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oldcitylife.com

Volume 8 Issue 2 | FEB. 2014

“Tying the Knot” Saint Augustine style

Special Places to say “I Do!” Beautiful Custom-Designed Gowns Help Planning the Big Day

Far From Ordinary

The bold work of Don Trousdell

How to do Italy

...essential travel tips

Trussed-up Trunks

Vilano Beach Decorated Palms

St. Augustine’s Culture & Lifestyle Magazine


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2014

Castaway Publishing, Inc PO Box 35 St. Augustine, FL 32085 904.461.6773 OCL@castawaypublishing.com Lura Readle Scarpitti

Managing Editor editor@castawaypublishing.com 904-325-5930

Brian Hornung

Art Director brian@rockitinteractive.com

Diana L. Garber

Ad Sales Director oclads@castawaypublishing.com 904-679-1550

Melissa Roby

North Saint Johns County Ad Representative oclads@castawaypublishing.com

Distribution

Warren Macbeth Christianne Mcabeth Truett Yarbrough John Dattoma Publication Distribution Service Dominion Distribution

Old City Life Magazine publishes 12 issues annually subscription $19.95 | 12 issues

oldcitylife.com Follow us on Facebook Text copyright © 2014 Photography © 2014 Introduction © 2006 Locally Independently Owned and Operated

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the publisher. All material is compiled from sources believed to be reliable, published without responsibility for errors or omissions. Old City Life Magazine, Inc. assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photos.

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Letter from the Editor

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ear Readers,

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To use a cliche that certainly makes the rounds this time of year, love is in the air. It’s February, which means Valentine’s Day is upon us. A day when lovers, both young and old, seek to find that special way to show that special person just how much that person means. I have to ask, what better place is there than Saint Augustine to help a person do just that? Ambling down these lovely, historic streets, strolling arm-in-arm along the bayfront at sunset, enjoying rich food and luscious drinks in our fabulous restaurants, and sharing in the unique ambiance of the town with the one you love...these are just some of the ways you can spend “quality time” with that someone who makes your heart go all “pitter-pat”. Romance permeates every tree, rock and cloud of this place. It’s in our history even. Just ask Raphael Cosme. We asked him to let us in on some of the Oldest City’s tales d’amour and romantic places starting on page 69. I know, I’m getting all sentimental, but hey, I’m a sap. Ther are so many people who have met, fallen in love and gotten married in this wonderful city (myself included) that I can’t help it. I’m starting to think there’s something in the water! It’s no wonder that this time of year sees a lot of guys deciding to “pop the question”. The cloistered gardens, the quaint streets, the serene beaches, marshes, and rivers provide the perfect backdrop for getting down on one knee and... But once that’s done, there’s the wedding to plan. It’s one of the biggest events in a couple’s life and there’s a lot of pressure, mostly on the bride-to-be, to make that day one to remember. All that makes Saint Augustine special for lovers makes it doubly so for weddings. We have become one of the top destination wedding cities in the world and it’s not hard to understand why. Former St. Augustine Record Editor Margo Pope was gracious enough to use her insider’s knowledge to help prospective marrieds find their perfect spot to say “I do” here in the Nation’s Oldest City and her insights can be found in our special weddings section starting on page 14. A special thanks goes out to Daniel Thompson Bridals for allowing us to feature his beautiful creations, Ponce de Leon Weddings and Special Events for giving us the perfect location for our shoot, Blue Water Jewelers for their stunning jewelry, and Panache Salon for bringing out the stunning beauty of model Niamh Hart . It’s not all love and romance over here at the offices of OCL, though. This month we focus on the out-of-the-ordinary world of artist Don Trousdell, the out-of-the-ordinary palms of Vilano Beach, and the out-ofthe-ordinary tips for traveling to Italy (believe me, you need to know what author Tammy Harrow has found out traveling there herself-the hard way!). We want to make February’s wedding section an annual event. This year’s is only a hint of what we have planned for the years to come as the magazine continues to get bigger and better as time passes. For this one, if we helped one bride to find the perfect place, perfect dress, perfect...whatever... we will consider it a huge success! With love, Lura OCL

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12 beauty 14 the perfect dress 27 living 31 people 32 seen 34 wine 40 music 42 art 47 travel 52 calendar 61 finance 62 recipe 65 seen 66 poem 69 history 70 equine 73 seen

contents oldcitylife.com

Volume 8 Issue 1 | JAN. 2013

“Tying the Knot” Saint Augustine style Special Places to say “I Do!” Beautiful Custom-Designed Gowns Help Planning the Big Day

Far From Ordinary

The bold work of Don Trousdell

How to do Italy

...essential travel tips

Trussed-up Trunks

Vilano Beach Decorated Palms

St. Augustine’s Culture & Lifestyle Magazine

on the cover Any bride would be thrilled to say “I do” atop the former Ponce de Leon Hotel(now Flagler College), overlooking one of the most romantic cities in the country. Now you can by contacting Ponce de Leon Weddings and Special Events(904)826-8617

Photo by KATE GARDINER Dress: Daniel Thompson Bridals Location: Flagler College Solarium Jewelry: Blue Water Jewelers Hair and Makeup: Panache Salon Dress: Niamh Hart volume 8

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White Wedding

Dresses that is....

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An Old City Wedding

What to know and where to go, for that special day

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Living

The Searles design and build their dream home

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Far From Ordinary

Don Trousdell and his colorful works are in a class by themselves

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The Man & his Mustang

Cindy Norman returns with another story from the equestrian side


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enowned archeologist Dr. Kathleen Deagan of the Florida Museum of Natural History recently spoke to the St. Johns County Chamber of Commerce’s Tourism & Hospitality Council. The event was held on the grounds of the Fountain of Youth. Ms. Deagan shared photos, stories and information from over 30 years of archeological digs at the Foutain of Youth site.

Photos by: Melissa Roby

Photos Left to Right:Adam Shockey, Suzy Booth • Kathie Odonnelly, Dr. Kathleen Deagan • Todd Neville, Steven Binnager • Richard Goldman, Andy Witt • Pete Royal, Joyce Royla, Linda Allen • Jamie Shreeves, Ron Burben • Kathy Deagan, Kit Keating • Stan & Linda Taylor

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WEDDED BLISS IN THE NATION’S OLDEST CITY

By Joseph L. Boles Jr. pring is quickly approaching, and many brides and grooms are anticipating their special day in the nation’s oldest city. Unfortunately, if they did not start planning a year ago, maybe two, they are going to have a tough time finding a venue in what seems to be the wedding capital of the world. The bride that vacillates is often overwhelmed when picking a location. As the River House explained to me, brides start shopping at least a year out from their special day. Not to be sexist, but I was told that grooms rarely scour the area for the perfect location. So, throughout the year, we have a steady stream of brides-to-be, their mothers, aunts, grandmothers, sisters, friends and occasionally a pitiable father, having made the mistake of asking to be included. He will regret that request. We have stunning wedding venues in St. Augustine. I can tell you so because five short years ago my wife and I were married here. This month we proudly grace the cover of Old City Life. As a newly married couple, my wife Jane and I came down the steps of the church and jumped into a carriage, embarking upon what became the most magical tour of this city that I had ever experienced. It is an amazing city for a wedding. I have been on the Holly Jolly Old Town Trolleys, the ghost tours, the sightseeing trains and trolleys. I have been on tour buses, on bikes and walked every square inch of the town. There is no comparison however, to riding in a carriage on our streets. As you stroll through St. Augustine, and see brides on every corner, during the good weather seasons, I know everyone turns to each other and says “Awww, look, a bride.” It warms your heart. Unless you too have ridden in a carriage through the town, dressed to the nines with a glass of champagne in hand, you can’t imagine how many well-wishers shout, clap and wave, making you feel like the most important couple in the world. It’s like a Christmas, Easter and St. Patrick’s Day parade all rolled up into one. In this issue you will sees lots of advertisements and articles for wedding planners, caterers and site rentals. And I hope that as the more standard venues fill up, that some of our future brides will use a little creativity in picking the setting for their wedding. I’d like to see a wedding held onboard a huge barge in the bay. Can’t you just imagine the notes of Mendelssohn’s Wedding March wafting across the fort green? I’d like to see someone plan a Juan Ponce de León or a Pedro Menéndez de Avilés style of a wedding. A couple could build a scaffold alongside the statute, Ponce or Pedro standing between the couple while reciting their vows. How about a closing of one of our streets for a massive wedding block party, complete with pony rides and blowup moon bounce houses for the kids (maybe that goes a little too far.) I do like an idea that someone came up with the other day. To rent every carriage in town, picking up wedding guests from a downtown church and dropping them off at a reception area. Just like a medieval ball. Or maybe there could be a pirate wedding, where on the day of the reenactment some poor chap is made to walk the plank into the treacherous waters of marital bliss, present company excluded, as I have been in marital bliss since I said I do. I know I have been called the “entrepreneurial mayor,” and I think any of these ideas are possible, “for the right price.” But every wedding venue in town is probably a little difficult to make happen without compromising quality of life. I am proud, and excited, that brides and grooms continue to flock to the nation’s oldest city to celebrate the most special day in their lives. I just hope they return, telling the world about where they got married. And possibly stay a few days, spending a few vacation dollars on food and attractions. Anyways, have a great spring. I hope you personally receive invitations to attend many wonderful weddings in this beautiful town of ours.

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One of the newest and most exciting watersports gaining popularity along Florida’s Historic Coast Ž is Kite Boarding. In this shot, local Saint Augustine boarder, Eddie Toy rips, just off the Saint Augustine Beach Pier. Photo by Addison Fitzgerald

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Waterfront Properties 51 Water Street

There is something remarkable about the light at this storybook downtown estate. Located where the Intracoastal joins the inlet and ocean, these surrounding bodies of water make colors all the more vivid. All five owners since 1925 have been inspired by this remarkable Mediterranean Revival and the natural beauty around it. Cloistered in a beloved historic neighborhood, the residence offers 6,300SF replete with original detail. Make yourself at home at 51waterstreet.com. $1,675,000

1 Holly Lane

No expense spared, not a single detail overlooked, every inch thoughtfully considered and expertly executed by respected artisans - this multifaceted gem has a pool set in travertine, covered verandas and patios, a splendid courtyard wall around the perimeter, 300’ dock with lift, floaters and a most intriguing and compelling home which will excite your senses. Visit 1hollylane.com and take a leisurely look at the wonderful gathering rooms and the excellent master’s quarters. This tranquil harbor is 1 nautical mile from the ICW and 2 from the ocean. $1,795,000

1 Tremerton Street

A very special jewel in the downtown crown of waterfront properties, this Tremerton Street compound is replete with delightful surprises. From the street what appears to be a charming historic cottage gives way to a crisply appointed 3BR/3BA single-story home and a detached 1BR/1BA guesthouse with the Intracoastal Waterway in its backyard. Take a look at 1tremerton.com. $1,495,000

Irene Arriola, Broker/Assoc. GRI www.irenearriola.com 904.669.0691


beauty

Your “Beautiful” Day

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wedding day for a bride is usually one of the most anticipated and remembered events in her life. Much thought, from early in life to the moment the “I do” occurs, goes into making this day as perfect as possible. Most brides put a lot of attention into the way she will appear in front of everyone, and most importantly her new husband/significant other. I feel a bride should feel totally comfortable with who they are on the inside, and any facial non-reversible altering surgical procedure should be done well before the wedding, or even the engagement. A procedure should never be done in hopes to gain another’s approval or happiness. An alteration may lead to a change in feeling from either the bride-to-be or their significant other. It can take months for the final result to “settle in” and with any procedure, complications can occur. Time is needed to address these issues and allow healing time (both mental and physical). With that said, there are many minor non-invasive or minimally invasive procedures that a bride can entertain to make her ‘glow’ on her big day. These procedures are intended to soften and refresh ones appearance. They all have minimal risks, recovery, and usually are reversible (or with time will ‘go away’). When done professionally, these procedures will not alter ones appearance significantly, they just supplement ones overall appearance. Skin Care- a professional line, such as Obagi or Neova, will give the

by Dr. Douglas Johnson

skin a more overall balanced appearance and help soften unwanted skin conditions (oily/dry skin, acne, pigmentation-red and brown spots, decrease pore size, soften minor irregularities, and wrinkles). Microdermabrasion- a series of treatments that debrides the outer layer of ones skin and stimulates new skin cells. It is usually done in a series of five treatments, every week or every other week. Chemical Peel- this procedure can be done in a series of light peels to help overall appearance of skin. There is some skin redness/ peeling/flaking for a few days. Pre-conditioning the skin with skin care and/or microdermabrasion will allow safer and more predictable results. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL)- a series of treatments with no downtime or recovery. This therapy does much the same as a series of light chemical peels but without the skin redness/peeling. There is one treatment every 3-4 weeks for a total of 3-5 treatments. Neuromodulators- (Botox, Xeomin and Dysport). All of these products are effective in reducing lines that occur when one animates (between the brows, forehead, on the outside of the eyes, around the lips). They are not instantaneous, needing about 3-10 days to take effect.

Procedures Offered: Non-Surgical Ultherapy Botox, Dysport & Xeomin Restylane, Radiesse & Juvederm Fillers Fractional Laser Non-Surgical Face Lift Surgical Face Lift Neck Lift Eyelid Surgery Facial Implants Brow/Forehead Lift Dental Implants Aesthetician Services Customized Steam Facials Microdermabrasion Chemical Peels Skin Rejuvenation Analysis Available Product Lines: Skin Medica, Obagi, Neova

Dr. Douglas L. Johnson

Fillers- these products are injected under the skin to help replace loss of volume. They can help reduce/soften wrinkles and replace or enhance volume loss areas (cheeks, lips, around the eyes and mouth). These products do have an instantaneous result. Latisse- a product placed on eyelashes to improve the thickness, length, and number of eyelashes. I feel the objective of a facial cosmetic surgeon is to make a surgery as natural as possible. A wedding day is a beautiful event and the bride is the center of attention on that day. So, small enhancing procedures to accentuate and/or soften the appearance can be beneficial and pleasing and give one more self-confidence. It may be best not to want to change ones appearance drastically since the inner self is who your significant other should have fallen in love with and who he will spend the rest of his life with.

Board Certified Maxillofacial Surgeon Fellowship Trained in Facial Cosmetics

Harbor Island Executive Center 1301 Plantation Island Dr • Suite 101 • St. Augustine

904-460-0505 • www.FloridaFaceDoc.com 12

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The Perfect Day..

...The Perfect Dress

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s it a dramatic satin ball gown? Or a sleek, Marilyn Monroe-esque silk chiffon? Or a beautifully-detailed lace mermaid style? “That is up to the bride,” says Daniel Thompson, of Daniel Thompson Bridals. “If a bride comes in with her dream dress in mind, I can design it. I let her tell me what dress is going to make her feel most special, and then I set about creating that for her.” So, there’s not a “perfect” wedding dress. There is, however, a perfect place to showcase Daniel’s wonderful creations-Flagler College’s beautifully-restored Markland House and newly-opened Solarium, both of which have recently been made available for weddings in this grand ol’ house and hotel. The rooms take you back to a gentler, more elegant time and our lovely model Niahm Hart’s ethereal beauty certainly helps to make Daniel’s splendid creations shine.

Location Courtesy Ponce de Leon Weddings and Special Events Dresses Courtesy Daniel Thompson Bridals Jewelry Courtesy Blue Water Jewlers Hair & Makeup by Panache Salon Flowers by The Conservatorie Floral and Event Design

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Stylist: Megan Martin Photos by Kate Gardiner

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he exquisitely-detailed lace of this mermaid dress demonstrates the passion for working with this fabric that Daniel developed at the famous design house, Priscilla of Boston-his first job as a designer. “Priscilla has always been known for it’s spectacular work in lace, especially when I was there back in the ‘80s, and I have never lost the passion for that particular fabric.” This “love for lace” doesn’t mean that he’s not just as happy cutting out a dress pattern using silk dupioni, satin, silk chiffon, tulle, or any other fabric a bride has her heart set on. “I love working with them all,” he says. All of Markland House’s interior rooms have distinct personalities, which makes the venue such a versatile place to have your wedding, or reception, or both. The library is mysterious and masculine, while the aptly named “Yellow Room” is bright and cheery. Interestingly enough, they are right across the entryway from each other, making for a nice contrast.

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his dress is perfect for a more formal, elegant affair,” Daniel says of this A-line silk satin ball gown. “The crystal beading at the waist adds a lot of glamour to a relatively simple line and makes it a great dress for an evening ceremony.”

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omance abounds in this Southern estate home, which is surrounded by an ante-bellum style, wrap-around porch overlooking a lush green lawn. The Greek Revival columns at the entry way to the house provide the perfect setting to pledge your undying love in front of family and friends. And standing at the top of the steps in this strapless tulle ball gown will make any bride feel like Scarlett O’Hara herself. Fiddle-de-dee.

