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St. Augustine’s Culture & Lifestyle Magazine

Volume 8 Issue 8 | AUG. 2014

oldcitylife.com

Kick Start

youth soccer-Ancient City style

Bigger Picture

through the eyes of Graham Nash

Artistic Touch

the st. augustine art association


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Issue 8

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2014

Castaway Publishing, Inc PO Box 35 St. Augustine, FL 32085 904.461.6773 OCL@castawaypublishing.com Lura Readle Scarpitti

Managing Editor editor@castawaypublishing.com 904-325-5930

Brian Hornung

Contributing Art Director brian@rockitinteractive.com

Diana L. Garber

Ad Sales Director oclads@castawaypublishing.com 904-679-1550

LeeAnn Kendall

Advertising Sales • Public Relations ads@castawaypublishing.com 904-501-3917

Distribution

Warren Macbeth Christianne Macbeth Truett Yarbrough John Dattoma Publication Distribution Service Dominion Distribution

Voted St. Augustine’s Best “Every Year” 15 Years in a Row!

Old City Life Magazine publishes 12 issues annually subscription $19.95 | 12 issues

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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the publisher. All material is compiled from sources believed to be reliable, published without responsibility for errors or omissions. Castaway Publishing, Inc. assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photos.

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letter from the editor Dear Readers, It’s called “The Beautiful Game.” How great is that saying? That’s something that I did not know before I talked to Josh Braun, the Ancient City Soccer Club’s Director of Coaching, about the game of fubol, or soccer, as we here in the States call it. Look, I’ll be the first to admit that there’s a lot more that I do not know about soccer, but, I do have to say that I have always been a casual fan of the sport. Like most people in the US, my favorite spectator sports are, in order, college football, college football, and…college football. All kidding aside, like many people, as time goes by, that’s had some competition as I have found myself gravitating towards this thrilling and face-paced sport as it has gained more and more exposure over the years. It’s a well known fact that the country’s big three, when it comes to sports, are, in no particular order: football, baseball and basketball. But, as people are becoming more involved in the game, soccer is gaining ground on these established giants. As people become more educated about the game, the one main complaint, the lack of a lot of scoring, has started to fade considerably. As this issue gets ready to go to press, Germany is just a few weeks into its reign as World Cup Champions, having beaten a very good Argentinian team in the final, which has on its roster arguably one of the best players in the world today-Lionel Messi. Messi’s ball handling skills and outright mastery of the game are unparalleled among today’s players-to watch him is like watching a magician. The things he can do with a ball astound all who follow the sport..and, even those who don’t. Those skills didn’t just happen overnight. Messi started playing soccer as a youth-he spent his life experimenting and honing his moves over and over and over. The result…well, if you watched any of the World Cup highlights, you’ve seen it-sheer magic. Soccer, and youth soccer in particular, has been on the rise over the past few decades and the exquisite talent on display at this year’s World Cup has only served to add fuel to that fire-inspiring more St. Augustine youths to don cleats and a uniform, get out there and start trying to emulate the spectacular tricks performed by Messi and his fellow “magicians.” The Ancient City Soccer Club is here help them do just that. With the soccer craze that’s sweeping the county, we felt it fitting to tell the story of this outstanding local organization, which has been serving the children of St. Johns County for well over 3 decades. We think you’ll agree that it’s a community treasure that will hopefully continue to thrive for decades to come. In my book, they’ve scored a huge “GOOOOOAAAAAALLLLLLLLL!!!!! Lura

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4 letter from the editor 10 from our mayor 24 flagler focus 35 home 39 travel 42 community 45 body 48 wine 49 finance 57 recipe 60 calendar 67 art 69 giving 70 theater 73 fashion 66 seen

contents St. Augustine’s Culture & Lifestyle Magazine

Volume 8 Issue 8 | AUG. 2014

oldcitylife.com

Kick Start

youth soccer-Ancient City style

Bigger Picture

through the eyes of Graham Nash

Artistic Touch

the st. augustine art association

on the cover Fort lawn=soccer practice opportunity. Evan Scarpitti and Ava Gibbs chase after ball handler Max Gibbs (Ava’s big brother) on the lawn of the Castillo de San Marcos during an early morning pick-up game. Photo by Justin Itnyre

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W

ith the skyline of the Old City in the background, El Galeon’ waits for her departure from St. Augustine Municipal Marina this past July. The 170-foot, 495-ton authentic wooden replica galleon, along with her sistership, the Nao Victoria, calls St. Augustine its North American homeport and is scheduled to return to the city in 2015. Photo by Hookey Hamilton

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.

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The Bigger Picture

A snapshot of the other side of rocker Graham Nash.

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90 Years Young

The St. Augustine Art Association just gets better with age.

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Sportsmanship Counts

Flagler College Athletics combines competition and good attitude

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The Beautiful Game

Played by cute kids....

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El Camino

Have backpack, will travel...Spain!

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Photo by Addison Fitzgerald

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Photo by ???? volume 8

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from our mayor

Summer’s Almost Gone.......Not!

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n most parts of America, certainly in my youth, the end of summer brought with it the beginning of school. Not so in Florida!  One day a high schooler can be blissfully surfing, swimming or fishing in 95 degree weather with ‘nary a cloud in the sky or a care in the world.  The next day it can be just as sunny, just as warm and the beach just as beckoning but nooooooooooo,  everything is off limits because it’s time to go BACK TO SCHOOL!!   Here in Florida, the end of summer isn’t really the end and it can limp right along into September and October with hot, steamy days that beg for a cool breeze.  I remember that St. Augustine High School was not my favorite venue at the beginning of school year because it was always so darn hot!  Built outside of town in a filled-in swamp, all that underground muck seemed to ooze and belch moist heat into the classrooms like some miasma of putrid decay!  (When I was a Senior I was awarded the A.H Tebault Creative Writing Award and I try to live up to it-can you tell?)      Anyway that was pretty much how I felt when we reported for another year of boring, useless and irrelevant academia (wow, my attitude did stink, didn’t it !)  And, we didn’t have to go back until after the first of September!  Today’s kids start so early in August that Labor Day Weekend seems like a mid-semester break!  That seems so un-American to me.  Summer break should be real summer break, like it was for our ancestors (and for me). Summer, by definition, is June 1st until August 31st.  You couldn’t

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By Joseph L. Boles Jr.

really get into the rhythm of school because of the Labor Day thing, so our school district just waited patiently until the first Monday after the31st, which in some years, could buy us another week…yahoo!      My little brother Booger (really, Michael Wade…but who wants to call their little brother that!) and I played little league baseball.  The teams were sponsored by local civic clubs who paid to get their names on our backs: Civitan on mine (whatever a Civitan is?) and Booger had a cool sponsor: the Moose Club. My Daddy told me that the Moose Club had little lockers for each member where they could store their imbibatory spirits (liquor)  cigars and such that were purchased in the next county and “smuggled” across the line!  Kind of a heavy and controversial burden to carry on the back of a bunch of 9 year olds. I am sure some of our Bible Belt parents just knew the Moose Club logo was going to burn itself into the flesh of those innocents marking them for life.  Thank goodness they didn’t know about the pool table and the poker room!      We played our tournament on Labor Day Mondays for years.  Our families would bring their folding chairs and sit up on the little ridge above the red dirt baseball field. That red dirt was my Kryptonite.  If it was a dry dusty day and I sucked in a lot of it during a game, I would “get the croup”.  I would wake up in the middle of the night trying to breathe, honking like the Greyhound Bus from Mayberry, RFD, gagging , trying to breathe

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and unable to even wheeze out a distress call to my Mom. But little brother Booger would jump up and run into my parents room, (without knocking I’m afraid…oh well!) yelling, “HE’S DYING, HE’S DYING!”  My mother would come in and calm me down and help me breath slower till it was just a low, constant rasp in my lungs and throat.  She’d hook up the vaporizer and put it next to my bed with Vics Vaporub in it and for good measure she’d rub about a cup of it on my chest and then put a white t-shirt on so it wouldn’t get all over the sheets. By then I would feel pretty good and sleep was never far away.  Someday when my dear sainted Mother has gone to her “Just Reward,” as we sometimes call it in the South, I will remember those times (and I will probably cry a little, and if my children see me, I’ll tell ‘em about Ole Yeller…all men are allowed to cry about Ole Yeller! Just the best movie ever made is all!).      So Summer was a long time for all of us.  I must offer my condolences to the children of today who will be getting back to the old schoolyard about the middle of August I understand.  The bad part of it (for you), is that all fun stuff stops about two weeks before the first day of school.  No family takes their vacation in the few weeks leading up to school.  So that leaves the end of June or July for Harry Potter World or the Magic Kingdom (days so hot and crowded a family of four can drink up a mortgage payment in $8 bottles of water before lunch!). So there is a five week period for any out of town trips.  And why? Well you have to go “SCHOOL CLOTHES SHOPPING,” for what I never could figure out. And if we came home with anything that I remotely liked I couldn’t wear it yet because they were “SCHOOL CLOTHES.”  It seemed to me that the jeans and sneakers I wore all summer would be just fine at school if I’d just let my mother wash them on occasion. For example...       After my brother and I swam in a muddy creek one hot summer day, we came home calling ourselves “mud monsters” and my mother was not amused! She made us strip our clothes off right there in the backyard and she hosed us down “buck naked.” I SWEAR SHE DID! We had to stand there shivering with that cold well water on us and we had to hose “each other’s clothes” till the mud was off. Before we could use the towels she dangled in front of us we had to, again, hang “each other’s clothes”, (there was some lesson there-she went to Duke you know-but it flew over MY head!).  The next morning we had to go and “fetch (a good Southern word)  EACH OTHER’S CLOTHES” off the line and bring them into the laundry room.  They felt a little stiff and when I turned toward Booger he had taken my underwear and jeans and stood them up in the corner like a little invisible man!  We howled and spent the next twenty minutes positioning the stiff clothes in different places around the house, sick and throwing up with laughter!  Ah…Summer.      Nowadays, kids have a lot more stuff to do in the summer, though.  Tennis lessons, golf lessons, art classes, Math Club (just kidding), Vacation Bible School. Oh, we had Vacation Bible School, but it didn’t have a catchy name, like “Ninja Turtles Awesome Trek to Jesus Land” or anything that even tried to be cool.  For us Vacation Bible School was poster board, white paste glue, pipe cleaners and stale Graham Crackers.  There were no DVD’s of course.  We  had “filmstrips” of the Holy Land shown through the “filmstrip projector” on a sheet.  We had David and Goliath coloring books but just for the junior highs, (too much violence for the little ones!).  We would go the cemetery and weed the tombstones, pick up litter, you know, character building stuff like that!  The best activity ever was a field trip to the YMCA in the big city to an “indoor pool”.  I was really excited because the girls were going along, too!  You see, in my day, boys would swim in the same mud hole together but the girls didn’t swim with us at all.  We used to think that every little noise was some girl sneaking up to peek at us in our underwear, but it was always just squirrels getting the acorns. So we got to the YMCA and changed in the locker room. We wrapped our towels around us and eased nervously out to the pool.  And there they were....local girls in bathing suits, (one piece bathing suits of course, but backless and not a little skirt on any of them, racy women!)  We decided to all run and jump in beside them with eight cannonballs and instantly drench them where they stood giggling. (We were some classy dudes!)  Well I leapt high, (as high as a little fat boy could and hit the water in incredible cannonball form. In a thunderclap I realized this was no shallow creek in the woods but eight lethal  feet of poisonous chlorine water.  Before I could close my mouth I  swallowed about a quart of the foul brew and popped up gasping for breathe, (great, I thought in a millisecond, I’m allergic to red dirt and pool water!). I flailed and flopped to the edge of the pool and proceeded to vomit, throw up, regurgitate (sounds a little better), spewing out of my mouth, nostril and “ears” it seemed that water (and my breakfast) onto sweet delicate feet of   those girls standing by the edge of the pool.  There were no longer impressed by our cannonball prowess!      So make the best of your summer, it won’t last long and someday, like me, you will reminisce about the good ole days, but for you it will be selfies at the beach and Twittering that makes you throw up with laughter.  Go get with it!!!! volume 8

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THE BIGGER PICTURE CONVERSATIONS WITH A

RENAIS

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by Susan Johnson photo of Crosby, Stills and Nash by Eleanor Stills

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SSANCE MAN The vision of Graham Nash

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e all know Graham Nash. Or at least we think we do. He’s the composer, singer, songwriter and trailblazer who helped provide the soundtrack for an entire generation. He’s been called a legend, an icon and the voice of an era. It’s Graham Nash who encouraged many of us to change the world, teach our children, light the fires in our own very, very, very fine houses and stand up for the ideals and dreams in which we believe. He is philosophical, outspoken and compassionate, with a compelling sense of social awareness. I caught up with him for an exclusive interview with Old City Life on July 2nd, just a few hours before he took the stage in Bethlehem, PA. to kick off the first in a 40-leg concert tour with David Crosby and Steven Stills that will bring all of them right here to the St. Augustine Amphitheatre on August 10th. (more })

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On A Carousel

“Riding along on a carousel...trying to catch up with you.”

Believe me, it’s not easy catching up with Graham Nash. One minute, he’s shaking his booty in the mirror, the next minute he’s sharing an umbrella with Carrie Anne at the Bus Stop and, not too many minutes later, he’s singing harmony with David Crosby and Steven Stills, writing songs about Military Madness, the Immigration Man and the Chicago Seven and lighting the fire in a “very, very, very fine house” with none other than Joni Mitchell (yes, she really was arranging flowers in a vase that she bought that very day; he sat down at the piano to write about it and an hour later, “Our House” was born). Change seems to happen pretty quickly for Graham Nash and he seems more than willing - and very able - to keep in step. He gained success as a founding member of the Hollies and first came to America as part of the British Invasion. Returning here for an extended visit with new love, Joni Mitchell, Nash found David Crosby and Steven Stills sitting in her living room when he arrived. They were working on a new tune and Nash joined in, adding a three-part harmony that was a perfect fit. “I knew from the very first moment I sang with them that night that this was what I wanted to do.” But Nash had been a part of the Hollies for years, and making that particular change meant leaving Allan Clarke, his lifelong friend, and the first person with whom he had really begun to make such beautiful music. “Of course it was very difficult. I was leaving my friends, particularly my friend Allan Clarke. I had been friends with Allan since I was six years old. But it shows you the power of music.”

Songs For Beginners “I am a simple man”

But let’s back up and begin at the beginning. Graham Nash started practicing signing his name for autographs when he was about 13 years old. “I knew at that age that I wanted to be a musician and I just pulled myself towards my dream. The way I did that was instead of concentrating on my lessons at school, I would be drawing stage setups and drum kits and guitars. That’s how you pull yourself towards the dream that you have.” Early memories? “I remember using a plywood guitar and shaking my ass in front of a mirror imitating Elvis. Allan Clarke and I used to imitate the Everly Brothers. What happens is, once you do that and you know how to do that, you can forget about doing that and focus on the music.” And how did the transition from writing tunes like the catchy “Bus Stop” to penning songs that reflected the social unrest and chaos that Nash saw happening in the United States come about? “I did write protest songs when I was with the Hollies but they were in more of a pop vein.“ While Nash doesn’t advocate drug use, he does admit that smoking pot was a factor in his changing perceptions of what songwriting could be. “I think that smoking dope at that point in my life opened my mind to infinite possibilities. But, you also must understand that I began to witness the way that David Crosby, Steven Stills, Joni Mitchell and Neil Young wrote songs. And I began to realize that there were more important things to talk about.”

Wild Tales

If Nash’s willingness to open up about weed is an eyeopener for you, wait until you read his book. Entitled “Wild 14

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Tales”, the stories are all that and more! But, they’re also delightfully bawdy, surprisingly insightful and heartwrenchingly honest in their portrayal of a talented and sensitive young boy whose passage to adulthood during a time of social and personal change, challenge and upheaval brought him all that he dreamed of and more! Graham Nash has written a stirring first-hand account of his own ‘coming of age’ as an artist, musician, songwriter, partner and troubadour. But wait! We forgot to mention photographer. Read on!

