offers a water view. One of Horvath’s favorites is the library. “I love the view from the library. We raised the windows on the street side for more privacy and lowered them on the marsh side for better glimpses of water through the canopy of trees. We can also see Maria Sanchez Lake and get a straight-on view of the horizon from beneath the 312 Bridge!”

Custom Comfort story by LeeAnn Kendall photos by Justin Itnyre

...... on the marsh side for better glimpses of water through the canopy of trees

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But let’s get practical. What if all that water starts to rise? The home was built so that, in case of flooding, all that water would be confined to the garage area. The habitable rooms in the house are on the second and third floors. The interior design ranges from the old to the new; from the minute to the magnificent. Treasures include 100-plus-year -old Heart Pine stair treads and sills made from joists, headed to the scrap heap from Ancient City Baptist Church. There are columns from the Alcazar Hotel, too: solid Heart Pine. Originally, in bad shape, covered with lead paint, weighing a ton, and with a mysterious hole drilled all the way through the center! Ready to be discarded, they were reclaimed and lovingly restored by Horvath and Rumpel. The upper floors are wood and the second floor is marble on a concrete slab. Pickled pine ceilings and trim give a beachy Florida feel. “After we did our ceilings and trim, we were hired to renovate the Flagler College art department. Crews came over to look at our technique, then they went back and did the same at the college.� Horvath and Rumpel then turned their attention to one (more }) 24

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of the smaller rooms. Green river-rock granite and cherry shaker cabinetry in-filled with stainless steel that integrates the appliances adds a polished elegance to what could have been an ordinary and, by some standards, undersized galley kitchen. Everything, everywhere, is hand-picked - right down to the dumb waiter that runs from house to garage. An eclectic mix of contemporary art, found objects and antiques grace the home and each has a story to tell. Horvath and Rumpel have intermingled their own pieces with those of fellow artists and friends. One wall features a Beau Redmond painting created for Horvath’s City Commission campaign; another features a Wendy Tatter batik; and, on a nearby shelf, a gift from artist Jim MacBeth is displayed. The house was designed so meticulously that even the angle of the sun was considered. “We get some sun in the winter and there’s enough of an overhang so that we never get any direct sunlight in the summer,” explains Rumpel. Furnishings have been chosen with the same unerring eye for detail. For example, in the living area and facing the stunning marsh views, an antique settee sits comfortably alongside early modern Le Corbusier and Betoya chairs. Stunning, soaring, simple and spectacular, this tall, narrow house on the marsh is definitely unique. But maybe the most striking aspect of the home is the vision from which it was created. An aesthetically, structurally and environmentally customized building designed with the ingenuity and expertise that only these two artists and architects could have envisioned. The concrete reality of a beautiful dream. OCL

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Rascals &

history

Crackers article and photos by Rick McAllister

W

hether you were born in the South or are one of its many transplants, you certainly have come across the term “Cracker,” most likely used in some derogatory fashion. It is, however, a word that has significant meaning in the history and the architecture of Florida and some of our neighboring Southern states. The earliest use of the word “cracker” seems to be during the Elizabethan era describing a braggart. The original root is the Middle English word “crack,” meaning “entertaining conversation” (as in “to crack a joke”). William Shakespeare used the word in King John (1595): “What cracker is this. . .that deafes our ears. . .” By the mid 1700s, the English, both at home and here in the colonies, used the term to describe those settling in remote and harsh backwoods locations as found in a letter to the Earl of Dartmouth: “I should explain to your Lordship what is meant by Crackers; a name they have got from being great boasters; they are a lawless set of rascals. . .who often change their places of abode.” The word later took on expanded meanings including the more popular one that describes the sound of the whip used by the Florida cowboys as they herd their cattle; the constant cracking of corn which was one of the staples for these pioneering settlers; and the sound of pecan shells being walked on by Georgia pioneers. Noted author Patrick Smith (“A Land Remembered”) writes, “What really makes a person a true Florida Cracker (besides being born in the state)? Several things: a love of the land and nature, growing things in soil, close family ties, and a deep sense of religion. A Cracker’s word is his bond. They either like you or they don’t, and it’s as simple as that.” Today, being a “Cracker” seems to take on two meanings. For Floridians whose roots go back many generations, it is considered a source of pride, to be descended from strong people who flourished during harsh times and conditions. People who understood the meaning of hard work and the strength of the family. At the other end of the spectrum is the use of the word as demeaning and bigoted: the equivalent of a “redneck.” The houses that these early settlers built became known as cracker houses, and had unique characteristics that included the following: simple design so they could be built quickly to provide immediate shelter from the elements; the predominate use of pine and cypress for floors and siding; bricks made of oysters and lime were used as pilings to keep them off the ground; and a wide porch to provide shelter from the sun. Frequently begun as a small dwelling, called a “single pen,” they were often expanded and took on such colorful names as a “saddlebag” and “dog-trot” house. The position of the house as it related to the path of the sun and the direction of the prevailing weather was considered and the floors were usually planked with cracks to help with house cleaning and to feed the hounds and chickens who sheltered under the house. They are disappearing rapidly, but if you get off the interstates and onto some of our backroads, you can still find examples of original cracker dwellings. OCL

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gardening

St. Johns County’s Cabinet Supertore

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By Kimberly Leonardi

pring colors have been amazing this season as we now continue transitioning into the warmer season with annuals and perennials such as Vinca, Marigolds, Salvia, Lantana, Cone Flower, Portulaca, Purslane, Pentas, and so forth. Keep in mind that establishing new plantings involves frequent watering, especially if we’re not getting regular rainfall. It’s very important to water plants slowly to allow for absorption into the roots.  Keeping roots moist is very important in order for most new plants to thrive! Florida friendly principles that include the right plant for the right place are also very important. Coastal areas require landscapes tolerant of salt and wind; deer populated areas require deer-resistant plants; etc. Even in optimal conditions, soil amendments may be required for new plantings in order to get them off to a great start.  Be on the pest patrol and keep a watchful eye for aphids— I’ve already noticed them on a few of the plants in the nursery! They multiply quickly and can go undetected as they’re very small. There are many effective treatments of aphids, as well as other harmful insects in the garden, but take caution if you’re trying to establish a butterfly-friendly garden. What you utilize to eliminate harmful insects may also eliminate the butterfly population. A way to avoid this is to group your butterflyattracting plants in a specific area, or in containers, so you can take precautions against accidental damage from mass pesticide application. Some wonderful and butterfly attracting plants include: Milk Weed, Parsley, Passion Flower and Porter Weed.  If you’re looking forward to attracting bees for pollination, give Citrus, Agastache or Heather a try! It’s a growing trend to use less grass and more native, environmentally-friendly flora which helps eliminate the need for excess watering and runoff into our waterways. There are beautiful choices available for this purpose, whether it’s ornate grasses, shrubs, succulent, cacti, or palms. Planting native trees or palms with large canopies also provides much-needed shade and protection from the sun in the summer months. I’ve mentioned it before, but I love, love my large sylvester date palm, which offers shade over my patio, as well as a shield from the western glare of the sun. As we prepare to transition to a new home, we’re going Florida Friendly, which means minimal water requirements and no irrigation...drought and salt tolerant or bust!    There’s so much to see and do here in our wonderful city, and I hope that you are able to soak in spring and the beautiful wonders of nature in combination with all of the wonderful festivities.  We were fortunate enough to venture to the Epcot International Flower show this year-a fabulous spectacle of beautiful flowers, vegetable and displays.  The Living With The Land attraction is always one of our favorite activities.  We love to see all the fruits and vegetable and hydroponic displays!  If you ever get a chance during the spring, I highly recommend this event!    Be cool until next time...Happy Gardening!!! OCL

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by Captain Don Combs

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t was a crystal blue morning just before the full moon in April. We had been trolling all morning with a spread of natural baits and lures. It was dolphin season and we were ready for any strike. The early morning passed and at 10 am the left outrigger line went down hard. Fish on, the battle begins...........

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T

en minutes later we discovered we were hooked to a small Blue Marlin. The seas were calm and the water clear. We slowed the boat as the double line came into hand. Just then the marlin was gone. We were disappointed we could not get a tag in the marlin but it was still a good start for the day. Morning passed into afternoon and we had no bites until 3 pm. We had decided to troll to a hump that rose form eight hundred to six hundred feet. As we trolled around the sea mount we could see the current disturbance from it. Fish on! This time it was a fifty pound wahoo, now we have something for the table. Then another hard bite and we saw another nice Blue Marlin hooked up. Twenty five minutes later and we had tagged a 200 pound Blue Marlin. Then the action got hot. We called in two other boats and they each caught one Blue Marlin and several meat fish. They also lost several Blue Marlin hook ups. During the next two hours we caught three wahoo over fifty pounds and tagged another Blue. At the end of the day we had caught three Blue Marlin, four wahoo and missed three more Blue Marlin. Most people reading this would think we were fishing in some exotic place like the Bahamas or Costa Rica. We were fifty seven miles east of Saint Augustine, Florida.

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When it comes to Marlin fishing, lures are the way to go. You can cover more ground and it usually takes out a lot of angler error. The lure that has caught the most Blue Marlin in this area is the American Express by the C&H Lure compamy. It is a blue and white lure rigged with two 10/0 hooks. This lure comes in several color combinations including Black over Green. This lure caught my grander (1000 pound marlin) in Treasure Cay in the Bahamas.

When pulling lures, they should be in the water eighty percent of the time and breaking the surface the other twenty percent. Wave and wind conditions set speeds for pulling lures. These conditions will also affect lure selection and even the number of lines you can pull without tangles. In high seas and high wind, I pull four Express lures which are weighted and pull straight. I like to pull them at speeds from eight to ten knots. If you are lucky enough to hook a fish don’t decrease your speed until the fish settles down. In many cases you may have to run away from a charging fish just to keep a tight line. You don’t have to pull big lures to catch big marlin. The C&H flame lure is good proof of this statement. Several of my captain friends in Hawaii and Costa Rica have reported their favorite marlin lure was the original C&H Flame. Hot pink over pink was one color and dolphin/yellow, green and orange was another. One thing I always do is pull dark colored lures on the three left lines and light colored lures on the right side of the spread. Lots of articles have been written about lure colors and cloudy or sunny days. I honestly can report no difference, I still start off pulling my light and dark spread. If I start getting more strikes on all dark lures, I will put out more dark colors. I can say however, that on certain days

Mate readies the release tag as a big blue comes boatside

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Come join us on the river & Enjoy Sunset Cocktails, Dockside!

Cottages RV Sites Charter Boat Tours Full Liquor Bar

1001 Front Street, Welaka Florida 32193

386-467-7171 32

www.welakalodge.com

marlin prefer certain colors. For example during certain tournament days I have seen all fish caught on some variety of pink lures or perhaps all blue and white lures. I have always tried to “match the hatch”. This simply means you try to match the fish in the area that Marlin may be feeding on. Black and purple if you are fishing around black fin tuna, green and yellow if you are seeing a lot of small Dolphin. Pink and browns are suppose to resemble squid. I believe that faster speeds produce better and more hookups. When the seas are flat I try to pull around ten knots surface speed. But I have caught many marlin at speeds much higher, up to fifteen knots. Drag settings must be checked and rechecked throughout the day. As your equipment heats up drag settings increase. I like to use twenty pounds of drag at strike and while fighting the fish. The only time I change this is when the fish gets close to the boat. With a good angler I will tell him to increase drag to thirty pounds to help control the fish at the boat. Your equipment in general is a very important part of the puzzle. Most Blue Marlin can be caught on a “50-wide” reel. You can get about 900 yards of line on a fifty wide by first filling the reel with four hundred yards of 100 pound, Power Pro line and then topping with sixty or eighty pound monofilament. However, the day you hook a grander (1,000 pounds) or larger marlin on a 50-wide you will most likely lose the battle. Your only chance is if the marlin puts on a good surface show and doesn’t sound. I have seen several large fish sound and you can never get the dead weight of such a large fish back to the surface. Once this happens sharks usually get the marlin and you are both losers. I have always fished with “80-wides” and eighty pound line. The faster you can get the fish to the boat for a release the better chance the fish will live. Long fights kill fish! For rods, I use four bent butts and two straight butts for the riggers. Many times a marlin will come up and swat or grab a lure then let go. With straight butted rods this causes the lure to shoot forward and in many cases the fish will lose interest or sight of the lure. With a bent butt rod the volume 8

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lure will still be right where the fish hit the first time. I use the bent butts for the flat lines, the chair line and the shotgun line. Hooks must be sharp but not too pointy. Many anglers over sharpen the hook and it actually weakens the point. I try to cut down the barb on a 7732 mustard but leave a solid point. When I travel to the Islands I increase my hook and leader sizes because of larger fish. The problem with this is thicker leaders affect the action of the lures and so do larger hooks. I use 11/0 mustard hooks and 25 foot, 600 pound leaders in the Islands. It’s a big ocean, so where do I fish? Marlin are deep water fish. Off of Florida’s east coast most marlin are caught around the 200 to 600 foot areas. There are no fences in the ocean and marlin can be at any depth but your best chances are at those numbers. The Islands are a different story. There, most fish are caught over structure ranging from 3,000 to 12,000 feet. The other thing to look for when fishing is schools of tuna. Troll around the school but not close enough to cause them to dive. Most of these schools are spotted with high-powered radars that can see birds over ten miles away. With fuel prices high and to increase your chances, I recommend ROFFS fishing reports (www.roffs.com). I have used this service for over twenty years and have had great success. Use these tips and enjoy one of natures greatest fighting fish, but always release for another day. Good luck - Captain Don Combs

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AJ McGuinness fighting the Grander in the Treasure Cay Billfish Tournament.