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The PerfectDesigner

ny woman walking into Daniel Thompson Bridals on San Marco Avenue can’t help but feel like she’s died and gone to wedding dress heaven. Immediately, you start running your hands over the luxurious fabrics; taking in the beautiful beading, embroidery, and detailing on the samples displayed around his understated store. For designer Daniel Thompson, they are really walking into his childhood dream. “I have drawings of wedding dress designs that I did when I was 4 or 5. I never wanted to be anything else. I wrote to Priscilla of Boston when I was in my teens, asking them what I needed to do to be a designer.” Following their advice, he went to design school contacted them after, and the next thing he knew, he was a member of the team. Decades later, and on his own, his reputation for creating that special, one-of-a-kind wedding gown has grown to where he now regularly designs for clients in Philadelphia and New York as well. To ensure every bride-to-be feels as comfortable as possible, Daniel works with his clients one-on-one, by appointment only, so that the design process, which can be very personal, isn’t interrupted by people browsing in the shop. Consultations can be booked by calling (904)217-7982. For Daniel, the goal is simple: “(To)make the bride feel as beautiful and comfortable as she can be for her big day. I make my dream come true by making her dream come true.”

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he Solarium atop the historic Flagler College offers breathtaking views of Saint Augustine from the terraces on either side of the main room. Imagine exchanging vows with the entire city laid out in front of the two of you. The venue opened only 6 months ago and it’s obvious why it has become an instant classic on the list of truly spectacular places to start a new life together.

Feeling like anyone else other than Marilyn Monroe would be impossible in this dress. Classic, simple but a bit sexy(but not too...), for the fun, flirty bride. “This would be a great dress for a beach wedding or something a little less formal,” Daniel explains. “Certainly a more mature bride would look fabulous with the daring neckline, crystal detail at the waist, and the beautiful drape of the silk chiffon-glamorous, just like the gorgeous icon that inspired it.” volume 8

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The Perfect Day..

...The Perfect Place story by Margo C. Pope Special to Old City Life

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hen home is Greater Saint Augustine, there’s no need for a local bridal couple to travel very far for the wedding of their dreams. In fact, couples come here from around the world to say  their vows  here because of the romance of the Nation’s Oldest City. Churches and social  clubs  will never go out of style. However, growing in popularity are beaches,  boardwalks,  grand gardens, historic sites, and golf courses, such as Anastasia Island’s Marsh Creek, or the links of World Golf Village’s King and the Bear or Slammer and Squire. The fleet of St. Augustine Sailing stands at the ready for sea-going couples. Even carriage rides. The key is what’s right for the bride and groom. It’s their special day. “Just about anywhere is a good place to have a wedding in Saint Augustine,” says Betty Crosby, a veteran wedding planner and officiate, who has operated Elegant Events of Saint Augustine  since 1994. She’s done the carriageride wedding, which appears to be just an everyday tour; in actuality, it’s a couple beginning their life as husband and wife while gliding through the streets of the city. Downtown’s historic atmosphere is always a draw. A welcome new addition to the wedding blissthe iconic Spanish Revival Hotel Ponce de Leon(now home to Flagler College), the 19th-century flagship of Standard Oil Co-founder Henry M.  Flagler’s hotel empire. Famous for hosting kings, queens, American presidents and other luminaries  in  the  gilded  age of opulence through the 1960s;  “How can any bride not feel like a princess herself in that rotunda and ballroom,” says Lindsay Ohlin, a wedding consultant with Coastal Celebrations. Spring and summer weddings can now be booked in the ballroom, the unique Solarium and  adjoining  terraces  atop the college,  historic  Markland House,  or the Crisp-Ellert Museum.

feel. The tallest building in the city, known locally as “The Wachovia Building”, will soon join in the romance. Its 1928 lobby, with its massive marble columns, elegant ornamental ceilings, was home  to  a bank(bank vault still intact), will welcome weddings  this spring to “The Treasury on the Plaza.” Attractions are getting into the wedding business as the demand for  destination wedding  increases.  The Fountain of Youth Archaeological Park  features a wide range of outdoor settings, often,  with the park’s  flock of peacocks  in attendance. Another group of unique spectators, this time famous educators, adorn the garden of the Oldest School House. According to Cindy Stavely, General Manager of one of the newest  historic attractions, the Colonial Quarter, popular sites there include the 18th Century Section’s Charter Oak; atop the  Quarter’s watchtower(with a view of the Castillo de San Marcos and the Matanzas Bay); and, the nearby St. Augustine Pirate and Treasure Museum. And speaking of pirates, a Black Raven pirate ship wedding is an event in, and of, itself. Just say “Aye do!” The energetic bridal couple(and up to 30 of their guests) can start wedding bliss with a climb of 219  steps to the top of the  St. Augustine  Lighthouse-well worth the effort for that 360-degree view of the Atlantic Ocean, Intracoastal  Waterway, and St. Augustine. 5-inch heels are not advised(for obvious reasons). “There are 100 weddings a month going on in Greater Saint Augustine,” said Kathy Catron, Communications Director for St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra, and the Beaches  Visitor and Convention Bureau. She goes beyond the traditional city limits of St. Augustine to include the  Ponte Vedra Inn  and Club, the  Marriott Sawgrass Resort,  and the World Golf Village’s Renaissance Resort.  Visit www.floridashistoriccoast.com where you’ll find a link on the VCB’s home page devoted to all a prospective bride and grooms wedding and celebrations planning. When it comes to weddings in Saint Augustine, our beautiful little town makes is so easy to say “I do!” OCL

Similarly, other Flagler-era hotels have been brought back to life. The Casa Monica Hotel and the Lightner Museum/ City Hall(formerly the Alcazar Hotel) offer timeless venues for weddings. The Rock Bridge over the Koi Pond in the Lightner courtyard has been a draw since Flagler’s time. Another Lightner option: the beautiful Amoré Wedding Chapel, operated by The Wedding Authority. Additional downtown sites include the city-owned gazebo in the center of the historic Plaza de la Constitucion(by permit only); the private gardens of the Gonzalez-Alvarez House – aka Oldest House;  the Historic Villa Zorayda(a 19th-century scaled-replica of the Alhambra in Granada); Fernando Llambias House; Peña-Peck House; Fatio House and the Government House.  All transport you “back in time”, adding to that special “Saint Augustine Wedding” 18

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Wedding Venues Amore Wedding Chapel 75 King St. St. Augustine, FL 32084 (904)826-0715   The Bayview Room at A1A Ale Works 1 King St. St. Augustine, FL (904)829-2977   The Casa Monica Hotel 95 Cordova St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084  (904)819-6006   Holiday Isle Oceanfront Resort on St. Augustine Beach 860 A1A Beach Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-2555   King & Bear/Slammer & Squire 1 King and Bear Dr. Saint Augustine, FL (904)940-6261 The Lightner Museum 75 King Street Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-2874   The Lodge & Club 607 Ponte Vedra Blvd. Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (800)243-4304   Marineland 9600 Oceanshore Blvd. St. Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-1111   Marsh Creek Country Club 169 Marshside Dr. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)461-1101   The Peña-Peck House 143 Saint George St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)829-5064   Ponce de Leon’s Fountain of Youth 11 Magnolia Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)829-3168   Ponce de Leon Weddings and Special Events at Flagler College 74 King St. St. Augustine, FL 32084 (904)826-8617  

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Ponte Vedra Concert Hall 1050 A1A North Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (904)209-0399 Ponte Vedra Inn & Club 200 Ponte Vedra Blvd. Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (888)839-9145   The Reef 4100 Coastal Highway Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-8008   Renaissance World Golf Village 500 South Legacy Trail Saint Augustine, FL (904)940-8635   River House Events 179 Marine St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)826-6210   Sanchez House 7 Bridge St. Saint Augustine, FL 32082 (904)571-3877   Serenata Beach Club 3175 S Ponte Vedra Blvd. Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (904)823-3368 St. Francis Inn 279 Saint George St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-6068 St. Johns Golf and Country Club 205 St. Johns Golf Dr. Saint Augustine, FL 32092 (904)940-3200 The White Room 1 King St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-9056 Treasury on the Plaza Catherdral Place Saint Augustine (904)217-0077   World Golf Hall of Fame 1 World Golf Place Saint Augustine, FL 32092 (904)940-4000

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ThePerfect Day..

...The Perfect Feeling 4 things to do to keep from putting on the pounds, keep the stress at bay, and own your wedding day! story by Kim MIller

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on’t let the thought of all eyes on you on your wedding day send a destructive cycle of poor eating or exercise patterns in the days leading up to your wedding. Know that even a few weeks of concentrated healthier eating and exercise practices will have you glowing; beautifully streamlined in the middle; and feeling great on your special day. Three Weeks Out There is no better time than now to own up to your vision of who you are. Implement the following eating, exercise, and guided imagination plan and be consistent in your effort. This stuff works. If you are a novice, keep a cool head and do the work. In a few days you will begin to feel the positive flow. If you are an intermediate or advanced, healthy eating brideto-be, keep on track with this plan. Attitude: Confidence with execution rules! Know that you WILL have a lean, streamlined waist. 1) Focus Daily on What You Eat: Increase nutrient dense foods. Aim for 6-8 servings of clean vegetables daily. Include crisp vegetables in omelets, shakes, roasted in olive oil, and as snacks with a high protein hummus dip. Increasing nutrient dense foods is a sure winner for slimming the middle. Smart Tip: Chips and cookies aren’t acceptable just because you had your vegetables! Attitude:  Stay motivated. Remember a small investment of self-control now will have a huge payoff.  2)  Cardiovascular Exercise 6 Days  Weekly: Include six-toeight 1-minute 90% effort sprints with a 1-minute recovery during a daily 20 minute cardio workout. Running, cycling, rowing, swimming, stairmaster, elliptical machine, even power walking will do. Smart Tip:  The consistency of sweating daily is crucial in reducing mid-section puffiness because it releases toxins out of the body reducing inflammation in the mid section.  Don’t overdo the cardiovascular exercise-it may feel good at the time, but often you justify not working the next day because you worked out longer or harder the previous day. Attitude:  He loves me for who I am, but I want to feel great and look the best I can for me! 3) Empower Yourself Daily By Eliminating Foods: Mindless meal planning and snacking takes away our feeling of self control, making us feel weak willed. Clear out the pantry and refrigerated of foods that are bad(yes, there are bad foods! Meal plan and take control! Smart Tip: Go fresh(veggies and fruits, lean proteins, legumes and fiber rich grains)! Most packaged foods have an abundance of allergens(soy, gluten, wheat, sugar) that inflame the body creating puffiness in the mid-section. 4) Daily take a few moments to unwind, decompress and dream a little.  Use guided imagery to contemplate. Envision what it will be like for both of you on your wedding day. After your wedding day?  And into your futures?   Smart Tip: Do not underestimate the power of imagination.  Take the advice of Albert Einstein, “Logic will get you from A to B, but imagination will take you everywhere.” Attitude: Dream a little. After doing all of the above, your wedding day will be lovely! 20

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ThePerfect Day.. The Perfect Skin by Amanda Alton

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very bride needs a plan to achieve your beauty goals to feel most confident on her big day. But when and how to start? Well, we’ve got your answer. 6 months out:  Set a goal for your skin. Do you want to change the redness; brown spots; texture?  Start on the correct pharmaceutical skin care line  to achieve that goal and personalized  skincare regime based on this acronym: G.R.A.S.S.(Growth Factor, Retinol, Anti-oxidant, Specialty, SPF).  Reduce redness, broken capillaries, sun damage and improve clarity withIPL(intense pulse light) treatment. 5 months out:  Consider getting Laser Hair  Removal to feel confident and care-free on your wedding day and honeymoon.   4 months out: Replace any lost volume or indentations in the face with Juvederm. This Hyaluronic Acid filler helps fill out lines and softens facial contours. 3 months out: Soften expression lines with Botox Cosmetic. Start using Latisse to help make your own lashes longer, darker and fuller-no need for fake ones! 2 months out: Have a Medical Spa treatment to revitalize skin and improve texture. 1 month out: Get a professional make-up consultation. For a soft glow, Jane  Iredale  mineral makeup is long-lasting,  lightreflecting makeup reflects light. Week Of: Have your eyebrows shaped by a professional to open up the face and enhance the eyes. Be cautious of waxing if you are using retinol. THE BIG DAY: Get plenty of rest the night before. Stay hydrated and hydrate the skin with the proper moisturizer. Relax and smile knowing you are looking your best!

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Salons and spas like Panache and Small Indulgences can fill all you and your wedding party’s beauty needs-from hair, makeup, skin treatments and more. Medical spas/centers, such as The Facial Rejuvenation Centre, Fountain of Youth Spa and Laser Center, and St. Augustine Oral and Facial Surgical Center can also come to your aid with a variety of easy and painless treatments and procedures so you can put your best face forward when you say “I do.”

Salons, Spas and Skin Care Centers Amanda Hopcraft-Makeup Artist 1829 Old Beach Rd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)217-4002   Blush Salon & Beauty Bar 1941 A1A South Saint Augustine, FL 32080  (904)471-6466 Debbie’s Day Spa & Salon 403 Anastasia Blvd. St Augustine, FL 32080 (904)825-0569

Panache: An Aveda Store, Salon & Spa 1089 A1A Beach Blvd. St Augustine, FL 32080 (904)461-9552 Philosophie 48 San Marco Ave. Saint Augustine, FL (904)825-2662   Salon Nouveau 206 San Marco Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)234-0262 St. Augustine Oral and Facial Center 1301 Plantation Island Dr. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)460-0505

Fountain of Youth Spa and Laser Center 5 Sanchez Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)819-1481

Small Indulgences European Day Spa 9 Sanchez Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-6220

London Looks Hair Design 132 Sea Grove Main St. Saint Augustine, FL (904)471-7770

The Facial Rejuvenation Centre 1750 Tree Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)810-5434

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Shine bright...

you crazy diamond!

By Nicole Nettles

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uying a diamond is a one-of-a-kind and unique experience. The “hunt” may sometimes be a little confusing, intimidating or overwhelming. These are completely normal feelings. However, with the right jewelry store, you should feel excited and confident with your purchase. Choosing a diamond is many times one of the largest, most significant and memorable items someone will purchase. Diamonds will not go out of style, fade, stop working or lose their flash like most gifts on the market today do. No one ever handed down a laptop or iPad to the next generation. Diamonds are forever, and here are five easy steps to help you make choosing one an enjoyable experience.

Jewelers

Videographers

Blue Water Jewelers 500 Anastasia Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)829-5855

Addison Fotographic Services Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-5308

Carter’s Jewelry 1021 A1a Beach Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-1023 Nettles Fine Jewelry 1811 US Highway 1 S Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-5565 Larry’s Jewel Box 2495 State Road 207 Saint Augustine, FL 32086 (904)824-3016

Step One: Form a budget. Most people have an idea of what they are able to spend...unless you are a very lucky individual with limitless funds.

Madalyn’s Jewelry & Fine Gifts 2510 US 1 S Saint Augustine, FL 32086 (904)797-9445

Step Two: Have an idea of what is important to you. Style? Shape? Size? Quality?

Joel Bagnal Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)7614-4706

Step Three: Pick a jewelry store you trust, and feel comfortable working with. If you do not have a jeweler, then take a little time to ask friends and family. Recommendations go a long way. Visit local stores near your home. Every jeweler is different, and each store will have its own flavor and style. Hopefully there will be the perfect jeweler in your area just for you. Step Four: Start looking! A good jeweler will help you determine the best diamond for you within your budget. Knowing what is important to you in a diamond will help the jeweler narrow down the perfect diamonds to show you. He will also educate you on the characteristics about each diamond and discuss the four c’s: cut, color, clarity and carat weight. They will also teach you why each diamond reflects light a certain way, why the shape or facets look different than other diamonds and why diamonds are priced differently. Step Five: Have fun picking the perfect diamond for you or your loved one. When you feel confident, educated and excited, the right diamond will stand out and sparkle like no other. Let this be a wonderful experience you embark on with a local jeweler. The wonderful advantage of purchasing from a local jeweler is growing a relationship with someone you trust and can continue to go to with questions, repairs, purchases and more. A quality local jeweler will provide customer service that far surpasses the internet and box stores. Shine bright you crazy diamond and good luck! 22

Griffin Productions 128 Terrapin Rd. Saint Augustine, FL 32086 (904)794-1112 Life and Love Studio 40 Grove Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)687-3437

Invitations Lemonlark 135 Jenkins Street Saint Augustine, FL 32086 (904)829-5256 The Conservatorie Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)829-1129

Sterry Piano Company Themed & Wedding Event Rentals St. AuguStine, FloridA

904-829-9829

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ThePerfectDay..