“Love, Graham Nash” – The Bigger Picture “The objective of what we do is to exemplify through form the very essence of (an artist’s) work, but in “Love, Graham Nash” it became more about the essence of the man, his vision, his music. In this case, the man and the artist are virtually inseparable. He is relentless in his pursuit of the bigger picture,” says Steven Albahari, publisher, 21st Editions, “The Art of the Book” If you’ve never heard of “Love, Graham Nash”, 21st Editions or Steven Albahari, stop reading right now and visit the website. (www.21steditions.com.) Seriously. it’s that important. Because until you see the quality, scope and creativity of the “Art of the Book” collections, it will be almost impossible to grasp the artistic contribution Nash has made through his collaboration with Albahari and his 21st Editions publishing partner, acclaimed poet John Wood. (Google him too if you need to – you’ll be glad you did.) Defined as “interactive performance art” by Albahari, Nash’s artistic ‘neighbors’ at 21st Editions include Sally Mann, Joel-Peter Witkin, Imogen Cunningham and Herman Leonard (the collection “Listen: Herman Leonard and His World of Jazz” was honored with the 2010 Lucie Award). Whatever most of us think we know about Graham Nash, many of us don’t know about his talent for capturing a moment – or, in this case, an entire era - through an image. He became obsessed with taking pictures at a very early age and learned about photography from his father, who went to jail because of a misunderstanding over a $30 camera. Nash explains, “That was very traumatic for me. I was a young boy and my father’s main joy in his life was this camera that he’d bought from a friend. The police came to our door, my father wouldn’t reveal his friend’s name and, long story short, he ended up in jail.” Nash went on to collect multiple honors for his own work, has curated the work of others and established Nash Editions, recognized by the Smithsonian Institution for its role in the invention of digital fine art printing. Both his first IRIS 3047 printer and his 1969 portrait of David Crosby are in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. With all these accolades, why take on a project of this magnitude? Four years in the making, one in production and Nash involved almost every step of the way. Simple. “The one thing I’ve always demanded from the universe is quality. I want the best, always. When Steven showed me some of the books he had produced, I wanted to do one with him.” Photographer and St. Augustine-resident Kenneth Barrett, Jr., has seen the 21st Editions “Love, Graham volume 8

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Nash” collection and considers it to be “a piece of living history. “We are viewing an era through the eyes of Graham Nash and the people with whom he interacted. Nash always had his camera with him and was on the forefront of the digital printing era. What he’s done here is put together a fabulous look at life through his lens. And he saw it all. As an insider, he was allowed to wander around behind the scenes where you and I or other photographers and journalists wouldn’t have that kind of access.” And what is the bigger picture? Nash doesn’t hesitate. “The

bigger picture here is that as dire as the world seems, as crazy as it seems, as violent as it seems, there are many, many wonderful things done in this world every day. Hope is better than depression, love is better than hatred and peace is better than war.” Where do we start? Again, at least for Graham Nash, it’s simple. “If you don’t like violence, don’t beat people up. If you’re looking for beauty, appreciate beauty wherever you might find it. Be what you want to see.” And which photo in the “Love, Graham Nash” collection best represents that bigger picture for the photographer himself ? I suggest my favorite; a simple shot of Nash’s wife Susan nursing their now-32-year-old daughter Nile. It took a minute, but he agreed. “Yes, I think that does represent the essence of what I believe. Our children, even though they are 25% of our population, are actually 100% of our future and if we don’t teach them a better way of dealing with our fellow human beings, we’re in dire straits here.” Which goes to show that, if we pay attention to our troubadours and trailblazers, we might discover that life really does imitate art; that if we wait long enough, most things will come full circle and that those words, written by a young Graham Nash over forty years ago, still hold very true today. Teach your children well. Feed them on your dreams. And know they love you. Crosby, Stills and Nash are currently on tour and will visit St. Augustine on Sunday, August 10th. A special edition box set, “CSN&Y 1974” is available now as is the Nash autobiography, “Wild Tales: A Rock and Roll Life”. For more information about “Love, Graham Nash” please visit www.21steditions.com. OCL

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90 YEARS YO U N G ART ASSOCIATION THRIVING AT 90 YEARS

NEW PROJECTS ARE COMMUNITY

FOCUSED

story and photos byby Renee Unsworth

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or 90 years, the St. Augustine Art Association has been promoting and creating art in the Ancient City. Established in 1924 as the St. Augustine Arts Club, a small group of artists created the organization, which helped transform our historic town into a winter art colony between 1930 and 1950 during the Great Depression and World War II. Hundreds of American artists traveled to St. Augustine from places such as Rockport and Provincetown, Maine and other locations. Ninety years later, the mission of the early visionaries to promote the arts and offer a venue where artists of all skill levels can exhibit artwork and pursue their creative expression is still being fulfilled. (more })

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T

he Art Association’s home in the historic district of St. Augustine, was built in the 1950s by early members. Art exhibits are rotated each month in the building, which can be found at 22 Marine Street, with members submitting original artwork for juried shows, such as the Fifth Annual Nature & Wildlife Art Exhibition, which is on view through Aug. 31. “Our membership base is about 600 individuals and families: Many are locals and some are from as far away as the Southwest,” said Elyse Brady, Director of the Art Association. “Membership is open to all, and our members participate as artists, volunteers, docents, receivers, installers — you name it. They are a wonderful collection of diverse people who share their time, talent and resources for the good of the organization and are the reason the Art Association has been in existence for 90 years!” Each year, the Art Assocation hosts its major fundraiser, the Fall Arts & Craft Festival on Thanksgiving weekend at Francis Field. Hundreds of artists and craftspeople come together to offer their art to the St. Augustine community and visitors each year during this event. In addition to the Art Festival, funds also are raised for the Art Association through numerous events and art programs. “We are sustained through a combination of memberships, project grants, donations, art entry fees, special events, facility rentals, workshops and educational programs,” Brady explained. “Every bit adds up. We’re fortunate that our founders had the vision to build the Art Center back in the 1950s, so we’re not encumbered by a mortgage. We still have maintenance costs, utilities and insurance however, so we’re always in fundraising mode.” Brady became the Director six years ago, having previously worked in graphic design and coordinating continuing education programs at Florida Community College. She has a fine art degree in painting from UNF, and submits her own work in shows at the Art Association as well. “My dad was a very fine artist, so I was exposed to painting and drawing at an early age. I’m still working on my skills through master workshops offered at the Art Association where I’ve had the opportunity to study with Roger Bansemer, Elizabeth Mowry, Richard Weaver, Paul Ladnier, Louise Freshman-Brown, and this fall Jim Draper,” Brady said. “I’m particularly drawn to the open spaces of the Florida landscape and marshes, and I’m experimenting now with pastels — when I can carve out the time, of course. This summer, she has been busy helping with the summer art camps for children. Each week offers a different theme — from “Hello Mona Lisa” to “Through the Museum Looking Glass” — with students exploring painting, ceramics, sculpture, mixed media, drawing and more. In this space, Brady said she finds her inspiration. “Stepping into this beautiful Art Center each day is inspirational. So much creativity flows through here and so many talented artists,” she said. “It’s a place where magic happens. I especially enjoy seeing children plugged into art, not gadgets in our summer art camps and after school programs. And it’s always a profound experience for me to interact with blind students during our Tactile Art Show.” This year, the 13th annual Tactile Art Show will feature touchable art, submitted by artist members. This juried exhibit of touchable art is part of the Art Education for the Blind’s Art Beyond Sight global initiative, produced with the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind. The exhibition will include sculptures, assemblages, pottery, fiber art, reliefs, wall hangings and mixed media with Braille labels and selected audio guides.

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Elyse Brady Director of the St. Augustine Art Association

The Braille TOUCH marker in front of Lightner Museum volume 8

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The Tactile Art Show has led the Art Association to complete a new project: The TOUCH St. Augustine program — a Braille Trail with TOUCH markers (around town) and the TOUCH St. Augustine Art Garden (at the Art Association building. “The TOUCH St. Augustine project was inspired by our annual Tactile Art Show for the Blind, which we’ve been doing for 13 years. Students from FSDB produce Braille labels for the exhibit’s touchable art and tour the show for their mobility training,” Brady said. “We wanted to expand this concept beyond the gallery walls. After seeing a Braille flag created by the Kansas Braille Transcription Institute, we came up with the idea of developing similar Braille markers for St. Augustine’s historic statuary.” According to Brady, a grant from the Community Foundation JoAnn Crisp-Ellert fund allowed the creation of the TOUCH St. Augustine initiative. TOUCH is an acronym for Tactile Orientation for Understanding Creativity and History.  Five statues were chosen for the initial phase: Ponce de Leon; Pedro Menendez; the St. Augustine Foot Soldiers; Father Pedro Camps; and Henry Flagler. “It took two years to design the bronze plaques with Braille and raised tactile graphics as well as the concrete bases. This was a collaborative effort, with our graphic designer Liesl Swogger, retired architect Clyde Brady, sculptor Enzo Torcoletti, and Nancy Berger, the Braille specialist from FSDB on the lead team, Brady said. “We will supplement the Braille Trail with audio guides and the expansion of our web site — touchstaugustine.com.   The Art Association’s new Art Garden will include sculptures, Braille markers and other elements that engage the senses. “It will become a starting point for the citywide Braille Trail. And we plan to add more markers around the area in the future,” Brady explained. On July 2, one of the FSDB students was asked to read the Braille marker for the St. Augustine Foot Soldiers monument during the 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act commemoration.  “It was a remarkable moment to see our idea come to fruition and to witness the impact this project will have on the blind community,” Brady said. A fundraising effort for the (more }) volume 8

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A sculpture model for summer camp projects at the St. Augustine Art Association.


TOUCH Art Garden already has nearly $100,000 pledged. “Thanks to a generous $50,000 matching gift from our president, Diane Bradley and her husband, Bill Mayer, and many donors, we have raised almost $100,000 for the TOUCH St. Augustine Art Garden and exterior renovation,” Brady said. “We still need to raise another $100,000 and are reaching out to the community for their support. This is a 450th legacy project that will beautify our town now and be a source of pride and inspiration for future generations.” Brady said that the Art Association hopes to break group this fall and plans to have the garden and sculptures in place for a May 2015 dedication. NATURE AND WILDLIFE EXHIBIT The Fifth Annual Nature & Wildlife Art Exhibition is on view through Aug. 31 at the St. Augustine Art Assocation, 22 Marine Street. This nationally acclaimed exhibit features 130 works of art inspired by the beauty of the natural world and the diversity of wildlife that inhabit it. More than 200 artists from across the country submitted nearly 500 works of art into the prestigous contest to vie for $5,000 in cash awards, including a $2,000 Best in Show prize.  A jury panel consisting of a painter, photographer, potter and mixed media artist selected the entries, which will be judged for awards by  Jenny Hager-Vickery, Associate Professor of Sculpture at the University of North Florida. “The entries this year have been exceptional,” said Diane Bradley, STAAA President. “We’re thrilled the St. Augustine Art Association has attracted such accomplished nature artists for this annual event.” The St. Augustine Art Association offers free admission to the public. Hours are noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday. To learn more and to arrange group tours, call  904-8242310 or go to www.staaa.org. LOST ART COLONY An online gallery of selected works from the St. Augustine Art Association’s permanent collection offers an opportunity to connect with the early art colony artists. Go to www.staaa.org/permanentcollection to view the collection. UPCOMING EVENTS July 26th-Aug. 31st: The Fifth Annual Nature & Wildlife Exhibit 2014 5TH Nov. 29th-30th: 49th Annual St. Augustine Art & Craft Festival at Francis Field ONGOING EVENTS Monday Night Life Drawing Sessions: Weekly live model sessions. Gestures and long poses. A non-instructional intensive weekly studio session with the live model. Participants may work in any medium. Easels, tables and chairs provided. $10 model fee for StAAA members: OPEN STUDIO TUESDAYS: From 1 to 4 p.m. each Tuesday. Lacking studio space? Looking for a workplace to create, critique or collaborate? Tuesday afternoons have been set aside for art making in the gallery. Easels, tables and chairs provided. Fee is $10 for StAAA members. OCL

Ashley & Jared June 22, 2013

Beverly Bennett Photography

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FOCUSED ON SPORTSMANSHIP

by Tom Iacuzio photos by Zach Thomas

I

n the win-at-all-costs world of athletics, it often seems like sportsmanship gets relegated to the bench, but talk to Flagler College Athletic Director Jud Damon and he will tell you the two don’t have to be mutually exclusive. “There’s no reason a coach or athlete cannot play very hard to win in a sportsmanlike manner,” said Damon. “I think what you see on television these days, in the way athletes behave, whether in professional sports or in college, it’s a lot of ‘me me me.’ “ Since joining Flagler in 2009, Damon has made sportsmanship and personal integrity the foundation for the college’s Athletic Department, a philosophy that has paid off. Flagler has won the NCAA Div. II Peach Belt Conference’s Institution of the Year Sportsmanship Award for four consecutive years. Flagler is the only school to earn the award in consecutive seasons.Then this past May, the NCAA honored Damon with the 2013 NCAA Bob Frederick Sportsmanship Award. “I was stunned and incredibly grateful,” said Damon about winning the award. “I think there are generally two types of people in the world: those who are grateful and those who feel that they are entitled. I certainly try very hard to be the former.” The Frederick Award is given to one person each year across the entire NCAA and honors a coach, administrator or staff member who possesses a demonstrated history of sportsmanship. The award was named for former University of Kansas Athletic Director Bob Frederick, and is the culmination of a very intentional plan to incorporate sportsmanship into the philosophy of the Flagler Athletics Department — a concept that mirrors the man who instills it. “We’re just not going to have that as part of our program,” he said of the “win-at-all-costs” mentality that runs rampant in sports. “For me personally, how I operate philosophically is based in how I operate as a person. It’s an outgrowth of my own convictions. If you approach it from the standpoint of nothing but wins and losses then the whole thing is pretty shallow.” Damon is the former athletic director at Georgia College and State University, Savannah College of Art and Design and Trinity International University before coming to Flagler. From day one he sat down with his team of coaches and staff members to draft what they believed should be the “core covenants” of the Flagler athletics program: accountability, integrity, professionalism, sportsmanship and teamwork. (more })

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“There’s no reason a coach or athlete cannot play very hard to win in a sportsmanlike manner”

Flagler College Athletic Director Jud Damon wins NCAA’s prestigious award for sportsmanship

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Under Damon, sports teams are asked to make conscious and tangible efforts to improve and innovate sportsmanship on an almost daily basis. Coaches are even asked to submit a sportsmanship plan every year on how they intend to do that. For example, the men’s soccer team has been known to invite the opposing team out for pizzas after the game, and the women’s basketball team has begun honoring the opposing team’s players on Flagler Senior Night. Teams have also been active in St. Augustine community and surrounding area, volunteering with Habitat for Humanity, Make-A-Wish, Think Pink and The National Marathon to Fight Breast Cancer in Jacksonville. “It’s important to have a culture of respect among NCAA institutions because that will create game environments and experiences that are enriching for everyone involved — fans, student-athletes, coaches, staff — everyone,” said Damon.