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Sometimes drinking too much in a restaurant can be a good thing......

Good Taste

story & photos by Tammy Harrow

B

ack in 1979, nearing Winter’s end, adventurer Tristan MacDonald, his wife Alex and their two teenagers, Lorna and Gaere, sold their house, business, and all of their belongings, leaving their coastal hometown of Penzance, England behind, and headed for the U.S. Sailing their 45 foot yacht, the Intsholo III, their journey to St. Augustine came by a way most of us can only dream. Their voyage lasting more than a year, they stopped first in Barbados, then meandered their way through the islands, living the life. They had no idea what they would do once they sailed into St. Augustine. Tristan and Alex explored several different business options but nothing really stuck with them, until one night the family was out celebrating Lorna’s 19th birthday at Casa de España. It was there they decided to make that very place their own family-run restaurant- The Raintree. With no restaurant experience, the family took a giant leap of faith. “It’s what happens when you drink too much in a restaurant,” Lorna said. “You end up buying it.”

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The MacDonald’s spent close to a year renovating before opening the doors. Mom Alex ran the front of the house, Daughter Lorna bartended, and Son Gaere ran the kitchen. Dad Tristan could be found wandering throughout the restaurant entertaining customers with tales of his adventures. The Raintree was a success, quickly being named one of the top 10 restaurants by Florida Trend magazine. While it started out as a very formal fine dining experience, it has since evolved into a more relaxed, yet still elegant, atmosphere. A decade after opening, the reins were handed over to Lorna and her brother Gaere and eventually just to Lorna. Today the restaurant is run by Lorna and her husband Chris Cantabene, along with chef and creative genius Matt Berg and longtime Chef Jeff Keane who has been with Raintree for over 20 years. Gaere is still living in town and working as a successful contractor, Tristan and Alex split their time between St. Augustine and Durango, Colorado when they’re not off on an adventure- currently they are hiking along the El Camino de Santiago (or Way of St. James), but make guest appearances every Thanksgiving working alongside the rest of the Raintree staff. 36

Food & Drinks The Raintree offers an extensive menu created to please everyone from carnivores to picky pescatarians, with fresh fish offerings daily. Some dishes can also be altered for strict vegetarians. Many of the same menu favorites remain from the original menu including house favorites Brandy Pepper Steak and Beef Wellington. The desserts here truly are to die for. Don’t leave without ordering a Mixed Berry Crepe flambéed with Chambord. With over 200 different wines from around the world, choosing just one may be a problem. Since 1987, Wine Spectator has given The Raintree the Award of Excellence. There is also a nice selection of craft beers and an extensive assortment of cocktails. The Fresh Mint Mojito is my favorite. Make sure to stop by on the weekends for live music in the courtyard, catch one of the restaurant’s regular dinner shows held at the Upstairs Supper Club, or drop by Sundays for the popular brunch available from 10a.m.-2p.m. The restaurant is open daily from 5p.m.-10p.m.. OCL

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Dining Guide Symbol Key Beer and Wine breakfast Courtyard/outdoor Dancing Diner Entertainment Full Liquor Bar Happy Hour Kids Menu Late Night Menu Lunch Organic Ingredients Parking Party/Banquet Facility Raw Bar Reservations Required Sunday Brunch Take Out Tiki Bar Waterside Dining

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n Amici

1915 A1A South • Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)461-0102 • amicistaugustine.com Amici is one of the true Italian restaurants in northeast Florida, where ambience and cuisine are authentically Italian. Vito Arena has been sharing his family’s old-world legacy of remarkable Italian dishes to fall in love with, while he and his sister, Benedetta make each dining moment and private party unforgettable. It is no wonder that Amici has been voted “Best Italian Restaurant” consecutively, year after year by the residents of Saint Augustine.

n The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse

102 San Marco Avenue • Saint Augustine (904)824-7211 • raintreerestaurant.com Enjoy casual dining at its finest at The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse, recognized nationally and internationally as one of Florida’s top destination restaurants. The Raintree is renowned for it’s consistent, award-winning menu, wine list and full bar served in the warm, intimate atmosphere of a restored 1879 Victorian home with live music in our courtyard.

n The Reef Restaurant

4100 Coastal Highway • Saint Augustine (904)824-8008 • www.thereefstaugustine.com The Reef, originally called Comptons, was built by the Usina family on a beautiful piece of oceanfront property in tranquil North Beach, three miles north of the Usina Bridge, on land owned by the family for generations. Comptons opened in 1989 and enjoyed great success for the next ten years. It closed in 1999 due to the ill health of Mr. Compton and hurricane damage. The Reef was opened in 2002, under the direct ownership of the Usinas. Since that time the restaurant has worked hard to produce fine food and beverages, professionally served, all accompanied by unsurpassed views of the magnificent Atlantic Ocean. It has steadily built a reputation as one of the most popular dining destinations in Saint Augustine.

Conrad’s Specials

Zarzuela Seafood Clams, Mussels, Shrimp Scallops and Codfish Served in a Lobster sauce $23.95

Seafood Carbonara Prosciutto, Green Pea, Bacon, Shrimps and Scallops served in a White Alfredo Sauce $19.95

4010 US1 South South--St. St.Augustine, Augustine,FL FL 4010 US1 794-9440 www.conradssteakhouse.com 794-9440 ••www.conradssteakhouse.com

n South Beach Grill

45 Cubbedge Road • Saint Augustine Beach (904)471-8700 • www.southbeachgrill.net “Fresh local seafood and aloha service since1997” This popular restaurant is one of only three direct oceanfront eateries in Saint Johns County. While the oceanfront location is unique, one thing that sets the restaurant apart is the absolute resolve to source and procure 100% fresh fish. All fish arrives at the restaurant “on loin” where it is skillfully skinned, weighed and cut into fillets. The promise of fresh is evident not only in the fish selection but across the entire seafood menu as well. South Beach Grill is open 7 days a week. Lunch 11a.m.-4:30p.m., Dinner from 4:30p.m. to 9:30p.m., serving breakfast Saturdays & Sundays from 7:30-10:30.

n Sunset Grille

421 A1A Beach Blvd • Saint Augustine Beach (904)471-5555 • www.sunsetgrillea1a.com Most Award Winning Restaurant in Saint Augustine Beach, 29 time winner of The Great Chowder Debate. Have won Awards for our Datil Pepper Wings, Baby Back Ribs, Coconut Shrimp, Crab Fondue, Lobster Ravioli, Shrimp and Grits and Brownie Volcano Dessert. Our Key West atmosphere and kids menu makes us fun for the whole family. Celebrating our 22nd Anniversary!

n The Tasting Room

25 Cuna Street • Saint Augustine (904)810-2400 • www.thetastingroomfl.com A contemporary Spanish restaurant. Vibrant splashes of art complement a colorful array of “Tapas,” delectable little dishes designed for sharing and socializing. Iberianaccented entrées infused with fresh, local flavor and created with ingredients imported directly from Spain sail hot to your table. From curvy sofas cozying up to a Flamenco red fireplace, award-winning wines lining an entire wall, and live Latin music nights, The Tasting Room is fueled by a passion for authentic Spanish food and wine. Reservations are not required, but recommended. Courtyard Dining, Private Dining Room available that seats up to 20. For more information please email us or call, make online reservations at tastetapas.com. 38

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n Conrad’s Steakhouse

4010 US1 South Saint Augustine, Florida (904)794-9440 • www.conradssteakhouse.com Conrad Martin, from Spain, was recently voted one of the best chefs in America. Conrad’s Steak House is known for its outstanding service and generous portions, along with keeping a Spanish flair in Conrad’s cooking. Conrad’s paella and codfish in green sauce are delicious. The restaurant also offers chicken, seafood, pastas and salads. Conrad is in the kitchen; Mary, his wife, controls the front of the house. This “gem” of restaurant is a “FEAST OF QUALITY AND TASTE” with great food and hospitality. Lunch every weekday 11:30a.m.-2p.m. • Dinner every night, 5pm-9pm Closed Tuesdays.

n 386 A Fusion of Fine eating

5949 N. Oceanshore Blvd, Palm Coast, FL, 32137 (386)246-0070 • threeeightsix.com Nestled among the majestic oak trees in “The Hammock” alongside scenic A1A, lies 386, A Fusion of Fine Eating. Residing in a building reminiscent of “Old Florida”, 386 embodies the local spirit while invoking a worldly feel with cuisine. The menu boasts a fusion of American favorites from East to West, local fresh seafood in Southern favorites like shrimp-n-grits, aged steaks as one would find in the West, and scallops recalling time spent on the North Eastern shore. The menu is complimented by a wide selection of wines from around the globe and a generous selection of beers on tap. 386 is the realization of a dream for a husband and wife team who are committed to serving the freshest of ingredients and living by the motto “do the right thing” for our patrons. Experience Palm Coast’s very own culinary escape

n Blackfly The Restaurant

108 Anastasia Blvd. • Anastasia Island (904)201·6300 • www.blackflytherestaurant.com If you’re looking for a seafood restaurant in St. Augustine, Blackfly is one of St. Augustine’s newest and most unique seafood restaurants. Having opened in June of 2012, Blackfly has won favor with the local community and tourists alike. We’re known for our daily fresh fish specials, brick oven pizza plus steak, chicken, chops and pasta. The well-stocked bar is a great place to relax with friends. The dining room features the art of partner Vaughn Cochran and a 1,000 bottle temperature controlled wine room. The Shores Room with its own private bar can accommodate parties of up to 40. Open for dinner Tuesday to Sunday. .

n Hurricane Patty’s

69 Lewis Blvd. • Off U.S. I at Oyster Creek Marina (904)827-1822 • www.hurricanepattys.net Only minutes from downtown off of U.S. Highway l, Hurricane Patty’s serves lunch and dinner daily overlooking the water. Enjoy nightly themed specials throughout the week, featuring drink and dinner specials and live entertainment featuring a wide variety of seafood, steaks, pork chops, chicken, pasta, awardwinning chowder, and, for lunch, sandwiches, salads, and burgers. Full bar and Happy Hour daily 3-7 p.m. Housed in one of St. Augustine’s oldest structures-a renovated 1800s fish dock and warehouse, Hurricane Patty’s feature views of the surrounding marshes, marina, and St. Augustine skyline.

n Captain’s BBQ

5862 N. Oceanshore Blvd.Palm Coast, FL 32137 (386)597-2888 Offers some of the best TRUE SOUTHERN BBQ, we only use the best quality meats and ingredients. Our meats and side dishes are slow cooked in our special wood burning smoker. Although smoking is a very slow, time consuming process it is worth every second. The result is moist, juicy meats, infused with a delicious smoked wood flavor. Come try Captain Chris’s almost famous Ribs, Chicken, Pulled Pork, Turkey Breast and Brisket which are available daily with exciting additions of daily specials. All of our side dishes are homemade: Macaroni Salad, Sweet Corn Bread, Baked Beans and Cole Slaw. Located on beautiful and scenic A1A at Bing’s Landing in the Hammock of Palm Coast. Captains BBQ is also accessible by water (29.615°N 81.205°W) just south of channel marker red “108” captainsbbqbaittackle.com

Open for Dinner Tuesday - Sunday n DOLCE Café

210 St. George St. St. Augustine, FL, 32084 Trying to accommodate everybody’s needs, DOLCE Café has something to offer for everybody; the locals and tourists, big and small - everybody who is up for something delicious. GLUTEN FREE Crepes, Gourmet organic coffee, french pastries, desserts, gourmet ice cream, real fruit smoothies, milkshakes, fresh deli sandwiches and many more. When in the St. Augustine area, come visit our landmark and café. Sip the atmosphere of old world continental coffees and savor the smell of our freshly baked crepes. Open 8a.m. - 8p.m.

n Donovan’s Irish Pub

7440 US-1 North * Saint Augustine (904)829-0000 • www.donovansirishpub.com “If you walk in as a stranger, you will leave as a friend.” Stop in for an Irish feast of genuine Irish recipes, award-winning desserts, lunch and dinner menus, signature dishes, weekly specials, a vast selection of wines and beer and much more. Customers enjoy our surrounding TVS or hanging out in the adjoining Danny’s place for a game of pool or darts. Conveniently located near the World Golf Village, on US 1. We’re open 7 days a week from 11a.m. to 11 p.m.

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Dine

FRESH SEAFOOD & STEAKS Daily specials

Tell Fish Stories

THE ANGLER’S BAR

Happy Hour 4 - 6:30

THE SHORES ROOM GIFT SHOP Private Parties Art by Vaughn Cochran

904.201.6300 108 Anastasia Blvd www.blackflyrestaurant.com 39


spice

Grill Season

W

Join us on the water Drinks, Food & FUN!