The Perfect Way

by Ari Sufalko

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or centuries little girls have dreamed of their wedding day. A charming prince, an elegant carriage, singing and dancing and guests engulfed in music and flowers. The reality of modern society changes the scene. Nowadays it’s budgets and timelines, venues and contractors, and a zillion other things that need attention. While we struggle to cling to the romance of true and everlasting love, the hard truth is that the key to a successful wedding day is buried deep in the details. A few helpful suggestions will help you make your day the special one you envision. First, take a deep breath and relax. As important as all this planning is, it’s not more important than your relationship with your future spouse, your family or your friends. Surround yourself with experts. If you can afford to hire a wedding planner, do it, but remember that friends and family who have planned weddings can also be a great resource. At the end of the day, your opinion is the only one that counts. Make sure you hire the right vendors. Choosing the right people to insure that your event is the all you dreamed it could be is vitally important. Beware of the pushy would-be catering chef. “Oh I can handle that,” are famous last words from dozens of cooks whose idea of gourmet is putting catchup and mustard in small dishes alongside their grilled hamburgers. Saint Augustine is blessed with a wealth of restaurants and caterers to meet your individual style: The Raintree, The Tasting Room, Sunset Grille, The Bistro at Culinary Arts, La Pentola, South Beach Grill, Marsh Creek and The Reef all excel in exceeding your expectations for your special event.

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Restaurants/Caterers A Step Above Catering Company Saint Augustine, FL 32095 (904)814-4383 A1A Ale Works Catering and Private Dining 1 King St., Suite 101 Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)466-0103 Amici 19158 A1A South Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)461-0102 The Bistro at Culinary Arts Outfitters 9E South Dixie Highway Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)829-272 Coquina Beach Surf Club 451 A1A Beach Blvd, Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-2434

Marsh Creek Country Club 169 Marshside Dr. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)461-1101 O.C. Whites 118 Avenida Menendez Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)342-1159   Old City House 115 Cordova St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 904-826-0113 Pavillon 45 San Marco Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-6202

Holiday Isle Oceanfront Resort on St. Augustine Beach 860 A1A Beach Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-2555

Raintree Restaurant 102 San Marco Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-7211 The Reef 4100 Coastal Highway St. Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-8008

Jaybird’s Restaurant 2600 N Ponce De Leon Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)429-7153

South Beach Grill 45 Cubbedge Rd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-8700 23


ThePerfectDay..

The Perfect Picture

A good picture says a thousand words, but a bad picture screams them. This makes your choice of photographer one of the most important decisions you will have to make when planning your wedding. Many of the photographers that provide Old City Life with our amazing images, such as Kate Gardiner, Tammy Harrow, Justin Itnyre, Tommy Addision, Rick McCallister, Christine Cousart, and Melissa Roby, are also known for making your wedding and reception photos ones that you will cherish forever.

Photographers Addison Fotographic Services Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-5308 Christine Cousart Saint Augustine, FL (904)687-7700 Hookey Hamilton 172 Avenida Mendez Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)728-4957 Kate Gardiner Photography 900 Anastasia Blvd. Suite E-2 Saint Augustine, FL 32080 602-370-0794 kategardinerphoto.com

Dana Goodson Photography 701 Merriwood Ln. Saint Augustine, FL 904-635-2276 danagoodson.com   Life and Love Studio Saint Augustine, FL 904-669-8511 lifeandlovestudio.com   Robin McQuay Anderson Photography 592 Battersea Dr. Saint Augustine, FL 32095 904-540-4842 robinmcquayanderson.com S. Smith Photographic 135 Jenkins Street 105B-266 Saint Augustine, FL 32086 904-347-9257

ThePerfectDay..

The Perfect Bouquet

Posies or peonies; daisies or delphiniums; lilies or lilacs...wedding flowers are the what set the tone of your event and can make or break the decor. Places like 57 Treasury help can take any venue: church, reception hall, garden, private home, even the beach, and make it spectacular...whatever your favorite flower may be.

Florists 57 Treasury 144 King St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)827-1707 A Fantasy in Flowers 110 Cumberland Park Drive Suite 108 Saint Augustine, FL 32095 (904)268-7022 (888)725-2034 Flowers by Shirley 2121 US 1 South # 19 Saint Augustine, FL 32086 904-824-8163

Clubhouse settings almost as breathtaking as

Flower Works 510 N Ponce de Leon Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-7806   Jade Violet Wedding & Event Floral Boutique 1395 US1 South Suite C Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)415-2480 Lori Parker Floral Studios 3787 Palm Valley Rd. Suite 102-149 Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 (904)806-8820   The Conservatorie 900 Anastasia Blvd. Suite E2 Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)829-1129 Info@conservatoriedesign.com

t he bride

www.golfwgv.com/weddings | (904) 940-6261 | St. Augustine, FL 24

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Saint Augustine takes the cake when it comes to weddings, but don’t worry. There are plenty of bakers out there to make another one. Hot Shots Bakery is one of many that can create a beautiful, delicious cake...for you to smash into each other’s faces when the right time comes.

Wedding Cakes Happy Cakes 112 Sea Grove Main St. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-4163 Hot Shots Bakery and Cafe 8 Granada Street Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-7898 Sweet Weddings Cakes 144 King St. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)824-2420 

Small Town Cake Shop 1395 U.S. 1 South Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)826-3360 Sugared Bliss 35 San Marco Ave. Saint Augustine, FL 32084  (904)814-8035  

ThePerfectDay..

Siftin’ Pretty Saint Augustine, FL 32086 (904)417-8306  

The Perfect Plan

Idea of planning a wedding just too much to even think about? Ask any one who has done it: it’s a LOT of work. Think about it-you’re putting together a major event with many moving parts-catering, rentals, decor, transportation...and that’s just scratching the surface. It can get overwhelming and such the joy out of what is supposed to be one of the happiest days of your life. So why not leave it to the experts? Wedding planners take the worry and hassle out of your hands so that you can focus on what’s important-starting your new life out right.

Wedding Planners

The Wedding Authority 75 King St. Suite 114 Saint Augustine, FL 32084  (904)826-0166   The Eventful Gals 208 North Ponce De Leon Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904)201-1215   Coastal Celebrations 697 16th St. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)501-6493 (904)501-9020  Elegant Events 3940 Barbara Terrace Saint Augustine, FL 32086 (904)797-2352   St. Augustine Weddings & Special Events 135 Jenkins St. Suite 105B-318 Saint Augustine, FL 32086 (904)794-1725   Sun and Sea Beach Weddings 236 Huntston Way Saint Augustine, FL 32259 (904)201-9193   volume 8

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Music

CHILLULA Saint Augustine, FL (904)315-4505   Beachside Entertainment Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904)471-3908   ProShow Disc Jockey Service 1093 A1A Beach Blvd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (877)364-7332   Footloose Entertainment Saint Augustine, FL 32092  (904)854-8014

Rentals Taylor Rental Andy’s Taylor Rental 1005 Pope Rd. Saint Augustine, FL 32080 (904) 471-2991 Lovely Loo 1093 A1A Beach Blvd. St.Augustine, FL 32080 904.315.7027 info@thelovelyloo.com St. Augustine Rental & Sales 1589 Old Moultrie Rd. Saint Augustine, FL 32084 (904) 808-8380

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let us Inspire Your Surroundings!

Furniture & home DĂŠcor Bridal Registry Services and Gift Certificates Available

www.peacelovehome.net

904.217.4150

400 cBl Drive, Suite 101. St. augustine, Fl 32086 located in Cobblestone Village

Mikee’s

Frame Shop Moultrie Commerce Park

3440 US 1 South St. Augustine, FL 32086

Phone 904.794.9992 Fax: 904.797.9998

Family Owned & Operated David & Carol Kosko

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home

SaintAugustine

Living

Ecclectic and Classic Décor Goes to the Beach

M

y husband and I built a beautiful house on the beach after working for a year and a half with an architect to finalize all architectural elements,” said Barbara Searles. “We live in Denver, 2000 miles away from our new home, which meant added challenges. Our builder gave us Valerie Lee’s number and, little did she know, but she and her associates would be a large part of our lives for nearly two years. Valerie helped us and handled our project brilliantly.” Valerie Lee of Anastasia Design Group was referred to Tom and Barbara Searles via John Ruggeri Construction, the builder the Searles had chosen to build their second home. Originally from Denver, the Searles had vacationed in St. Augustine for many years and, after much searching, had decided on Sea Colony as the community within which to build their new home. Started in 2011 and finished in 2013, the Searles house took about two years to build and decorate from start to finish. Lee and her firm Anastasia Design Group handles all the decorating for Ruggeri’s high end construction, both residential and commercial. “We meet with the clients to specify their whole house, from the kitchen cabinets to their countertops to the tile,” explained Lee. “With some clients we can do it in the amount of time allotted because they don’t have very particular directions or specific needs. Other clients hire me to do more detailed decorating, which is what the Searles did. The

“The Searles Home” story by Barbara Hunt Hanrahan photos by Justin Itnyre & Zach Thomas

We will eventually happily retire in this home. “

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Searles wanted something more unique and different.” “Before we met Valerie, we didn’t intend to use her services for everything, but because she listened to us, and we realized our tastes meshed, she had a hand in every room of our 15 room house,” Searles elaborated. “She even went to the plumbing supply house with us to help pick out toilets, sinks, faucets and bathtubs. Otherwise we would have been totally lost. Never were our house plans far from her side when she talked with us. Her assistant was also a valuable asset in keeping all of us on track and searching endlessly for items we couldn’t find in person. Now that’s service!” “I helped them from the beginning, in choosing the exterior paint colors to the interior paint colors, the tile…everything. Then they hired me to do the interior design,” said Lee. “If you are fortunate enough to hire a professional to help you with the interior of your house, particularly your second home, it allows you to have a flow that you can’t duplicate over years and years of living in the house with the things you collect over time. If you renovate and decorate your home one year and then five years later you redo your living room, it’s not cohesive and consistent. That’s what makes a house that’s done from top to bottom look so great. It’s completely done that way.” “Valerie was patient, professional and possesses a unique eye,” Searles testified. “Our first sit- down meeting to get down to the nitty-gritty of our home came with me showing up with over a foot high stack of folders filled with design ideas pulled from magazines, design books, and pictures of ‘looks’ we wanted for each room and our outdoor spaces. “ “We do everything from the furniture to the rugs to most of the art and accessories,” Lee said. “New accessories are incorporated with the clients own accessories. The Searles travel extensively throughout the world so they are always collecting things. One of the things they did that started the entire process, the direction of the coloring for the interiors, was the living room rug. It’s got some great burgundy tones and other unique qualities to it. They bought in turkey and when they came back they said, “Oh, we bought a rug.” I said ‘OK. What does it look like?’ It was huge and I thought, ‘Oh my. I hope it fits.’ Fortunately it did; it fit perfectly! So that became kind of the direction. The styling kind of derived from that Turkish rug and the colors in it.” “Valerie took those one-dimensional ideas and helped us create the whole house look,” Searles added. “We even went to Turkey somewhere in the process and purchased a large Turkish rug (unbeknownst to Valerie until I sent her pictures). This rug 28

had to become the centerpiece of the great room, which she helped us turn into a gorgeous, yet comfortable gathering spot for family and friends. “ “In the Searles kitchen they wanted this very particular granite that looks like stones,” Lee continued. They wanted the whole kitchen done in that but it was just too overwhelming so we just ended up doing the center island that way.” Searles agreed. “Valerie also has forged excellent relationships with key partners in the home building process like the plumbing supply house, lighting suppliers, the builders’ subcontractors, etc., and tolerated my quest for a special piece of granite that I just ‘had to have’ for a kitchen island, which I’m proud to say we found and has become a great talking point when showing people the house.“ Lee observed that “people have a tendency to like the same tones. It’s interesting, though, especially when we have clients who have moved from up north or out west, they tell me they are just so sick of the darker warm tones and winter colors. Those are the people that end up going completely the opposite way. Their idea of beach décor if they have lived in Denver or Minnesota might be white painted furniture or palm trees so when people tell me they want a coastal beachy look I say, ‘Well lets figure out what your idea of coastal really is. What does a particular genre mean to you?’” Searles described that “Valerie also helped incorporate some fairly strong ideas my husband and I had about certain rooms

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and outdoor spaces, even incorporating some of our own beloved artwork that had either been in storage, or in our Denver house, and worked it into the already finalized color schemes throughout the house. Lee described her design style and philosophy as timeless and classic. “Even if some color waves are super popular, I tend to gravitate away from them. Having been in this business for twenty-three years, I have seen certain trends and color schemes become popular and then fade out and then become popular again. In this way, we get to see trends fade away and come back again consistently, so we try to do is something that we will still like ten years from now. Then we know that it is classic. We try to stay more with the classics.” Searles concluded, “Many of our neighbors, family and friends have been to our house and all they can say is ‘Wow, this is fantastic!’ My husband and I couldn’t be happier. We will eventually happily retire in this home. “

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Woman’s Exchange Luncheons at the Peña Peck House by OCL Staff

T

he Woman’s Exchange is pleased to announce its Spring Luncheon dates, which will be held March 25, 28th, April 1, 4, 8 and 11. These unique luncheons, held in beautiful gardens of the historic Peña-Peck House, 143 Saint George Street, are planned, prepared, and served by Woman’s Exchange Volunteers. Menus are set closer to luncheon dates and spots fill up quickly for these popular feasts. For a very reasonable $25, you will be treated to a delicious noon-time repast, which includes tea or coffee and dessert,(you may bring your own wine if preferred, which will be served to you by our volunteers), plus a $5 coupon to use in the Peña-Peck House Shop and Miss Anna’s Emporium. This shop features a variety of hand-crafted products made by women from across the country and helps to promote one of the Woman’s Exchange’s primary goals-to provide a place for women to market and sell their handmade goods to support themselves and their families. Funds raised from the luncheons also help preserve the Historic Peña-Peck House, and benefit other charitable efforts of the Woman’s Exchange. Tours of the Peña-Peck House are available after lunch for an additional donation. Another one of Woman’s Exchange endeavors is to restore the artwork in the Peña-Peck House. One of the first successes of this project is a landscape watercolor by Celeste MacGregor Burt, originally of Palatka, and an aunt of Anna Gardner Burt, the last owner of the Peña-Peck House. This painting, more than a century old, had suffered from the effects of sun, mold and time. After being de-acidified, flattened, matted and framed using current standards, the beauty of this painting has been revealed and is currently on display at the property.    Tours of the house, which run daily(except holidays), are like a walk back in time, revealing the history, artwork, and furnishings of the downtown landmark. Donations to fund continued restoration of this timeless treasure are always welcome. For more information about this project, or to make a donation, please email us. staugustineexchange@gmail.com

EMMA Concert Association & Flagler College present

Upcoming Performances • 2013 - 2014 Season

BUFFALO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA with Philippe Bianconi, Pianist

Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 • 7:30 p.m. • Tickets $35

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA SYMPHONY

An all Mendelssohn performance Saturday, March 22, 2014 • 7:30 p.m. • Tickets $35 KARKOWSKA SISTERS DUO Piano, Violin, and ... Humor Sunday, March 30, 2014 • 2:00 p.m. • Tickets $30 CAVATINA DUO A wonderful combination of guitar and flute Sunday, April 6, 2014 • 2:00 p.m. • Tickets $25

Purchase tickets online: www.emmaconcerts.com or call 797-2800 for more information Like EMMA Concerts - follow us on Facebook Children & Students with ID $5 - all Performances

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people

An Interview with Eddie Creamer

story by Rev. Bobby Crum photos by Christine Cousart

O

n an emotional morning, just two days before Christmas, Eddie Creamer sat down and shared his life story over a classic breakfast at Theo’s Restaurant on King Street in St. Augustine, Fla. Signs for Prosperity Bank, the bank he had been CEO of since 1999, were changing to Ameris Bank. Eddie shared his thoughts in this personal Old City Life interview. OCL-Tell us a little about yourself and your background. I am a 3rd generation Floridian, born and raised in Port St. Joe. My dad’s father was a fisherman, and my dad worked at the local chemical plant. I enjoyed playing baseball and football for the school teams. I started my first job when I was 14 years old. When I graduated high school, I moved out of Port St. Joe and attended the University of West Florida where I graduated with a degree in accounting. While there I met my future wife Julie, and we married in 1980. We’ve enjoyed 34 years of marriage and have two sons. Our first stop out of college was in Manchester, GA where I worked in a textile mill. We decided to move back to Port St. Joe, and I took a CFO (Chief Financial Officer) job at a small bank, which is where my banking career began. OCL-Tell us about coming to St. Augustine and Prosperity Bank. I worked as a banker in the Florida panhandle for 14 years when I received an opportunity to work in St. Augustine. Our first visit to St. Augustine was in 1997, and we immediately fell in love with the city. When I began working at Prosperity Bank, we had $70 million in assets and 30 employees. Fastforward to 2008 and we had grown to $1.2 billion in assets, 25 branches and 260 employees. We were a top 15 bank in the state. Then we had to navigate the recession which in reality was more like a depression; the only difference was the federal response. We were forced to scale back and as a result lost some jobs. It was painful to lose those jobs and see good people go. Today, we have stabilized and are profitable. Our merger with Ameris Bank officially takes place today. OCL-Eddie, I know you’ve been very active giving back to the community. I was a member of the Lions Club for years, and I’m currently a member of the St. Augustine Rotary Club. I’ve been active coaching in little league and am a member of the Cathedral Parish. I’ve been blessed to be on the board of trustees at Flagler (College)-Eddie’s community contributions are extensive. OCL-Are there some things here in St. Augustine that you’d like to see changed? I wouldn’t change anything about St. Augustine. Yet, (pauses)... change will happen. So, we have to manage the change so that the result is what we want. We have a great school system and government with great leaders. OCL-What would you like readers to know about you? I’m an avid runner. I’ve run six marathons and 12 half-marathons, and I plan on running my seventh in 2014. I also enjoy reading. My philosophy is that life is about how you treat other people, regardless of who they are. Fundamentally, my family is the most important thing in my life. volume 8