“Anyone with enough resources can build a winning team, but we want to do things on a deeper level.” “The way he leads our department and student-athletes is truly inspiring,” said Assistant Athletics Director Ryan Erlacher. “I have never seen an administrator care for the students as much as he does; always trying to find a way to challenge them and help them grow as citizens.” Since Damon took over in 2009, Flagler has experienced NCAA Regional tournament wins, NCAA Division II Final Four appearances, conference championships and many other honors. “We do want to win championships, don’t mistake that,” he said. “Of course, the more competitive our teams get, the more championships we win, and as we continue to win sportsmanship awards simultaneously, that will be real validation for the way we run our athletics program.” OCL

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by Lura Readle Scarpitti photos by Addison Fitzgerald and Justin Itnyre

THE BEAUTIFUL IN OUR GAME BEAUTIFUL Ancient City Soccer Club

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eet Max Gibbs. Max is a precocious, energetic, fun 10-year old boy. He’s also a third generation Ancient City Soccer Club kid (his 5 year-old sister Ava, is set to become one in the fall). Meet Max’s mom, Amy. Amy is a second generation ACSC kid-but back in her day it was called Ancient City Soccer League. Her mom, Michele Wiles, and her dad, Cochran Keating are what I guess you could call the first generation Ancient City Soccer Club… kids at heart? That’s because Michele and Cochran were not kids when the organization was first formed and they didn’t actually play in the League. They were adults with children that would play soccer with a group of kids at the little corner lot just west of the Alligator Farm. Naturally, while watching their kids play, this idea emerged from the parents’ discussions: “We need to get a league started so that they can really play the game.” “It was parents with kids who wanted to play and loved the game and wanted other kids to have an opportunity to play,” says Wiles. (more })

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o they set about doing just that. Sounds easy enoughright? Not so much, says Wiles. Nobody in the City Recreation Department really understood this “new sport” and it was a slow start to be sure. But founding members, Wiles and Keating, along with fellow residents Dan and Michelle Johnson and German transplants, Mike Weiss and Ana Weiss, persevered, finally got a charter and the Ancient City Soccer League was created. Much like today, practices were held on fields around town, but certainly not nearly as many as today (games were held at St. Augustine High). The number of kids participating back then (1981 or ‘82-the actual year the club got started is a little fuzzy) doesn’t even come close to the nearly 600 kids registered in the ACSC today. The sport at the time was not well-known here in the states but they were still able to find enough people in the area who knew enough about soccer to fill the coaching roster: other transplanted Europeans in town, Flagler soccer team members, and some parents, like Wiles, who learned the game from her French father, who were familiar with futbol. Gibbs and her brother, Cochran IV, both played in the organization from day one. As the kids grew older, and started to enter Junior and Senior High, the desire to represent their schools on the soccer field started to emerge and the parents banded together once again to try and get a high school team formed. Once again, they were met with opposition but their perseverance paid off and the first St. Augustine High School Soccer team hit the field in 1984. Fast forward three decades later and, thanks to these dedicated parents and the legions that followed, this “new” sport has really taken off in the Old City. Drive past the fields behind R.B. Hunt on any given day and there are dozens of children decked out in cleats, shin guards, colorful striped jerseys and shorts, all running after a black and white ball. Parents line the fields watching their children participate in conditioning drills, learning ball handling skills, experiencing what it’s like to be on a team, developing a sense of strategy. Most importantly, they’re out there watching their kids just have fun participating in this face-paced and thrilling sport. If you look at the Club these days, it’s obvious that the ACSC has certainly come a long way from its more informal roots. With the phenomenal growth (again, the current membership tops 600 participants each year) came the need for a more cohesive organization. The current club has an active and engaged board of directors and a dedicated group of volunteers and coaches, all under the leadership of the ACSC’s Director of Coaching, Josh Braun. A USSF-licensed coaching professional, Braun came to the Club in 2005 with an outstanding resume in soccer. A few of the highlights include: Member of the Semi-professional Central Coast Roadrunners (PDL); 4-years as a NCAA Division I player (Oral Roberts University); a member of the US U-17 National Team Player Pool (which feeds into the National Team poolthe team that we just saw compete in this year’s World Cup); and Assistant Coach of FC Jax Destroyers (PDL). Josh, who holds a Masters degree in Marriage and Family Therapy, at one time wanted to be a family therapist, but his time spent on the field while working on his Masters changed all that. “I really realized my life’s calling and my passion for

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it…after I finished my Masters, my wife and I moved to St. Augustine and it was at that point in time that I took the role with the club.” You would think, that with all of his competitive experience, Josh would be all about winning and his ASCS program would reflect that. In all actuality, nothing could be further from the truth. His curriculum, modeled on the US Federation guidelines, is tailored to teach technical and tactical skills, how to dribble, settle, pass, shoot the ball, etc., at every age level in a child’s development “so that A) kids are having fun, and B) getting better,” according to Braun. The objective here is on learning how to handle the ball, not on scoring goals and winning. “My philosophy from the start has been a two-pillar approach…and that encompasses every level of youth soccer in our area, and that is that kids are having fun and enjoying their selves and developing a love for the game and number two is that kids are learning new skills and developing their skill set as a soccer player and as a young person…I’ve worked really, really hard to create an environment where we’re not hammering the wins and the losses. We are focused on kids enjoying the game, kids growing at the game.” Ask James Whitehouse, an ACSC Board Member, coach, player-parent (all five of his children are members of the club at various levels), long-time soccer fan and player: he agrees with Braun and his style of coaching. “The US has had too much of an emphasis on winning in youth soccer. Instead, it is learning the skills for handling a ball and kids not being afraid to try their

ACSC Director of Coaching Josh Braun watches the action

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moves with the ball that will make players great. The way you and I can handle a ball with our hands, Lionel Messi can do that just as well…with his feet. He’s called Messi the Magician for that reason; because his skills are so well-honed he can do anything that he wants with the ball.” Whitehouse, who grew up playing youth soccer in Jacksonville Beach and has played and coached soccer most of his life, knows first-hand what it takes to truly succeed in the game. “We need to continue to encourage our youth players to learn individual ball skills, to not be afraid to try new moves over and over; even if they fail, that is how they will become more skillful. That is how we will improve soccer in the US.” As for soccer in St. Augustine, the club is set up to help kids do just that. Dr. Volk of Orthopedic Associates, ACSC’s major corporate sponsor, agrees. “I think that Ancient City Soccer, it starts out as a thing, you can take it as far as you like.” Volk first became involved with the club as a parent when his daughter started playing 15 years ago (she is now 20 and in college) and since that time, every one of his 4 children has gone through the program in one way or another. Like many parents, he eventually became a coach and then, a few years ago was approached to be the corporate sponsor. “It was a win-win situation for everybody…At Orthopedic Associates, we always like to get involved in the community and we always want to get involved with something that promotes health, or sports, and well-being.” Ancient City Soccer was the perfect fit. “It’s probably the best community outreach that we’re involved in right now and we want to see the relationship flourish as more and more kids come out. OA is in their third year of sponsorship and that relationship doesn’t look like it’s ending anytime soon.” As for the structure of the club, much like Dr. Volk stated, it’s designed to take kids as far as they would like to go in the sport. Almost all kids first get involved as a part of the Recreational League, where kids from 4 to 19 can learn the game and improve upon their soccer skills. Next step up is the ACS Developmental Academy, which is structured, according to the ACSC website “to create a culture where technical skill, creativity and flair are celebrated.” The final level for area soccer players “wanting to be challenged at the highest levels of play” is the PDA of Florida. This program is for elite players who are trying to achieve the highest level of play they can and is often used to help prepare for possible continuation of a player’s competitive career through college and beyond. It’s obvious that the club, and soccer in the Nation’s Oldest City itself, has flourished since its humble beginnings back in the early ’80s. It’s well-run organizations such as these that have helped to spark the uprising of soccer in the United States too. Though it has yet to gain the fan base of some of the country’s more beloved pastimes, (American) football, basketball and baseball, it’s getting there. As Dr. Volk puts it, “As you learn more about the science behind it and the strategy, watching a soccer game for 120 minutes and seeing the score go 0-0 can be one of the most exciting things to watch.” Whitehouse continues that thought. “People complain that soccer is boring, that ‘There’s no scoring-it’s 1-0 or 2-1, That’s boring.’ But they’re missing the point. It’s not the scoring that is the beauty of the game, it’s the ball handling and the amazing moves and shots...it’s really the game itself.” For more information on Ancient City Soccer Club, please visit their OCL website at www.ancientcitysoccer.com 32

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SaintAugustineLiving

home

Custom Sea Colony Home Highlights its Ocean Views

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lifelong dream of oceanfront living took the Bonds on a road trip all the way up the east coast of Florida, until they found affordable oceanfront property. In 2006, they discovered Sea Colony, bought a lot and built their oceanfront dream house. Full time residents since 2009, Lisa and Matt are home. Lisa says she’s happiest with sand between her toes and husband Matt, a lifelong surfer, is happiest when he’s in the water. “If he’s not traveling for business and not in the garage painting surfboards, he’s surfing.” The high achieving couple, Matt, a lawyer at one of the major TV networks and Lisa, a financial planner, love being outside and built their house to take full advantage of the view. With more windows (84 windows to be exact) than siding, their goal to have open and sweeping views was achieved by local architects Florez & Florez. Endless ocean views from almost every room invite you to come in, make yourself at home and enjoy. “The house just beckons us to have people over,” Lisa says. The main living area, aptly called the “Ocean Room,” adjoins the kitchen and is the perfect space for entertaining and enjoying the changing light and the view. With 18 foot, soaring ceilings and views forever, this is where the Bonds and their friends gather.

story by LeeAnn Kendall photos by Justin Itnyre

The “Bond” House “We’ve found our slice of heaven.”

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Luxury Outdoor Furniture Sale on In Stock Items volume 8

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On the Thursday night, when we arrived for pictures, the Bonds were out of town, so their neighbor and friend, decorator Donna Matthews, had everything staged perfectly for the cocktail hour photo shoot. You could easily get lost in 6,200 square feet, but their four bedrooms, four full baths and 2 half baths, so comfortably decorated, and all oriented to the water, guide you right back to the ocean backyard. The back deck with pool and hot tub plus complete summer kitchen are an invitation for constant entertaining. With the dune walkover on the contiguous lot, going from pool to ocean and back to pool, is easy. Inside or out, this house is designed for comfort and fun. When not outside, Matt, a self-taught airbrush painter, transforms surfboards into stunning collector items. Lisa’s art studio doubles as the guest area now and is decorated in cottagey light greens and blues and is an invitation to put your feet up and relax. Their house feels like a constant state of vacation. They love their neighborhood and the great feel of St. Augustine, a small town vibe with the perfect beach. The Bonds are staying, as Lisa says, “We’ve found our slice of heaven.” OCL

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El Camino

travel

de Santiago

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arlier this year, in our fitness issue, we wrote about preparing for a major backpacking journey, specifically walking the Camino de Santiago in Spain. After planning and preparing for this adventure for several months, on March 31st I flew to Madrid and made my way to St. Jean Pied de Port in France to begin this 500 mile sojourn. The Camino is the third major pilgrimage in the Christian world (the Holy Lands and Rome being one and two) and it is the route that the Apostle St. James took to deliver his message to that part of the world. Every year since, tens of thousands of people annually make the trek, some for religious purposes and some for just taking a long hike on foreign soil. Whatever the reason, the objective is to journey to the Cathedral in Santiago de Campestela and for those who traveled at least 100 K, to receive their personal “Compestela”

article and photos by Rick McAllister

verifying their accomplishment. The first three days out of St. Jean take you into the Pyrenees Mountains where you cross into Spain. My time in the mountains was challenging to say the least; in addition to the dramatic ascents and descents, we had rain, sleet and snow, making following the trail markers through the difficult terrain a major challenge. While I made this trip by myself, there were always others on the trail who became walking companions for a part of the time. After the mountains came an area known as the Meseta, the flat land with periodic “mesas” or table rocks similar to what you see in Colorado. This was my favorite area to hike with wide open vistas filled with fields of wheat, hillsides covered with wine vineyards, and small olive tree orchards. The wide open spaces provided great opportunities for personal reflection and the small villages that dotted the landscape were like an oasis providing cafes for respite and refreshment and albergues for nightly lodging. The third topographical area we walked through was Galicia.

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This hilly terrain seemed to hold the clouds and it rained every day I was there. The landscape was painted a lush green, dotted with farms and villages and vast forests of eucalyptus trees. After five weeks on the trail, I arrived in Santiago de Compestela, six pounds lighter than when I started and with a little wear and tear on the legs. I attended the daily pilgrim mass in the beautiful cathedral and received my certificate (compestela) for completing the journey. It would be hard to select a favorite aspect of this pilgrimage; there were so many. The topographical and scenery changes along the route, the history and architecture of the infrastructure, and the friendliness of the Spanish people along the entire Camino would certainly be among the most memorable, however, the people you met and shared the trail with, people from all over the world who shared this common experience, topped the list. There was no political agenda...only an interest in how your journey was going, where you were from, and what you would take home with you from your respective journey. The very first evening on the trail, part way up the Pyrenees Mountains and sitting at my dinner table were folks from South Korea, Spain, Belgium, England, Germany, Ireland, and the United States. There was a warming fire in the stone fireplace and the wine cemented an atmosphere of Olympian camaraderie. On the trail, everyone was greeted with an “hola” and a “buen Camino.” I was fortunate to be in Burgos for Palm Sunday and in Leon for Easter where I witnessed the massive celebrations at the spectacular cathedrals in both of these towns; festivities which encompassed the entire day and appeared to include most of the populations.

Vineyards and olive groves

Approaching the village of Obanos

Rick gets his workout...

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This is very much a festive land. If you are planning to make this journey, preparation is a must. Since it has become a world renowned hike, there is much information out there to assist you; the internet, movies, and publications. The Camino also has a support organization here in the United States called the American Pilgrims on the Camino (APOC) whose mission is to support the infrastructure of the Camino, to gather pilgrims together, and to provide information and encouragement to past and future pilgrims. We are fortunate to have the newest chapter right here in St. Augustine and you may contact them via staugustinechapter@americanpilgrims.com or by contacting this author at fotowurks@aol.com or 904-501-7777. OCL

Knights Templar Castle in Ponferrada

A village in Galicia

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One

community

Anderson Circle W ebster gives us the following as a definition for cornerstone. . . .”a basic element. . .laid at the corner;” synonymous with “foundation.” A good case could be made that the American Legion building located at 1 Anderson Circle and immediately to your right as you enter the “first city” from the Bridge of Lions is in fact the “cornerstone” of St. Augustine. Not just because it sits at a pivotal corner of our town but foremost because it represents the military and its relationship to our history, to our present, and to our future. The story of American Legion Post 37 is a story told in two fascinating but different chapters; the first one dealing with the history of the building itself, and the other dealing with the significant relationship this town has had with a military presence from the start. The home of the American Legion began as the home of Charles F. Hamblen, a prominent resident and business man in St. Augustine in the late 1800s and the early 1900s. After moving here from Maine, he started a grocery business and expanded into a general mercantile business, and when the fire of 1887 destroyed this operation, he acquired significant property on what is now Aviles Street and operated a very successful hardware business, supplying many of our early entrepreneurial business people including Henry Flagler. Construction on his beautiful home, which he called “Blenmore,” was started in 1899 and completed in 1904. Both Charles and his wife, Antonia, died in 1920, and the house was

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story and photos by Rick McAllister Charles F. Hamblen photo courtesy of Nancy Birchall

willed to a trust and more specifically to be used as a social club for male wage earners and men of small means. This became known as the “Charles F. Hamblen Club.” In subsequent years, the house has functioned as a boarding house, a YMCA, and a USO. Then, in 1940, it was rented by Post 37 of the American Legion and has remained the proud and distinguished headquarters for this prominent member of our community. The second part of this story is about Post 37 and the importance of a military presence during our 450 year history. A quick check of our history during any of the Spanish, British or American rule will show a strong presence of military in this community, and many would argue that it is a significant reason as to our standing as the oldest continued settlement in the United States. The American Legion was chartered by Congress in 1919 and it is the nations largest veteran wartime service committed to mentoring youth and sponsorship of wholesale programs in our communities, advocating patriotism and honor, promoting strong national security, and continued devotion to our fellow service members and veterans. Post 37 has honorably served those who have worn the uniform of the United States and at a community level, supports such Legion activities as American Legion baseball, Blue Star Service Banners (care packages, letters, and moral support to troops and their families), Boys State/Girls State and Boys Nation/Girls Nation (introducing kids to state and federal level government operations), Heroes to Hometowns (assisting severely injured service members in transition from service to civilian life), and numerous scholarship awards and programs. The Hamblen property (Post 37) is an architecturally significant structure located in the most prominent section of the historic heart of St. Augustine and efforts are now underway to renovate the property in order to upgrade the usefulness and appearance of volume 8

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Nancy and Ron Birchall

the current structure for the benefit of the community. While Post 37 has traditionally been open to the public, the remodeled facility will take a dramatic step forward in this regard. The “Legion Legacy” will: • Save, preserve, and enhance a historic building located in the heart of our beautiful bayfront. • Provide a community asset capable of hosting local as well as military gatherings and celebrations. • Establish a welcome center for civilian and military visitors to St. Augustine. • Offer public dining and a bar/grill with spectacular views of Matanzas Bay and the Bridge of Lions. • Create a prestigious American Legion Headquarters. • Create an educational environment displaying art and artifacts representing 450 years of military history here in St. Augustine. • Create a place of honor and remembrance. • Establish a location for both active duty personnel and veterans seeking financial and legal assistance. • Provide a self-sustaining resource for generating funds to support the vast American Legion projects and scholarships. According to LTC. Ron Birchall, U.S. Army (Ret), “a renovated headquarters for American Legion Post 37 will more adequately serve the 20,000 veterans currently residing in St. Augustine, and also serve as a focal point for military involvement with the upcoming 450th Commemoration in 2015 and events planned for the next two years. Far more than just a building, a renovated American Legion Post 37 will once again be a proud symbol of America’s Armed Forces, and a centerpiece of patriotism and honor in America’s Oldest City.” Ron and his wife Nancy have dedicated their time and effort to making this project work and it should be noted that Nancy is a distant relative to Charles F. Hamblen, the original owner of the house. Funding for this project is through the non-profit “Forward March” program and is dependent upon public support and contributions. If you are interested in making a contribution or just learning more about this very special project, please contact Ron or Nancy Birchall or “Forward March” at 904-794-2883, 904-669-5595 or NcBirch@4wardmarch.org.