Our New Sunday Brunch 10am - 1pm includes, Prime Rib, Crablegs, Shrimp, Unlimited Mimosa’s and more

Hurricane Patty’s

69 Lewis Blvd St. Augustine 904.827.1822

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by Colleen Messner The Spice & Tea exchange

hat better way to enjoy the summer than by grilling out with friends and family. There are so many options when choosing what to grill, from red meat, chicken and fish to vegetables and even fruit, just to name a few. One of the best ways to flavor your meats is with dry rubs, which require little preparation. Some of our most popular for grilled meat are Smoked Barbeque Rub, Backwoods Hickory, Tailgaters (made with local Datil Pepper), Chef ’s Choice or Butcher’s Rub. For chicken try some Crazy Chicken, Jamaican Jerk, Smoked Barbeque, or Cinnabar Smoke blend. For vegetables try Tuscany Blend, Signature blend (made with local Datil Pepper) or Vicks Garlic Fix. For fish lovers try the Spicy Tuna or Grilled Fish Blend. Begin by rubbing down your red meat, chicken, pork chops, fish or vegetables with some olive oil and rub in one of the custom blends of choice. Allow it to marinate from a few minutes up to 24 hours in the refrigerator.  Now it’s GRILL TIME! Using a non-stick, high-heat spray is a vital step in acquiring perfect grill marks without the sticky mess. Spray directly on the grates before you put your meat on the grill. A paper towel dabbed in canola or peanut oil will also do the trick (MUST be done prior to heating the grill- you don’t want to get burned!).   A tip for fish: you should always start your fish on the grill, skin-side-UP. This will also help firm up the fish and keep the fish from falling apart. A simple, easy season butter might be a yummy ending to your grilling. Keep it simple by taking a stick of butter and roll it into Bacon Salt, Chardonnay Oak Smoked Salt or any other one of our seasoned salts.  Wrap it in plastic and refrigerate overnight to make sure the flavors infuse into the butter.  Cut and serve on hot grilled food.  At the Spice and Tea Exchange, we take some of the guesswork out of summertime grilling to serve some of the tastiest dishes.  You will be the “grill master” and envy of your friends. Happy Summertime Grilling!

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Not the only water view in town...

...simply the most spectacular

904-824-8008 4100 Coastal Highway St. Augustine, FL 32084 thereefstaugustine.com

J oin u s at the Beach! Casual Oce a n ffrr o n t Dining L unch & D i n n e r Eve Everyday B r eak ea k f a s t o n t h e We Weekends

4 5 Cub b ed g e R o ad Cre sce nt Be ach, F L 9 0 4 . 4 7 1 . 8 7 0 0 • so u t h be ach gr ill. net volume 8

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Fresh Seafood, Wild Game Exotic Specialties Offering Daily Chef’s Specials

Lunch: Tues-Sat: 11-3 Dinner: Tues-Thur 5 - 9 Fri-Sat 5 - 10 Open Holidays! Sun 5 - 8 Sunday Brunch 10-3

904.824.3282 • 58 Charlotte Street www.LaPentolaRestaurant.com 41


by Chef Sheery Gaynor photos by Tammy Harrow

Summer Freeze

N

othing beats a freeze in the summertime! Like ice cream and sorbet, there are no limits to the possibilities of flavor combinations of the popsicle, nor any rules on age limit. Something about having your frozen treat on a stick is just fun! The recipes here include some for kids and some for adults. Making your own popsicles is cost effective and worth the price of a sturdy mold. Your kids will enjoy the fun of making them and it’s a great way to add a healthy fruit and juice snack without too much sugar. For adults, they are a fun party favor and are sure to be a hit at your next pool party! Allow at least 6 hours for your pops to freeze and loosen by running hot water over the exterior to release from molds. Some recipes recommend soaking the sticks in water; I do not recommend this, as they swell and make removal of a fitted lid quite difficult. If your sticks float up when filling, then allow an hour of freezing time before inserting. Popsicles store comfortably in a quart sized Ziploc bag in freezer and keep up to 6 months.


recipe Apple-Berry Bar

Juice of 1 lemon ¼ c. apple juice 1 granny smith apple, peeled, cored, diced (1/4”) ½ c. blueberries ½ c. raspberries ½ c. blackberries ¼ c. sugar ¼ c. water 1. Bring water and sugar to a boil to make simple syrup, cool. 2. Toss apples and berries in lemon and apple juice. 3. Marinate apples and berries in syrup and mash berries to produce juicy mixture. 4. Fill popsicle molds, freeze, unmold, enjoy!

Tutti-Frutti Punch Pop

½ orange, cut into wedges, sliced thin (1/16”) crosswise ½ lemon, cut into wedges, sliced thin (1/16”) crosswise ½ lime, cut into wedges, sliced thin (1/16”) crosswise ¼ pineapple, trimmed, peeled, cored, diced (1/4”) ½ c. watermelon, diced (1/2”) 5-10 grapes, sliced thinly (1/16”) crosswise ¼ c. sugar ¼ c. water ½ c. orange juice ½ c. pineapple juice 1. Bring water and sugar to a boil to make simple syrup, cool. 2. Marinate fruit in syrup and juices overnight to soften and sweeten citrus rinds. 3. Fill popsicle molds, freeze, unmold, enjoy!

Toasted Coconut and Vanilla Bean Yogurt Popsicle

1 c. sweet shredded coconut 1 can unsweet coconut milk 1 c. nonfat Greek yogurt ½ vanilla bean ½ c. sugar 3 Tbsp. milk ½ c. powdered sugar 1. Preheat oven to 350˚F. Toast coconut 7-10 minutes, moving coconut around occasionally during cooking time to prevent over browning the edges. Should be mixed shades of golden brown. 2. Pour yogurt, coconut milk, milk, and powdered sugar into blender. 3. Half vanilla bean crosswise reserving half; then split vanilla bean half lengthwise and scrape seeds into liquid mixture. 4. Blend mixture, fill molds, freeze, unmold, enjoy!

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Salted Caramel Fudgsicle Salted Caramel Sauce 1 Tbsp. water ¼ c. sugar 1 Tbsp. unsalted butter 3 Tbsp. heavy cream ¼ tsp. kosher salt

Caramel Custard 3 Tbsp. cornstarch ¼ c. sugar Pinch salt 1 & ½ c. cold milk 1/3 c. dark chocolate, chopped or chips 1 & ½ tsp. vanilla Chocolate Custard 3 Tbsp. cornstarch ¼ c. sugar Pinch salt 1 & ½ c. cold milk 1/3 c. dark chocolate, chopped or chips 1 & ½ tsp. vanilla Salted Caramel Sauce 1. To make salted caramel sauce, add water and sugar to small saucepan and lightly mix. To prevent crystallization while cooking the sugar, use a lid to create steam and occasionally brush sides of pan with water, using a pastry brush. Cook until mixture liquefies and turns amber. 2. Remove from heat and whisk in butter and cream. 3. Once caramel sauce is smooth and homogenous, add kosher salt and lightly mix. 4. Reserve Caramel Custard 1. Pulse cornstarch, sugar, salt, and milk in blender. 2. Cook mixture over medium heat in saucepan, stirring constantly until thick enough to coat the back of a spoon (nappe). 3. Remove from heat and add salted caramel sauce and vanilla extract. Chocolate Custard 1. Melt chocolate in microwave, 30 seconds, stir, 30 seconds, stir. 2. Pulse cornstarch, sugar, salt, and milk in blender. 3. Cook mixture over medium heat in saucepan, stirring constantly until thick enough to coat the back of a spoon (nappe). 4. Remove from heat and add chocolate and vanilla extract. Fudgsicles 1. Cover fillings with plastic wrap directly on surface to prevent skin from forming. Cool in refrigerator 1 hour. 2. Pour cooled custards into separate pastry bags (or Ziploc baggies) and snip ¼” off the ends. 3. Fill popsicle molds, alternating layers of chocolate and caramel. 4. Freeze, unmold, enjoy!

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Midori Melon Mojito Ice Lolly

14 c. honeydew, peeled, seeded, and diced 3 oz. Midori melon liqueur 1 oz. rum 4 oz. club soda 1 & ½ Tbsp. sugar Juice of 1 lime 16 mint leaves, chopped 1. Combine melon, liqueur, sugar, and rum in blender and puree. 2. Drain mixture in ultra-fine sieve or cheesecloth to remove any solids. 3. Muddle mint leaves and lime in mortar and pestle. 4. Pour puree mixture over lime and mint and mix well. 5. Fill popsicle molds, freeze, unmold, enjoy!

Dr. Douglas L. Johnson Board Certified Maxillofacial Surgeon Fellowship Trained in Facial Cosmetics

Dirty Pirate Freeze

2 & ½ c. Coca-Cola 1/3 c. Captain Morgan’s Spiced Rum 1/3 c. Kahlua 1. Mix all ingredients. 2. Pour into popsicle molds, freeze, unmold, enjoy!

Harbor Island Executive Center 1301 Plantation Island Dr • Suite 101 St. Augustine

904-460-0505 www.FloridaFaceDoc.com

Ladies Night KaraokE Live Music 23 HD TV’s Outdoor Bar Billiards

Something for Everyone! Now Serving Great Food! Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Mon-Fri 1-7 pm Sunday Bike Day, Music & Sports Monday Hospitality Industry/Service Night Tuesday Swing Dancing with Adam & Janine Wednesday Karaoke Party with DJ Rob St. John Thursday Country Night/Line Dance with DJ Erik & Renie Friday Ladies Night with DJ Rob St. John Saturday Live Bands @ 9 pm Teachers Night Specials

123 San Marco Ave. 904-823-8806

www.mardibar.com 44

Furniture & home Décor

let us Inspire Your Surroundings! www.peacelovehome.net

904.217.4150

400 cBl Drive, Suite 101. St. augustine, Fl 32086 located in cobblestone village volume 8

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event

by Karen Lane

‘Ahoy (young) Mateys!!!

St Augustine Yacht Club Junior Sailing 2014

L

ooking for an opportunity for your child to learn all the wonders of maritime history combined with the art of sailing? What better place to do this than the historic waterways of the Nation’s Oldest City with the St. Augustine Yacht Club. Young sailing enthusiasts will get hands on sailing experience, learning about safety, weather, wind directions, navigation, maritime communication, boat styles, rigging and marine ecology, as well as the “how” and “how not to” for safe sailing. In 1873, the St. Augustine Yacht Club (SAYC) was formally founded as the first yacht club in Florida. Today, the purpose of the SAYC is the same as it was in 1873: to promote boating and water related activities, cruising, sailing and racing. To continue this goal, the Junior Sailing Program was founded by the SAYC, principally due to the driving efforts of member Wendy Thomson, who is fulfilling her passion of sailing by passing it down to the youth of St Augustine. Entering its third season, the program put over 100 sailors through last year. Because of generous donations from members and the community, the SAYC Junior Sailing Program continues to grow and this season is expected to be its best yet. The Summer 2014 program offers three levels of training for students from the ages of 6-14. Opti #1 for beginners, Opti #2 for Intermediates, and a new fleet of Club 420 boats for advanced training. The Optis are 8’ training boats for the beginner sailor and the Club 420 is a 2-man boat for the older, more experienced students. All classes are run by Certified US Sailing Instructors with over 30 years of sailing and racing experience. The ratio of students to instructors is 6-1. The Summer Program ($195.00/week) will start volume 8

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June 9th and run 10 weeks (Monday - Friday 9a.m. -3p.m.). Because there was a waiting list last season, it’s a good idea to register early online at www.staugustineyachtclub.com The Sailing program goes beyond sailing skills. Last October four of the Junior Sailors were finalists for the First Annual Maritime Heritage Festival. Each wrote an essay on “What it was to be a Sailor 450 Years Ago.” Maritime History is part of the Sailing Program and the St. Augustine Maritime Heritage Foundation promotes education, history, and preservation of St. Augustine and its historic waterways. The mission statement is to expose our youth to the lifetime sport of sailing in a safe professional manner. Whether you want to take the sport to a competitive or recreation level, this organization will provide the foundation.=

SAFETY, LEARN TO SAIL, HAVE FUN Contact Wendy Thomson – Founder & Director of St Augustine Yacht Club Junior Sailing 904-687-4625 or sailtraining@staugustineyachtclub.com for more information. Visit the website for additional information at www.staugustineyachtclub.com/sailtraining and www.staugustineyachtclub.com/jrsailingdownloads

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Music to the Ears

E

The St. Augustine Music Festival

mbraced within the gilded sanctuary of St. Augustine’s historic Cathedral Basilica, Florida’s most extraordinary chamber music festival returns in June for its eighth season. The St. Augustine Music Festival, held June 19-21 and 2628, under artistic director Jorge A. Peña, has become a world-class occasion for celebrating classical music. Most extraordinary: it’s completely free and will be streamed for free via the web. Peña, a native of Honduras, is a viola player with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra. He and his cellist wife, Jin Kim Peña, started the music festival in 2007. “We felt that the famous history of St. Augustine, and the beauty and fantastic acoustics of the Cathedral, called for classical music to be a part of these community treasures,” Peña says. The concerts are presented free of charge, but staging them requires year-round fund-raising in order to pay for  performers, music, instrument rentals and other concert costs.  The SAMF board of directors is very active in recruiting sponsors and donors that include institutions such as Florida Blue, the Community Foundation for Northeast Florida, the St. Augustine Record and the St. Johns County Tourist Development Council. However, a large share of the budget is covered by tax-deductible donations from individuals. Free concerts are essential to Peña’s mission to bring in new, young audiences to classical music. “We have removed the economic intimidation factor,” he says. “We see entire families

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music by Dave Bresing

attending concerts that would be out of reach at the typical $35$55 ticket price range for concerts of this caliber.” In a town prone to tourist-oriented spectacles, the festival is a low-key leader in bringing St. Augustine to a more sophisticated level of local cultural integrity, says SAMF board member Rhey Palmer. “SAMF from the start has been about authenticity, education, excellence and heart. The festival’s growth shows that audiences recognize and support the real thing.” Last year’s firstever web streaming of three concerts had immediate impact, he says. “We had Internet viewers and new supporters from around the world,” Palmer says. “And there was a noticeable increase in the number of young faces among the local Cathedral audiences after the Webcasts.”  This year, all six concerts will be streamed live. The concert series this year includes performances by the standard-setting Diaz Trio. Violinist Elissa Lee Koljonen, who dazzled audiences last year with her tango-pulsing “Four Seasons of Buenos Aires” by Astor Piazzolla,  returns with a Mozart concerto. Violinist Andres Cardenes is back with four Vivaldi concertos. Brilliant guitarist Stephen Robinson and internationally acclaimed Jacksonville flautist Les Roettges, both North Florida favorites, will also be in the house. A special treat: the sublime J.S. Bach “Goldberg Variations” will be played in a rare, complete performance by pianist Eugenio Urrutia-Borlando. Visit www.StAugustineMusicFestival.org or call (904) 347-6260 for more information.