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Photos by: Tucker Joenz

The New Year’s Gala of Galas

seen

The Flagler Ball is widely regarded as one of, if not Saint Augustine’s most glamorous New Year’s gala. This year the Ball celebrated its 125th anniversary. The Flagler Ball takes place in the Ponce de Leon Dining Hall, built in 1888 as part of the Gilded Age gem Hotel Ponce de Leon. The opulent setting is ringed with glass windows, golden chandeliers, wall sconces, all designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany. The event raises money for the Flagler College Scholarship Fund, which helps offset tuition costs for many students with financial need. Photos Left to right from top: Nicole & Dave Gentempo • AJ & Gail McGuiness, Colest Kayall, Bill Douglas • Rico & Genie Phanhthourath, Barbara Berlin, Bob Silverman, Sean McQuade, Stephanie Steel • Alexandra Storfer, Tom Fichtelman, Kelly Thompson, Diedre Boese • Randy Propper, Holly Horner, Michelle & Harry Propper • Elizabeth Lemieux, Kathy Kolatac. Bob Kolatack, Vicky Perry • Barbara Bozard & Big Mac McDowell • Bill and Susan Abare Jr, Hazel and John Folsom • Faith Tiberio, Pierre and Shirley Thompson, David and CC Drysdale, Rebekah Drysdale, Sarah Breadwater, Frank Upchurch • Barbara Cone & James Banta • The Flagler Ballroom • Carla & Kevin Fisher 32

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wine

A Toast to Remember

E

by Jeanne Maron

very little girl’s dream is to have that fantasy wedding where the location is perfect, all her friends and family are present, and she looks beautiful. Of course, the huge wedding is every parent’s nightmare. With the average wedding exceeding $20,000, there are ways to save money when it comes to what the guests drink. A venue that provides its own alcohol will be a thorn to reckon with. You are at their disposal and will have to pay the price for what you want to offer. In this scenario, limit the guests to the lower priced wines and beers. I’ve seen cash bars at weddings which are acceptable, but make me cringe.   You’ll be better offering no alcohol, or save it for the reception only. Guests are not prepared to pay their own way. Ideally, if you have total control of your venue, shop the nearest wine store for help and discounts. They will be able to give you a formula for how much alcohol, wine, beer, etc. to buy to be amply prepared.   Whatever you decide upon, don’t let your bartender open bottles until they are completely out of the previous same bottle.   Your servers can chill the whites regardless if they are used or not. The unopened bottles can be returned to the store for a refund or used at a later date. When it’s time to cut the cake, have a reasonable toasting bubbly poured for the guests. Personally, I’d limit the pours to two ounces. Many will not drink the wine and those who want more will seek out the server on their own. What you pour is just as important. The term Champagne is overused. Your sparkling wine does not have to be true Champagne from France. If that’s what you want to pour, decent Champagne might be Taittinger, Mumm, Moet-Chandon or Piper-Heidsieck. All of these wines will price in the average $25-$50 per bottle. A good alternative for a comparable crispy sparkling wine is the Italian Prosecco. These sparklers are extremely affordable and are the closest match to a crispy Champagne taste. With the average coming in around $10-$15, you could definitely save a bundle. Look at Bolla, Tiamo, Perlage, and Nino Franco. There are many good U.S. Sparkling Wines from California and even New Mexico. If you shop around, you can find a Blancde-Blanc which is typically made from Chardonnay or a Blanc-deNoir which comes from Pinot Noir. These can save you even more money.  Some inexpensive brands are Domaine Ste-Michelle about $10-$12 , and Crane Lake or Barefoot Bubbly, about $9. Last, but not least, the Spanish Cava is another good bubbly. These tend to be a little bit creamier on the tongue but still put out good bubbles and set the tone for a great toast. Look at Kila and Freixenet. These start in the $9 range but most Cavas average in the $12-$15 range. No matter what you toast with on your special day, remember it’s the entire experience what matters.  Your guests will not remember what you served at your wedding, but how beautiful you looked. Cheers to you! The Gifted Cork is located at 64 Hypolita Street in downtown St. Augustine, FL. Call for more information at (904) 810-1083.

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Fresh Seafood, Wild Game Exotic Specialties Offering Daily Chef’s Specials

Lunch: Tues-Sat: 11-3 Dinner: Tues-Thur 5 - 9 Fri-Sat 5 - 10 Open Holidays! Sun 5 - 8 Sunday Brunch 10-3

904.824.3282 • 58 Charlotte Street www.LaPentolaRestaurant.com volume 8

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Dining Guide Symbol Key Beer and Wine breakfast Courtyard/outdoor Dancing Diner Entertainment Full Liquor Bar Happy Hour Kids Menu Late Night Menu Lunch Organic Ingredients Parking Party/Banquet Facility Raw Bar Reservations Required Sunday Brunch Take Out Tiki Bar Waterside Dining

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n Amici

1915 A1A South • Saint Augustine, FL 32080 904.461.0102 • amicistaugustine.com Amici is one of the true Italian restaurants in northeast Florida, where ambience and cuisine are authentically Italian. Vito Arena has been sharing his family’s old-world legacy of remarkable Italian dishes to fall in love with, while he and his sister, Benedetta make each dining moment and private party unforgettable. It is no wonder that Amici has been voted “Best Italian Restaurant” consecutively, year after year by the residents of Saint Augustine.

n The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse

102 San Marco Avenue • Saint Augustine 904.824.7211 • raintreerestaurant.com Enjoy casual dining at its finest at The Raintree Restaurant & Steakhouse, recognized nationally and internationally as one of Florida’s top destination restaurants. The Raintree is renowned for consistent, award-winning menu, wine list and full bar served in the warm, intimate atmosphere of a restored 1879 Victorian home with live music in our courtyard.

n The Reef Restaurant

4100 Coastal Highway • Saint Augustine 904.824.8008 • thereefstaugustine.com The Reef, originally called Comptons, was built by the Usina family on a beautiful piece of oceanfront property in tranquil North Beach, three miles north of the Usina Bridge, on land owned by the family for generations. Comptons opened in 1989 and enjoyed great success for the next ten years. It closed in 1999 due to the ill health of Mr. Compton and hurricane damage. The Reef was opened in 2002, under the direct ownership of the Usinas. Since that time the restaurant has worked hard to produce fine food and beverages, professionally served, all accompanied by unsurpassed views of the magnificent Atlantic Ocean. It has steadily built a reputation as one of the most popular dining destinations in Saint Augustine.

n South Beach Grill

45 Cubbedge Road • Saint Augustine Beach 904.471.8700 • southbeachgrill.net “Fresh local seafood and aloha service since1997” This popular restaurant is one of only three direct oceanfront eateries in Saint Johns County. While the oceanfront location is unique, one thing that sets the restaurant apart is the absolute resolve to source and procure 100% fresh fish. All fish arrives at the restaurant “on loin” where it is skillfully skinned, weighed and cut into fillets. The promise of fresh is evident not only in the fish selection but across the entire seafood menu as well. South Beach Grill is open 7 days a week. Lunch 11-4:30, Dinner from 4:30 to 9:30, serving breakfast Saturdays & Sundays from 7:30-10:30.

n Sunset Grille

421 A1A Beach Blvd • Saint Augustine Beach 904.471.5555 • sunsetgrillea1a.com Most Award Winning Restaurant in Saint Augustine Beach, 29 time winner of The Great Chowder Debate. Have won Awards for our Datil Pepper Wings, Baby Back Ribs, Coconut Shrimp, Crab Fondue, Lobster Ravioli, Shrimp and Grits and Brownie Volcano Dessert. Our Key West atmosphere and kids menu makes us fun for the whole family. Celebrating our 22nd Anniversary!

n The Tasting Room

25 Cuna Street • Saint Augustine 904.810.2400 • thetastingroomfl.com A contemporary Spanish restaurant. Vibrant splashes of art complement a colorful array of “Tapas,” delectable little dishes designed for sharing and socializing. Iberianaccented entrées infused with fresh, local flavor and created with ingredients imported directly from Spain sail hot to your table. From curvy sofas cozying up to a Flamenco red fireplace, award-winning Wines lining an entire wall, and live Latin music nights, The Tasting Room is fueled by a passion for authentic Spanish food and wine. Reservations are not required, but recommended. Courtyard Dining, Private Dining Room available that seats up to 20. For more information please email us or call, make online reservations at tastetapas.com. 36

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n Conrad’s Steakhouse

4010 US1 South Saint Augustine, Florida 904.794.9440 • conradssteakhouse.com Conrad Martin, from Spain, was recently voted one of the best chefs in America. Conrad’s Steak House is known for their outstanding service and generous portions, along with keeping a Spanish flair in Conrad’s cooking. Conrad’s paella and codfish in green sauce are delicious. The restaurant also offers chicken, seafood, pastas and salads. Conrad is in is the kitchen, Mary, his wife, controls the front of the house. This “gem” of restaurant is a “feast of quality and taste” with great food and hospitality. Lunch 11:30am-2pm Wed. thru Mon., Dinner 5pm-9pm Wed. thru Mon. Closed Tuesday

Valentine’s

Have OCL delivered. 12 issue yearly subscription 19.95 OldCityLife.com

WEEKEND SPECIAL THURS. - SUN. also serving our regular menu 4 Course Dinner - $39.95

Shrimp in Champagne Sauce or Canapé Salad • 8oz. Lobster & 8 oz. Filet Mignon Bing Cherries with Ice Cream in a Chambord Sauce

4010 US1 South - St. Augustine, FL

(904) 794-9440 • www.conradssteakhouse.com 794-9449 • www.conradsteakhouse.com

Your Dreams Come True . . . With an Oceanfront View

904-824-8008 4100 Coastal Highway St. Augustine, FL 32084 thereefstaugustine.com volume 8

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Get to Know SAiRA. A collection of18 local restaurants from casual to upscale, seafood to salads... SAiRA’s got it all! Celebrate the culinary and cultural diversity unique to the area by supporting these independently owned businesses. Go local! Go SAiRA! Go to... www.staugustinerestaurants.com

Contemporary Spanish Cuisine

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giving

The Marsh Creek Women’s Association

By OCL Staff

The Marsh Creek Women’s Association is a nonprofit organization that was founded in 1989. Over the years, the mission of the group has grown, from providing initial contact and social activities for new members, to providing assistance and charitable support for the community as a whole. The association holds luncheons on the second Wednesday of each month from September through April. These events offer good food, friendship and entertainment for those attending. Back in 2005, the group formed its initial Community Outreach Committee to identify local, nonprofit organizations in need of assistance. The objective was to make an impact by supporting the needs of a small number of specific charitable programs. “We are a powerful group of women who have fun and give back to the community in an effective, and organized manner,” said member Eileen Fitzpatrick. “And we hope that we will be able to fulfill our mission, which is to assist charitable organizations and families in the St. Augustine area, through volunteering time, service or providing financial support.” On Nov. 2, 2013, the MCWA Outreach Committee held its first fundraiser of the season, “The Equinox.” The time of year when day and night are equal. In keeping with this theme, the club was beautifully decorated with glittery centerpieces in black and white. Attendees got into the spirit of the event by wearing their best black and white attire. The club’s chef, Joe Abdulghani, and his staff, prepared a tasty variety of food, while the MCWA members provided homemade desserts. Nostalgia, a very popular local band, provided dance music. Sixteen decorated shopping bags, filled with goods and services donated by local vendors, were raffled off during the course of the evening. Special thanks go to the title sponsors of the event, Andrew DeFeo, of Hyundai of St. Augustine, and the Marsh Creek Club. Proceeds from this affair, together with any proceeds from subsequent events, are distributed to eight local charities, listed on the groups website. For more information about the Marsh Creek Women’s Association, visit www.marshcreekwomen.org. volume 8

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Send the Choir to Carnegie Hall by Chris Bodor

T

St. Augustine Singers

he nation’s oldest city is full of secrets. However, it is no secret that we have a community chorus filled with talented professionals, and amateur vocalists, who volunteer their time to perform for adoring audiences each year. The St. Augustine Community Chorus was founded in 1948 as the St. Augustine Choral Society, and performed into the 1970s under that name. The name was changed to the St. Augustine Community Chorus in the 1980s, and is now a nonprofit organization. Their Christmas concerts at the Cathedral Basilica are highlights of the holiday season, and they have charmed music lovers with shows such as The Look of Love in spring of 2011. Here is something that you might not know. The community chorus also boasts an additional, smaller group of singers who are traveling to New York City in June. The St. Augustine Singers, formed in 1996, is a small group of roughly 30 members. The group fulfills the performance needs of those singers who want to sing all year long, since most groups take a break over the summer months. Their summer rehearsals culminate in an early fall performance, prior to the start of community chorus rehearsals in October. The group enjoys singing a wide variety of ethnic, popular and classical music. Many of the performance pieces are challenging, ones that the singers would not have an opportunity to perform elsewhere. They perform a varied repertoire, ranging from madrigals, folk, spirituals, world, standard classical choral music and contemporary works. Their decision to push the envelope with one particular piece proved to be a fortuitous choice. A New York City production company noticed that The St. Augustine Singers were performing a piece called “World Beloved: A Bluegrass

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music

Mass” by Carol Barnett. The production company extended an invitation to them to join with a choir of 200 voices to sing the piece in Carnegie Hall on Sunday, June 8, as part of the DCINY Concert Series in New York City. They will be accompanied by the well-known bluegrass ensemble Dailey & Vincent. Almost all of the members have elected to make the trip to New York City which will involve rehearsals with Dr. Jefferson Johnson, director of choral studies at the University of Kentucky and the performance at Carnegie Hall. During their journey to New York City, The St. Augustine Singers will be ambassadors. “We will be emphasizing our role as residents of the nation’s oldest city,” says conductor Kathleen Vande Berg. “As well as emphasizing the city’s rich cultural heritage, its historical importance and home to artistic expression.” “What a fabulous opportunity, not only to join with other groups from around the country, and to work with outstanding soloists, musicians and directors,” says Kathy Schirmacher, who has been a member for eight years, “but also to spread the word about the wonderful place that is St. Augustine.” The St. Augustine Singers hope that many of the people hearing them in June will be encouraged to visit the nation’s oldest city as a result. However, the group is responsible for their own expenses, which means they will be fundraising over the next few months to help with airfare, hotel and performance expenses. The St. Augustine Singers are under the umbrella of the St. Augustine Community Chorus, but they receive no funds or administrative support from the larger group. They are entirely self-sufficient. Those interested in helping to “Send the Choir to Carnegie Hall” are asked to contact Jillian Bos at (904) 599-8426.