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MM 25944

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body

The HEAT is on (so cool it for a bit!)

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How to survive Summer workouts

ome years ago, when I considered myself a runner in the classic sense of actually living and breathing the runner’s lifestyle, there was a popular 10 kilometer race in Milan, Ohio. The race was a highlight of the very popular, annual Milan Melon Festival. It was always held over the Labor Day weekend. Each year over 100,000 people would journey to this small village of less than 1,500. The temperatures on race day were invariably over 95 degrees and 95 percent humidity! I loathed it. I always envisioned a personal best at this race because it was a flat, out-and-back course. For those of you who aren’t runners, runners live for the ‘flat, out-and-back” course. There are no fancy undulations or patterns to the course to slow down their times or to keep them from funning ‘flat-out’. They are the ones where a personal record, or PR, are easily had. The Milan course was a dream for that. And year after year, and for many years of my youth, it was one of those personal-best seekers.

What I Failed to Consider

Runners, and often tennis players, are infamous for putting up with a lot of physical pain. They enter long and difficult races, many times in extreme conditions like the heat and humidity of the Milan Melon Festival Run. In spite of the punishing conditions, they still run like mad people-in a good way. They incur much pain and suffering-in a good way. Then after the race is over, they forget about all the pain and about all the suffering, only to seek out another race for another PR. My opinion of them is...you gotta love them! Here’s the problem though: in my situation with the extreme heat conditions of the

story by Kim Miller

Milan Melon festival, I didn’t just forget how painful that race was, but I failed to remember how dangerously hot it was.

What is Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke?

Heat-related illness is when your body can’t keep itself cool. As the air temperature rises, your body stays cool when your sweat evaporates. That’s the good stuff. But sometimes on hot, humid days, the evaporation of sweat is slowed by the increased moisture in the air. When sweating isn’t enough to cool your body, your body temperature rises, and you may become ill. Heat exhaustion happens when your body gets too hot. It can be caused by physical exercise or hot weather. When you are suffering from this you can experience heavy sweating, weakness, confusion, dizziness, nausea, headache, fast heartbeat. Heat stroke is when the internal temperature of the body reaches 104°F. It happens when your body gets too hot during strenuous exercise or when exposed to very hot temperatures, or it can happen when heat exhaustion isn’t properly treated. Heatstroke is much more serious than heat exhaustion. Heatstroke can cause damage to your organs and brain and, in extreme cases, it can kill you. In warm to hot conditions, most adult tennis players will lose between 1.0 and 2.5 liters of water during each hour of competitive singles. Sweat rates of 3.5 liters per hour are not unusual when the environment gets hotter and more humid; as intensity of play increases; and  as a player becomes more aerobically fit and acclimatizes to the heat.  Sweat is mostly water, but it contains a fair amount of sodium and chloride. Clinical evidence supports a relationship between heat-related muscle cramps and a high-sodium loss.  Without adequate sodium replacement, the cumulative effect of such losses can lead to a progressive sodium deficit after several days of playing or training in the heat.  The effects of inadequate sodium replacement cause muscle cramps or increased heat exhaustion during subsequent play.  One reason that tennis players don’t always offset sweat losses with fluid intake is that, during a match, thirst is usually not a rapid enough indicator of  body water losses. Because players don’t always feel the need to drink as much as is needed they should follow a pre-determined hydration plan, whether they are thirsty or not. Studies have shown significant decreases in muscular strength, muscular endurance, physical work capacity, and even mental performance, with only marginal to moderate body water losses.  Also, current research shows that fluid ingestion reduces internal body temperature, as well as muscle glycogen use, during prolonged exercise. These factors contribute to improved performance. If you are prone to heat-related muscle cramps during hot weather, you might consider increasing your intake of foods and liquids containing salt. Avoid drinks that contain caffeine (more })

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General Gotta Know Heat Smarts For Summertime Activities

Lifetime fitness means taking it down a notch in extreme heat conditions. But oddly enough, while many people will agree with this statement yet, nonetheless, will take pride in not heeding this advice. Let’s go back to that-just what do I mean when I say “lifetime fitness means taking exercise down a notch in the heat?” Many of us strive to be healthy, lean and fit. However, lifetime fitness encompasses more than being healthy, lean and fit. Lifetime fitness is not the superficial kind of fitness where people cycle through periods of being hyped up to crashes into a sedentary lifestyle, on and off, throughout their lives. This kind of fitness approach is comparable to yo-yo dieters; people who get hyped up about a new diet only to yo-yo back to their old lifestyles and body weights. This behavior saddens me. It is self-defeating. Many athletic and fitness striving people desire to do things right yet it is their impatience with obtaining quick results that is their downfall. This impatience is why many people end up simply reading but not heeding sound medical advice of being safe when exercising in the heat.

How to Get The Right Mindset

Situation: It is hot and humid outside but I have not worked out yet. Mindset: It is not the end of the world. Either go inside and train at a gym, or drink lots of water ahead of time and then go outside and train with a decreased intensity (making a decision is key here!). Situation: It is hot and humid outside but it’s important that I train hard today because I have an upcoming race or match coming. Mindset: I can train later in the day or early in the morning. It will be inconvenient and out of my regular routine, but I can do it this once, or I will decrease my intensity today knowing that this is only one of many challenges I have in my lifetime. The most important thing to remember...when it’s hot and humid, do the sensible thing-take it down a notch! OCL

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GARDENING

by Kimberly Leonardi

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emember when we (or, perhaps I was the only one) were all freezing over the winter and we vowed never to complain during the summer heat again? Well, summer is here and I’m keeping my promise. I’m basking in our blazing summer sun— with sunscreen of course! We live in paradise, and enjoying our tropical locale, palm trees, lush green grass, and beautiful flowers is a daily delight. We can stroll through history downtown, or along our breathtakingly beautiful scenic beaches…sometimes it’s good to just sit back and smell those roses! However, after you’re finished smelling the roses, tip prune them and give them a bit of fertilizer. Also, make sure they don’t have any black spot on their leaves, which is an indicator of a typical type of fungus on roses. While in trimming mode, keep in mind that after Crape Myrtles bloom you can cut off expired flowers and you’ll likely get another bloom cycle—if you’re lucky, two more!      I am in awe of landscape and lawn maintenance crews, as well as any outside laborers because they are conditioned (hopefully) to work in our blistering summer heat.  If you’re not conditioned as such, you may want to take on the gardening chores in the cooler parts of the day, such as mornings and later afternoons.  These fabulously long days give everyone opportunity for gardening in the beautiful twilights of dawn or dusk.  When it’s dark at 6:00pm, I’m like a bear hibernating in the winter, but longer days help fill me with so much more energy! Add in the balmy weather, and gardening is a breeze (pun intended).      You may have noticed how fast the grass is growing now that summer is in full swing. Constant afternoon showers boost that right along. But take note: the heat of the summer is not the time for weed-and-feed type fertilizers; it’s much too hot.  If you want to green up your lawn, I’d recommend organic milorganite, or any other time-release fertilizer that’s safe for summer temperatures. If you’re noticing any fungus, or signs of insect damage in the lawn, you’ll want to address those issues quickly to thwart further damage. Treatment varies plant to plant, so speak with your local nursery about options if you have questions or concerns.      Speaking of plant damage, grasshoppers cause their fair share. They especially enjoy feeding on—but are not limited to— fleshy plants like Crinum Lily. If you see them, eliminate them! No mercy! Other pests to be on the lookout for: leafminers. If you see a tunneling affect in the foliage of your citrus, it’s probably leafminer.  I recommend an all-seasons oil spray. Leafminers develop and live within the leaves of plants, feeding on the soft inner tissue, which, in turn, causes tunneling. The last of the pests I’ll mention are the ever-pesky aphids. They’re still thriving in the heat, unfortunately. Any organic pesticide should work on them, but be mindful not to spray butterfly plants.      The last thing I would like to emphasize for the summer is ensuring the roots of your plants are getting ample water.  Slow watering, such as a drip line or running a hose to the base of a large plants (only letting it trickle for an appropriate time period), are good methods of accomplishing this. Without ample rainfall I would venture to say that roots should be watered every day during establishment period, and then taper off from that point. The bigger the plant, the more water is typically required!         It’s hard to believe that the kiddos will be heading back to school soon, but with that you can begin planning the fall garden.  Gardening with the foods and flowers of the season always seems to be of interest to children, and what a great thing to be able to teach them! Even if it’s one plant they can take responsibility for, and nurture,  imagine the possibilities!  

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Back to Basics

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ne would think that pure varietals (a single grape type) would be more expensive than a blend. This is not always the case. Some grapes are purposely grown just to create a wonderful blend that is coveted in the marketplace. There are some blends that are more of a “kitchen sink” concoction, but many are high quality and have beautiful notes of different spices and fruits, with layers of flavors from the entry to the finish. Personally, I love blends. I enjoy the fact that every single blend is different and hard to duplicate. I picture the winemaker in a chemistry lab measuring each varietal to his/her palate. I also enjoy wines that have screw-off tops as opposed to cork. Are they better? Cheaper? What’s the truth about screw-off tops? Screw-off caps are still the closure on large “jug” wines-really inexpensive domestic wines-but luckily, that type of wine is a dying breed. Meanwhile, modern screw-off caps have come on the scene as the closure of choice on many bottles of fine wine, especially white wines from all over the world. Screw-off tops allow a wine to reach the customer in perfect condition, with a minimum of bottle variation. Cork, of course, has a centuries-old tradition behind it, and there are also concerns about the impact of screw caps on the aging of those few wines that require decades to be at their best. Furthermore, I have to admit that a waiter opening a corked top wine is much sexier than cranking a screw-off top.

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wine by Jeanne Maron What about the old myth that red wine goes with red meat and white wine goes with fish and fowl? I guess that means the “experts” know our palates and moods. By all means, drink what you like. There is a pairing process for the balancing of wine fruit and acidity to the weight and acidity of the food, but it’s not a rule. I love Pinot Noir and I sell a lot of it at Thanksgiving for turkey pairing. Red drinkers unite! Now, who are these experts? Generally they are highly looked upon critics for their grading of wines in the marketplace. They are known to have a great palate (but that’s subjective, isn’t it?). Turning to critics for advice is natural. We do it all the time. However, many wine drinkers hear that a wine received a 90-plus point rating from a famous wine critic and they go out of their way to get that wine. The high rating has probably driven the price higher than it should be. Unless you’ve found that you like or respect that critic’s palate, be your own critic. I believe these experts are practicing their trade with each wine they taste, like a doctor or lawyer would practice their trade. There is no absolute remedy for everyone. I enjoy the practice of wine tasting but realize it’s all subjective. I am a legend in my own mind. Quality should not be based on price: it’s based on taste, how it makes you feel, and the situation where/when you enjoy it. No matter what you drink, enjoy and toast to the good life. Get down to basics and journal what you like. You’ll see trends in your favorites and will become a critic for your palate.

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Understanding Interest Rates

finance

by Alan Bratic, CFP® Financial Advisor

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or the past 18+ months, all eyes of the investment world have been focused on the Federal Reserve Board (Fed) and how will the Fed’s monetary policy affect the interest rates. After all, interest rates movements can significantly affect fixed income based investments and our everyday lives. These changes affect our daily lives from the mortgage interest rates we pay to the rates we earn on CDs, savings accounts and other fixed income instruments. Complexities of the fixed income markets can often trap novice and experienced investors alike, so let’s take a look at some basic examples.

Differences Between Short and Long-Term Rates The Fed controls the Fed funds target rate which influences the market for short-term securities. The Fed funds rate is the rate banks charge other banks for overnight loans. These rates will often influence an interest rate you are receiving in a savings account or on a 3-9 month CD. On the other hand, long-term rates are market driven and move in anticipation of changes in the economy and inflation. These rates are represented by yields of the 10-year and 30-year Treasury bonds and they will influence the interest rate you’re receiving on bonds and, often, 30-year mortgage rates. Both rates are mostly influenced by economic factors such as inflation, the pace of economic growth and the strength of the US dollar. Having said this, these rates do not necessarily move in tandem. For instance, the short-term rates rose in 2004-2006, while long-term rates remained relatively low. Today, if you go to your local bank, generally both short-term and long-term CDs are paying historically speaking very low rates. It is all about the old economic rule of supply and demand.

Interest Rates and Bond Values First of all, let’s explain what bonds are. Basically, when you purchase bonds or bond mutual funds, you are being a lender: in other words, you are lending money to a corporation, government or municipality in return for interest and/or principal payments over time. Sound familiar? For those of you having a mortgage, bells should be ringing right now. Bonds offer coupon/interest payments, usually every 6 months, and repay principal upon maturity of the bond, which can be as long as 30 years from now. When interest rates fluctuate, bond prices do as well, but in an inverse relationship. Basically, when interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. Conversely, when the rates decline, bond prices tend to rise.

overall debt. Secondly they will look at the amount of the loan and the purpose of the loan. Thirdly, they will consider if the loan is secured by a property or unsecured, like a business or personal loan. For example, this can make a difference in paying a 5% or 24% interest rate on your loan. Make sure you keep your credit history in good standing and do not borrow more than you can afford to pay comfortably. Now let’s look at the opposite scenario where you’re investing the money and trying to get the highest rate on your investment. The most important factor here will be how much risk you are willing to take. In other words, riskier bonds/CDs/funds will offer a higher interest rate. However, you might lose your investment if the issuer defaults on the bonds. At the same time, municipal issuers offer lower rates but in most cases the interest is tax free. These bonds are often revenue backed and insured bonds, therefore are less likely to default on the bonds. When shopping for CDs, contact several banks/brokerage firms and see who has the best rates available and make sure you are aware of any hidden charges, surrender penalties, etc. Also, ask them about their “breakpoints,” amounts at which the rate might increase ($100,000 and above etc). The bottom line is that interest rate sensitive investments are a very viable option as a part of your overall investment strategy and understanding their behavior will help you increase your rates of return. As always, please consult your financial and tax advisor prior to investing and enjoy the interest rate changes to your benefit! The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. No strategy can assure success of protect against loss. The above material was prepared in association with Peak Advisor Alliance. Securities and advisory services offered through Cetera Advisors LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity.