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ST. AUGUSTINE MUSIC FESTIVAL CONCERT PROGRAMS Week One Friday, June 19th-Opening Night SAMF Chamber Orchestra, Andres Cardenes-violin soloist Violin concert - Vivaldi Concerto in e minor, Op. 4, No. 2 Concerto in g minor, Op. 4, No. 6 Concerto in D Major, Op. 4, No. 11 Concerto in G Major, Op. 4, No. 12 Intermission   Felix Mendelssohn String Symphony No. 8 in D Major I. Adagio e grave – Allegro II. Adagio III. Menuetto (Allegro molto) & Trio (Presto) IV. Allegro molto   Saturday, June 20th-Summer Music Stephen Robinson, Guitar Les Roettges, Flute Boyd Jones, Organ/Harpsichord Program TBA   Sunday, June 21st-Grace and Beauty Diaz Trio/Pena Trio Ludwig van Beethoven String Trio in C Minor, Op. 9, No. 3 I. Allegro con spirito II. Adagio con espressione III. Scherzo: Allegro molto e vivace IV. Finale: Presto   Intermission   Johannes Brahms String Sextet No. 1 in B-Flat Major, Op. 18 I. Allegro ma non troppo II. Andante ma moderato III. Scherzo: Allegro molto IV. Rondo: Poco allegretto e grazioso   Week Two Thursday, June 26th-Discovery Louis Spohr Double String Quartet No. 3 in E minor, Op. 87 I. Adagio – Allegro II. Andante con Variazioni III. Scherzo; Allegro IV. Finale; Allegro molto Quartet I  Quartet II Aurica Duca, Violin  Jorge Avila, volume 8

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Violin I Clinton Dewing, Violin Antonio Rincon, Violin II Jorge Pena, Viola  Colin Kiely, Viola Jin Pena, Cello  Moisés Molina, Cello   Intermission   Heinrich von Herzogenberg Horn Trio in D Major, Op. 61 I. Allegretto II. Presto III. Andante con moto IV. Allegro Eric Olson, Oboe Debra Sherrill-Ward, Horn Eugenio Urrutia-Borlando, Piano   Camille Saint-Saëns Septet for Trumpet, two Violins, Viola, Cello, Bass and Piano Op.65 I. Preambule II. Menuét III. Interméde IV. Gavotte et Final Julian Kaplan, Trumpet Jorge Avila, Violin I Aurica Duca, Violin II Jorge Pena, Viola Jin Pena, Cello Patrick Bilanchone, Bass Eugenio Urrutia-Borlando, Piano   Friday, June 27th-Piano Spectacular Eugenio Urrutia–Borlando; Piano Johann Sebastian Bach Goldberg Variations, BWV 988 Aria  With Thirty Variations   Saturday, June 28th-Mozart and More Mozart SAMF Chamber Orchestra, Elisa Koljonen; violin solo   W. A. Mozart – Concerto No. 4 in D major for violin and orchestra K. 218 I. Allegro II. Andante cantabile III. Rondeau: Andante grazioso -Allegro ma non troppo   Intermission   W.A. Mozart – Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201 I. Allegro moderato II. Andante III. Menuetto IV. Allegro con spirito 47


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904.471.7300 Emil Hernandez

48

Annette Kidder

2225 A1A South Suite A3 St. Augustine, Florida 32080 www.staugustinedentist.com volume 8

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Celebrate World Bellydance Day with

Blue Lotus

story by Chris Bodor

G

ina Marie Newman, the founder, director and choreographer for Blue Lotus Bellydance, is diligent about sharing her knowledge. “Belly Dance” is a bit of a misnomer that has stuck around,” she reveals. “The term encompasses dances from many regions and was originally used by an American promoter of the 1893 Chicago World’s fair. This name was chosen for the female dancers at the North African Village pavilion.” Gina and her troupe are a familiar sight in the Nation’s Oldest City and St. Johns County, performing at countless events such as The Gamble Rogers Folk Festival, The St. Augustine Pirate Gathering, The St. Augustine Seafood Festival, First Friday Art Walk, the Ponce De Leon Celebration and on May 17th, World Bellydance Day, Blue Lotus participated in a global event called the International Shimmy Mob. The intention of this event is to raise awareness of domestic violence. On this day, dancers around the world perform the same dance, on the same day, in the same t-shirt. Please visit www.shimmymob.com for information on this global gathering. Gina Marie began her dance

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training as a child, performing her first stage solo at age ten. Fitness, movement and dance have always been present in her life. She discovered Middle Eastern Dance as a young woman and immediately felt a connection to the music, movements and history of this dance form. Gina has studied with many of the most talented instructors and musicians in the Middle Eastern dance world. Blue Lotus Bellydance performs authentic presentations as well as fantasy driven, entertainment choreographies such as pirate style and/or other fusions. The principle dancers of Blue Lotus Middle Eastern Dance Company have a minimum of 10 years of Middle Eastern Dance training and are well versed in the history, musicality and movements of this beautiful art form. Many have over 30 years of training. Gina Marie Newman and the Blue Lotus Bellydancers are available for demonstrations, workshops and performances. She also offers classes for all levels, from beginner to advanced. Information is available on her website at www.bluelotustribal.com and she can be contacted by phone at (904)540-2313 or by email ravenstar6@hotmail.com. OCL

49


Pink Up the Players

I

The TPC shows their support for Donna 26.2

f you were at the final round of the Tournament Players Championship this year, you might have felt like you were seeing the world through rose colored glasses...there was a lot of pink around, in every shade imaginable...even on the guys! In case you hadn’t gotten the memo and have been wondering why this explosion of color occurred in the most unlikely of places-the third year of Pink Out the Players was in full swing, with pink flowers, pink ribbons, pink attire...and pink faces (that is if the spectators forgot their sunscreen). All this was in support of the Donna 26.2 organization, whose sole purpose is, according to the Donna Foundation’s website, donnnahickenfoundation.org, “to (raise) money to be used exclusively for the critical needs of First Coast women living with

50

photos by Addison Fitzgerald

breast cancer.” This all started a couple of years ago when the PGA Tour decided they wanted a richer, fuller relationship with the Donna 26.2 organization. They were already running two 5Ks during the year in partnership between the two organizations...but they wanted to do more. With the tournament moving to May and the final round falling on Mother’s Day each year, it seemed the perfect thing to doencourage everyone, men included, to wear pink. We had to see it for ourselves so Old City Life sent one of our intrepid photographers to take pictures of this worthy effort to bring a little color into our lives while helping those who need support during their battle with this disease.

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worship Abbey of Castle Otttis (Ah-tis) (Interdenominational) Prayer on Sunday Mornings Adults and Mature Children only Vilano Beach | 824.3274

Chapel of Our Lady of La Leche (Catholic) 8:30am, 5pm, Holidays 8:30am, 3pm 27 Ocean Avenue | 824.2809 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Call for Services 500 Deltona Blvd | Shores | 797.4412

Anastasia Baptist Church Sunday 9:30am Contemporary 11am Traditional 1650 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.2166

Christ Our Savior EV Lutheran Church Christian Formation 9am Divine Service 10:30am (deaf interpreted) 21 Milton Street | Uptown | 829.6823

Anchor Faith Church (Word of Faith) Sunday 11am, Wednesday 7:30pm 1764 Tree Blvd | St Augustine | 797.6363

Church Of Christ Sunday Bible Class 9am Sunday Worship 10am, 6pm, Wed 7pm 2900 Lewis Speedway | 824.1800

Ancient City Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Sunday 10:45am, 6pm Wed 6:30pm Bible Study and Prayer 27 Sevilla Street | Downtown | 829.3476

Church at Vilano (Baptist) Bible School 9:30am, Sunday 10:30am Wednesday Prayer and Bible Services 7pm 121 Meadow Ave | Vilano Beach | 827.0477

Berea Seventh Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:15am, Worship 11am Prayer Meeting 7:30pm 151 M L King Ave | Downtown | 824.9145

Community Bible Church Equipping Hour (classes for all ages) 9:30am Fellowship Worship Service10:30am Wed (school schedule) Word of Life Clubs, ages 4 thru High School, Bible Study 6:30pm 3150 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.3875

Bethany Baptist Church Call for Services 5465 CR 208 | Bakersville | 824.5169 Bethel Baptist Church Call for services 222 Riberia St | Downtown | 824.5304

Corpus Christi Catholic Church Daily Mass Mon-Sat 9am • Sat Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Mass 8:30am, 9:45am & 11:00am 6175 Datil Pepper Rd | Shores Area | 797.4842

Bible Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am & 5pm 2485 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.3999

Congregation Sons of Israel (Jewish, Conservative) Services Friday 7:30pm & Saturday 10am 161 Cordova St | Historic District | 829.9532

Bridge of Life Christian Center (Full Gospel Assembly of God) Sunday Worship 10:30am Wed 6:30pm Bible Study Lewis Point Plaza | 797.0669

Crescent Beach Baptist Church Sunday School Bible Fellowship 9:30am Worship 11am, Sunday Worship 6pm 885 SR 206 E | St Augustine | 794.7777

Cathedral-Basilica Parish (Catholic) Saturday Vigil Mass 5pm Sunday Masses 7am, 9am &11am, 5pm Daily Mass 7am Monday - Saturday 38 Cathedral PL | Historic Distict | 824.2806

Dawson Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Sunday School 9:30am, Sunday Worship 110am, Bible Study Wednesday 7pm 225 N Orange St | St. Augustine | 824.8049

Celebration Church-St Augustine 10:30am Sundays St. Augustine High School Auditorium Childcare and Youth Services are provided 3205 Varella Ave | 737.1121 | celebration.org Center for Spiritual Living Call for Services 1795 Old Moultrie Road | 825.3600

Family Worship Center (Christ Centered Worship) Sunday 10am, Thursday 7pm 2040 SR 207 | 819.9970 First Church of Christ Scientist (Christian Science and Reading Room) Sunday School and Service 10am Wednesday Service 5:30pm 2555 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.8882

First Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:45am Monday Word and Action Bible Study 6:45pm Wednesday Prayer Service 12 noon 89 St Francis Street | Downtown | 824.6590 First United Methodist Church Sunday 8:15am & 11am - Traditional Worship Sunday 9:30am - Contemporary 118 King Street | Downtown | 829.3459 Grace United Methodist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 8:30am, 11am Junior Church during 11am Carrera St at Cordova St | Downtown | 829.8272 Good News PCA (Christian) Sunday Worship 9am & 10:30am Nursery provided for all services 1357 Wildwood Drive | 819.0064 Heritage Baptist Church Bible Fellowship 9:30am Sunday School 10am Sunday Worship 11am & 6pm Wed 7pm prayer meeting 1480 Wildwood Dr | 824.8888 Hineni Messianic Fellowship (Messianic - Jewish & Non Jewish Believers) Friday Shabbat 7:30pm Tuesday Bible Study 7:30pm 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 827.9731 Holy Cross Charismatic Orthodox Sunday 10am 110 Masters Drive | 810.0535 Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of St Augustine 2940 CR 214 | 829.0504 Homeport Christian Church Sundays 9am Traditional 10:45am Contemporary Wednesday 6:30pm 5605 US 1 S | St Augustine South | 797.8921 Hurst Chapel AME Church (Methodist) Call for Services 28-1/2 Bernard St | Downtown | 824.0500 Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall South Cong.- Sunday 4pm & Thur 7:30pm North Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Wed 7:30pm East Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Thursday 7:30pm 735 Kings Estate Rd | 797.7599 Lighthouse Church of God Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening 6pm, Wed Evening 7pm 1230 Kings Estate Road | 797.6996

Helping Families and Friends Honor Their Loved One We will assist in every aspect of the funeral or cremation service. As St. Augustine’s only full service funeral home and cemetery, we can handle all the details for you. “Four generations of the Craig family Just one call - one location!

serving the areas families”

1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com 52

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Mc Dowell Baptist Church 16 Bayview Drive | St Augustine Call for Services 829-8388 Memorial Lutheran Church of the Martyrs Sunday School Sundays Traditional 8am Contemporary 10:30am 3375 US 1 South | 797.4377 Memorial Presbyterian Church Sunday 8:30am Informal, 9:30am Church School 10:50am Pipe Organ Prelude, 11am Worship 36 Sevilla St | Historic District | 829.6451 Mill Creek Baptist Church Sunday Bible Service 10am, Sunday Worship 11am, 6:30pm, Wed 7pm 6019-A State Rd. 16 | Mill Creek | 940.3130

Saint Photios National Shrine (Greek Orthodox) Monday - Saturday, Sunday Service Friday 11am 41 St George St | St Augustine | 829.8205 San Sebastian Catholic Church Saturday Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Masses 8am,10am, 12 noon Spanish Daily Mass 8am Tues - Friday 1112 SR 16 | 824.6625 Seventh - Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:30am, Worship 11am 555 State Road 16 | St Augustine | 824.5855 Shiloh Baptist Church Call for Services 271 West King St | Downtown | 824.3913