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Far From Ordinary

J

The work of Don Trousdell

ust about everyone in Saint Augustine is celebrating the 450thanniversary, as the oldest continually occupied European settlement in the United States, in one way or another. Local artist Don Trousdell decided to put his own twist on the celebration by creating a themed art exhibit called “Ordinary People”, which was recently purchased by the city and featured at the St. Augustine Visitors Center in the fall. “My latest theme show, followed the Picasso exhibit at the St. Augustine Visitors Center, was about the  ‘Ordinary People’, the life of people that left Spain and came to the New World for the first 50 years in Saint Augustine. Why they left, where they were from and why they did what they did when they got here,” said Trousdell, who is now a Saint Augustine resident originally from New Jersey. “So that makes me a little different than artists that do landscapes or abstracts or what have you. I live on Anastasia Island and my home looks right out at the same dense forest that the settlers had to deal with. I’ve walked these woods and beaches many times.” Trousdell wanted to bring awareness to the  every day residents of the time, not just the big names like Spanish explorer Pedro Menendez. “Most people can name the important guys like Menendez but what I wanted to do is featured the average Joe, the guy that came over here not knowing what he was getting into, and this became the inspiration for the paintings to celebrate the 450thbirthday,” Trousdell said. “The stories to me are just as important as me doing the art. I had to do a lot of research to find out why someone would jump on a boat and come over

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story by Ashley Bates

here. Some of the reasons were “.....it’s a very old that Spain wasn’t the best place idea in this world then.” The bright and vivid paintings where everything from “Ordinary People” not only is on computers,” please the eye visually but also tell a story; something that Trousdell weaves into each one of his themed exhibits. “Every painting I have has words next to it, telling the story, and it’s a very old idea in this world where everything is on computers,” he said. Trousdell did extensive research to find out about the Saint Augustine landscape and the people here 450 years ago, and he says our quaint town had a much different look and feel with forests and wild animals blending with the  new settlers and Native Americans. “There was a huge sandbar across the harbor; Menendez couldn’t bring his ships in here so he dumped everybody  on Anastasia Island and for the first two years, while they were fighting off the French and establishing a place here, it was people on the beach with little huts, near where the cross is today,” Trousdell said. “When you hit the beach here for the first 50 years is much different; you are out in the wild. The locals were not very good farmers to begin with, although a lot of farmers were brought here because the soil was full of roots. They learned from the Indians that they could grow corn pretty quick.” Trousdell uses several types of mediums to create his art but most popular are his cut canvas paintings, a technique

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art

that he created himself  which is based on the Mayan art he saw in the Yucatan. “Cut canvas is where I cut sheets of canvas apart and I put  them together on a master canvas, which is white-on-white and allows me to move the shapes around. Then, I cover  the canvas  with metallic colors,  then I cover the whole thing with black oil paint and lift it off, so it separates on the acrylic and becomes  very jewel-like when I add the color on top,” he said. “People love it because it gives a different look to typical, realistic stuff. It’s more of a design point of view. Each cut canvas painting takes about three days, is very visual, and comes together in stages; there is not a lot of brush work, it’s mostly rubbing of color.” As a former graphic designer, Trousdell has an interesting art background that contributes to his artistic process. He grew up in the “industrial playground” of Newark, N.J. and had the chance to attend an art high school and then became a graphic designer. “I was a real visual person right from the beginning and I was very lucky to attend an arts high school as opposed to the book reading kind, which would have been death for me. I went on to Pratt Institute and was a  graphic designer for 45 years,” said Trousdell, also an 18 year resident of Bermuda. “Now that’s different than most people’s background. Today my background influence is my work, which was nationally recognized design studios of the 1960s and 70s, they were internationally known for their ideas and their look. Our clients ranged from Playboy Magazine to the U.S. Army. We had huge international accounts.” Trousdell followed up “Ordinary People” with an soldout exhibit called “Wild Things,” which ran through the month

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of January at the St. Augustine Art Association(parts of which can be seen on Don’s website, www. trousdellar t.com). The exhibit  featured Florida’s wildflowers but more importantly it’s about their pollinating friends. “Pollination has become a huge problem; the world’s crops depend on pollination which is in decline. This exhibit brings awareness to how important pollination is and it’s not just bees and butterflies but... also pollinators that you may not even think of; mice, hummingbirds, you name it,” he said. Other popular Trousdell exhibits include “Children of the Universe,” which are paintings of the solar system from a child’s perspective, and “Walk in Peace,”: a concept Trousdell says goes back 30,000 years. “I am known for my use of color  and  that shows  in  the themed shows that I have done in the past few years. I used color for them very much like the color we see every day,” he said. “I want to use the colors that people see every day-colors that made Florida special.” OCL

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Art Galleries of St. NORTH OF THE PLAZA Augustine is an association of many diverse and eclectic galleries locatedART EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE 1. LOVE’S in the city. From local 2. TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE artist owned businesses 3. ST. PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105 to exhibition hallsAUGUSTINE and museums, these galleries 4. METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET offer collections of local, 5. HIGH TIDE GALLERY: 51A & B CORDOVA STREET regional, national and facebook.com/artgalleriesofstagustine 6. THEartists. STARVING ARTIST: 28 CUNA STREET international

EAST OFNORTH DOWNTOWN OF THE PLAZA

7. #7 ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE

1. LOVE’S EMPORIUM: 8 CATHEDRAL PLACE 22. SIMPLEART GESTURES: SOUTH OF THE PLAZA 2. TRIPP HARRISON GALLERY & studio: 22 CATHEDRAL PLACE   4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 3. ST. AUGUSTINE PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS: 35 HYPOLITA #105   23. ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH: 4. THE METALARTZ: 58 HYPOLITA STREET    8. GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET 5.370-A HIGH TIDE GALLERY: & B CORDOVA STREET A1A BEACH51A BLVD. 9. BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET 6. THE STARVING ARTIST:AND 28 CUNA STREET  24. ISLAND FRAMERS GALLERY: 7. ROHDE AVENUE GALLERY: 7 ROHDE AVENUE 10. PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET 4106 A1A SOUTH 11. AMIRO ART & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET SOUTH OF THE PLAZA WEST OF THE PLAZA 12. GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET 8. GALLERIA DEL MAR: 9 KING STREET 13. JOEL BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET 9. BRILLIANCE IN COLOR: 25 KING STREET 25. MUSEUM: 10.LIGHTNER PLUM GALLERY: 9A AVILES STREET 14. AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET 75AMIRO KINGART STREET 11. & FOUND: 9C AVILES STREET 12.CRISP-ELLERT GEORGIA NICK GALLERY: 11A AVILES STREET  15. PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET 26. MUSEUM: 13. BAGNAL GOLDSMITH: 11B AVILES STREET  48JOEL SEVILLA STREET 16. ST. AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET 14. AVILES STREET GALLERY: 11C AVILES STREET 27. king fine art: 15.130 PASTA GALLERY: 214 CHARLOTTE STREET  17. LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1 130 STREET 16. ST.KING AUGUSTINE ART ASSOCIATION: 22 MARINE STREET . 18. GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET 17.BUTTERFIELD LOST ART GALLERY: 210 ST.GEORGE STREET #C-1  28. GARAGE ART GALLERY: 18. GRACE GALLERY: 47 KING STREET   19. GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY: 49 KING STREET 137A KING STREET. 19. GRAND BOHEMIAN GALLERY:  49 KING STREET 20. SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET 29. space:eight: 20. SPEAR HOUSE GALLERY:149 CORDOVA STREET    21. ABSOLUTE ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET  228 W.KINGAMERICANA ST. 21. ABSOLUTE AMERICANA ART GALLERY: 77 BRIDGE STREET

EAST OF DOWNTOWN 22. SIMPLE GESTURES: 4 WHITE ST. E. & ANASTASIA BLVD. 23. THE ART STUDIO OF ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH:370A  A1A BEACH BLVD. 24. ISLAND FRAMERS AND GALLERY: 4106 A1A SOUTH

WEST OF THE PLAZA 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.

LIGHTNER MUSEUM: 75 KING STREET CRISP-ELLERT MUSEUM: 48 SEVILLA STREET 130 king fine art: 130 KING STREET BUTTERFIELD GARAGE ART GALLERY: 137A KING STREET. space:eight: 228 W.KING ST.

ART GALLLERIES of St. Augustine is an association of the many diverse and eclectic art galleries located in the nation’s oldest city. From local artist-owned businesses to elegant exhibition halls and museums, these galleries offer outstanding collections of local, regional, national and international artists.

First Friday Art Walks 5-9 pm On the first Friday of each month the galleries offer new art exhibits and lively receptions to the public. Start your FREE self-guided tour at any of the Art Galleries, most within walking distance to each other. Hop aboard the FREE Art Walk trolley that runs throughout downtown. For more info, visit us www.ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

www.ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

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904.824.8460 amiroartandfound.com

904.824.2310 www.staaa.org

904.826.8530 www.flagler.edu/crispellert

ArtGalleriesofStAugustine.org

11C Aviles Street • 904.823.860

904.827.9800 www.lostartgallery.com

904-825-4577 ButterfieldGarage.com

904.342.2186 GeorgiaNickGallery.com

904.819.9512 www.staugphotogallery.com

904.827.9997 simplegestures@live.com

904.824.6322 metalartzgifts.com

P.A.St.A Art G a l l e r y

904.824.0251 pastaartgallery.net

904.827.1899 ArtfullyGraceGallery.com volume 8

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904.829.5003 NeffJewelers.com

904.829.6880 grandbohemiangallery.com

904.540.3661 www.facebook.com/starvingartiststaug 45


Come see our amazing collection of Miro, Dali, Chagall, Lennon, Picasso and more...

Darwin Chavez

Antiquities to Contemporary Art MUSEUM QUALITY AT AFFORDABLE PRICES

904.827.9800 210 St. George Street

(South of the Plaza off King St.)

lostartgallery@gmail.com

www.lostartgallery.com

Hookey Hamilton Photography

Joel Bagnal, Goldsmith

11B & 11C Aviles St, St. Augustine, FL 32084

11 Aviles Street, St. Augustine, Fl 32084 Phone: 904.614.4706

Email: hookey@hookeyhamiltonphotography.com

Email: jbagnal@joelbagnalgoldsmith.com Web: joelbagnalgoldsmith.com

Weddings should be fun, Nature beautiful, and Precious moments caught forever. Discover Hookey Hamilton, Fine Art and Portrait Photographer.

Commemorating life’s special occasions and relationships with custom designs in precious metals and gemstones. Complete client design and production involvement by email from any location.

Phone: 904.728.4957

Web: hookeyhamiltonphotography.com

Hot Shot Bakery and Cafe

Open for breakfast and lunch daily freshly-baked goods, coffee, catering and custom wedding/all-occasion cakes

8 Granada Street - Saint Augustine (904) 824-7898 46

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travel

So You Want to See Italy?

Here’s what you need to know before you go

W

hen one lives in an historical seaside paradise such as St. Augustine, deciding where to go on vacation can be a dilemma. For me, there’s only place in the world I’d rather go, and that’s Italy. With something like 500 ancient cathedrals, it’s hard not to find jaw-dropping beauty everywhere. It’s also nearly impossible to have a bad meal. The friendly people, the shopping, the sites, the smells and the crystal clear Mediterranean Sea will draw you in and make you want to stay as long as possible.

What not to pack Unless you want to show off the fact you’re an American tourist, leave your shorts, gym clothes, and clunky white American tennis shoes at home. You won’t see anyone except maybe cruise ship passengers sporting this attire outside of a gym. Sadly enough, this too includes yoga pants. Italians dress nice, so if you want to blend in, plan to wear modest, business casual clothes like skirts and slacks. Dark, slim tennis shoes are acceptable if you’re worried about aching feet. Ladies, if any of your tops show the slightest hint of cleavage, toss them out of your suitcase right now. Trust me on this, unless you plan to stir lots of unwanted attention, particularly if you’re traveling alone. Take a cue from the scarf-clad Italian women probably born with this knowledge. Many chapels throughout Italy won’t even allow you inside with as much as your shoulders exposed, so be prepared to cover up.

Bathrooms When you leave America, prepare to leave behind the lush

Story and pictures by Tammy Harrow bathrooms large enough to house your extended family. Most bagnos here are tiny, leaving much to be desired. There are no dual showerheads or extra jets, and if the water pressure is good, consider yourself lucky enough. On the plus side, there are bidets, which leaves me wondering, “Why in the world are these ingenious little contraptions not more popular in the states?” We have sinks to wash our hands, but only dry toilet paper to wash… never mind. Maybe it’s just a cultural thing, like the same reason washcloths don’t seem to exist in Italy. Do they even make them? I don’t know, but I’ve spent months traveling all over and have yet to see one. And while we’re on the subject of bathrooms, always carry loose change. What does that have to do with bathrooms? Many places make you pay to use the facilities. Even the few that don’t have attendants responsible for keeping them squeaky clean. You’ll likely come face-to-face with one when exiting a stall. She’ll offer you lotion, cologne, mints and you will want to give her a little tip. Why? Because she looks like someone’s cute little grandma and because her job stinks, literally.

Language So you’ve bought an Italian phrasebook and have been practicing. Be prepared when you try to impress someone with your new skills and find they actually understand you and even, oh my gosh, respond. What now? You have no clue what they’re saying, and flipping through your phrasebook isn’t going to help. They’re still talking 100 miles an hour and are probably (more })

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laughing at you at this point as you frantically flip through the pages trying to figure out what they are saying. Also, the Italian men who speak at least some English will rarely admit when they don’t understand what you’re saying. It takes a lot of practice to watch their expressions and signals to learn they have no idea what you’re talking about. Make sure when you do meet English speakers, you skip the slang terms. You will cause a misunderstanding if you say “Oh, that stinks,” unless you really mean something smells bad. Don’t use contractions either. For instance, say “cannot” instead of “can’t.” When there are several variations for a word, stick to the most proper word, i.e. instead of belly, tummy or gut, use stomach. Learn the phrase “Non capisco” (I don’t understand) so you don’t appear rude when someone’s trying to speak to you in Italian. It also helps to smile when you say it. If you’re a solo traveling woman, repeat after me: “Ho un marito” (I have a husband). Even if you don’t, I promise you’ll thank me later. 

Eating & Drinking The coffee here will kill you. OK, not really, but imagine sipping hot jet fuel, no amount of sugar and/or cream will help. Choking it down requires dilution of water for a while until your tastebuds adjust, which can take weeks. Most places offer great mild cappuccinos, which I’m told are “for little babies.” Water is either still or with gas (sparkling), even in the convenience stores, so pay attention if you have a preference. Italians eat small continental-type breakfasts, usually pastry or some type of bread with their morning jet fuel. I’m guessing they don’t want to dilute the caffeination effect, which for me means quivering insides and hands too shaky to even hold my

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camera. Learn to like, or at least tolerate, olives. They’re about as easy to avoid as candy at Christmas and are in every dish, growing in almost every yard, everywhere. There’s no escaping them. At some point you will at least accidentally ingest one. Embrace it. Prepare your palate for the lack of creamy 1,000 calorie salad dressings, a staple in every American restaurant, only oil and vinegar here. Fish here is expensive, I mean really expensive, like sell-a-kidney kind of expensive. Doesn’t matter that every restaurant I visit is a stone’s throw from the sea where there’s an overabundance of them. I guess I should have realized this when I learned fish was sold by the gram rather than the portion. With that being said, it is worth ordering, especially in a place where you get to choose your catch from a tub of ice or window display, wait for it to be buried and cooked whole in a pan of salt, before being cleaned and drizzled with olive oil at your tableside. Delizioso. In the Amalfi region, delicious limoncello and wild fennel liquor apertifs are often served with lunch and dinner. Maybe this explains why the Italians take such long lunches.

Lodging Apartment, and even house rentals, are often less expensive than hotels. Airbnb.com is a good safe bet for searching for that perfect place. Beds are extra firm and bring back memories of childhood camping...on the ground, so when you leave home, prepare to bid arrivederci to the comfort of  your pillowtop mattress. On the plus side, your achy neck and back will suddenly feel better, trust me.

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Italian hotel rooms offer less amenities than Americans are used to- many have no TVs, and if they do they only offer a few channels. I guess they expect visitors to be out doing things rather than laying in bed watching the televisione. Many rooms don’t offer alarm clocks or even booklets of information. Recommendations on things to do and places to eat will have to come from the hotel staff.

Driving/ Riding If driving or riding in NYC leaves you reaching for anxiety meds, prepare yourself, and bring them along. I’m not even sure why those pointless traffic signs are placed along Italy’s roadways, since no one, except maybe foreigners, even pretend to obey them. Sto  simply means slow down, and  yield  means accelerate enough so you can beat the other guy heading in the same direction. If drivers see a sight they’d like to explore, they simply stop the car in the middle of the mountainy road, get out and take their time looking over the edge. No worries about the other drivers, they will go around, usually after a few horn honks and unfamiliar gestures. If you find yourself on a one-lane road speeding head-on towards another car, bus, or moped, don’t be intimidated. Remember, he who shows fear first loses… and will have to back up, even if it means driving around a treacherous mountain in reverse. Don’t be a chicken. And on the highways, as far as speed limits go, don’t bother trying to see if there are any actual signs posted, you’ll be going too fast to notice. Speed is dictated by the bumper of the guy in front of you, there’s no 3-6 second following rule here.

Work Ethic Italians take pride in their jobs and well, just about everything. Waiters, hotel employees, the whole hospitality industry is paid well, and it shows in their work. You will never see a waiter reach across you, or act like you being there is bothering them. The ones I’ve met have made careers out of their jobs, and have no desire to do anything else. It’s as if they were born for their job, or their job was made for them. In America, we only expect college students or job hoppers to be temporarily employed as waiters, and we pay them accordingly. When tourist season ends, some of the towns basically shut down, and the hospitality employees take a nice long winter break. Also, be aware most businesses and shops shut down for a few hours each day from around noon until 2 or 3 p.m.