Getting the Best Interest Rates It does not matter if you’re investing or borrowing money, getting the best rate on both sides can really mean a great difference to your bottom line. Let’s take the stance that you are borrowing money-one of the first components lenders will look at is your credit history, along with your income and your volume 8

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Dining Guide Symbol Key Beer and Wine breakfast Courtyard/outdoor Dancing Diner Entertainment Full Liquor Bar Happy Hour Kids Menu Late Night Menu Lunch Organic Ingredients Parking Party/Banquet Facility Raw Bar Reservations Required Sunday Brunch Take Out Tiki Bar Waterside Dining

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n Amici

1915 A1A South • Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)461-0102 • amicistaugustine.com Amici is one of the true Italian restaurants in northeast Florida, where ambience and cuisine are authentically Italian. Vito Arena has been sharing his family’s old-world legacy of remarkable Italian dishes to fall in love with, while he and his sister, Benedetta make each dining moment and private party unforgettable. It is no wonder that Amici has been voted “Best Italian Restaurant” consecutively, year after year by the residents of Saint Augustine.

n The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse

102 San Marco Avenue • Saint Augustine (904)824-7211 • raintreerestaurant.com Enjoy casual dining at its finest at The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse, recognized nationally and internationally as one of Florida’s top destination restaurants. The Raintree is renowned for consistent, award-winning menu, wine list and full bar served in the warm, intimate atmosphere of a restored 1879 Victorian home with live music in our courtyard.

n The Reef Restaurant

4100 Coastal Highway • Saint Augustine (904)824-8008 • thereefstaugustine.com The Reef, originally called Comptons, was built by the Usina family on a beautiful piece of oceanfront property in tranquil North Beach, three miles north of the Usina Bridge, on land owned by the family for generations. Comptons opened in 1989 and enjoyed great success for the next ten years. It closed in 1999 due to the ill health of Mr. Compton and hurricane damage. The Reef was opened in 2002, under the direct ownership of the Usinas. Since that time the restaurant has worked hard to produce fine food and beverages, professionally served, all accompanied by unsurpassed views of the magnificent Atlantic Ocean. It has steadily built a reputation as one of the most popular dining destinations in Saint Augustine.

n South Beach Grill

45 Cubbedge Road • Saint Augustine Beach (904)471-8700 • southbeachgrill.net “Fresh local seafood and aloha service since1997” This popular restaurant is one of only three direct oceanfront eateries in Saint Johns County. While the oceanfront location is unique, one thing that sets the restaurant apart is the absolute resolve to source and procure 100% fresh fish. All fish arrives at the restaurant “on loin” where it is skillfully skinned, weighed and cut into fillets. The promise of fresh is evident not only in the fish selection but across the entire seafood menu as well. South Beach Grill is open 7 days a week. Lunch 11a.m.-4:30p.m., Dinner from 4:30p.m. to 9:30p.m., serving breakfast Saturdays & Sundays from 7:30-10:30.

n Sunset Grille

421 A1A Beach Blvd • Saint Augustine Beach (904)471-5555 • sunsetgrillea1a.com Most Award Winning Restaurant in Saint Augustine Beach, 29 time winner of The Great Chowder Debate. Have won Awards for our Datil Pepper Wings, Baby Back Ribs, Coconut Shrimp, Crab Fondue, Lobster Ravioli, Shrimp and Grits and Brownie Volcano Dessert. Our Key West atmosphere and kids menu makes us fun for the whole family. Celebrating our 22nd Anniversary!

n The Tasting Room

25 Cuna Street • Saint Augustine (904)810-2400 • thetastingroomfl.com A contemporary Spanish restaurant. Vibrant splashes of art complement a colorful array of “Tapas,” delectable little dishes designed for sharing and socializing. Iberianaccented entrées infused with fresh, local flavor and created with ingredients imported directly from Spain sail hot to your table. From curvy sofas cozying up to a Flamenco red fireplace, award-winning Wines lining an entire wall, and live Latin music nights, The Tasting Room is fueled by a passion for authentic Spanish food and wine. Reservations are not required, but recommended. Courtyard Dining, Private Dining Room available that seats up to 20. For more information please email us or call, make online reservations at tastetapas.com. 52

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n Conrad’s Steakhouse

4010 US1 South Saint Augustine, Florida (904)794-9440 • conradssteakhouse.com Conrad Martin, from Spain, was recently voted one of the best chefs in America. Conrad’s Steak House is known for its outstanding service and generous portions, along with keeping a Spanish flair in Conrad’s cooking. Conrad’s paella and codfish in green sauce are delicious. The restaurant also offers chicken, seafood, pastas and salads. Conrad is in the kitchen, Mary, his wife, controls the front of the house. This “gem” of restaurant is a “FEAST OF QUALITY AND TASTE” with great food and hospitality. Lunch every weekday 11:30a.m.-2p.m. • Dinner every night, 5pm-9pm Closed Tuesdays.

n 386 A Fusion of Fine eating

5949 N. Oceanshore Blvd, Palm Coast, FL, 32137 (386)246-0070 threeeightsix.com Nestled among the majestic oak trees in “The Hammock” alongside scenic A1A, lies 386, A Fusion of Fine Eating. Residing in a building reminiscent of “Old Florida”, 386 embodies the local spirit while invoking a worldly feel with cuisine. The menu boasts a fusion of American favorites from East to West, local fresh seafood in Southern favorites like shrimp-n-grits, aged steaks as one would find in the West, and scallops recalling time spent on the North Eastern shore. The menu is complimented by a wide selection of wines from around the globe and a generous selection of beers on tap. 386 is the realization of a dream for a husband and wife team who are committed to serving the freshest of ingredients and living by the motto “do the right thing” for our patrons. Experience Palm Coast’s very own culinary escape

n Blackfly The Restaurant

108 Anastasia Blvd. • Anastasia Island (904) 201·6300  www.blackflytherestaurant.com If you’re looking for a seafood restaurant in St. Augustine, Blackfly is one of St. Augustine’s newest and most unique seafood restaurants. Having opened in June of 2012, Blackfly has won favors with the local community and tourist alike. We’re known for our daily fresh fish specials, brick oven pizza plus steak, chicken, chops and pasta. The well-stocked bar is a great place to relax with friends. The dining room features the art of partner Vaughn Cochran and a 1,000 bottle temperature controlled wine room. The Shores Room with its own private bar can accommodate parties of up to 40. Open for dinner Tuesday to Sunday. .

n Hurricane Patty’s

69 Lewis Blvd. • Off U.S. I at Oyster Creek Marina (904) 827-1822 • www.HurricanePattys.net Only minutes from downtown off of U.S. Highway l, Hurricane Patty’s serves lunch and dinner daily overlooking the water. Enjoy nightly themed specials throughout the week, featuring drink and dinner specials and live entertainment featuring a wide variety of seafood, steaks, pork chops, chicken, pasta, awardwinning chowder, and, for lunch, sandwiches, salads, and burgers. Full bar and Happy Hour daily 3-7 p.m. Housed in one of St. Augustine’s oldest structures-a renovated 1800s fish dock and warehouse, Hurricane Patty’s feature views of the surrounding marshes, marina, and St. Augustine skyline.

n Fratelli’s n Captain’s BBQ

5862 N. Oceanshore Blvd.Palm Coast, FL 32137 (386)597-2888 Offers some of the best TRUE SOUTHERN BBQ, we only use the best quality meats and ingredients. Our meats and side dishes are slow cooked in our special wood burning smoker. Although smoking is a very slow, time consuming process it is worth every second. The result is moist, juicy meats, infused with a delicious smoked wood flavor. Come try Captain Chris’s almost famous Ribs, Chicken, Pulled Pork, Turkey Breast and Brisket which are available daily with exciting additions of daily specials. All of our side dishes are homemade, Macaroni Salad, Sweet Corn Bread, Baked Beans and Cole Slaw. on beautiful and scenic A1A at Bing’s Landing in the Hammock of Palm Coast. Captains BBQ is also accessible by water (29.615°N 81.205°W) just south of channel marker red “108” captainsbbqbaittackle.com

415 Anastasia Blvd. St. Augustine, FL 32080 904-819-1760 We are proud to offer Saint Augustine our fresh from the source, and made to order cuisine. We feature traditional Italian comfort foods, along with lighter, and healthier dishes. Here at Fratelli’s, we use the finest imported products, local sustainable meats, seafood, and vegetables.It’s our commitment and responsibility to provide fresh and authentic Italian food. We lay the foundation for a romantic Italian dining experience.  Who are you treating tonight?.

n Jaybird’s Restaurant and Pizzeria n DOLCE Café

210 St. George St. St. Augustine, FL, 32084 Trying to accommodate everybody’s needs, DOLCE Café has something to offer for everybody, the locals and tourists, big and small and everybody who is up for something delicious. GLUTEN FREE Crepes, Gourmet organic coffee, french pastries, desserts, gourmet ice cream, real fruit smoothies, milkshakes, fresh deli sandwiches and many more. When in the St. Augustine area, come visit our landmark and café. Sip the atmosphere of old world continental coffees and savor the smell of our freshly baked crepes. Open 8a.m. - 8p.m.

2600 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd St. Augustine, Fl. 32084 904-429-7153 jaybirdsrestaurant.com Serving great American food, fresh and homemade, for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner. Open 7 days a week, 7am to 9pm, Friday and Saturday night till 10 pm with live music. We have spacious comfortable dining rooms with a full bar and large, pet friendly patio. Come join us for some of our house specialties like Crunchy FrenchToast, our Breakfast Burrito, famous Burgers, Cubans or Cobb Salad. After 2pm our fresh hand tossed Pizza, Calzones, Wings and other specialties are sure to please.

n Donovan’s Irish Pub

7440 US-1 North * Saint Augustine (904)829-0000 DonovansIrishPub.com “If you walk in as a stranger, you will leave as a friend.” Stop in for an Irish feast of genuine Irish recipes, award-winning desserts, lunch and dinner menus, signature dishes, weekly specials, a vast selection of wines and beer and much more. Customers enjoy our surrounding TVS or hanging out in the adjoining Danny’s place for a game of pool or darts. Conveniently located near the World Golf Village, on US 1. We’re open 7 days a week from 11a.m. to 11 p.m.

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Join us on the water Drinks, Food & FUN!

Our New Sunday Brunch 10am - 1pm includes, Prime Rib, Crablegs, Shrimp, Unlimited Mimosa’s and more

Hurricane Patty’s

69 Lewis Blvd St. Augustine 904.827.1822

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Not the only water view in town...

...simply the most spectacular

904-824-8008 4100 Coastal Highway St. Augustine, FL 32084 thereefstaugustine.com

J oin u s at the Beach! Casual Oce a n ffrr o n t Dining L unch & D i n n e r Eve Everyday B r eak ea k f a s t o n t h e We Weekends

4 5 Cub b ed g e R o ad Cre sce nt Be ach, F L 9 0 4 . 4 7 1 . 8 7 0 0 • so u t h be ach gr ill. net volume 8

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by Chef Sheery Gaynor photos by Tammy Harrow

Sandwich…Unwrapped

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efore you write that back-to-school grocery list, rethink it. Consider your audience. Our country, including and especially, generation Z children, born between 1995 and 2012, are gourmet. Gone are the days of bologna and white bread, unless it’s “baby bologna” or some other specialty import, and the white bread is an artisan variety. Let’s recognize and honor this progressive change and developed palate in our youth and in our culture. Not only can you encourage healthy eating patterns by making this change; but, include your kids in the menu planning and you’ll be amazed at what they create. By definition, a sandwich consists of 4 components: bread, spread, filling, and garnish, each serving an important function and purpose. Maximize your creativity in creating a sandwich by not limiting yourself in varieties of each component while including each component in your delicious handheld creations. The purpose of the bread is to house the sandwich; match sturdy and strongflavored fillings with hearty bread. When time allows, make your own bread, it is a lovely Sunday activity and there is something so wholesome about freshly made bread. Explore various options at

your local bakery and remember that, technically, tortillas, pizza dough, and crisp flatbreads are all breads, so wrap it up or serve open-faced. The purpose and function of spread is to prevent the bread from becoming soggy. A spread is typically some kind of fat, due to its capability in creating a barrier between wet filling and dry bread; examples include mayonnaise, butter, cream cheese, avocado. Choices for fillings are virtually endless and include any variety of meats, cheeses, bound salads, and vegetables. Garnish can be accompaniments to the sandwich or included within the sandwich for added color, flavor, and texture. Pickled vegetables, sprouts, or fruits serve this purpose well. Sandwiches left to right top to bottom: Caprese salad, peanut butter and strawberry preserves, cucumber dill, Gruyere pimento salad, California style black pepper turkey and Swiss, goat cheese and roasted pepper, caramelized onion, Brie, and apple, almond butter and boysenberry preserves, caramelized onion, Prosciutto, Brie, arugula, and roasted tomato


recipe

Caprese Salad Sandwich

Hearty bread, brushed with olive oil and lightly toasted Fresh tomato slices Fresh buffalo mozzarella slices Salt and white pepper to taste Fresh basil leaves Drizzle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar (not included in photograph)

Gruyere Pimento Salad Sandwich

Any variety of bread 2 oz. Gruyere cheese 1-2 Tbsp. red bell pepper, roasted, peeled, seeded, diced Salt and white pepper to taste 1. Roast whole pepper in 500ËšF oven until completely black, turning occasionally OR place pepper in hot skillet with tiny drizzle of oil and cook each side until black OR place over open flame of grill or open-flame burner and turn, until completely black. 2. Remove pepper from heat and place in a bowl, cover immediately air-tight with plastic and rest for about 5 minutes. 3. Peel black outer skin from pepper, then remove stem and seeds. 4. Dice or slice peppers as needed. 5. Shred Gruyere cheese. 6. Mix diced, roasted red peppers with cheese and mayonnaise until you reach a spreadable consistency.

Hearty variety of bread, brushed with olive oil and lightly toasted 1-2 oz. sliced, caramelized Vidalia onion 1-2 oz. Brie cheese, sliced Sliced apples to taste (Braeburn and Granny Smith are used here), tossed with fresh lemon juice 1. To caramelize onion, slice onion thin, lengthwise. 2. Heat skillet over high heat, add drizzle of olive oil, just enough to lightly coat the bottom of pan. 3. Once oil is hot, add sliced onions and season with salt and white pepper, a pinch of sugar can be added (optional). 4. Cook on high, stirring occasionally, until onions start turning brown. 5. Lower heat to medium and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until onions reach an evenly-amber hue. 6. Deglaze with a splash of apple cider vinegar (not necessary to caramelize onion, but works well with this recipe). 7. Assemble sandwich by spreading a layer of caramelized onion over bread and top with slices of Brie cheese and sliced apples.

Prosciutto, Brie, arugula, and roasted tomato

California Turkey and Swiss Sandwich

Hearty variety of bread, brushed with olive oil and lightly toasted 1-2 oz. sliced, caramelized Vidalia onion 2 slices Prosciutto ham, sliced very thin 1-2 oz. Brie cheese, sliced Arugula 1-2 miniature San Marzano tomatoes, roasted 1. Follow instructions in apple-Brie sandwich for caramelized onion. 2. Using the same pan, remove onions and cook Marzano tomato (split in half lengthwise) for a minute or two on each side to soften. 3. Assemble sandwich by spreading a layer of caramelized onion over bread and top with slices of Prosciutto, Brie, arugula, and tomato.