1475 Old Dixie Highway • St. Augustine Tabernacle Baptist Church Call for Services (904) 824-1672 280 Duval St | aigFuner DowntownalHome.com | 829.2041 www.Cr

Temple Bet Yam (Jewish Reform) Services First and Third Friday 7:30pm 2055 Wildwood Rd | St Augustine | 819.1875 The Village Church (Interdenominational) Bible School 9:00am Services 9am & 11am, Children’s 11am Adult Bible Study 10am, Youth 5pm 4225 Pacetti Rd | World Golf Village | 940.6768

Miracle Center Ministries (Non-Denominational) Sunday 10:30am 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 824.9673

Saint Augustine Shores United Methodist Church Sunday School 10am, Traditional 9am Contemporary 11am 724 Shores Blvd | St Augustine Shores | 797.4416

Moultrie Baptist Church Sunday School 9:45am Service 11am, 6pm, Wed 6:30pm 3699 US 1 S | Moultrie Creek | 797.9005

Saint Cyprian’s Episcopal Church Sunday Holy Eucharist 10am Third Sunday 5:30pm 37 Lovett Street | 829.8828

New Life Baptist Church Call for Service Times 346 Varella Avenue • Near SR 16 | 823.9537

Saint Francis In-the-Field Episcopal Church 9am, Sunday 10am 895 Palm Valley Rd | Ponte Vedra | 543.0112

Turning Point at Calvary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:40am Worship 9:40am, 11am, 6pm 3500 SR 16 • 829.9795

New Saint James Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am 135 Rodriquez Street | 824.6500

Saint Luke AME Church African Methodist Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 11am 694 W Pearl St | Downtown | 824.6120

Unitarian-Universalists Fellowship of St. Augustine Sunday 10:30am 2487 A1A South | St Augustine | 471.2047

Saint Mary’s Baptist Church Call for Services 69 Washington St | Downtown | 824.1314

Wards Creek Baptist Church Sunday Services 7am, 10:45am 7pm Home Bible Studies Wednesday Youth 6pm - Service 7pm 7730 County Rd 13 N | Wards Creek | 522.0128

Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church Saturday Vigil 4:00pm Sunday masses 8am, 10am, 12 noon Daily mass Tue 8:15am, Thurs 8:15am 5950 SR 16 | 824.8688 Pentecostal Fellowship Center Church Sunday Schoool 10:00am Worship 11am, 6pm | Youth Thursday 5:30pm 1065 Kings Estate Rd | Kings Estates | 797.6040

Saint Paul AME Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship Services 10:45am Bible Study Wednesday 6pm 85 ML King Avenue | 829.3918

Trinity Episcopal Parish Holy Eurcharist 7:30, 9am Family Service & 11:15am Wednesday 10am Holy Eurcharist and Healing Service followed by Bible Study 215 St. George St | Historic District | 824.2876

Zion Baptist Church Call for Services 94 Evergreen Ave | St Augustine | 826.1424

Pilgrim Church (United Church of Christ) Service Sunday 10am 5880 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.5187 Radiant Family Church Sunday Worship 10:45am, Wednesday 6:30pm 1515 CR 210 | 808.7390 Saint Anastasia Catholic Church Saturday 4pm, Sunday 8am & 10:30am Daily Mass 9am Monday-Friday 5205 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.5364

“Our Family Serving Your Family Since 1915” 4th Generation

1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com volume 8

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Hookey Hamilton

Joel Bagnal, Goldsmith

Fine Art and Portrait Photographer

11B Aviles Street, St. Augustine, Fl 32084 Phone: 904.614.4706

11B & 11C Aviles St St. Augustine, FL 32084

Email: jbagnal@joelbagnalgoldsmith.com Web: joelbagnalgoldsmith.com

Phone: 904.728.4957 Email: hookey@hookeyhamiltonphotography.com

Web: hookeyhamiltonphotography.com

Commemorating life’s special occasions and relationships with custom designs in precious metals and gemstones. Complete client design and production involvement by email from any location.

Hot Shot Bakery and Cafe

Open for breakfast and lunch daily freshly-baked goods, coffee, catering and custom wedding/all-occasion cakes

8 Granada Street - Saint Augustine (904) 824-7898 54

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Painting With Flowers

art by Ashley Bates

57 Treasury

K

arin Sufalko has always had a hand in design, whether it be interior, ergonomic, or today, floral design. Floral design gives Sufalko the ability to “paint with flowers” as she calls it. “I love to make flowers dance,” said Sufalko, in her Bavarian accent. “Flowers have their own dance and I don’t like to curtail that dance, and I can also create things from not exactly the materials that most people have. I can use bushes, trees, whichever. What I like to do is custom work for the individual. I don’t have catalogs. You can’t come in here and say ‘No. 79.’ It doesn’t happen. I stay away from FTD because they tell you exactly what to do: they say two yellow roses and three Gerbera daisies in a yellow pot and that’s when I walk away; actually run away.” Sufalko opened 57 Treasury in 2000, just after she moved to Saint Augustine from Chicago, by way of Bavaria, Germany, and she has had a runaway hit ever since. “It just happened, I used to do big floral arrangements for artists’ openings on First Friday,” she said. “When we first started we didn’t know anybody, so we joined AGOSA (Art Galleries of St. Augustine) for First Fridays. Then the person I bought a house from was getting married and they asked if I would do their flowers and I said ‘Yes, I would love to.’ So that’s how it started, with that one wedding and then another wedding and it just kept going.” The simple way that 57 Treasury began is still the way Sufalko operates the business today: simply, customized and personal. “I want to be involved personally in this business. I even deliver flowers to the bride and all that. I prefer that to anything else; a personal touch because I want to know that they are happy,” she said. “It’s custom; it’s the heart; it’s the core that needs to be happy and flowers can make that happen.” “I love all flowers, I even love weeds and I incorporate them sometimes. I have a friend Robert who sometimes brings me weeds and I incorporate them...we both love them and it makes things have a different dance: it’s not tight and contrived. It’s natural.” Sufalko’s flower studio is located on King St. and is filled with fresh flowers and gifts, along with a rustic atmosphere which pairs perfectly with her approach to floral design. 57 volume 8

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Treasury specializes in custom flower design for weddings, birthdays, events and any special occasion. “Somebody told me it (Saint Augustine) was a fabulous spot and I was ready to open up my own shop,” said Sufalko, who opened her shop up with friend Lee Stoetzel. “I said to my older sister, when she was here creating (arrangements) for my youngest daughter’s wedding...‘Isn’t it amazing I get to do what I love? It’s become a business,’ and she said to me, ‘What? You’ve done this all your life!’ I think it’s a great statement and it really impressed me. To me it really defines what I’m doing.” When a customer, whether it is a bride or a husband purchasing a bouquet for his wife, walks into her studio, Sufalko gets to know them along with their likes and dislikes and she begins to envision the custom floral design. “I think from the personalities that I talk with and what they are envisioning, I can see what they want and from there we go,” she said. “My favorite thing is to create something, whether it be a wedding or a corporate event or a birthday or whatever celebration.” Currently there are many floral trends that are popping up on Pinterest and bridal magazines, like the Grand Lodge that is rustic and earthy, or the Confetti trend that is vibrant and brightly colored designs, according to International Floral Distributors trend forecast for 2014. But if it were up to Sufalko, she would always suggest to do your own thing when planning a special event that includes floral design. “Trends certainly happen and I can see them in here,” Sufalko said. “Brides come in and they all want the same thing, like right now is the color mint, blush colors. I understand why brides are doing that, going to these internet spots, because they feel they need inspiration from them, but I’d rather do my own thing. I’m not trendy. I’d rather figure it out and do it and come up with it myself. OCL

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Ancient City Poets

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Poetry by Chris Bodor

his month the Ancient City Poets invite you to “Talk on the Child Side” and celebrate the joy of being a child. One such opportunity will be on Saturday, June 21st at The Gathering of Friends Children’s Arts Festival. All children who attend will be given an opportunity to learn how to write a poem, collaborate with illustrators, and make a poetry book during this interactive arts festival for children. The free event will happen on June 21st, 2014 from 2p.m. to 8p.m. at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre. The festival is free, open to the public, and will feature artist-led instruction in a variety of art forms including painting, glass-fusing, beading, puppetry, weaving, poetry, dance, music-making and more. Join us for a fun-filled day of making art and crafts, playing games with pirates, hoola-hooping, square dancing, and storytelling. Children and parents are encouraged to wear play clothes and parents must accompany children at all times. The festival is funded in part by an ACH grant from the St. Johns County Tourist Development Council. For more info email the Friends of the St. Augustine Amphitheatre at fosaaartsfestival@ gmail.com Then, on Sunday, June 29th, join the Ancient City poets for an afternoon of poetry. Poets and poetry lovers are invited to PlantA-Poem with the Ancient City Poets at The Gallery Café of St. Augustine (1974 US-1 S, in the old Staples Plaza). Please resister at the door at 1:45p.m and the hour long workshop begins at 2p.m. There is a small $10 charge to cover the cost of endless coffee and sweet treats. Then, travel a short way up US-1 for “St. Augustine Speaks”, a community open mic gathering held at City Coffee Company (1280 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd, near Village Inn). Share a poem or two with a warm and supportive crowd, or just listen and soak in the spoken word scene. The readings are held on the last Sunday of each month and start at 3p.m. and are held “renga style” with no emcee or sign-up sheet. The events conclude when all presenters have had an opportunity to share.

My Turtle Scott By Kimmy Van Kooten Flagler Hospital Anderson-Gibbs Bldg 301 Health Park Blvd. Suite 219 St. Augustine

One sunny day When I was little My mother came home with a baby turtle First she made me close my eyes “Don’t peek!” she said “I have a surprise!” In my hand She placed the present she bought A friend at last, my turtle Scott I played all day and sometime around dawn I placed my dear Scott on our front lawn But then I forgot... Where did he go, Mommy? Where’s my turtle Scott? One days not enough, With tears I fought Days gone by, weeks and months I searched our yard for my turtle Scott but then I forgot.. volume 8

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Davis Dhas, MD Dr. Dhas is Board Certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and has been in practice in St. Augustine since 2009.

Reda Alami, MD Dr. Alami is Board Certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and has recently been named a “Top Doc” in Jacksonville and St.Augustine.

Gloria Lelaidier, ARNP Certified Nurse Midwife, has her Masters in Midwifery from the University of Florida and has brought more than 2000 St. Johns residents into this world.

Anah Marks, ARNP

Anah is a graduate of Florida State University. She has been in obstetrical nursing since 1997, and a NurseMidwife since 2001. Anah is knowledgeable, caring and loves the relationships that she builds with her patients over years of care.

Call Us At (904) 819-9898 Monday thru Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm 57


NORTH of The Plaza 1. LOVE’S ART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE 2. TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE 3. ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105 4. METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET 5. HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET 6. THE STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET 7. #7 ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

SOUTH of The Plaza 8. GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET 9. BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET 10. PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET 11. AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET 12. GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET 13. JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET 14. AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET 15. PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET 16. ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET 17. LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1 18. GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET 19. GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY: 49 KING STREET 20. SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET 21. ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET

Art Galleries of St. Augustine is an association of many diverse and eclectic galleries located in the city. From local artist owned businesses to exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer collections of local, regional, national and facebook.com/artgalleriesofstagustine international artists.

EAST of Downtown 22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH: 370-A A1A BEACH BLVD. 24. ISLAND FRAMERS AND GALLERY: 4106 A1A SOUTH

The ART GALLLERIES of St. Augustine is an association of the many diverse and eclectic art galleries located in the nation’s oldest city. From local artist-owned businesses to elegant exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer outstanding collections of local, regional, national and international artists.

WEST of The Plaza 25. LIGHTNER MUSEUM: 75 KING STREET 26. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM: 48 SEVILLA STREET 27. 130 king fine art: 130 KING STREET 28. BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY: 137A KING STREET. 29. space:eight: 228 W.KING ST.

FIRST FRIDAY 5-9 PM On the first Friday of each month the galleries offer new art exhibits and lively receptions to the public. Start your FREE self-guided tour at any of the Art Galleries, most within walking distance to each other. Hop aboard the FREE Art Walk trolley that runs throughout downtown. For more info, visit us www.ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

NORTH OF THE PLAZA 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

LOVE’S ART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE   ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105   METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET    HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET THE STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET  ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

SOUTH OF THE PLAZA 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET  AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET  ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET . LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1  GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET   GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY:  49 KING STREET SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET    ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET 

EAST OF DOWNTOWN 58

22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH:370A  A1A BEACH BLVD.