Drinking/ Smoking

In the states, most of the smokers I know shamefully hide their habit, and are close to beginning their 75th attempt at quitting. I guess the whole lung cancer/cigarette smoking connection hasn’t caught on in Italy because everyone here smokes. On the bright side, the vino flows freely here, and it’s common to see house bottles on the tables during both lunch and dinner. This makes up for the overabundance of cigarette smoke. Putting aside all of my cynicism and silliness, Italy, in all its splendor, will welcome you with open arms, teach you to breathe, to just be still, and to take in its magnificence waiting for you around every corner, in every town. Other than St. Augustine, there really may be no better place on earth. OCL

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poetry

February Sunday

Monday

Royal Family 02 Transfer of Office Colorful transfer of royal duties from the 2013 Royal Family to the 2014 Royal Family Isabella Gardens, 2PM 904-829-2333

“A Stroll Through Europe” 03 Exhibit February 1-28 Lost Art Gallery 904-827-9800 lostartgallery.com

Florida Chamber Music 09 Project Presents “Schubert” Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 3pm pvconcerthall.com

Inaugural 10 Flagler Health Care Foundation Golf Classic

Mason Jennings Concert 16 Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 1050 A1A Niorth, Ponte Vedra Beach 8pm pvconcerthall.com

Journey: 17 450 Years of the African-American Experience

26.2 With Donna: The National Marathon

23

Donna Deegan’s famous National Marathon to Fight Breast Cancer 200 ATP Tour Blvd., Ponte Vedra Beach 7:30am

VisitPonteVedra.com The St. Augustine Orchestra

02

marks the 50th Anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act with three concerts. 400 San Juan Drive, Ponte Vedra Beach

staugustineorchestra.org

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to benefit the Emergency Care Center Fund

Marsh Creek Country Club flaglerhospital.org

January 20 -July 30 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily Visitor Information Center 10 W. Castillo Drive

Tuesday

Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys 23 Orange Street, St Augustine, FL 7pm

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1 Open Mic Night with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys 23 Orange Street, St Augustine, FL 7pm

Open Mic Night 1 with Smokin Joe at Ann O’Malleys 23 Orange Street, St Augustine, FL 7pm

StAugustine-450.com

Flagler College Tours 24 Tour the former Hotel Ponce de Leon, daily from the main lobby (Rotunda) at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. 74 King St., St. Augustine legacy.flagler.edu/

The Gamble Rogers 25 Folk Festival presents “An Evening With Acoustic Eidolon” St. Augustine Art Associatio 7pm gamblerogersfest.org

City Walks 03 Mardi Gras Pub Crawl

“Freedom-Riders”

04

the National Endowment Celebrate Mardi Gras with the origi- for the Humanities African-Amer Experience nal, world famous St. Augustine City Virginia Room, Ringhaver Ctr. Walks Pub Crawl Flagler College March 3-8

StAugustineCityWalks.com

flagler.edu/our-community

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City Calendar 2014 Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday Sunset Celebration at Vilano Beach Town Center

01

260 Vilano Road, St. Augustine, FL

www.vilanobeachfl.com

The Best of Limelight’s Celebrity Cabaret http://limelight-theatre.org

04

11

18

05 Lightner Museum Curator Tours 75 King Street, St. Augustine 904-824-2874 lightnermuseum.org Plaza Stroll 12 Historic Walking Tour St. Augustine City Walks St. Augustine, FL 32084 FREE Admission 4pm StAugustineCityWalks.com Friends of the Arts: Bag Lady Luncheon

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The Friends of the Arts present their popular Bag Lady Luncheon at the Beach Club at Sawgrass 50 Executive Way, Ponte Vedra Beach

ccpvb.org

5

c

on

St. Augustine Orchestra Concert Lewis Auditorium, Flagler College 7pm StAugustineOrchestra.org

27 26

Open Mic Night at Tradewinds Lounge 124 Charlotte St. St. Augustine, FL

Open Mic Night at Tradewinds Lounge

rican of

y

13

124 Charlotte St. St. Augustine, FL

5-8pm tradewindslounge.com 904-829-9336 Tommy Emmanuel with 20 Martin Taylor Concert Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 7:30pm pvconcerthall.com Journey: 27 450 Years of the African-American Experience January 20 -July 30 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily Visitor Information Center 10 W. Castillo Drive

05

1st Friday Artwalk, 07 Downtown St. Augustine St. Augustine Art Association Gala 22 Marine St., St. Augustine 904-824-2310 staaa.org

5-8pm tradewindslounge.com 904-829-9336

StAugustine-450.com

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06

Sunset/Moonrise at 14 St. Augustine Lighthouse

sunset and moonrise from the most unique perspective in town

staugustinelighthouse.org

PRESIDENTS DAY WEEKEND at World Golf Village ‘Dancing at Lughnasa’ Lewis Auditorium at Flagler College St. Augustine, FL 7:30pm

21

08

River House 179 Marine St., St. Augustine http://aaacharitablefoundation.org

Saint Augustine Yacht Club 15 Art Auction 5:30pm 442 Ocean Vista Avenue staugustineyachtclub.com/artauction Art & Craft Festival St Augustine Beach Pier tnteventsinc.com Delbert McClinton Concert Ponte Vedra Concert Hall, 8pm pvconcerthall.com

22

Uptown saturday Night

904-826-8600

29th Annual Cathedral Festival

Fifth Annual All American Air Table Tennis Classic

San Marco Avenue, St. Augustine

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February 28-March 2 Mission of Nombre de Dios St. Augustine

Searle’s Sack of St. Augustine

01

Authentic re-enactment of Captain Robert Searle’s 1668 attack on St. Augustine.

thecathedralfestival.com

904-534-6168 searlesbucs.com

February oldcitylife.com

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health

Hope on the Horizon for Brain Health!

Y

By John Hoffman

es, every second of every day we all get a little bit older, and if we’re lucky, a little bit wiser. By the way, wise means having, or showing, experience, knowledge and good judgment. In order for us to gain knowledge we need to remember, or recall, what we have learned from past experiences, and apply it to what we are trying to accomplish. As we get older, this certainly can become a daunting task. In some cases, we struggle to remember names of people we have known for years, important birthdays of loved ones and what we needed to buy in the grocery store. I cannot begin to tell you how many times I have been in the aisle of a store and asked a customer if they needed help. They look at me with a puzzled look and reply, “I can’t remember what I came in for.” My humorous reply is, “was it something for the memory?” I usually get a good laugh from the customer. What science is teaching us is that circulation to your extremities to allow for better blood flow is critical for proper brain function. A change in ones diet will certainly help. For example, reducing the consumption of red meat. The bad cholesterol in your blood stream can cause plaque to form and slow down circulation. And of course, a consistent protocol of exercise. Fruits and vegetables contain powerful antioxidants that help to protect cells from deterioration, and also contain natural sterols. Sterols are natural compounds that are cholesterol-like in nature. When consumed from fruits, vegetables, legumes and nuts they enter into the digestive tract and block the bad cholesterol in trying to be absorbed into the blood stream. Unlike statin drugs, they do not have side effects. There are a few very good natural occurring supplements that can be found in most health food stores that are showing great promise for brain function and health. Here are a few of my favorite brain health supplements. 1. DHA. DHA is an essential fatty acid found mostly in fish oil, plants and algae. DHA is imperative for proper fetal brain development. DHA is a primary structural component of the human brain, cerebral cortex, skin, sperm and retina. DHA is the most abundant omega-3 fatty acid found in the brain and retina. DHA deficiency is associated with cognitive decline. DHA levels have been shown to be reduced in severely depressed patients. 2. Phosphatidlycholine. Choline is a B vitamin that converts to acetylcholine in the brain. Acetylcholine is responsible for helping to transfer information correctly within the brain. 3. Vinpocetine. Vinpocetine is a plant alkaloid extracted from the periwinkle plant. Vinpocetin has been shown to enhance cerebral blood flowing capabilities, as well as neuroprotective effects. It has been used in many cases successfully to treat tinnitus, otherwise known as ringing of the ears. Again, there is nothing like a well-balanced diet and consistent exercise. However, the supplements listed above can become very useful for helping to increase cognitive function.

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John Hoffman has worked within the natural foods industry for 32 years as a manufacturer rep and national educator for nutraceutical-based companies, and as a consultant to natural food retailers nationwide. John has traveled extensively throughout the United States, as well as England, teaching and training natural food retailers about the recent findings of nutraceutical supplements i.e., amino acids, herbs, plant extracts, essential fatty acids, minerals and vitamins.

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family

Craig Funeral Home Annual Holiday Remembrance Program

By OCL Staff

T

he Craig family and staff at Craig Funeral Home recently held their Annual Holiday Remembrance Program. A reception was held as each family was presented with a crystal ornament personalized with the name and dates of their loved one. This ornament can be hung on a Christmas tree, or otherwise displayed in commemoration of their loved one for years to come. This program is a special afternoon provided to all the families that Craig Funeral Home has served throughout the year.   The holidays can be a particularly difficult time after the loss of a loved one.   They hope that by offering a forum for commemorating loved ones during the holidays that they might help families to continue to heal from their loss and find peace.

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worship Abbey of Castle Otttis (Ah-tis) (Interdenominational) Prayer on Sunday Mornings Adults and Mature Children only Vilano Beach | 824.3274

Chapel of Our Lady of La Leche (Catholic) 8:30am, 5pm, Holidays 8:30am, 3pm 27 Ocean Avenue | 824.2809 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Call for Services 500 Deltona Blvd | Shores | 797.4412

Anastasia Baptist Church Sunday 9:30am Contemporary 11am Traditional 1650 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.2166

Christ Our Savior EV Lutheran Church Christian Formation 9am Divine Service 10:30am (deaf interpreted) 21 Milton Street | Uptown | 829.6823

Anchor Faith Church (Word of Faith) Sunday 11am, Wednesday 7:30pm 1764 Tree Blvd | St Augustine | 797.6363

Church Of Christ Sunday Bible Class 9am Sunday Worship 10am, 6pm, Wed 7pm 2900 Lewis Speedway | 824.1800

Ancient City Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Sunday 10:45am, 6pm Wed 6:30pm Bible Study and Prayer 27 Sevilla Street | Downtown | 829.3476

Church at Vilano (Baptist) Bible School 9:30am, Sunday 10:30am Wednesday Prayer and Bible Services 7pm 121 Meadow Ave | Vilano Beach | 827.0477

Berea Seventh Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:15am, Worship 11am Prayer Meeting 7:30pm 151 M L King Ave | Downtown | 824.9145

Community Bible Church Equipping Hour (classes for all ages) 9:30am Fellowship Worship Service10:30am Wed (school schedule) Word of Life Clubs, ages 4 thru High School, Bible Study 6:30pm 3150 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.3875

Bethany Baptist Church Call for Services 5465 CR 208 | Bakersville | 824.5169 Bethel Baptist Church Call for services 222 Riberia St | Downtown | 824.5304

Corpus Christi Catholic Church Daily Mass Mon-Sat 9am • Sat Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Mass 8:30am, 9:45am & 11:00am 6175 Datil Pepper Rd | Shores Area | 797.4842

Bible Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am & 5pm 2485 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.3999

Congregation Sons of Israel (Jewish, Conservative) Services Friday 7:30pm & Saturday 10am 161 Cordova St | Historic District | 829.9532

Bridge of Life Christian Center (Full Gospel Assembly of God) Sunday Worship 10:30am Wed 6:30pm Bible Study Lewis Point Plaza | 797.0669

Crescent Beach Baptist Church Sunday School Bible Fellowship 9:30am Worship 11am, Sunday Worship 6pm 885 SR 206 E | St Augustine | 794.7777

Cathedral-Basilica Parish (Catholic) Saturday Vigil Mass 5pm Sunday Masses 7am, 9am &11am, 5pm Daily Mass 7am Monday - Saturday 38 Cathedral PL | Historic Distict | 824.2806

Dawson Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Sunday School 9:30am, Sunday Worship 110am, Bible Study Wednesday 7pm 225 N Orange St | St. Augustine | 824.8049

Celebration Church-St Augustine 10:30am Sundays St. Augustine High School Auditorium Childcare and Youth Services are provided 3205 Varella Ave | 737.1121 | celebration.org Center for Spiritual Living Call for Services 1795 Old Moultrie Road | 825.3600

Family Worship Center (Christ Centered Worship) Sunday 10am, Thursday 7pm 2040 SR 207 | 819.9970 First Church of Christ Scientist (Christian Science and Reading Room) Sunday School and Service 10am Wednesday Service 5:30pm 2555 Old Moultrie Rd | 797.8882

First Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:45am Monday Word and Action Bible Study 6:45pm Wednesday Prayer Service 12 noon 89 St Francis Street | Downtown | 824.6590 First United Methodist Church Sunday 8:15am & 11am - Traditional Worship Sunday 9:30am - Contemporary 118 King Street | Downtown | 829.3459 Grace United Methodist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 8:30am, 11am Junior Church during 11am Carrera St at Cordova St | Downtown | 829.8272 Good News PCA (Christian) Sunday Worship 9am & 10:30am Nursery provided for all services 1357 Wildwood Drive | 819.0064 Heritage Baptist Church Bible Fellowship 9:30am Sunday School 10am Sunday Worship 11am & 6pm Wed 7pm prayer meeting 1480 Wildwood Dr | 824.8888 Hineni Messianic Fellowship (Messianic - Jewish & Non Jewish Believers) Friday Shabbat 7:30pm Tuesday Bible Study 7:30pm 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 827.9731 Holy Cross Charismatic Orthodox Sunday 10am 110 Masters Drive | 810.0535 Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church of St Augustine 2940 CR 214 | 829.0504 Homeport Christian Church Sundays 9am Traditional 10:45am Contemporary Wednesday 6:30pm 5605 US 1 S | St Augustine South | 797.8921 Hurst Chapel AME Church (Methodist) Call for Services 28-1/2 Bernard St | Downtown | 824.0500 Jehovah’s Witness Kingdom Hall South Cong.- Sunday 4pm & Thur 7:30pm North Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Wed 7:30pm East Cong. - Sunday 1pm & Thursday 7:30pm 735 Kings Estate Rd | 797.7599 Lighthouse Church of God Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am Sunday Evening 6pm, Wed Evening 7pm 1230 Kings Estate Road | 797.6996

Helping Families and Friends Honor Their Loved One We will assist in every aspect of the funeral or cremation service. As St. Augustine’s only full service funeral home and cemetery, we can handle all the details for you. “Four generations of the Craig family Just one call - one location!

serving the areas families”

1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com


Mc Dowell Baptist Church 16 Bayview Drive | St Augustine Call for Services 829-8388 Memorial Lutheran Church of the Martyrs Sunday School Sundays Traditional 8am Contemporary 10:30am 3375 US 1 South | 797.4377 Memorial Presbyterian Church Sunday 8:30am Informal, 9:30am Church School 10:50am Pipe Organ Prelude, 11am Worship 36 Sevilla St | Historic District | 829.6451 Mill Creek Baptist Church Sunday Bible Service 10am, Sunday Worship 11am, 6:30pm, Wed 7pm 6019-A State Rd. 16 | Mill Creek | 940.3130

Saint Photios National Shrine (Greek Orthodox) Monday - Saturday, Sunday Service Friday 11am 41 St George St | St Augustine | 829.8205 San Sebastian Catholic Church Saturday Vigil Mass 4pm Sunday Masses 8am,10am, 12 noon Spanish Daily Mass 8am Tues - Friday 1112 SR 16 | 824.6625 Seventh - Day Adventist Church Sabbath School 9:30am, Worship 11am 555 State Road 16 | St Augustine | 824.5855 Shiloh Baptist Church Call for Services 271 West King St | Downtown | 824.3913

1475 Old Dixie Highway • St. Augustine Tabernacle Baptist Church Call for Services (904) 824-1672 280 Duval St | aigFuner DowntownalHome.com | 829.2041 www.Cr

Temple Bet Yam (Jewish Reform) Services First and Third Friday 7:30pm 2055 Wildwood Rd | St Augustine | 819.1875 The Village Church (Interdenominational) Bible School 9:00am Services 9am & 11am, Children’s 11am Adult Bible Study 10am, Youth 5pm 4225 Pacetti Rd | World Golf Village | 940.6768

Miracle Center Ministries (Non-Denominational) Sunday 10:30am 1797 Old Moultrie Road | 824.9673

Saint Augustine Shores United Methodist Church Sunday School 10am, Traditional 9am Contemporary 11am 724 Shores Blvd | St Augustine Shores | 797.4416

Moultrie Baptist Church Sunday School 9:45am Service 11am, 6pm, Wed 6:30pm 3699 US 1 S | Moultrie Creek | 797.9005

Saint Cyprian’s Episcopal Church Sunday Holy Eucharist 10am Third Sunday 5:30pm 37 Lovett Street | 829.8828

New Life Baptist Church Call for Service Times 346 Varella Avenue • Near SR 16 | 823.9537

Saint Francis In-the-Field Episcopal Church 9am, Sunday 10am 895 Palm Valley Rd | Ponte Vedra | 543.0112

Turning Point at Calvary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:40am Worship 9:40am, 11am, 6pm 3500 SR 16 • 829.9795

New Saint James Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship 10:30am 135 Rodriquez Street | 824.6500

Saint Luke AME Church African Methodist Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship 11am 694 W Pearl St | Downtown | 824.6120

Unitarian-Universalists Fellowship of St. Augustine Sunday 10:30am 2487 A1A South | St Augustine | 471.2047