Goat Cheese and Roasted Pepper Sandwich

Cucumber-Dill Sandwich

Hearty variety of bread Mayonnaise and/or mustard (any variety) 2 oz. Boar’s head black pepper turkey, sliced thin 1-2 oz. Swiss cheese, sliced thin Romaine lettuce, red onion, tomato slices, cucumber slices, alfalfa sprouts

Hearty variety of bread, brushed with olive oil and lightly toasted 1-2 oz. goat cheese, crumbled Roasted red pepper, sliced Drizzle of olive oil and vinegar (optional and not included in picture) *Follow directions for roasted pepper detailed in pimento salad instructions.

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Caramelized Onion, Brie, and Apple Sandwich

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Hearty bread Cream cheese, mixed with fresh chopped dill, salt and white pepper to taste English cucumbers, sliced thinly and tossed with fresh chopped dill, white wine vinegar, olive oil

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Beauty Appliances

Great Gift Ideas

Dee Lexandra, PhD, MSW, LCSW

Certified Addiction Professional & Parent Coordinator

Practicing more than 25 years! Specialties: Relationships, Recovery, Military & Life Changes S.E.A., LLC, Individual, Couple & Family Therapy 88 Riberia Street Suite 140 St Augustine, 32084

904-302-7303

Client Centered Solutions Lead to Positive Change!

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The St. Augustine

Amphitheatre

Building of a philosophy, not just a venue

story by Ryan Murphy

A

while back when I first started working at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, a common question that people would ask innocently enough was, “When there is not a concert going on at the Amphitheatre, what are you guys doing?” I tried to always use it to spark a conversation about how the events and concerts themselves take much planning leading up to the day of. However, I began to realize that it wasn’t so much about what we were doing that I enjoyed discussing, but the possibilities of what we could do. It is now over four years later, I feel that we are beginning to truly see that. Opening the gates in the morning these days, I am usually welcomed by a variety of sights ranging from: early joggers who have made the Amphitheatre stairs part of their routine; children laughing as they unload the school buses to attend the children’s summer camp; a local coffee shop setting up to serve the long line of anxious ticket buyers who have gotten up at the crack of dawn to beat the “on sale” crowds; or even the random State Park campers who have wandered over to explore the trails surrounding the grounds. Lately, many mornings, it’s the sounds of trucks, buses and tour crew throwing open the doors of the loading dock in the early morning light. All these sounds and events have become equally welcoming to the staff as they arrive and begin the day; slipping easily into their respective roles. With all these events and interactions, there comes a common philosophy and approach to all that we do. This philosophy is what drives us, makes us happy and moves us forward. For us as a staff, it is all about the “experience:” a true and genuinely appreciated experience that spans from the artist, crew, fan, audience, staff and beyond. When I recently asked

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the staff of the Amphitheatre what it means to them, I get a variety of answers that all have a common thread. That thread is truly rooted in the idea that the Amphitheatre should be enjoyed fully by the community, the staff that operates it and all that enter its gates. It is these three aspects that we all agree upon as a staff and realize are mutually intertwined and necessary in its sustainability, relevance and success. The concerts and list of amazing artists that we have been lucky enough to host, is ever growing and becoming a matter of great pride. But we constantly challenge ourselves and strive to be more than just a place for the average concert. We have made a point to highlight and encourage the Amphitheatre as a community gathering place for workshops, speaker series, press releases, social gatherings and more. Events such as Pecha Kucha, the upcoming “Lost Skills” workshop series, EYC press conference, Night Owl Cinema nights, FOSAA Children’s Art Camp, chamber meetings, and so much more,are happening on a regular basis. I look forward to having myself and the staff write these columns in the upcoming months as I feel the community of St. Augustine and beyond will not only get a good inside view into how all these great acts end up coming to our wonderful town, but also all the work that goes into everything behind each event, and how the philosophies that we embrace as a staff carry through all that we do. It would be nice to change that question of “What do you do when there aren’t concerts going on at the Amphitheatre?” to the more appropriate question of “What don’t you do?”

59


August Sunday

Monday

27

Fall Out Boy Concert St. Augustine Amphitheatre 7:30 pm staugamphitheatre.com

St. Augustine Flea Market Open Every Sat & Sun 9-4

Lost Ships Tour at the St. Augustine Lighthouse Reservations are required St.AugustineLighthouse.org

03

2495 State Road 207, St Augustine, FL

Historic Weapons Demonstrations at Castillo de San Marcos

Sunset/Moonrise

10

Crosby Still & Nash

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 7:30 pm staugamphitheatre.com

2495 State Road 207, St Augustine, FL

04

0

23 Orange Street

11

Motherhood Out Loud at Limelight Theatre

111 Avenida Menendez Slip 86 2:15pm www.schoonerfreedom.com

11 Old Mission Ave,

18 3rd Monday Art & Merchant Walk

Bob Weir & Ratdog with the 24 Chris Robinson Brotherhood Concert

Historic Weapons Demonstrations at Castillo de San Marcos

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 5 :30pm staugamphitheatre.com

10:30 am - 3:30 pm nps.gov

31

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys St Augustine, FL 7pm

Labor Day Holiday

12

Aug 12-31 limelight-theatre.org

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys

19

23 Orange Street

St Augustine, FL 7pm

Starts at A1A Beach Blvd 5 – 8 p.m. 904-347-8007

Plant-A-Poem Workshop and Reading

60

23 Orange Street

Schooner Freedom Privateers and Pirates Set Sail

17 St. Augustine Flea Market Open Every Sat & Sun 9-4

2

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys St Augustine, FL 7pm

10:30 am - 3:30 pm nps.gov

at St. Augustine Lighthouse staugustinelighthouse.org

The Gallery Cafe 1:45-3pm bodor.org

28

Tuesday

25

Kayaking - Old Florida 26 Faver-Dykes State Park Faver-Dykes State Park 9:30am rippleeffectecotours.com

01

02 Educator Appreciation Days at Ripley’ Believe It or Not!

Sep 2- Oct 19 19 San Marco Avenue facebook.com/staugustineripley

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05

2

9

City Calendar 2014 For a complete listing of area events, go to OldCityLife.com

Wednesday

’s

30

The Soulshine Tour Michael Franti & Spearhead’s first-ever music & yoga tour

06

Movies by the Bay

St. Augustine Municipal Marina FREE Every Wednesday June 11-Aug 13 830pm facebook.com/saintaugustineripleys

13

Maritime Heritage Foundation Gathering St. Augustine Yacht Club 5:30pm staugmaritimeheritage.org

20

Music By the Sea Concert Series St. Augustine Beach Pavillion 7-9pm thecivicassociation.org

27

St. Augustine Beach Pavillion 7-9pm thecivicassociation.org

75 King Stree 10am lightnermuseum.org

ys

31

Navigating By Sail Schooner Freedom

07

111 Avenida Menendez Slip 86 12:15pm www.schoonerfreedom.com

Concerts In the Plaza

14

21

03

Open Mic Night 28 at Trade Winds Lounge 124 Charlotte Street 5-9pm tradewindslounge.com

1st Friday Artwalk, Downtown St. Augustine

01

Meet The Treasure Hunters

St. Augustine Pirate and Treaure Museum 6-8PM thepiratemuseum.com

Marineland Full Moon Kayak Tour

08

22

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 6 :30pm staugamphitheatre.com

Ponte vedra Concert hall 7pm pvconcerthall.com

3PM-Dusk 260 Vilano Road vilanobeachfl.com

2014 Full Moon Offshore Race St. Augustine Yacht Club

09

Second Saturday Plant Sale

15

Beres Hammond Concert

02

Washington Oaks Gardens State Park 10am-2pm floridastateparks.org/washingtonoaks

20th International Skimboard Tournament

The Fresh Beat Band

Sunset Celebration at Vilano Beach Town Center

staugustineyachtclub.com

50 of the world’s best skim boarders compete in one of the sport’s major events. Vilano Beach - St. Augustine skimzone.com/vilano-beach.html

Plaza De La Constitucion 7-9pm plazaconcerts.com

Open Mic Night at Trade Winds Lounge

Saturday

101 Tolstoy Lane 7pm rippleeffectecotours.com

124 Charlotte Street 5-9pm tradewindslounge.com

Music By the Sea Concert Series

Lightner Museum Curator Tours

Gavin DeGraw and Matt Nathanson Concert

Friday

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 6 pm staugamphitheatre.com

St. Augustine Amphitheatr 6pm StAugAmphitheatre.com

6

2

Thursday

29

Old City Farmers Market

St. Augustine Amphitheatre 8:30 am - 12:30 pm

16

“Journey to the South Pacific” at the IMAX Theater World Golf Hall of Fame WorldGolfIMAX.com

Seminole War Commemoration 23 St. Francis Barracks 9am 904-940-0932

Uptown Saturday Night San Marco Avenue 5-9pm 904-823-9263

30

The Downtown Bazaar

Colonial Quarter • 33 St George St 6-10 pm thedowntownbazaar.com

September oldcitylife.com

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worship Abbey of Castle Otttis (Ah-tis) (Interdenominational) Prayer on Sunday Mornings Adults and Mature Children only Vilano Beach | 824.3274

Chapel of Our Lady of La Leche (Catholic) 8:30am, 5pm, Holidays 8:30am, 3pm 27 Ocean Avenue | 824.2809 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Call for Services 500 Deltona Blvd | Shores | 797.4412

Anastasia Baptist Church Sunday 9:30am Contemporary 11am Traditional 1650 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.2166

Christ Our Savior EV Lutheran Church Christian Formation 9am Divine Service 10:30am (deaf interpreted) 21 Milton Street | Uptown | 829.6823

Anchor Faith Church (Word of Faith) Sunday 11am, Wednesday 7:30pm 1764 Tree Blvd | St Augustine | 797.6363

Church Of Christ Sunday Bible Class 9am Sunday Worship 10am, 6pm, Wed 7pm 2900 Lewis Speedway | 824.1800

Ancient City Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Sunday 10:45am, 6pm Wed 6:30pm Bible Study and Prayer 27 Sevilla Street | Downtown | 829.3476

Church at Vilano (Baptist) Bible School 9:30am, Sunday 10:30am Wednesday Prayer and Bible Services 7pm 121 Meadow Ave | Vilano Beach | 827.0477

Berea Seventh Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:15am, Worship 11am Prayer Meeting 7:30pm 151 M L King Ave | Downtown | 824.9145

Community Bible Church Equipping Hour (classes for all ages) 9:30am Fellowship Worship Service10:30am Wed (school schedule) Word of Life Clubs, ages 4 thru High School, Bible Study 6:30pm 3150 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.3875

Bethany Baptist Church Call for Services 5465 CR 208 | Bakersville | 824.5169 Bethel Baptist Church Call for services 222 Riberia St | Downtown | 824.5304

Corpus Christi Catholic Church Daily Mass Mon-Sat 9am • Sat Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Mass 8:30am, 9:45am & 11:00am 6175 Datil Pepper Rd | Shores Area | 797.4842

Bible Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am & 5pm 2485 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.3999

Congregation Sons of Israel (Jewish, Conservative) Services Friday 7:30pm & Saturday 10am 161 Cordova St | Historic District | 829.9532

Bridge of Life Christian Center (Full Gospel Assembly of God) Sunday Worship 10:30am Wed 6:30pm Bible Study Lewis Point Plaza | 797.0669

Crescent Beach Baptist Church Sunday School Bible Fellowship 9:30am Worship 11am, Sunday Worship 6pm 885 SR 206 E | St Augustine | 794.7777

Cathedral-Basilica Parish (Catholic) Saturday Vigil Mass 5pm Sunday Masses 7am, 9am &11am, 5pm Daily Mass 7am Monday - Saturday 38 Cathedral PL | Historic Distict | 824.2806

Dawson Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Sunday School 9:30am, Sunday Worship 110am, Bible Study Wednesday 7pm 225 N Orange St | St. Augustine | 824.8049

Celebration Church-St Augustine 10:30am Sundays St. Augustine High School Auditorium Childcare and Youth Services are provided 3205 Varella Ave | 737.1121 | celebration.org Center for Spiritual Living Call for Services 1795 Old Moultrie Road | 825.3600

Family Worship Center (Christ Centered Worship) Sunday 10am, Thursday 7pm 2040 SR 207 | 819.9970 First Church of Christ Scientist (Christian Science and Reading Room) Sunday School and Service 10am Wednesday Service 5:30pm 2555 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.8882

First Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:45am Monday Word and Action Bible Study 6:45pm Wednesday Prayer Service 12 noon 89 St Francis Street | Downtown | 824.6590 First United Methodist Church Sunday 8:15am & 11am - Traditional Worship Sunday 9:30am - Contemporary 118 King Street | Downtown | 829.3459 Grace United Methodist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 8:30am, 11am Junior Church during 11am Carrera St at Cordova St | Downtown | 829.8272 Good News PCA (Christian) Sunday Worship 9am & 10:30am Nursery provided for all services 1357 Wildwood Drive | 819.0064 Heritage Baptist Church Bible Fellowship 9:30am Sunday School 10am Sunday Worship 11am & 6pm Wed 7pm prayer meeting 1480 Wildwood Dr | 824.8888 Hineni Messianic Fellowship (Messianic - Jewish & Non Jewish Believers) Friday Shabbat 7:30pm Tuesday Bible Study 7:30pm 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 827.9731 Holy Cross Charismatic Orthodox Sunday 10am 110 Masters Drive | 810.0535 Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of St Augustine 2940 CR 214 | 829.0504 Homeport Christian Church Sundays 9am Traditional 10:45am Contemporary Wednesday 6:30pm 5605 US 1 S | St Augustine South | 797.8921 Hurst Chapel AME Church (Methodist) Call for Services 28-1/2 Bernard St | Downtown | 824.0500 Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall South Cong.- Sunday 4pm & Thur 7:30pm North Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Wed 7:30pm East Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Thursday 7:30pm 735 Kings Estate Rd | 797.7599 Lighthouse Church of God Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening 6pm, Wed Evening 7pm 1230 Kings Estate Road | 797.6996

Helping Families and Friends Honor Their Loved One We will assist in every aspect of the funeral or cremation service. As St. Augustine’s only full service funeral home and cemetery, we can handle all the details for you. “Four generations of the Craig family Just one call - one location!

serving the areas families”

1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com 62

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Mc Dowell Baptist Church 16 Bayview Drive | St Augustine Call for Services 829-8388 Memorial Lutheran Church of the Martyrs Sunday School Sundays Traditional 8am Contemporary 10:30am 3375 US 1 South | 797.4377 Memorial Presbyterian Church Sunday 8:30am Informal, 9:30am Church School 10:50am Pipe Organ Prelude, 11am Worship 36 Sevilla St | Historic District | 829.6451 Mill Creek Baptist Church Sunday Bible Service 10am, Sunday Worship 11am, 6:30pm, Wed 7pm 6019-A State Rd. 16 | Mill Creek | 940.3130

Saint Photios National Shrine (Greek Orthodox) Monday - Saturday, Sunday Service Friday 11am 41 St George St | St Augustine | 829.8205 San Sebastian Catholic Church Saturday Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Masses 8am,10am, 12 noon Spanish Daily Mass 8am Tues - Friday 1112 SR 16 | 824.6625 Seventh - Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:30am, Worship 11am 555 State Road 16 | St Augustine | 824.5855 Shiloh Baptist Church Call for Services 271 West King St | Downtown | 824.3913

1475 Old Dixie Highway • St. Augustine Tabernacle Baptist Church Call for Services (904) 824-1672 280 Duval St | aigFuner DowntownalHome.com | 829.2041 www.Cr

Temple Bet Yam (Jewish Reform) Services First and Third Friday 7:30pm 2055 Wildwood Rd | St Augustine | 819.1875 The Village Church (Interdenominational) Bible School 9:00am Services 9am & 11am, Children’s 11am Adult Bible Study 10am, Youth 5pm 4225 Pacetti Rd | World Golf Village | 940.6768

Miracle Center Ministries (Non-Denominational) Sunday 10:30am 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 824.9673

Saint Augustine Shores United Methodist Church Sunday School 10am, Traditional 9am Contemporary 11am 724 Shores Blvd | St Augustine Shores | 797.4416