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FACEBOOK.COM/ARTGALLERIESOFSTAUGUSTINE


GALLERIES

904.824.8460 • amiroartandfound.com

11C Aviles Street • 904.823.8608

904.826.8530 • flagler.edu/crispellert

904-825-4577 • ButterfieldGarage.com

904.827.9997 • simplegestures@live.com

ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

904.342.2186 • GeorgiaNickGallery.com

904.824.6322 • metalartzgifts.com

P.A.S t . A Art Gal l er y

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904.824.0251 • pastaartgallery.net

904.829.5003 • NeffJewelers.com

904.827.1899 • ArtfullyGraceGallery.com

904.829.6880 • grandbohemiangallery.com

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904.540.3661 • facebook.com/starvingartiststaug 59


poetry

June Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

First Sunday: 01 St. Augustine Vintage Car Tour of Mission Nombre de Dios

02 El Galeón Visits St. Augustine Tour a full-sized replica of a 17th century Spanish galleon

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys

21 Orange Street staugustinevintagecartours.com

111 Avenida Menendez 10am-6pm

09

08

Florida Chamber Music Project Presents “Piazzola/Dvornak” Ponte Vedra Concert Hall 3pm pvconcerthall.com

Father’s Day 15 at World Golf Hall of Fame WorldGolfHallofFame.org

SAYC Fathers Day Regatta

Offshore St. Augustine http://staugustineyachtclub.com

Maritime Heritage Family Fun Day

23 Orange Street

St Augustine, FL 7pm St. Johns County 10 Chamber of Commerce Golf Tournament Palencia Club 12-5pm stjohnscountychamber.com

Sailing Summer Camp

St. Augustine Yacht Club June 16 - 20 9am-3pm staugustineyachtclub.com

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23 Orange Street

23

22

17

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys St Augustine, FL 7pm Salt Air Farmer’s Market

24

Historic Weapons Demonstrations

01

Marineland Marina 830am-noon MarinelandMarina.com

Fountain of Youth Park 11am-3pm staugmaritimeheritage.org

Plant-A-Poem Workshop and Reading

03

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The Gallery Cafe, St. Augustine 1:45-3pm bodor.org

First Sunday: 06 St. Augustine Vintage Car Tour of Mission Nombre de Dios

30 El Galeón Visits St. Augustine Tour a full-sized replica of a 17th century Spanish galleon 111 Avenida Menendez 10am-6pm

Castillo de San Marcos 8am-545pm nps.gov/casa

07

08

21 Orange Street staugustinevintagecartours.com

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City Calendar 2014 For a complete listing of area events, go to OldCityLife.com

Wednesday

Thursday

Music By the Sea Concert Series

Concerts In the Plaza

04

St. Augustine Beach Pavillion 7-9pm thecivicassociation.org

Tourism & Hospitality Council

meets at World Golf Hall of Fame 5-7pm

Movies by the Bay

11

St. Augustine Municipal Marina FREE Every Wednesday June 11-Aug 13 830pm facebook.com/saintaugustineripleys

SAYC Wednesday Night Race Series 5pm

18

25

St. Augustine Beach Pavillion 7-9pm thecivicassociation.org

SAYC Wednesday Night Race Series 5pm

Plaza De La Constitucion 7-9pm plazaconcerts.com

staugAmphitheatre.com

904-829-6300

12

Ponte Vedra Concert Hall pvconcerthall.com

Concert 13 Ottmar Liebert and Luna Negra Ponte Vedra Concert Hall pvconcerthall.com

19

26

Open Mic Night at Tradewinds Lounge 5-8pm tradewindslounge.com 904-829-9336 Shadows of the Past

03

Fountain of Youth Park FountainOfYouthFlorida.com

staugustineyachtclub.com

King Buster 400 Kingfish Tournament June 20-22 kingbuster.com U. S. Women’s Open Championship

20

Beach Bash Anastasia State Park floridastateparks.org/anastasia Vettes at the Village World Golf Village 10am-3pm nfca.net

14

at World Golf Hall of Fame June 19-22

Concert 27 Rebelution St. Augustine Amphitheatre 6pm staugAmphitheatre.com

Fireworks over Matanzas

Children’s Arts Festival St. Augustine Amphitheatre fosaa.org

21

Third Saturdays Nocatee Farmers’ Market

04

1 South Castillo Drive 6pm

1st Friday Artwalk, Downtown St. Augustine

09

07

Dowtown area DrakesRaid.com

Washington Oaks Gardens State Park floridastateparks.org/washingtonoaks

at St. Augustine Lighthouse staugustinelighthouse.org

St. Augustine Music Festival

Drake’s Raid June 6-7

Second Saturday Plant Sale

Sunset/Moonrise

124 Charlotte St. St. Augustine, FL

02

06

Concert Weezer St. Augustine Amphitheatre 7:30pm

Catholic Charities celebrates their new home at 3940 Lewis Speedway Concert Acoustic Alchemy

Saturday

1st Friday Artwalk, Downtown St. Augustine

05

Eighth annual music festival features free, world-class classical music concerts St. Augustine Cathedral Basilica June 19-28

staugustineyachtclub.com

Music By the Sea Concert Series

Friday

245 Little River Road, Ponte Vedra nocatee.com

Uptown Saturday Night San Marco Avenue 5-9pm

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The Downtown Bazaar Colonial Quarter in St. Augustine 6-10pm thedowntownbazaar.com Sunset Celebration at Vilano Beach Town Center 260 Vilano Road 3pm-dusk vilanobeachfl.com

05

July oldcitylife.com

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Organically Yours

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’ve consistently been asked the difference between organic and every day wine that is out in the marketplace. Organic wine is wine grown in accordance with principles of organic farming, excluding the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides and herbicides, as opposed to wines made from grapes that use all or some of the above. The consumption of organic wine has grown over the years, the growth out-pacing the consumption of non-organic wine. There are an estimated 1500-2000 organic wine producers globally, and many of them right here in the US, primarily on the west coast. The legal definition of organic wine is based primarily in the way that the use (or non-use) of preservatives occur during the winemaking process. Wine production comprises two main phases: that which takes place in the vineyard and that which takes place in the winery (i.e. fermentation of the grapes). The baseline definition of organic wine as “wine made with grapes farmed organically”, deals only with the first phase (grape growing). Wine matures over time. It is widely considered that certain types of wines improve with aging, as the flavors become more integrated and balanced. The greatest percentage of wines are produced in a way that allows them to last, sometimes as long as decades. The use of added sulfites is debated heavily within the organic winemaking community. Many vintners favor their use in small quantities for stabilization of wine, while others frown on them.

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wine by Jeanne Maron

Currently the only effective preservatives that allow wines to last for a long period are ‘non-organic’. While there are a growing number of producers making wine without added preservatives, it is generally acknowledged that these wines are for consumption within a few years of bottling. In some parts of the world, namely Europe, wine cannot legally be labeled as “Organic.” Wines that have added sulfites, but are otherwise organic, are labeled “wine made from organic grapes.” In the United States, wines certified “organic” under the National Organic Program cannot contain added sulfites. Many customers have asked me if organic wines taste differently.  I personally don’t taste a difference but am leery of selling organic unless the customer understands the differences and the longevity of the juice. Another misnomer is the term “sulfite free.” There is no such wine available that is completely free of sulfites as there are naturally occurring sulfites in all wines. However, the percentage is so low most consumers with allergies would still not be affected with organic wines. Visit Jeanne Maron at The Gifted Cork, 64 Hypolita Street in downtown St. Augustine, FL. Call for more information at (904) 810-1083.

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Social Security Planning: Is It Necessary?

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ocial Security is one of the most popular programs the federal government has ever put into place. In total, about 57 million Americans received retirement, disability, or survivors’ benefits during 2012 at a cost of about $786 billion. Social Security retirement benefits were received by nine of 10 people age 65 or older during 2012 and were a major source of income for more than two-thirds of retirees. It may not be surprising in light of the financial challenges Americans have faced during the past few years, but the percentage of people claiming Social Security retirement benefits at the earliest possible age increased by more than 2 percentage points between 2007 and 2009. According to one expert, 41 percent of men and 46 percent of women receive the smallest possible retirement benefit available to them because they claimed early at age 62. While some Americans may have had little choice about when to claim benefits, it’s important for those who do claim these benefits to plan and make informed decisions because Social Security retirement benefits are more complex than many understand. On his website, Boston University Economics Professor Laurence Kotlikoff  pointed out: “Social Security offers retirement, spousal, widow, widower, child, mother and father, and divorcee benefits. It has highly complex benefit formulas which include wage indexation of past covered earnings, benefit-specific reduction formulas for collecting benefits early, an earnings test, deeming provisions that limit when married and divorced people can take particular benefits, delayed retirement credits, credits for getting hit by the earnings test, indexation of benefits to inflation, a family benefit maximum, a “file and suspend” option permitting you to collect free spousal benefits while you defer your retirement benefit, the option to start your benefits early, suspend them, and restart them later, Windfall Elimination and Government Pension Offset provisions that limit retirement and spousal benefits available to workers with non-covered employment histories, and the list goes on.”  

Is it worth the effort? Some Americans are skeptical about whether Social Security benefits will be available when they reach retirement age. Social Security’s reserves, which were built up over three decades when the system took in more revenue than it paid out, are expected to be depleted sometime in the early 2030s. Once reserves run out, the tax revenue that funds Social Security will cover just three-fourths of scheduled benefits. There are a variety of options that might help keep Social Security viable including revising benefit formulas, raising taxes, raising the cap on taxable income, increasing retirement age, or some combination of all of these. Regardless of the challenge and the expense, the vast majority of Americans want to see the program continue, according to a 2013 study volume 8

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finance

by Alan Bratic, CFP® Financial Advisor

by the Pew Research Center. In fact, 90 percent of Americans want spending on Social Security to remain as it is or increase. Americans’ reasons for wanting to preserve Social Security often are personal; however, the AARP (formerly the American Association of Retired Persons) recently argued there are economic reasons for keeping the program in place, as well. A study released by the AARP Public Policy Institute suggested Social Security payments during 2012  supported about:   •9.2 million jobs •$1.4 trillion in economic output (goods and services) •$774 billion in value added (gross domestic product)• $370 billion in salaries, wages, and other compensation •$222 billion in tax revenues for local, state, and federal governments   The study also pointed out a significant portion of these benefits might be offset if the Social Security program was modified. In that circumstance, payroll taxes that are currently withheld from workers’ paychecks would drop and the takehome pay of many Americans would increase. It is uncertain whether the money would be spent or saved.   Social Security planning Whether you believe Social Security retirement benefits could or should be modified, it’s important to understand the options available to you, as well as the role benefits may play in your overall retirement plan. In some cases, particularly when it comes to spousal benefits, maximizing social security income can be quite complex. Here are some basic questions you may need to answer before you make any decisions:   •At what age can you receive full Social Security retirement benefits? (Hint: If you were born after 1943, it’s not age 65.) •How much will your potential retirement income change if you choose to receive benefits early or late? (If you had maximum taxable earnings and live to age 85, the difference between early and full benefits received over a lifetime is tens of thousands of dollars. The difference between early and late benefits is more than $150,000.) •Can your spouse, who doesn’t work outside the home,receive Social Security benefits while you’re alive? •If you and your spouse both work, when should you apply to receive the highest benefits possible? •How will earnings from work during retirement affect my benefits? (Hint: It depends on the age at which you take benefits.)   Recent studies have found few people understand the dollar value of the decisions they make about Social Security benefits. Social Security planning ensures you understand the amount of income Social Security may provide in various 63


Upscale Estate-Like Setting in Downtown St. Augustine Steps from the Intracoastal & Fort

circumstances and develop strategies that can help maximize the benefits you receive. For couples, making the most of spousal retirement benefits generally requires decisions about when to collect Social Security benefits be coordinated and considered within the context of other retirement income sources.

Financial planning is a process

48 Water Street • Saint Augustine 4 BR, 4.5 BATHS, 4379 square feet. Plus additional 700 sq ft. in guest house, .44 acre

$925,000 MLS # 148855

Michael Curet

904.710.8121 mcuret@pvclubrealty.com

280 Ponte Vedra Boulevard Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 • 904.285.6927 www.pvclubrealty.com *Preferred Membership Initiation Fee* Pricing for the Ponte Vedra Inn & Club and the Lodge & Club is available. Call me to see how to qualify!

1st TENNISPANISH SUMMER CAMP

At the Atlantic Beach & Tennis Club Future Stars Ages 5-8 June 9th – June 13th (Ages 5-6) June 16th – June 20th (Ages7-8) June 23rd – June 27th (Ages 5-6) June 30th – July 4th (Ages 7-8)

The pursuit of financial security is an ongoing activity. If your goal is to maximize retirement income, then Social Security planning should be a component of your retirement strategy and overall financial plan. Of course, like any other plan, it may need to be modified as your personal circumstances change or as government regulations are altered. If you would like to learn more about maximizing Social Security retirement benefits or developing a plan for your financial future, please see your financial advisors or feel free tocontact our office.   Sources: http://www.aarp.org/ http://www.ssa.gov/   The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. The above material was prepared in association with Peak Advisor Alliance. Securities and advisory services offered through Cetera Advisors LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity. OCL

Romance & Adventure! Enjoy the beauty of our historic waters on your Private Sunset Sail! • Captained charters • ASA Sailing Classes • Sailboat Rentals • Small boat Sailing Club • Sail time Memberships • Fleet of 22 to 49ft !

For any further questions, please contact: Viviana Rojas-Heil Head Tennis Professional 904.537.4409 • abtcjuniors@gmail.com ATLANTIC BEACH & TENNIS CLUB 8 Ocean Trace Rd St. Augustine Fl. 32080 64

St. Augustine Sailing Enterprises www.sta-sail.com • 904.829.0648

3076 Harbor Drive, Camachee Cove Yacht Harbor St. Augustine, FL 32084 photo: Addison Fitzgerald volume 8

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giving

Recovery: An EPIC Journey story by Susan Johnson

U

ntil three months ago, intoxicated individuals in St. Johns County ended up in the emergency room or jail. “We haven’t had a detox center in St. Johns County since Twin Oaks closed in 1988” says Patrick Morrissey, owner of Gypsy Cab Company, board member of Epic Behavioral Healthcare and one of the driving forces behind the opening of the new EPIC Recovery Center located at 3574 US1 South, Suite 111. Why does it matter? Maybe it doesn’t. Unless of course, you are one of the almost 24 million Americans who are addicted to alcohol and/or drugs, or a friend or family member of someone who is. Then it matters. A lot. Because detox is more than just “sleeping it off.” For an addict, detox can be the first step on the road to recovery. And, depending on the circumstances, detox can also be deadly. Dependency But so can addiction. Statistics show that only 1 in 10 of those 24 million who need help will ever receive it. (CATG “Defining the Addiction Treatment Gap”) “The dynamics of addiction are difficult to understand” c o n t i n u e s M o r r i s s e y. “Probably every family in St. Johns County has been touched by substance abuse and dependency in one way or another. This recovery center makes a connection that has been missing in our county for over 25 years. And the bottom line is that having it will save lives.”