Saint Mary’s Baptist Church Call for Services 69 Washington St | Downtown | 824.1314

Wards Creek Baptist Church Sunday Services 7am, 10:45am 7pm Home Bible Studies Wednesday Youth 6pm - Service 7pm 7730 County Rd 13 N | Wards Creek | 522.0128

Our Lady of Good Counsel Catholic Church Saturday Vigil 4:00pm Sunday masses 8am, 10am, 12 noon Daily mass Tue 8:15am, Thurs 8:15am 5950 SR 16 | 824.8688 Pentecostal Fellowship Center Church Sunday Schoool 10:00am Worship 11am, 6pm | Youth Thursday 5:30pm 1065 Kings Estate Rd | Kings Estates | 797.6040

Saint Paul AME Church Sunday School 9:30am, Worship Services 10:45am Bible Study Wednesday 6pm 85 ML King Avenue | 829.3918

Trinity Episcopal Parish Holy Eurcharist 7:30, 9am Family Service & 11:15am Wednesday 10am Holy Eurcharist and Healing Service followed by Bible Study 215 St. George St | Historic District | 824.2876

Zion Baptist Church Call for Services 94 Evergreen Ave | St Augustine | 826.1424

Pilgrim Church (United Church of Christ) Service Sunday 10am 5880 US 1 South | St Augustine | 797.5187 Radiant Family Church Sunday Worship 10:45am, Wednesday 6:30pm 1515 CR 210 | 808.7390 Saint Anastasia Catholic Church Saturday 4pm, Sunday 8am & 10:30am Daily Mass 9am Monday-Friday 5205 A1A South | Anastasia Island | 471.5364

“Our Family Serving Your Family Since 1915” 4th Generation

1475 Old dixie HigHway • St. auguStine • (904) 824-1672 • www.CRAIGFUNERALHOME.com


community

Dressing of the Palms Vilano Beach Town Center

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E

ach time as you drive east over the Vilano Beach Bridge, and reach the top, your mouth drops as you take in the incredible views of the Atlantic Ocean. At the east end of the bridge, turn right, and enter the Vilano Beach Town Center, designed and constructed under the guidance of a citizen and government partnership that began with a formal vision of the future in 1997. There are about 230 palm trees bordering the pedestrian-friendly town center streets – a welcoming opportunity to provide an event called “Dressing of the Palms.” Held for the enjoyment of all, especially for those on foot who can appreciate the details of each tree up close. From the end of November through January, visitors are welcomed by a 24-hour outdoor public art gallery of palms that were “adopted,” and decorated, by artists, friends, families, school groups, organizations and businesses. This Vilano Beach Main Street event is unusual because it is not coordinated, or regulated, by any government or business. It is an invitation to explore the creativity of members of the community, and to celebrate our coastal living. At the same time, it is an opportunity for those adopting palms to promote their talents. The idea for the event came from local artist Linda Arnold, who offered an initial sample tree this year called “Ponce de Tree-On,” complete with Spanish armor. Judges for the Dressing of the Palms were County Commissioner, Rachael Bennett, Creative & Advertising Manager of the Visitors & Convention Bureau, Stacey Sather and author Susan Brandenburg, a board member on the St. Johns Cultural Council. This past fall, in its 10th year as a Main Street Community, Vilano Beach Main Street hosted the statewide Main Street Conference. They received an “Outstanding Florida Main Street Special Event” award for another Vilano Beach Main Street event, “The Plastic Bottle Boat Race.” In this event, the race consisted of 6-foot boats that were created from recycled plastic bottles by third, fourth and fifth-grade students. Enjoy the gallery of some of the adopted and dressed palmtrees. Story and photos by Sacha Martin OCL

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Beauty Appliances

Great Gift Ideas

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Investing for Newlyweds

finance

By Alan Bratic, CFPA

P

lanning a dream wedding, and that one-of-a-kind honeymoon, often comes first for new couples. After all, everything else will magically fall into place, right? Well, that is not always the case when it comes to investing and finances. Let’s take a brief look at some of the most important aspects when it comes to investing and finances for newlyweds. Communication and Goal Setting To some it might be surprising that I feel that communication between couples comes first when it comes to investing. As with any other aspect of a great relationship, communication between the spouses is absolutely crucial. Often I see couples where one spouse will be entirely involved, while the other does not participate. Also, sometimes the couples will have no clue of each other’s financial situation, and where their assets are invested. One of the first aspects newlyweds should discuss is their finances, hopes, goals, fears and dreams. Sit down with a knowledgeable financial advisor and speak openly on these topics. The Sleep Factor Understanding the different aspects of risk is crucial for couples. Often, one spouse might be comfortable with aggressive investments, such as equities. On the other hand, this might cause the other spouse to lose sleep every night thinking about the fluctuations of global markets on a daily basis. In my opinion, both parties must be comfortable with the amount of risk they are taking in every aspect of their lives. Sometimes being too conservative can cause opportunities to be missed, thus creating more sleepless nights as well. You’re in This Together Determine and create your plan and strategy first. Do not let the products dictate your strategy. Once you pick a suitable risk tolerance, and create an investment strategy, then go into product/investment picking. So many times I see folks come into my office with their financial world created by products versus a sound strategy. This is a perfect time to start working on short-term, mid-term and long-term investment goals, and how to achieve them. Being on the same page and having a strategy on how to achieve your goals will leave you much more content, and it will increase your sense of commitment to each other as well.

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904.471.8880 Jacksonville 904.502.6010 St.Augustine

e:brian@rockitinteractive.com

Till Debt Do You Part More and more couples are greatly in debt when getting married. This can range from student loans and credit cards to mortgages. This is another area where couples should come clean and disclose to each other any personal debts they might have. Start to create a plan and a sound strategy to get out of that “bad debt.” I consider bad debt as any type of an interest-costing loan which does not support a probable appreciating asset. For instance, credit card debts, boat loans, department store cards, etc. A reasonable mortgage loan on a primary residence is not necessarily a negative in my book. This opinion will differ from an advisor to advisor, so make your own judgment call. Bottom line is this: if you don’t openly discuss your debts and create a plan to eliminate the bad ones, it can cause stress and arguments for years to come. Review, Adjust, Repeat As with most carefully crafted plans, life happens along the way. Change is one of the constants in our lives. Thus, every plan needs periodic reviews with your advisor. You can choose the frequency of those reviews as it fits your lifestyle. Often, annual reviews might be sufficient at first, but if changes are needed sooner, make sure you make the needed adjustments as soon as possible. To summarize, keep these points in mind when investing together: 1. Discuss your hopes and fears together openly with your financial advisor. 2. Agree on, and set, parameters for levels of risk you are comfortable with. 3. Determine your joint strategy first, and pick your investment vehicles and products last. 4. Have periodic meetings with your financial advisor to review your portfolios and make necessary adjustments. 5. Enjoy building your future together. The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. To determine which investment(s) may be appropriate for you, consult your financial advisor prior to investing. All performance referenced is historical and is no guarantee of future results. No strategy can assure success or protect against loss. The above material was prepared in association with Peak Advisor Alliance. Securities and advisory services offered through Cetera Advisors LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. Cetera is under separate ownership from any other named entity.

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by Chef Sheery Gaynor photo by Tammy Harrow

CROQUEMBOUCHE 62

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he croquembouche is the traditional French wedding cake, also served at celebratory events such as christenings and first communions. The profiteroles are made from pâte à choux dough, so named because of their resemblance to little cabbages (choux) once baked; croquembouche translates to “crunch in the mouth” because of its crunchy caramel garnish. The tradition of a stacked wedding cake dates back to Roman empire and medieval times; however this particular recipe was developed in 18th century France by the Marie-Antoine Carême, Chef de Cuisine, Pâtissier, and founder of the Pièce Montée, elaborate confectionery centerpieces, and is still commonly served today. Styrofoam cones can be purchased at art supply stores for less than $15 in a range of sizes; use a parchment paper lining for easy removal. Croquembouche assembly kits are available online in the $40 range (company called Lakeland) and the industrial cones range upward of $135 through various pastry supply stores and Amazon. The croquembouche must be assembled just before serving, as the caramel used to assemble does break down. The recipe can be scaled down and used to make simple éclairs or profiteroles (cream puffs) filled with ice cream, pastry cream, Bavarian cream (pastry cream with added whipped cream), and fresh fruit or nuts can be added to any of the creams. Pitted fresh cherries with pastry cream and topped with chocolate ganache is a winning combination. A raspberry puree or chocolate sauce makes a nice accompaniment.

CROQUEMBOUCHE with White Chocolate and Sugared Rose Petals Yields 1 croquembouche 10” diameter x 15 &3/4” tall Pâte à Choux Yields 70-100 1/5”-2” profiteroles 12 oz. all-purpose flour 2 & 2/3 c. (22 oz.) water 8 oz. unsalted butter 1 tsp. salt 10-11 medium eggs (give or take) 2 tsp. baking powder 1. Preheat oven to 425˚F. 2. Sift flour, break eggs. 3. Heat water, butter, and salt to a rolling boil. 4. Using a wooden spoon, stir flour into boiling liquid and cook over medium heat, constantly stirring, for about 5 minutes, until mixture feels quite dry. 5. Transfer the paste to a mixing bowl and mix using paddle until mixture cools slightly. 6. Add eggs one at a time, mixing until completely incorporated. Mixture may not need all the eggs; stop when dough has the consistency of toothpaste. 7. Add baking powder once eggs are mixed in. 8. Pipe choux paste into quarter-sized mini-domes onto a parchment lined sheetpan. 9. Brush tops with egg wash. 10. Bake for about 10 minutes at 425˚F until slightly browned, then lower oven temperature to 375˚F for another 8-10 minutes, until golden brown, dry, and hollow. 11. Cool profiteroles at room temperature.

Vanilla Bean Pastry Crème

food

Yields 6 cups 1 qt. milk 1 vanilla bean or 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract or vanilla paste 2 oz. cornstarch 8 oz. granulated sugar ½ tsp. salt 4 eggs 4 oz. unsalted butter Confectionary sugar for dusting 1. Split vanilla bean lengthwise using a sharp paring knife and scrape seeds into 2 quart heavy bottomed saucepan. 2. Add milk and stir well with wooden spoon. 3. Scald milk, stirring frequently to prevent burning. 4. In a separate bowl, combine eggs, sugar, and cornstarch, using whip. 5. Slowly pour scalded milk into egg mixture, stirring constantly with whip. 6. Pour egg mixture back into saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring constantly with wooden spoon to prevent burning. 7. Remove from heat once the first simmering bubble rises and pour into a shallow baking dish to cool. 8. Sprinkle confectionary sugar on top of warm mixture and lay plastic directly over custard to prevent skin from forming. 9. Cool in refrigerator 6 hours or overnight. 10. Pastry cream can be flavored with melted white, milk, or dark chocolate, praline paste (Nutella), melted butterscotch chips or Andes mints, lemon curd, or berry/fruit compote by stirring in to taste.

Caramel

Yields 2 & ¼ cups 2 c. cold water 2 lbs. granulated sugar 7 oz. corn syrup 1. Prepare a cooling bath for caramel to prevent overcooking by filling a bowl, large enough to place saucepan in, with cold water, set aside. 2. Prepare a cup filled with water and a pastry brush for brushing pan to prevent crystallization of sugars while cooking. 3. Combine water and sugar in stainless steel pan and dissolve sugar over low heat. 4. Increase heat to medium, then add corn syrup once sugar and water boil; return to boil. 5. Brush insides of saucepan if any signs of crystallization appear using pastry brush and water, do not stir mixture. 6. Remove from heat once mixture begins to change to a light amber and place pot directly into cold water. 7. Dip filled profiteroles into caramel and attach to Croquembouche mold. 8. Caramel can also be used for garnish by drizzling from fork or spooned onto parchment paper. To prepare white chocolate fans, melt 1 lb. white chocolate, spread 1-2 ounces at a time onto marble or granite surface with cake icing spatula, then scrape 2” fans with spatula tip. To prepare sugared rose petals, simply brush organic rose (or any other edible flower) petals with lightly whipped egg white, roll in granulated sugar and dry at room temperature overnight. OCL

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The Beginning of an Affair . . . a personal essay

… the sense of the place, the savor of the genie-soul of the place which every place has or else is not a place.” (Walker Percy, The Moviegoer) I do not fall in love easily.  But when I do, I stay in love. Though married many years, I am still in touch with boys, now men, I dated in school.  And they have a special place in my heart. It is the same with places that I have loved: the Smoky Mountains, San Francisco, Paris, London, and Italy, especially Cefalu  on that beautiful part of the Mediterranean called theTyrrhenian Sea. But only one place until now has held my heart. Its sights and sounds are in my blood and brain: New Orleans, almost a foreign nation. It has its own language: neutral ground,  making groceries, banquette, flying horses, chute-the- chute, mosquito hawk,alligator pear, and dressed sandwiches. It has its own accent, closer to that of New York than anywhere in the South, thanks probably to the same convergence of German, Italian, and Irish immigrants in the 1800s. It is rowdy and reverent, lavishing beads at Mardi Gras paradesand lucky or fava beans at St. Joseph’s Day food altars (I wear a silver one on a chain).  Voodoo still  exists.   My  pharmacist  uncle,  with a drugstore between  the French Quarter  and  Treme,  was often  asked to concoct  love potions.   Voodoo Queen Marie  Laveau’s  tomb was vandalized  just last  December, the Xs petitioning favors painted over. And though I can never lose the love I have for that old city, I have been seduced by another one even older:  Saint Augustine. I first visited Saint Augustine as a young woman, expecting my first child and quite taken by the Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche.  I did not know then that the nursing Madonna had been depicted as early as the second century in catacombs and in dozens of paintings and sculptures by artists like da Vinci, Correggio, Michelangelo, El Greco, and Rembrandt.   I also did not know that the child I was carrying  would  later, because of corporate needs,  move to Saint Augustine,  and that I would eventually follow. Call it fate. And so began my love affair with the Nation’s Oldest City  two and a half years ago  as I  walked  the beaches,  the tiny downtown streets,and the oddly-named Magnolia Street with its dense overhanging live oaks. I was home. But a place is more than geography.  It is also people, and they have captured my heart.  I felt so quickly welcomed, perhaps because Saint Augustine  has  so  much to do and  many  ways to meet new folks, perhaps because many of us are new and need each other. My neighbors are incredible.  One  delivers food to the infirmed.   Another  cares for  babies of girls  seeking  an education.  Still others work at food banks. When one neighbor was very  ill,others  brought food, walked her dog, helped with her child.  We chat, we party, we dine out,  we  read. Without my book club my mind would go hungry. Our teachers are amazing.  As a school volunteer, I have seen their dedication. 64

romance by Gaye Saucier Farris

And art and music is everywhere. I meet artists at the dog park, the hairdresser’s, the book club.  Volunteering at the Picasso exhibit was the highlight of  summer, as were the many free concerts at the Pier and Square. St. Augustine’s vibrant theater community has so many talented people who act, dance, sing, and direct for the sheer love of it,while others volunteer to make sets and costumes, usher, and, my  newfound gig, tend bar at the Limelight Theater! And on and on:  Friday Night art walks,  Uptown  Saturday Nights,  markets at the  Pier and Amphitheater,  festivals and food competitions,  national  stars at the  Amphitheater,  Nights of Lights, Fourth of July and New Year’s fireworks over water. I hope to  continue my love affair with St. Augustine  for a long time. And  when  I am done with this body,  I want its  ashes spread on both the Mississippi and the Atlantic. One flows through the city of my youth; the other caresses the shores of  my new and last love. Gaye Saucier Farris has been a newspaper reporter in New Orleans and Cincinnati, a high school and college English teacher, and a science research editor.  She did postgraduate work with the novelist Ernest Gaines.