Moultrie Baptist Church Sunday School 9:45am Service 11am, 6pm, Wed 6:30pm 3699 US 1 S | Moultrie Creek | 797.9005

Saint Cyprian’s Episcopal Church Sunday Holy Eucharist 10am Third Sunday 5:30pm 37 Lovett Street | 829.8828

New Life Baptist Church Call for Service Times 346 Varella Avenue • Near SR 16 | 823.9537

Saint Francis In-the-Field Episcopal Church 9am, Sunday 10am 895 Palm Valley Rd | Ponte Vedra | 543.0112

Turning Point at Calvary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:40am Worship 9:40am, 11am, 6pm 3500 SR 16 • 829.9795

New Saint James Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am 135 Rodriquez Street | 824.6500

Saint Luke AME Church African Methodist Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 11am 694 W Pearl St | Downtown | 824.6120

Unitarian-Universalists Fellowship of St. Augustine Sunday 10:30am 2487 A1A South | St Augustine | 471.2047

Saint Mary’s Baptist Church Call for Services 69 Washington St | Downtown | 824.1314

Wards Creek Baptist Church Sunday Services 7am, 10:45am 7pm Home Bible Studies Wednesday Youth 6pm - Service 7pm 7730 County Rd 13 N | Wards Creek | 522.0128

Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church Saturday Vigil 4:00pm Sunday masses 8am, 10am, 12 noon Daily mass Tue 8:15am, Thurs 8:15am 5950 SR 16 | 824.8688 Pentecostal Fellowship Center Church Sunday Schoool 10:00am Worship 11am, 6pm | Youth Thursday 5:30pm 1065 Kings Estate Rd | Kings Estates | 797.6040

Saint Paul AME Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship Services 10:45am Bible Study Wednesday 6pm 85 ML King Avenue | 829.3918

Trinity Episcopal Parish Holy Eurcharist 7:30, 9am Family Service & 11:15am Wednesday 10am Holy Eurcharist and Healing Service followed by Bible Study 215 St. George St | Historic District | 824.2876

Zion Baptist Church Call for Services 94 Evergreen Ave | St Augustine | 826.1424

Pilgrim Church (United Church of Christ) Service Sunday 10am 5880 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.5187 Radiant Family Church Sunday Worship 10:45am, Wednesday 6:30pm 1515 CR 210 | 808.7390 Saint Anastasia Catholic Church Saturday 4pm, Sunday 8am & 10:30am Daily Mass 9am Monday-Friday 5205 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.5364

“Our Family Serving Your Family Since 1915” 4th Generation

1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com volume 8

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NORTH of The Plaza 1. LOVE’S ART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE 2. TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE 3. ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105 4. METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET 5. HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET 6. THE STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET 7. #7 ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

SOUTH of The Plaza 8. GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET 9. BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET 10. PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET 11. AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET 12. GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET 13. JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET 14. AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET 15. PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET 16. ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET 17. LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1 18. GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET 19. GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY: 49 KING STREET 20. SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET 21. ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET

Art Galleries of St. Augustine is an association of many diverse and eclectic galleries located in the city. From local artist owned businesses to exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer collections of local, regional, national and facebook.com/artgalleriesofstagustine international artists.

EAST of Downtown 22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH: 370-A A1A BEACH BLVD. 24. ISLAND FRAMERS AND GALLERY: 4106 A1A SOUTH

The ART GALLLERIES of St. Augustine is an association of the many diverse and eclectic art galleries located in the nation’s oldest city. From local artist-owned businesses to elegant exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer outstanding collections of local, regional, national and international artists.

WEST of The Plaza 25. LIGHTNER MUSEUM: 75 KING STREET 26. CRISP-ELLERT ART MUSEUM: 48 SEVILLA STREET 27. 130 king fine art: 130 KING STREET 28. BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY: 137A KING STREET. 29. space:eight: 228 W.KING ST.

FIRST FRIDAY 5-9 PM On the first Friday of each month the galleries offer new art exhibits and lively receptions to the public. Start your FREE self-guided tour at any of the Art Galleries, most within walking distance to each other. Hop aboard the FREE Art Walk trolley that runs throughout downtown. For more info, visit us www.ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

NORTH OF THE PLAZA 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

LOVE’S ART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE   ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105   METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET    HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET THE STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET  ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

SOUTH OF THE PLAZA 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET  AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET  ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET . LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1  GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET   GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY:  49 KING STREET SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET    ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET 

EAST OF DOWNTOWN 64

22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH:370A  A1A BEACH BLVD.

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FACEBOOK.COM/ARTGALLERIESOFSTAUGUSTINE


GALLERIES 904.824.8460 • amiroartandfound.com

11C Aviles Street • 904.823.8608

904.826.8530 • flagler.edu/crispellert

904-825-4577 • ButterfieldGarage.com

904.827.9997 • simplegestures@live.com

ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

904.342.2186 • GeorgiaNickGallery.com

904.824.6322 • metalartzgifts.com

P.A.S t . A Art Gal l er y

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904.824.0251 • pastaartgallery.net

904.829.5003 • NeffJewelers.com

904.827.1899 • ArtfullyGraceGallery.com

904.829.6880 • grandbohemiangallery.com

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904.540.3661 • facebook.com/starvingartiststaug 65


Hot Shot Bakery and Cafe

Open for breakfast and lunch daily freshly-baked goods, coffee, catering and custom wedding/all-occasion cakes

8 Granada Street - Saint Augustine (904) 824-7898 66

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Drake’s Raid

art by Ashley Bates

Earns State Honors

“This is both an art and an archaeology exhibit and we are really proud of it”

T

he Drake’s Raid permanent installation of artifacts, unearthed below the north wing of the St. Augustine Art Association, recently earned state honors from the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation for the art exhibit. The Outstanding Achievement in Archaeology award was presented to the association at the Florida Trust statewide convention on May 16 in Tampa. In all, 13 projects in St. Augustine were recognized this year by the Florida Trust. The Association’s “Art y Facts of Drake’s Raid” showcases rare Spanish and Native American artifacts from Sir Francis Drake’s 1586 attack on St. Augustine and was recognized for its significance in preserving Florida’s heritage. The Florida Trust for Historic Preservation advocates for legislation and funding in support of historic preservation on behalf of Florida’s many historic sites, museums and parks. Elyse Brady, administrator for the St. Augustine Art Association, accepted the award, along with Stanford Adams, the exhibit curator and builder. “It’s a very prestigious award and we are honored to be recognized, especially given that this was a state wide award and so to be given the top award in this category is an accomplishment,” Brady said. “This is both an art and an archaeology exhibit and we are really proud of it; we worked very hard to try and tell the story in a very unique way.” City archaeologist Carl Halbirt discovered the Drake’s Raid artifacts in 1998 prior to the construction of the new wings of the art association. Halbirt unearthed an undisturbed collection of 16th-century pottery, building materials, a sewing needle and other items buried in a layer of burned charcoal just three feet under the floor. “The assemblage of artifacts unearthed at the art association is unparalleled,” said Halbirt in a press release. “The excavation was conducted under the auspices of the City’s Archaeological Preservation Ordinance, which had been in existence since 1987. The ordinance mandates that all new ground-penetrating construction projects, which occur within an archaeological zone and exceed more than 100 square feet in area, be evaluated for potential impacts to buried archaeological deposits.” The significance of the find, according to Halbirt, was confirmation of Drake’s Raid on St. Augustine in 1586, when the city was burned by the English expedition fleet led by Drake. “During this raid, the fledgling town was ransacked and burnt, with the Spanish fleeing into the woods. To my knowledge, this is the only archaeological example of this singular event that has ever been found. Plenty has been written that now forms the corpus of the

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historical record, but it is nice to have archaeological evidence.” Halbirt pitched the art and artifact exhibit idea to the art association several years ago. “(The) idea was to create a display showcasing this unique, to my knowledge one-of-a-kind, archaeological discovery,” Halbirt added. Featured art and artifacts in the exhibit include numerous Majolica pieces, a large reassembled San Pedro cob-marked Native American vessel, a touchable Stratigraphy Quilt, an original charcoal portrait of Drake and other artisan treasures. “What we are showing in this exhibit is how the cycle of creativity exists right here on this site,” Brady said. “There is this interesting juxtaposition going on where you see items of European and Spanish origin combined with Native American pieces that show the synthesis that was going on among the two cultures at that time. “One of the most stunning pieces in the exhibit is an original portrait of Drake that was created by Lisa O’Neil, using the actual charcoal that came out of the excavation,” Brady said. “Visitors can get right up close and personal with these 400-plus-year-old items and they can see the handiwork of the artisans of the past and see how they have influenced the artists of today, seeing the continuum of the creative process, that’s going on right here in this beautiful city.” The St. Augustine Art Association. located at 22 Marine Street, is open Tuesday through Sunday and is free to the public. In addition to the permanent Drake’s Raid exhibit, visitors can also see the popular Fifth Annual Nature & Wildlife exhibit that runs this summer through August 31st. For more information please call 904-824-2310 or visit the Website: www. staaa.org/ or Facebook page: www. facebook.com/StAAArt 68

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giving

Care for Our Community

Good Samaritan Health Centers, Inc. and Wildflower Clinic by Susan Johnson Editor’s note: One of the truly amazing aspects of our community is, and always has been, the commitment of professionals from all walks of life to helping those less fortunate. This month, we look at a special clinic, staffed by local medical professionals, to serve those who cannot otherwise afford care and/or medical insurance. We applaud the efforts of these, and the many other unsung heroes throughout St. Johns County, in their desire to make life better for those in need.

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he Good Samaritan Health Center offers free primary medical and dental care through the Wildflower Clinic, located at 268 Herbert St. in St. Augustine. Medical walkin clinics are held on Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings. Women’s clinics for needs pertaining to pelvic exams, breast exams, and PAP smears, are available by appointment, as are physical therapy, chiropractic, neurology, mental health, vision and dermatology clinics. The Wildflower also holds walk-in dental clinics on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. These clinics address exams, extractions and fillings. Dental hygiene services are also available but by appointment only. Certain dental clinics might also offer free blood pressure screenings, glucose monitoring and community resource information.

Dr. Christopher Zub is the Medical Director for Good Samaritan Health Centers, Inc. As an extremely busy physician, with a very succesful practice of his own, it’s only natural to ask “How does he, and the other medical professionals who donate their services, find the time?” “I schedule the time every week,” he says. “As a physician, I have a skill set that is critical, especially for those without insurance. What many of us don’t realize is that treating the medically uninsured has advantages for everyone. It takes a tremendous burden off of the Flagler Hospital ER. It also allows the patient to receive urgent care and follow up care, and cuts down on return visits for the same illness or for illnesses that have escalated due to neglect. Another often overlooked bonus is that a community whose residents enjoy optimum physical health has a much more healthy local economy as well. So, everything works together for all of us and all of it makes good sense.” A big surprise for me was the discovery that there is no Federal or State funding for the clinic. So, how does it keep going? “Our amazing and dedicated volunteers,” says Dr. Zub. “We honestly couldn’t provide this type of care if we didn’t have so many generous people willing to donate their time and services. In fact, I would like to take this opportunity to say a big ‘thank you’ to each and every one of our volunteers.” Good Samaritan is a 501c3 organization and gratefully accepts private financial donations, help with filling their wish lists and donations of time, talent and energy! Patients seeking medical attention must be uninsured residents of St. Johns County who are 18 years of age or older and who meet the financial guidelines. Those interested in dental care only can have medical insurance but it must not include dental insurance. Please call 904-829-1962 or visit www.goodsamstaug.org to learn more! This article is made possible because HERBIE WILES INSURANCE cares about our community, supports non-profits and wants Old City Life readers to be aware of the great resources available via local non-profit organizations.

Katrina Leonard & Dr. Christopher Zub volume 8

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theater

The Family that Plays Together Stays Together For Patsy Butler, theatre is all in the family.

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ctress and director Patsy Butler is the matriarch of a family full of drama queens and kings. Daughter Beth is the executive director of The Limelight Theatre. Granddaughter Rachel, an FSU theatre major, is a distinguished actress who has appeared in numerous productions at Limelight, FSU and other venues. Grandson Butler is a theatre major at Florida School for the Arts in Palatka and has played many notable roles at Limelight as well as his alma mater St. Johns County School of the Arts. Son-In-law Mark Lambert, a veteran actor whose credits include a fellowship at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and numerous leading roles in the Northeast Florida theatre scene, rounds out the extended family of actors. But this Alabama-native spawned another lasting theatre legacy in 1979 in her hometown. As founder of The Depot Players in Wetumpka, Alabama—a classic Southern Gothic small town that could be straight out of a Beth Henley script—she sowed the seeds for many acting careers, including that of her then-young daughter Beth, who literally grew up in the theatre. Since moving to St. Augustine eight years ago, she has continued to share her talents and vision. As director of “Seeing Stars in Dixie” at Atlantic Beach Experimental Theatre and “Steel Magnolias,” “A Raisin in the Sun,” “You Can’t Take It with You,” “Intimate Apparel,” “Picnic,” and, most recently, “Dearly Departed,” at Limelight Theatre, she brought her Southern sensibilities and effervescent sense of humor to the stage. Though she has essentially retired from acting and directing (but never say never…), Patsy’s recognizable peals of laughter in opening night audiences at Limelight Theatre are a reassuring prompt for both the actors on stage and the people sitting around her. “Community theatre gives everyone a chance to play a part. That’s the beauty of it,” Patsy explains. “You don’t have to have a resume. Everyone is welcome.” The Wetumpka Depot Players is still thriving and presenting its 33rd season. And with daughter Beth at the helm, Limelight Theatre is enjoying one of its most successful seasons ever (number 22!). And the legacy continues ... at a theatre very near you!

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by Wendy White Philcox

a skit from Limelight Theatre’s Gala salute to The Best of the Celebrity Cabaret. Photo credit: Laryssa Gobets

Karmic payback? Mark Lambert is mean as a snake to stepson Butler Robertson while playing Huck Finn’s abusive father in Big River. Photo credit: Renee Unsworth

The Queen Mother: Patsy Butler credit: Chris Philcox

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poetry

Ancient City Poets by Chris Bodor

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his fall, St. Johns Country will have its own literary magazine. The international publication is based in St. Augustine and it will be called AC PAPA, which stands for Ancient City Poets, Authors, Photographers, and Artists. The publisher of the project, Poet Plant Press, collected poems, personal essays and book reviews during the last three months. If you would like to find out more about AC PAPA, please email the publisher at poetplantpress@yahoo.com. The inaugural issue will be available in November and will feature a piece by Susan Bennett Lopez on The Kerouac House in Orlando where Jack Kerouac wrote his novel The Dharma Bums, poems by Robert Waldner and Ann Wood Fuller, and a haiku section edited by Michael Henry Lee, as well as essays and articles and photography from the creative minds of the Nation’s Oldest City. On Sunday, August 31st, you are invited to join the Ancient City poets for an afternoon of poetry. Poets and poetry lovers are invited to Plant-A-Poem with the Ancient City Poets at The Gallery Café of St. Augustine (1974 US-1 S, in the old Staples Plaza). Please resister at the door at 1:45p.m. There is a small $10 charge to cover the cost of endless coffee and sweet treats. The hour-long workshop begins at 2 p.m. Then, travel a short way up US-1 for “St. Augustine Speaks”, a community open microphone gathering held at City Coffee Company (1280 N. Ponce de Leon Blvd, near the Village Inn). Share a poem or two with a warm and supportive crowd, or just listen and soak in the spoken word scene. The readings are held on the last Sunday of each month and start at 3 p.m. and are held “renga style” with no emcee or sign-up sheet. The event concludes when all presenters have had an opportunity to share. For more info please go to the Ancient City Poets official website, www.bodor.org . This month also marks the five-year anniversary of the Ancient City Poets. The name was created in April of 2009 by Glenda Bailey-Mershon for a National Poetry Month event in April of that year. A few months later in August, New York-transplant Chris Bodor tuned on a microphone on the last Sunday of the month and last June the group started offering one hour writing workshops before the readings. These gathering would be nothing, if not for the many poetry lovers who have packed our local poetry places and spoken word spaces each month. It is so important for a writer to get their words “out there in the air” in front of an open and supporting audience. Through the process of reading out loud to an audience the writer gains valuable input and feedback that can help the writer fine tune and rework their written words. We would like to send out a big “thank you” to all of those who have contributed to the St. Augustine spoken word scene during the last five years. We salute you.