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Help for recovery EPIC Chief Executive Officer Patti Greenough agrees with Morrissey. She was determined to see this type of facility here and, although the new recovery center is just one facet of EPIC Behavioral Healthcare, she believes that it’s the missing piece of the complex puzzle that is substance abuse in St. Johns County. “When the only place for a person to go is the hospital or jail, they miss opportunities for care and treatment. The EPIC Recovery Center provides those opportunities.” People come in on their own, are brought in for detox or are referred by family, friends or physicians. There is a staff of about 30 professionally trained personnel, a 24-hour callin line, 12 beds for detox and 4 beds for residential treatment. There are also counseling and support systems in place for those receiving care and for their families. If you need help, you can get it at the EPIC Recovery Center. No one is turned away. Who needs it The fact is that anyone of almost any age can be addicted to any given substance. Here in St. Johns County, alcohol and prescription drugs seem to be the biggest problems. And it’s people between the ages of 30 - 45 who are struggling the most. Greg Wolf is the nurse manager at EPIC Recovery Center and is adamant about connecting the dots and offering a complete continuum of care. “When you call us, you’ll talk to someone; you won’t be accessing a machine that will give you voice mail options. And the person you speak with will most likely be involved in your care plan. Our number is (904) 417-7100 and the lines are open 24/7. If you need help, make that call. Don’t give up. We are here for you.” For more information about services available through EPIC Behavioral Healthcare please call (904) 829-2273 or visit. www.epicbh.org This story came about because Herbie Wiles Insurance cares about our community, supports EPIC Behavioral Healthcare and would like you, our OCL readers, to be aware of resources that can enhance your lives and the lives of your loved ones.

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people

Let’s Move Beyond Ourselves and Impact Our World” …Reverend Bobby Crum by Susan Johnson

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ev. Bobby Crum is a long-time contributor and friend of Old City Life magazine. In addition to his role as Worship and Teaching Pastor at Anastasia Baptist Church, Bobby contributes the majority of our “People” profiles to the magazine. We think the world of him, so this month we thought we would turn the tables on Rev. Bobby and ask him a few of the questions he usually directs to others! Here are his interesting – and very inspirational – responses. OCL: You graduated from Radford University in Virginia, went on to Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas and came to St. Johns County in 1995. Were you attracted to the northeast Florida area for any particular reason? Rev Crum: Patty and I really feel like God led us here to St. Augustine. We didn’t know anyone at the time and the church was a lot different than it is today. We have come to truly love and cherish the people, community and culture here. We get to live and work in one of the world’s great places. OCL: We are fortunate to live in a very unique and vibrant area. Let’s talk a little bit about family life in St. Johns County. You and your wife are the parents of two daughters. What do you enjoy most about raising a family here and what are a few of your favorite things to do? Rev Crum: My wife Patty is a schoolteacher at the amazing Ketterlinus Elementary School in downtown St. Augustine. Our daughters Allie and Anna are both students at St. Augustine High School. I cannot think of a better place to raise a family than the Oldest City. Patty likes to run with her running friends. I’ve been really into Stand Up Paddle boarding (SUP) over the last year or two. We love eating out downtown, playing on St. Augustine Beach, and being involved in the community. OCL: After spending almost 20 years in the same place and at the same job, a lot of folks would get a little restless. What is it about both the Oldest City and Anastasia Baptist Church that provide you with the daily inspiration and motivation to keep you excited about where you live and work? Rev Crum: Restlessness is a human condition that a lot of people wrestle with. In relationships and life, it’s important to have commitments and a sense of calling. I’ve had the great privilege of being able to adjust my role and title at the church over the years and that has kept me fresh and current. Anastasia is also an amazing church family and we feel so blessed to be able to minister and

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serve. God’s call is the foundation and stability for my time here. OCL: Many people who aren’t inclined to visit a church probably think of a pastor as a sort of spiritual superman with x-ray vision who stands ready to pass a little judgment on what they see in someone’s soul. We think you would probably disagree with that assessment. How would you describe your role as a faith-based leader in our community? Rev Crum: Pastors have the same stresses and temptations that everyone faces. We are human. Many people have had bad experiences in churches by being judged and hurt by negative comments. Above all, I try to point people to our God and Creator. I have also come to understand that many people wrestle with deep pains and scars that influence the way they act towards others. Pastors want the best for people. We seek to elevate who they are and lead them beyond pain to peace and joy. I strive, not always to perfection, to bring a compassionate response to everyone I encounter. As someone in the public eye, it has been important to me to give back to the community through my involvement in various organizations and non-profits. One final thought on roles… Bridges connect our community. Pastors seek to connect people with God.

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theater

‘Oliver!’ lead is 12-year-old St. Johns County boy

Limelight Theatre musical will feature adult community actors by Renee Unsworth and a dozen local children

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lexander Lawless, 12, is already a theater veteran, having played a munchkin in “Wizard of Oz” at Alhambra Theatre and Dining in Jacksonville; and Kurt, one of the Von Trapp children, in ‘The Sound of Music” at The Wick Theatre in Boca Raton. His newest role is Oliver Twist, the main character in Charles Dickens’ classic tale. The musical, “Oliver!,” will be staged June 5th through July 6th at Limelight Theatre, 11 Old Mission Ave., in uptown St. Augustine. Written by Lionel Bart, the production is a musical adaptation of Dickens’ story. The show tells the story of Oliver, an orphan who runs away from his cruel caretakers only to land himself in trouble with the wrong kind of people. As he navigates his new life, he finds hope in the kindness of newfound friends. When Lawless auditioned on April 5th, he had no idea he would be chosen from a group of 30 children as the lead. “I really thought I was going to get something smaller than that, like an orphan,” Lawless said. “I was very, very surprised and very excited. I was shocked.” “Oliver!” is directed by Tom Fallon, who wears several hats in the professional world — working on set building at Limelight Theatre and in the film business as a location manager and assistant director for commercials. He’s worked on film projects for Baptist Health, Chase Bank, JEA and Embril. For Fallon, choosing the right person for the “Oliver!” lead was important. And he found that person in Lawless. “I was looking for a smaller, innocent boy. I didn’t want an older teen,” Fallon said. “I just kinda wanted somebody that was wide-eyed. There is an innocence about Oliver that makes the story endearing… He’s not jaded about his surroundings … His innocence shines through.” Lawless is sharing the stage with his sister, Savannah, who is cast as an orphan in the show along with 11 other children. Savannah also played Marta Von Trapp in “The Sound of Music” with her brother and both were members of the children’s chorus in summer 2013 for “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” at Alhambra Theatre and Dining. “It’s always fun doing a brother–sister show,” Lawless said. “Probably my favorite shows are ones I did with my sister.” His parents, Chase and Adele Lawless from north St. Johns County, are happy to support their children’s acting roles, driving them to and from rehearsals and shows. “He loves Oliver more than any show he’s ever done. He loves the cast of children. We’ve never worked at the Limelight before, and it’s such a different experience. … It’s calm and relaxing, making it enjoyable for the kids,” Adele said. Other local children in the show include Jack Rose as Artful Dodger; Kyle Thompson as an orphan and Artful Dodger understudy; Evan Gray as an orphan and Oliver understudy; Ella and Gracia Romaine, orphans; Ashley Herbert, Henry

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Back row: Evan Gray, Gavin Downs, Will Gooden, Kyle Thompson, and Jack Rose (Artful Dodger). Center row: Savannah Lawless, Gracia Romaine, Alexander Lawless, Henry Purtill, and Ella Romaine; From row: Ashley Herbert and Kyler Unsworth.

Purtill, Gavin Downs, Will Gooden and Kyler Unsworth, as orphans; and Emily Onimus, as Bet and an orphan. For Fallon, directing a show with that many children is “a positive experience.” “I actually love it because you have an energy (from children) that you don’t have from adults. Even though you have different kinds of challenges, you get that energy from them,” Fallon said. “How you address them and give direction is different than adults, and hopefully it will be simple enough. When they have to move in a synchronized movement … we challenge them but at the same time, try not overwhelm them.” Fallon credits his team helping with the cast of children. Shelli Long is musical director, Roxanna Lewis is choreographer and Patty Runk is stage manager of the summer musical. The adult cast includes Andy Nance as Fagin; Chris MacEwan as Bill Sykes; Chloe Cordle as Nancy; Cayte O’Connor as Charlotte; Vinny Iaropoli as Mr. Sowerberry; James Desmond as Mr. Bumble; Rich Nowell as Mr. Brownlow; Cathy Swann as Widow Corney; Beth Pertill as Mrs. Bedwin; Lou Agresta as Dr. Grimwig; Butler Robertson as Noah; Susan Harrison as Old Sally; and the role of Mrs. Sowerberry will be filled soon. Show times are 7:30p.m. Thursday through Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $25 for adults, $22 for seniors, $20 for students and military; with a junior patron offer that features one free tickets for children ages 10-17 with the purchase of a full price adult ticket. For reservations, call the box office at (904)825-1164 or go to limelight-theatre.org. 69


travel

The Cruise Industry is Growing! by Tom Bartimus

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hen The Love Boat captured top television ratings in the 1970’s people really got interested in cruising. Since then cruising’s popularity has continued to increase in momentum. Even during the economic downturn that started in 2008, cruise line sales grew. It is estimated that more than 22 million people will cruise in 2014. And guess what? Americans represent 51% of the world-wide cruising population! It’s no wonder that a total of 16 new ships will launch in 2014. The $3.9 billion investment will increase the combined passenger capacity by more than 20,000 passengers per day. This is in addition to the more than 98 ships major cruise lines have introduced since 2000. Furthermore, the new ships are not “more of the same.” They are larger, more innovative, more luxurious, and designed for the whole family. Many offer unique experiences for vacationers at sea making the ships themselves a destination, not just the ports that they visit. So let’s take a look at some of the best new ships. Royal Caribbean International is ready to launch its unique Quantum class of ships. This class of ships is a true leap forward in terms of onboard experiences, entertainment, stateroom amenities and design. Their exclusive North Star is a jewel-shaped capsule that gently ascends over 300 feet above sea level to give breathtaking

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views of the ocean, the ship and destinations. SeaPlex is the largest indoor active space at sea, featuring a bumper car rink, a rollerskating rink, full-size hoops court, table tennis, a circus school and even a food truck! Then there is the RipChord by iFly, a skydiving simulator, that will keep you afloat on air! Add to all these innovations a mind-blowing light show with dazzling digital scenery and you’ll just have to visit the ice bar to cool down with your favorite drink. Oh, and there is the DreamWorks experience for the kids with Shrek-themed activities. Quantum of the Seas will join Royal Caribbean’s fleet of 22 ships in November sailing from the home port of New York. Her sister-ship, Anthem of the Seas will launch in 2015 with a Florida home port. Norwegian has already launched Breakaway sailing from the Port of New York. This 4,000 passenger ship offers an amazing variety of staterooms from the luxurious Haven villas, penthouses, and spa suites to larger family accommodations and studios for singles. It’s the only cruise ship in the world with five multi-story waterslides, the fastest pulling nearly 4Gs. The Sports Complex offers three levels of adventure for all ages including mini-golf, a rock-climbing wall and the largest ropes course at sea including The Plank, which extends 8 feet over the side of the ship. Add bowling alleys and a giant two-story Wii screen and it’s enough to

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keep even the most active cruisers busy. The Waterfront is a new concept that offers a quarter-mile oceanfront walkway lined with shops, restaurants, and bars. Norwegian’s free-style dining offers cruisers 29 different options. For the younger cruisers there’s the Nickelodeon Characters. Norwegian’s reputation for providing great entertainment continues with the Broadway musical Rock of Ages, Second City improv group, The Rockettes, Circus Fantasy, Burn the Floor, The Blue Men, Legends in Concert, Howl at the Moon, and The Fat Cats Jazz & Blues Club. The Norwegian Getaway will launch soon and will be home ported in Miami. Norwegian ships can always be identified by their beautiful original hull murals painted by famous artists. The Breakaway features hull art by Peter Max. The Italian Line MSC has built 12 new ships since 2003 and has just announced two more new ships. The MSC Divina, launched in November 2013, now offers year-round cruising from the port of Miami. This magnificent ship is truly one of the most beautiful on the sea and features two Swarovski crystal staircases that will take your breath away. Her infinity pool is the only one of its kind on the seas. The Divina has a ship within a ship with the exclusive MSC Yacht Club featuring signature butler service, complimentary wines and spirits, a private reception lobby, lounge, pool, restaurant and the only luxury suite at sea designed by Sophia Loren herself, the ship’s Godmother. The Divina offers first-class entertainment in their main theater and features popular, dance, and classical music throughout the ship. The Royal Princess was christened by Her Royal Highness, The Duchess of Cambridge on June 16, 2013. The Royal Princess is dazzling her passengers with exciting new features and has already won five prestigious Travel Weekly Magellan Awards in the Large Ship, Atrium, Spa, Pool and Mobile App Design categories. Her SeaWalk is being hailed as one of the “Top Gee-Whiz Features at Sea” by USA Today. All outside staterooms are balconies. There are only inside, balcony, mini-suite and suite category staterooms. The Regal Princess, her sister ship, will launch in May 2014 and will be home ported in Ft. Lauderdale. The above ships are just four of the 16 new ships that will be available to cruisers this year. With some many wonderful choices available, all I can say is…”Let’s Go Cruising!” volume 8