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TOP EARLY FALL FASHION TRENDS-2014 ARTISTIC, ORNATE, INTERESTING

fashion

by Aureatha Callison

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ho doesn’t love the Fall Fashion Back-to-School magazines? I used to, but now I find myself too busy to flip through 5 lb. magazines with trends that are sometimes too weird for wear. Besides, we live in St. Augustine, not New York City! Bringing it down to more realistic fashion styles for this fall, the look and shape is still very feminine and sometimes slightly oversized. I recommend finding your best shapes and consistently choosing trends that suit your body and style. I love to pull pieces out of my collection (like my vintage slips) and find new ways to use them with seasonal trends. Here are my ‘Cliff Notes on your best looks for a stunning early fall season. Color: Bright, bolds, neon and pastels Fun: You’ll see a lot of wacky neon furs-neon is always great for late summer evenings on the beach so your friends can find you. Powder Blue is emerging as the hottest pastel. Animal Prints: Remember, a little goes a long way. Place pattern where you want to draw the eye. Fashionable Sneakers: (instead of pointy 4-inch stilettoshallelujah!) and Lug Soles Favorite trends: Military, embellished Navy jackets & vests with pins, medals, lace, embroidered panels and gold accents. This City by the Sea is full of vintage pieces that can be decked out as layers for when the air turns cooler off the ocean. Along the lines of golds and laces, also add dresses, tops and coats with sequins, embroidery and mosaics. Turn Byzantine Queen for a day. Don’t feel comfy donning the royal robe and crown? Try an embroidered vintage clutch. Visually diverse prints, mosaics, windowpanes, graphics, checkered prints, paintings on fabric with faces or forest themes. Continue wearing: vintage slips, paired with woven mesh tights and romantic pastel sweaters, mini-dresses, subdued florals and elegant, layered feminine dresses and fringe...just because it’s awesome.

photo: Jordan Tan

Auretha transforms your image and your closet with love, laughter and Soul Style! Contact her at 801-694-8092 or Auretha@gmail.com www.Auretha.com

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last call

Know your Bartender Kevin Booth of the Oasis

Q: How long have you lived in St. Augustine Q: Do you have a favorite local band? and what brought you here? A: Ha ha, we have a lot of really good local The better part of 30 years A: I grew up in Bergen Co. NJ and also lived bands and musicians that play at the Oasis, I in Northern VA near DC for 14 years before would get in trouble if I just picked one. Q: Where did you get your start? moving here in the spring of ‘94. So it’s been A: In 1981 I worked for a restaurant in Fairfax, 20 years now. I’ve had family here for years Q: What’s the best thing about working at the Oasis? VA called PJ Skidoos, I started waiting tables and always wanted to reside here. there and later worked my way to the bar. Q: What is your favorite thing about St. A: The best thing about working at the Oasis is meeting a lot of different people from all over Augustine and why? Q: What is your favorite part of the job? the country, we have great regulars, live music, A: Being around all the people and basically A: Living near NYC and Wash. DC, everything plenty of big screen TV’s for sporting events is fast paced. Here it’s the nice climate, the and a great staff...couldn’t think of another helping contribute to their good time. place I’d rather work. beaches and the slower pace of living Q: What is your least favorite part of the Q: Where do you hang out outside of Q: What is your favorite cocktail to make? job? work? A: I don’t really have a favorite, I’ll make A: Having to cut someone off if they’ve drank too much and trying to explain it’s for their A: I work five nights a week, so on my two anything you want but we do have a great nights off, I try to spend time with my 11-year- tropical drink menu I put together recently, I own and others safety. old daughter at home. On my time off I also do take pride in making those. Q: What are your interests outside of work? enjoy cooking. I don’t go out as much as I used Q: Do you have a specialty drink? to, I guess I’m somewhat of a homebody. A: My two favorite pastimes are playing guitar A: A long time ago, I came up with a tasty and golf. tropical cocktail and called it the “Key West Rum Punch”. In 2000, Cheers magazine featured my recipe...1 1/2 oz. Captain Morgan Spiced Rum, 3/4 oz. Banana Liquor, a splash of grenadine, fill w/pineapple juice, shake and enjoy. Q: How long have you been a bartender?

Q: How about your favorite cocktail to drink? A: OK, call me boring but I’m a domestic light beer drinker. Q: Got a funny bartending story? A: I once worked at a bar in Alexandria, VA. A buddy of mine, who was also tending bar there had two regular customers who were cops that came in one day off duty. My buddy (we’ll call him “Sperm Whale”) decides to take one of their badges, walks back into the kitchen while it’s busy, holds up the badge and yells “IMMIGRATION”, half the kitchen staff ran out the back door, to the displeasure of the owner. Not long after, “Whale” was on a quest for a new job.

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people

Gratitude in the Nation’s Oldest City

Local Author and Fine Artist Linda Brandt

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by Chris Bodor photos by Mischele Miller

od’s gift put man’s best dreams to shame.” – Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Linda Brandt is a talented local writer and fine artist who has overcome an overwhelming amount of personal tragedies over the years. She is the only known adult survivor of a particular rare and serious brain tumor. Following surgery to remove the tumor, she contracted spinal meningitis and spent two months in hospital critical care. It was during this time, while inside an MRI chamber, that Linda had a neardeath experience of which she writes in her recently released autobiography, My Jonah Journey: Developing an Attitude of Gratitude. With prayers, the love of her family and friends, and her faith, Linda spent the next three years learning to walk again, to drive again, and ultimately, to paint again. “When we look at ourselves, we tend to surround ourselves with self-pity which leads to a downward spiral,” says Linda. “When I was ill, a dear friend said to me that it is vitally important that I keep positive images and positive people around me. Much like an apple tree, one cannot determine their life by one season. The next season can bring wonderful rewards.” Linda is certainly in the midsts of a vibrant season. She is an accomplished and award winning artist. Her book, “Henry’s Life as a Tulip Bulb” is the first release in the series of eight “Henry” books. Written and illustrated by Linda, her book strikes a chord with parents who want their children to look past problems and look forward to opportunity. Anyone who has experienced life’s difficulties in any capacity will relate to the story of Henry’s life. This message of following faith when we are plucked from our comfort zone is meant to be enjoyed by children of all ages but is especially captivating for seven to nine year olds. Having drawn since the age of four, Linda landed her first professional job illustrating political cartoons at the age of 19. By time she was 11 she was also interested in writing. “As the oldest of six children, part of my job was to entertain my younger siblings,” says Linda. “I made up puppet shows and wrote little stories to keep them occupied.” Although Linda has been involved in many art disciplines during her life, her writing has really taken off during the last seven years. “Henry’s Life as a Tulip Bulb” became a published book in 2006. The second Henry book will be out by early 2015 and is titled “Henry Goes West and Dreams Big”. Every artist knows how important perspective is in the composition of paintings, pieces of music, or writing. For Linda, choosing positive over negative is the cornerstone of her existence. “An attitude of gratitude has been shown to help folks heal faster, live longer, and create a better life for

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themselves.” Linda is an extremely active participant in the Saint Augustine arts community. Her fine art is on permanent display at the GNG Gallery on Aviles Street. She appears at book signings, and she reads her work at poetry readings. “Reading your work out loud to a supportive audience helps to bring fertilizer and water to the seeds of writing,” says Linda. “I see newbie writers, as well as seasoned writers flourish under the guise of writing and sharing their work.” There are big plans for Henry the Tulip Bulb. Henry has been written for animation and is part of a movie that has been scripted in a similar fashion of the 1988 film “Who Framed Roger Rabbit.” Linda has a “Henry A Team” in place to provide good orderly direction for Henry’s growth. The team includes a screenwriter, an actress, an actor, a casting agent, a musician, a financial agent as well as Linda’s personal assistant and her publisher and her publicist. The series of Henry books and the movie is their priority now. Copies of Linda’s books are available on Amazon or through her publisher’s website, www.innovopublishing.com. Information on Linda’s fine art can be found at www.yessy. com/Brandt.

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event

Mackenzie Weeks Comes Home for Fairytale Wedding story by Leigh Cort photos by J Photography by Jessi Caparella

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s Dallas Cowboy Cheerleader, Mackenzie Weeks and Miles Terry pledged vows at The Treasury on the Plaza during their fairytale June wedding, joyous family and friends knew Mackenzie had come back to her hometown of St. Augustine with the love of her life. She was excited to introduce her beautiful ‘old city’ to Miles and his family, as well as to their invited guests from around the country. The newly opened Treasury on the Plaza, St. Augustine’s exquisitely appointed Grande Ballroom and located in the heart of the City’s historic downtown, made it an enjoyable journey to plan and host the wedding. More than 250 guests assembled for a classic ceremony and meticulously glamorous reception. Making wedding plans long distance from Dallas, Texas wasn’t easy for Mackenzie, where she had recently finished her third and final season as a Dallas Cowboys Cheerleader. Living and working in Dallas, both Mackenzie and Miles felt their wedding would be a moment in time when they and their guests would always remember being a part of the City’s continuing place in history.  Mackenzie’s mother, Mary Lee Weeks and family were thrilled to learn about the opening of The Treasury on the Plaza. She knew that this splendid building was once the bank where Mackenzie’s Great Grandfather had banked during the Great Depression which inspired the family’s connection to The Treasury. Mary Lee beamed “Whenever I dreamed of the day that Mackenzie would be married, I always imagined a very elegant and dreamy fairytale setting.   But never, in my wildest imagination, did I ever expect to experience something that so completely fulfilled every wish I could have had for her”.   It was a night to remember. A partner in the stewardship of The Treasury on the Plaza with John Arbizzani, Brenda Bushell comments. “It was a gathering of the beautiful people – both inside and out! Mackenzie and Miles, with their families and guests, made The Treasury on the Plaza sparkle in celebration of their special day.” Article appears courtesy of the Treasury on the Plaza

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Photos by: Lura Readle Scarpitti

on the town FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK

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Photos left to right - Gloria & Calvin Fox • Joel & Mary Wood • Nico Recore, Roger Penny, Deven Dawson • Nancy Shaver, Jean Dragovich, Sarah Bansemer • Vincent Walk, Christa Gagliano, Billy Ford • Pat Kelly, Kimberley Kirby • Georgia Nick, Linda Brandt • Madie & Phil Martin • Alejaqndro Mallado, Jessica Clark, Victoria Garcia • Mike, Virginia & Ann Leigh Caruso • Donna & Greg Smith • Joan Trach, Anne Hlad • Erin Masters, Kelly McTaggart • Marianne Lerbs, Ron Zamora, Darryl Wise, Cathy Duncan 78

viles Street was the place to be as First Friday Art Walk was actually held on the second Friday of the month due to the 4th of July Holiday. The rain held off until as visitors and locals alike enjoyed a fun filled evening.

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CASINO NIGHT AT THE PLAZA

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his event was held May 16th at Treasury on the plaza to benefit Ayla’s Acres No-Kill Animal Rescue. Hosted by Cindy Williams and Eddie Mekka of television’s Laverne & Shirley, the attendees enjoyed Texas Hold ‘Em poker, slot machines, Blackjack, Roulette, and more. Ayla’s Acres No-Kill Animal Rescue gives love, security, & dignity to North Florida’s homeless and neglected animals through fostering, adoption, and sanctuary.

Photos by: Melissa Roby

Photos Left to Right: Eddie Mekka & Cindy Williams • Peggy & Ralph Molinari • David & Mary Mclean • Joyce & Bob Sikes • Kathy Kolatac, Vicki Perry, Vence Harbuck • Mia Martin, Karla Wagner • Lois & Bill Drak • Kev Lang & Ron Berben • Ellen Walden & Tom Gillis • Sandy & David Corneal

CONCERTS AT THE PLAZA

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he best way to spend a Thursday night in St. Augustine is at the weekly “Concert on the Plaza”. Bring a blanket or lawn chair and listen to some great music in a great place. The summer long music series happens every Thursday evening through Labor Day.

Photos by: LeeAnn Kendall

Photos Left to Right: Drew Munroe, Madison Loughlin, Drake & Alistair Munroe • Jake Rogers, Tim Colee, Jeff DaVega, Fred Schmidt • Baylee & Natalee Gibson • April & Peter Yungel • Jorge Selle & Carina Scotto • Sean, Ella & Jillian Preston • Ancient City Slickers

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Photos by: Lura Readle Scarpitti

on the town BLUEWATER JEWELERS

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Photos left to right - John & Debby Arbizzani • Dr. Jimmy & Karen Glenos • Kellie DeLamerens, Elena Laguardia, Angela Laguardia, Elena LaGuardia, Goar DeLamerans • Alison Johnson, Alicia Steinmetz, Leslie Berry • Megan Vidal, Todd & Heather Neville • Elaine & Don Gray • Don & Ashley Samora • Dr. Bob & Jane Thousand • Savannah Kehl, Mary Crutchfield, Kathleen Mather • Armand Busino, Arron Johnson, Robert Nettles • Iris Partelpoeg, John Burnfield, Troy Blevins • Melissa & David Johnson • Stephanie Lugo, Theresa Floyd, Naomi Conant, Tracy Lee

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luewater Jewelers hosted an exclusive “Forevermark White Party” July 18th at Treasury on the Plaza. The red carpet event showcased beautiful diamond earrings, bracelets and other diamond creations worn by the likes of Kate Upton, Katie Aselton and Gabrielle Union. Less than one percent of the world’s diamonds are eligible to become a Forevermark diamond. Delicious dessrts were provided by the Chocolate Turtle and coffee by Convive Coffee Roastery of St. Augustine. volume 8

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PALENCIA

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he Mahon Foundation presented the inaugural 2014 Summer Soiree, July 19, at the Palencia Country Club. The gala was geared to benefit Greater St. Johns County Foster Parents, Inc. (GSJCFAP), a non-profit 501(C)(3) organization dedicated to fostering a positive and supportive environment within foster and adoptive families. Established in 2013, The Mahon Foundation is a non-profit organization that provides financial support to aid the foster and adoptive families of St. Johns County.

Photos by: Lura Readle Scarpitti

Photos Left to Right: Meghan Hancher, Laurel Madson, Meredith Strout, Tiffany Trivedi • Steven & Carol Ference, Donald Hitchcok, Julian Chalfant • William Mahon, Corey Mahon • Katherine Pittman, Randi Mitchell • Kelly Vavra, Andy Kaufman • Meredith Strout, Dr. Stephen Strout, Johna & Bruce Beaman, Alex Ritter • Amy Gilland Mitchell, Michelle DeMarco, Carol Lahey

WOMENS FOOD ALLIANCE

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reasury on the plaza was the site of a Grande Event on July 8th. Attendees enjoyed appetizers, wines and desserts provided by Hilton Bayfront, the Giufted Cork, Becca Bakes Cake and Flippin’ Good Cookies. The Womens Food Alliance (WFA) cultivates and advances networking, education, and collaboration for women in the culinary and hospitality industry in the Northeast Florida region.

Photos by: Madi Mack

Photos Left to Right: Cindy Stavely & Pamela Ilaria • Colleen Messenger & Allie Olson • Sunny Montes & Rosaria Anderson • Sherry Stoppelbein & Nicole Franques • Monica Stouder & Jennifer Sureda • Leigh Cort & Rebecca Ray • Karin Sufalko & Jackie Hird • Hookey Hamilton & Debi Lander • Denise Jones & Janice Newton • Vickie Corder, Andrea Kinney & Jennifer Easterling

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Old City Life - August 2014  
Old City Life - August 2014