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golf

Honoring the Legacy:

by OCL Staff

A Tribute to African-Americans in Golf

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he World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum officially opened “Honoring the Legacy: A Tribute to AfricanAmericans in Golf ” on Friday, May 2 with a ceremony including Hall of Fame member Charlie Sifford and LPGA pioneer Renee Powell. Developed with the support of the PGA of America, the PGA TOUR and the USGA, this permanent exhibition contains rare photographs, audio, video and memorabilia to highlight the long, rich history of African-Americans in golf starting with pioneers from the late 1800s through today’s game. “I’m happy that golf fans from around the world can come to the Hall of Fame and learn about the amazing stories of African-Americans in golf,” said Sifford, who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004. “It is gratifying to see so many within the golf industry come together with the Hall of Fame to make this exhibition a reality.” Sifford’s PGA Player Card from 1960, the document that officially broke golf ’s color barrier, will be one of many items on display, along with others from 1985 PLAYERS champion Calvin Peete, boxing legend Joe Louis and tennis great Althea Gibson. Tablet technology featuring profiles of prominent AfricanAmericans in golf along with an interactive, touch-screen video display make this one of the Hall of Fame’s most advanced exhibits. The centerpiece of the exhibit is an original sculpture, “The DNA of the Golf Swing,” designed by renowned sculptor Mario Chiodo and features 13 African-American golf legends. “The PGA of America is proud to contribute to this important exhibition at the World Golf Hall of Fame which honors individuals, including PGA members, who paved a brave trail to ensure racial equity in golf,” said PGA of America Chief

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Executive Officer Pete Bevacqua. “Their stories should forever be remembered, as the rights they stood up for remain a noble cause. From those that opened the door for all to enjoy the game to golfers today who honor this tradition by playing at the highest level, we pay tribute to the legacies African-Americans have made to further golf and foster equality.” “It certainly is fitting that such a meaningful exhibit for our sport is opening 50 years to the week that Pete Brown etched his name in golf history by becoming the first African-American golfer to win a PGA TOUR-sanctioned tournament,” said PGA TOUR Commissioner Tim Finchem. “We should never lose sight of these poignant stories of overcoming significant challenges to make a lasting impact on golf, and the PGA TOUR is proud to collaborate with the other golf organizations to help tell this important story.” “This exhibit honors not just great players, but great people who broke through barriers and did so with determination and dignity,” said USGA Executive Director Mike Davis. “The USGA is proud to collaborate with the PGA of America and PGA TOUR on this wonderful addition to the World Golf Hall of Fame. It demonstrates that the golf community is stronger when we work together to celebrate the game’s history.” Best-selling author Pete McDaniel served as the lead writer on the project. McDaniel is the author of the acclaimed book “Uneven Lies: The Heroic Story of African Americans in Golf ’’ and co-wrote and co-produced the documentary “Uneven Fairways.” He is a member of both the African American Golfers Hall of Fame and National Black Golf Hall of Fame. Artist Mario Chiodo, renowned for his compelling sculptures based on history and social justice, created the centerpiece (more )

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sculpture. Chiodo has designed monuments throughout the U.S., including the Harriet Tubman/Thomas Garrett Memorial in Wilmington, Del., the Contrabands Freedman’s Memorial in Alexandria, Va., and “Remember Them: Champions for Humanity” in Oakland, Calif., the largest human rights monument in the Western United States. “It is an honor to open this unique exhibition, which is both part of the Hall of Fame’s ongoing mission to preserve the history of golf and a celebration of what can be accomplished with force of will and a love of the game,” said Jack Peter, Chief Operating Officer of the World Golf Hall of Fame. “We would like to thank the PGA of America, the PGA TOUR and the USGA, as well as Pete McDaniel, Mario Chiodo and the African-Americans in the game who worked tirelessly to help create this exhibition.” For more information, including photos, about the World Golf Hall of Fame & Museum and “Honoring the Legacy: A Tribute to African-Americans in Golf,” visit WorldGolfHallofFame.org. OCL

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TREASURE continued from pg. 2 Arbizzani, an extremely successful entrepreneur and investor, owns a diverse array of properties and has redeveloped a number of buildings in the historic district of the Ancient City. With the experience, knowledge and talent the two of them brought to the table, it was a match seemly made in heaven. In the midst of their research, Bushell and Arbizzani were drawn to the property’s beauty and potential as a special events venue and subsequently found that the building had another fan and a self-appointed historian. Larae Long, a local resident, had not only lived through much of the building’s history but had kept files with detailed records and historic photographs showing the special events hosted by The National Bank and The Exchange Bank. A number of these photographs are now featured on the Treasury on the Plaza website. (www. treasuryontheplaza.com). Converting the interior from its use as a bank, required the removal of the marble teller stations to open up the large dramatic space which has been renamed “The Grande Ballroom.” “Our renovation mantra has been ‘If it’s historic, we’re keeping it,’ “ states Bushell. “We tried to reuse original materials whenever possible.” The marble floors of the bank lobby were cleaned and polished and now serve as the dance floor.  The marble panels from the front of the teller stations were removed with painstaking care and used as the foundation for the glamorous new bar housed within The Treasury’s walk-in vault. The results of Bushell’s and Arbizzani’s partnership are nothing short of spectacular. They have taken the historic space into the modern era to meet the desires of today’s demanding wedding and convention clients. The Grande Ballroom’s columns are uplit and dramatic LED lighting which allows clients to change the hues which light the interior architecture. Wedding and conference planners from all over the United States are discovering this unique jewel. The Treasury opened in March and has already accepted wedding and conference bookings through October 2015. Even though it is brand new to the St. Augustine event venue scene, it has attracted the attention of many notable names in and around the city. In fact, Preston Pohl, finalist on The Voice has booked his wedding at the Treasury and it will host the upcoming wedding reception of St. Augustine native, and former Dallas Cowgirl, Mackenzie Weeks (which Bushell, as a former consultant to the Dallas Cowboys, is quite excited about).  In its first month, the venue has hosted the Saint Augustine Wedding & Event Association and has partnered with the Casa Monica and Hilton Bayfront hotels for a number of corporate events. Looking forward: the St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce will host is Annual Dinner & Business Leadership Awards at The Treasury in the Fall. When asked about the project, the pair seemed to have been truly touched by the beauty of the building. “I am very proud,” Arbizzani states. “They were considering turning this property into a retail marketplace. It was simply too beautiful not to preserve.” “I truly feel like we are stewards of this beautiful building. No one could afford to build this type of space today,” Bushell adds. “We hope it will be a place where future generations of memories are made.” OCL 76

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What a night it was as Carlos Santana rocked the St. Augustine Amphitheatre on April 27th. Carlos played all the old hits as well as songs from his new album Corazon to a capacity crowd. The concerts in the Old City just get better and better. photo: Tucker Jonez

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FLAGLER SPRING TEA

on the town

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lagler College recently hosted its annual Spring Tea in the Solarium above the former Hotel Ponce de Leon, now Ponce Hall. More than a hundred women mingled in their spring fineryincluding smart bonnets and bright dresses-to network and connect.

Photos by: LeeAnn Kendall

Photos Left to Right: Kathy Abare Paolini, Susan Abare, Sabrina Abare, Julia Owensby • Linda Mignon, Nancy Birchall, San Traupane • Margo Brown, Leslee Keys, Sabrina Kelbert • Betty Crosby, Pam Versaggi • Elsa Brader, Mary Jane Dillon • Susan Joyner, Nancy Pellicier, Martha Mickler • Sue Hale, Anne Wolfe, Shirley Keyser • Celeste Kyall, Linda Mignon • Karen Glenos, Cathy Burkhardt • Melinda Provenza, Jan Cheney, Helen DiMare, Mimi Roberson

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WOMANLESS BEAUTY PAGEANT

ay 15th, The White Room played host to the annual Womanless Beauty Pageant: a “cheeky” event brought to St. Augustine each year by the Young Professionals Organization of St. Augustine. Five brave men donned attire more becoming of the opposite gender, with Bill McClure’s “Consuela” walking away with top honors. Ultimately, the real winners were the local charities which the proceeds of the event supported.

Photos by: Lura Scarpitti

Photos Left to Right: Jodi & Joe Hatin, James Whitehouse • David Wood, Jennifer Grundman, Becca Royal • Hayden Whetstone, Jeremy Butcher, Matt Whetmore • Nicole Nettles, Jennifer Tesori, Karri Robinson • Jean Perry, Anne Guenther, Justin Escobedo, Patti Stokes • Katherine & Warren Taylor • Letti Bozard, Susan & Frank Timmons, Tim Sousa • Kayla Shreck, Christina Zinn, Hannah Russell, Lexi Lahiff • Martha Fulford, Kelly Abbatinozzi, Melinda & Jeff Stevens

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Photos by: Lura Scarpitti

on the town DERBY DAY

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Photos left to right - Bill Mignon, Sandra Goode, Ron Dixon • Shelley Whiteman, Jeff West • Zach Smith, Cathy Upchurch, Kathy Mignerey • Rachelle Melloch, Ignacio Sanchez, Lynne Dotn • Danielle Whitehoue, Dan & Mary Mallory • Lorna Kirkham, Jim & Beth Plitt • Dawn & Patrick Canan, Sandy Upchurch • Joy Frank, Stephen Coon, Michelle DeLucia • Mary Mowrey, Dawn Canan, Jeff & Lauren Abell, Barbara Abell • Margaret & Joe Finnegan, Nancy Valiant • Katherine & Todd Batenhorst, Betty & Allan Crosby • Laurie DeDi, Judi Cowan, Vanessa Lenoir, Veronica Deli • Lauren Abell, Jane Mathis, Debbie Wiles, Susan Conder-Stansel

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he St. Augustine/St. Johns County Advisory Council of Community Hospice of Northeast Florida hosted the Derby Run Party for Community Hospice on Saturday, May 3. The event, held at The Roberts Ranch on State Road 16 in St. Augustine, was a social event and fundraiser for Community Hospice. Despite the rainy weather, more than 160 guests gathered under the enormous red barn to tune into Churchill Downs and view the 140th Running of the Roses. 79


Photos left to right - Cathy & Brookes Burkhardt, event co-chairpersons • Dr. Bern & Bonnie Pineau, event co-chairpersons • David & Marion Anderson • Dr. Daniel Gassert, Elena Laguardia, Borna & Dr. Tawhid Hossain • Megan & Clay Nettles • J.B & Theresa Coomes • Linda & Tom Bartimus • Ken & Karen Yarbrough • Jim & Chris Conzemius, A.J. & Gail McGuinness, Linda & Ray Matuza • Front Row-Hannah Murray, Karen Mickler, Brenna Knotts, Charlene Niles, Stephanie Hollis. Second Row-Keith Rosen, Brena Lepore, Ronaldo Lachia, Chris Niles, Brian Bosley Back Row-Mike Mickler, Jason Zumstein, Perry Knotts, Mark Hughes • Dennis & Edie Demshar • Drs. Isabel & Gregory Oxford • Darcy & Mike Davis • Performers from the Dance Company • Janet & Art Runk

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Photos by: OCL Staff

on the town FLAGLER HEALTH FOUNDATION GALA

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Photos left to right - Joe & Maggie Gordy • Robin & Brad Cooper • Colleen Fetzer, Kate Cook, Krissy Faircloth, Hollie Shaffer, Nicole Raitano • Taryn Fuller, Stephanie Burkhardt, Catie Burkhardt, Cathy Burkhardt, Beth Burkhardt • Dr. William & Jude Platko • Cathy & Steve Auld • Dr. Robert & Jeani Taliaferro • Steve & Christine Chapman • Dr. James & Grace Grimes • Andrew DiFeo, Elena Laguardia, Bill & Elaine Kopf, Christine Chapman, Sue Foley • DR. Michael Gibbons & Dr. Erica Wong • Dr. Derek & Jill Muehrcke • Andrea & Dr. Jawad Farhat

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lagler Health Care Foundation’s Gala XII: The Golden Age of Hollywood took place May 16-18 at the Ponte Vedra Inn & Club. With a beach party on Friday evening for sponsors, a gem seminar on Saturday afternoon and a sponsor brunch on Sunday morning, there was something for everyone. The crown jewel was the black-tie Gala on the evening of Saturday, May 17, with more than 250 people in attendance. Brookes and Cathy Burkhardt and Dr. Benoit and Bonnie Pineau were the co-chairpersons for this year’s event. Gala sponsors had the opportunity to select the Flagler Hospital project or program they wanted to benefit, with options including the Bariatric Surgery Fund, the Clark & Alice Alger Tranquility Garden Fund, the Emergency Care Center, the Benevolent Care Fund, the Heart Program, the Facial Rejuvenation Centre Foundation for Skin Cancer, the Joanne Arnett Tutschek Fund, the Cancer Care Fund, the Renal Care Fund and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Fund.

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WEDDINGS & EVENTS 904-217-0077 • Treasuryontheplaza.com info@treasuryontheplaza.com

Old City Life-June 2014