JOSEPH L. BOLES JR. ATTORNEY AT LAW

ELDER LAW GENERAL PRACTICE • WILLS • TRUSTS & ESTATES • PROBATE AVOIDANCE & ASSET PROTECTION • MEDICAID ELIGIBILITY • REAL ESTATE • BUSINESS LAW “FREE WILLS FOR OVER 65”

NO CHARGE FOR INITIAL CONSULTATION

Joe Boles Attorney at Law Mayor, City of St. Augustine Chairman, Council on Aging

19 RIBERIA STREET • ST. AUGUSTINE

904-824-4278

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Photos by: Melissa Roby

seen FIND (Florida Inland Navigation District) Commsioner Carl Blow and the FIND Board of Commssioners held a Community Outreach Event January 17th aboard El Galeon’ at the Saint Augustine Municipal Marina. The event was free, open to the public and was followed by a FIND Board of Commissioners Meeting January 18. More information about FIND is available at www.aicw.org

Photos: Left to right from top: Kim & Ed Wuellner • Dr. Bob & Jane Thousand • Chris Kelly & Kara Kellley, Becky & Charlie Isiminger • Janet Lewis, Judith Seraphin, Ron Brown, Sue Agresta, Jerry Dixon • Andrea & Robert Samuels • Stephanie & Bill Yarbrough • June Taylor, Frances Marino • Bruce & Carol Humphrey • Joseph Burgess, Shannon Rininger, Andrea Small, Kenneth Rainer, Gary Raulerson • Rachel Bennett, Melissa Glasgow, Carl Blow, Robert Samuels • Terry & Dee Parker, Marty & Jeff Fox • Don Critchlow, Mandy Alonzo, Sam Turner • Judith Seraphin, Sally & George Gardner, Sue Agresta

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Poetry

“Words are the voice of the by Chris Bodor heart” - Confucius

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he Ancient City Poets will present a Plant-a-Poem workshop this month on Feb. 23 at the Gallery Cafe of St. Augustine (in the Staples Plaza.) Please register by 1:45 p.m. The workshop begins at 2 p.m. A small fee of $10 at the door is requested to participate, which provides for bottomless coffee and sweet treats to ignite the write and feed the need to create. Bring a haiku idea or two. You will learn how to cultivate a haiku seed and help it grow with feedback from other workshop participants. Shortly after 3 p.m., travel north up US-1 to City Coffee (1280 N. Ponce de Leon Boulevard,) to continue an afternoon of poetry at the Ancient City Poets Open Mic gathering. Readings are held on the last Sunday of every month from 3-4:30 p.m. The event is held in “renga style,” with no emcee or sign-up list. Anyone who has a desire to approach the podium can read a poem or two. Readings will end when everyone who wishes to read has contributed. Known as “St. Augustine Speaks,” the focus of this series is speaking the written word. It is a supportive environment for all skill levels to present and perfect their poetry delivery style. This is a free event and donations or patronage to City Coffee is encouraged. For more information on Ancient City Poets please “like” their Facebook page, or visit their website www.bodor.org.

Valentine’s Haiku Valentine’s Day the wind chill factor of minus one - Michael Henry Lee ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ first love he gives me his heart in a shoe box - Carla Shepard Sims ~~~~~~~~~~~~ I who loved her loved her icy waves and spray am taken to her - David Pitts ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Remembering … lost loves of long ago. valentine cards. - Ed Korunes 66

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Photographer Focus Part 2 L

ast month we introduced you to some of our contributing photographers, those people who make or break our magazine in so many ways. One of our goals when we took over the publishing of Old City Life was to make the publication very visual. Without the contributions of our many photographers, the magazine would not be where it is today. That said, OCL enjoys the services of over 30 seasoned writers and photographers-too many to feature in a single issue. This month we introduce you to three more of our top notch contributing photographers: Rick McAllister, who also contributes many compelling articles to the magazine; Melissa Roby, who captures so many of our local residents at various events; and our newest contributor, Christine Cousart. Our heartfelt thanks to you. Your contributions to Old City Life are immeasurable!

Christine Cousart • cousartphotography.com • 904-687-7700 Christine Cousart was born and raised in New Zealand and has resided in Saint Augustine Beach for the last eleven years. From a young age there was always a paint brush or a camera in her hand. She has traveled frequently to places like Sweden, Mexico, Portugal and Costa Rica teaching art camps and of course photographing the local scenes and people.Trained privately in fine art by retired art professor Jeanne Pellegrino, she understands the fundamentals of art and design. Her painted portraits are in private collections across the country. She brings this talent into the business portrait also. With a love for small business and an understanding of how important good photography is for marketing and advertising, she makes a point to get it right when shooting for her clients.

Rick McAllister • www.fotoworks.com • 904-501-7777 A resident of St. Augustine for the past 13 years, Rick has been honing his photography interests for the past 40 years. “It was a relaxing focus when I returned from Vietnam although I knew very little about it at that time.” Frequent strolls through the galleries in the Kodak Building in New York City provided the inspiration. His interest in nature sent him immediately to the macro world of botanicals and they remain a specialty of his to this day. “When magnified, Mother Nature has the most brilliant colors and patterns to be found anywhere, and they change from season to season and even day to day.” Other interests include candid portraits and natural light photography. Rick’s work may be seen at The Aviles Gallery on Aviles Street, including pieces from his newest series, The Olde South. This black & white series depicts images from the back roads of the South, with a special emphasis on old cracker style houses.

Melissa Roby • melrobyphotography.com • 904-707-2861 Artist Melissa Roby, owner of Mel Roby Photography, was thrust into owning her own photography business back in 2007 after a lay off. She has always had a passion for photography and fine arts beginning at a very young age and has always wanted her life to be surrounded by the arts while inspiring others to find their artist within. Graduating from UNF with a degree in Communications and Photography her photography has taken her to exotic locations like Paris, the Caribbean and Alaska. Melissa will be slowing down with the weddings and family session this year to open Saint Augustine’s very own art supply store called, The Red Sable. Melissa Roby

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Winter Recovery

gardening By Kimberly Leonardi

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f your fleshy plants, such as bananas, birds of paradise or split leaf philodendron’s were affected by the cold temperatures and have become “mushy”, I would recommend trimming them so they don’t breed disease and insects; however, you may want to wait until after the last freeze of the season to prune woody ornamentals. It’s time to amend the soil for planting if you haven’t already done so! It’s time to start those flower and vegetable seeds for spring transplanting! We just started our pepper seeds so I’m sure we’ll see them peeking up in a few weeks! If you haven’t already done so, complete pruning of dormant trees, shrubs and roses. Be sure not to prune plants too late that have just flowered, but bud this year for next year’s bloom cycle, such as camellias, azaleas, hydrangeas and Indian hawthorn, just to name a few. It’s also good to fertilize the aforementioned once they have finished blooming. Fertilize fruit and citrus trees if you haven’t already done so, and get a weed and feed type fertilizer on the lawn as soon as you notice it greening. This type of fertilizer, if needed, helps strengthen the lawn and deters weed germination. It’s also time to check those irrigation systems, rain gauges and sprinkler heads to ensure all are working properly in anticipation of warmer weather.  Different plants require different care, fertilization and trimming cycles, so if you’re ever a little confused your local garden centers are there for assistance as well as plant diagnostics.   If you ever need to test your soil for ph, or have a plant diagnostic or problem we also have a wonderful resource at the St. Johns county extension office located at 3125 Agricultural Center Drive, telephone number (904) 209-0430.   It’s still a bit early to consider spring and summer annuals, but you should continue to get beautiful blooms from your fall and winter flowers, so enjoy them before the warming trends.  It is love and weddings month, so maybe consider live plants, such as a rose bush or passion vine, as

opposed to cut flowers and give the gift that says, Amore’ every time it blooms! St Johns County is so beautiful and there are many helpful folks and resources to get you headed in the right flowering direction, so until next time, Happy Gardening!!

www.kpacpa.com

1200 plantation island drive, suite 230 • saint augustine, florida • 904.460.0747 68

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history

Romance on Every Corner S Story and photos by Raphael Cosme

aint Augustine, the nation’s oldest city, brims with unique historical sites, but  for more than a century  it has also  been  a city that  radiates  an aura of passion and romance. Saint Augustine caters to this archetypal image through ancient walls, streets, castles and many quaint cottages, creating the perfect environment for a couple in love and enjoying  one another’s company. For centuries, one of the locations designated by Ponce de Leon as  “Flowery Passover,”  named the peninsula La Florida (the Spanish name for Easter)  somewhere close to Saint  Augustine’s  shores. This claim sighted a beautiful area with romantic flowers. The Pedro Menendez-founded mother city destined European colonial couples to come to what is today the nation’s oldest city in the United States. Following the first settlements,  a popular legend of  a love story took over Saint Augustinians. In 1774, when the British returned Florida to Spain, Dolores, the wife of  Colonel Garcia Marti,  attracted the  Chief Officer, Captain Manuel Abela, with the scent of her perfume, starting a strong, passionate love affair that ended in tragedy.   Probably one of the first remarkable stories of love began in 1885  with entrepreneur Henry Flagler. When he visited Saint  Augustine with his second wife for their  honeymoon, he was inspired  to build here, adding to the existing charm and creating a romantic city for vacationers from the north. In 1930,  the local travelogue,  Tourist Guide Magazine, ran  a story  of La  Plaza de la  Constitucion  as  one of the best places for entertainment. At that time, the first radio broadcast system produced regular programs inviting couples to dance in public. These dancing couples were often seen at the plaza – a romantic sight indeed. Without a doubt  Saint  Augustine is  the ultimate icon of all romantic cities in the U.S.  With hundreds of  ancient sights, dozens of romantic courtyards dotted throughout the downtown historic district and  15  miles of beautiful beaches  within five miles of   town,  there is something for every couple to  explore and enjoy together. The city’s narrow streets with rich food, glamorous fashion,

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and countless charming boutiques and cafés are just waiting for you and your beloved to come and explore.   The nation’s oldest masonry  structure,  the  Castillo de San Marcos,  a fortification that was never taken in battle,  has dominated  the landscape of Saint  Augustine. The Castillo’s thick coquina walls brought the romantic aura for young World War II  soldiers  who  regularly  dated  and  got  engaged at the ancient sight where couples could enjoy the bay breeze during a romantic picnic. Some visitors have  made Saint Augustine  the “romantic city,” like  Barry and Linda Stouffer,  who  came to Saint Augustine  to touch the water  of the  “Fountain  of the  Amorino,” depicting  Putto  with a  Dolphin,  at  the  Dow Museum Complex.  “Since this city has  a  Spanish background that is very romantic, and  Spain  is known as a romantic country, Saint  Augustine has similar architecture and history that make it better romantically.  Here at this renaissance fountain we’ll  seal our love for eternity,” said Linda. Could Saint  Augustine be one of the 10 best romantic cities in the world? “Why not?,” the Nelson couple asked. “We stayed in a nice Anastasia Island hotel, had  a private beach and central room  whirl-pool spa  for  our wedding anniversary. Then we continued the celebration romantically throughout the night with Saint Augustine sangria.” Joe Finnegan, owner of the St. Francis bed-and-breakfast, said he deals with romantic couples every day. “First, this building was built in 1791  with old world charm located in the nation’s oldest city. With romantic rooms and suites, private walled yards with lush gardens, balconies, whirlpool tubs, gourmet breakfasts and fireplaces, all these added amenities make couples  feel romantic,” he said. “Plus, the classic Saint  Augustine carriage can pick up  the lovers  at the front entrance. That makes this place the best romantic getaway.” In the last 10 years, the city has established  a great reputation in the B&B industry,  and  has  as many as 37 throughout town, some with  beach  or bayfront locations.  Let’s  not forget Saint Augustine’s  “love trees,”  growing together in different downtown areas.  According to historians, the trees fusion is not an accident.  There was a biologist who planted these unusual trees,  probably  to make Saint Augustine more  of a  romantic  city, but locals made it a legend. If you kiss your loved one under the tree, you will have an everlasting romance. Generations of romantic couples have kissed under the love tree, and return on their anniversary to kiss again. And that’s not all. Many other  unique,  charming  places with  romantic atmospheres in ideal locations can be found all over Saint Augustine. So many choices, ready to meet the desires and tastes of any couple, makes Saint Augustine the perfect place to be a part of their love story. OCL 69


The Man and His Mustang Meet Art Moxon, and learn about his horsemanship journey with his curly mustang, Frosty. The Owner, Art Moxon Every spouse loves surprises. And that is just what my wife, Denise Moxon, said when I told her I wanted to buy a horse. After watching my wife become happily involved with her dressage riding, I knew that if we were going to spend any time together I would have to join her world of horses. She was even more surprised when I told her I wanted a mustang.  Mustangs are not well-known in the dressage world, but that was OK, as dressage is a little too fancy for me.   I wanted the most rugged, western cow pony I could find. My search for the perfect horse lead me to the curly mustang. They are rugged, with their dreadlock manes and thick curly fur, a true piece of Americana. Frosty had only 20 hours in training, not much for an eight-year-old horse. But there was something endearing and gentle about her eyes that attracted me. When the seller learned

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that I was 70, and hadn’t ridden in 50 years, she refused to sell her to me, fearing that I would be injured. After several months of searching with no success, I asked my wife to call again. This time the woman agreed, and Frosty moved to Florida. Frosty was not fit for me to ride upon arrival. I wasn’t sure if she would ever accept a rider. With plenty of time on my hands as a retired anesthesiologist, I committed to working with Frosty. I had never trained a horse, and decided to seek guidance from Cindy Norman. Frosty and I developed a special bond during her training, and I rode her a few times each week. Nothing is more heartwarming than to hear her calling me in the distance. I’m a lucky guy. The experience of learning to train my own horse always brightens my day.

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equine Story and photos by Cindy Norman and Art Moxon The Trainer, Cindy Norman When I first spoke with Art Moxon’s wife, Denise, I was doubtful the conversation would turn into a successful experience.   Denise candidly described her husband as a “man’s man.” She told me what she wanted most for her husband - safety. She then described the horse, an eight-year-old curly mustang with minimal training. Denise was also clear that Art was not accustomed to taking instructions from a woman. “Oh dear...” I thought. From my previous lifetime experiences, I am accustomed to being the only female in the board room. Getting along with Art was not a concern, and training horses is my passion.   However, an untrained mustang, combined with a 70-year-old retiree who hasn’t ridden in many years, is cause for concern.  Mustangs live wild on the range, have no human interaction and will flee - or fight in less than a second.  Once humans reach that  “fabulous age,” we no longer bounce when we hit the ground, our reaction time is slower and our recovery time for injuries is longer. Nonetheless, I agreed to discuss options with Art.  When Art called, he was polite, forthright, confident and firm in his goals of training his mustang. I offered to do an evaluation of Art and his horse working together.   During that time, Art learned an important lesson; what horses see in one eye is completely different from what they see in the other.  When training, you have to train both sides of the horse.   With this in mind, we agreed upon an action plan for the three of us. Art would observe and learn, while I trained one side of the horse. He would be responsible for training the other side inbetween sessions. What followed over several months was some of the most amazing transformations that I have ever had the pleasure of witnessing. I watched Frosty, the flighty, fearful, jumpy curly mustang, become a very respectful, responsive and relaxed horse.   I watched Art accept the responsibility of training his horse with respect and enthusiasm. There was never a question of whether Art had done his homework between sessions.   Instead, I was most often chastising him for jumping ahead in his research, study and practice with his horse.  I watched the two of them develop an incredible bond of trust, respect and leadership. Art and Frosty quickly became one of my favorite teams. The joy of watching their first arena ride and later, their first trail ride, are fond memories. I must check in sometime to see if he has decided to try western dressage with his rugged cow pony. OCL

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Art consistently did his “homework” between sessions. The results were outstanding.

Mustangs are not well-known in the dressage world, but they are rugged and a true piece of Americana.

Art wasn’t sure if Frosty would ever accept a rider. Now he rides her a few times each week.

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Photos by: Melissa Roby

seen

Habitat for Humanity, St. Augustine/ St. Johns County recently held their annual Gala for Humanity with live music, delicious food, a silent auction and raffles. The event supports building homes, communities and hope in St. Johns County. This year’s Gala was held December 14 at Trinity Episcopal Church.

Photos: Left to right from top: Hilary Cildes, Bart Piniaz • John Reardon, Candy Radford & Gary Jordan • Brent Smith, Alia Reiner, Shannon Page & David Aikina • Jennifer Wenzel, Lakay Cornell & Jenny Bookhout • Stephanie Showalter, Sue Chitwood • Charlie and Lorri Lassiter • Jeanie & Dannie Carter • Ted Bruck & Imelda Foley • William Bookhout, Cathy Whittington & Ben Bookhout • Leanne Daniels, Winnie Hess, Jerry Bates • Robert Coleman & Lakay Cornell • Faye Dawkins, Lisa White • David Flickinger, Kate Flickinger • Royce Pats, Summer Garrett volume 8

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contributors Joseph L. Boles, Jr. moved to Saint Augustine with his parents in 1967. He graduated from Saint Augustine High school in 1970 and went on to the University of Florida, where he earned a degree in Law and a degree in Design. He has seven wonderful children and a beautiful wife named Jane. He serves as Mayor of the City of Saint Augustine and is also a member of Memorial Presbyterian Church. His hobbies are golfing, fishing and painting.

Tammy Harrow is an avid world traveler, photographer and writer. She loves to journey around the globe searching for beauty and inspiration. She has created portraits throughout the US. Since relocating to St Augustine, Tammy has expanded into commercial photography and has a special place in her heart creatively photographing culinary dishes for local restaurants. She has a degree in Journalism, is nationally published and has trained with some of National Geographic’s top photographers.

Sherry Gaynor is a Certified Executive Pastry Chef (CEPC) and Certified Culinary Educator (CCE). She is a long-time resident of Saint Augustine and serves as a Chef Instructor for First Coast Technical College who is assigned to teach at Florida School for the Deaf and Blind. Sherry is from New Orleans, attended culinary school through Delgado Community College’s apprenticeship program and recently acquired her bachelor’s degree in Career and Technical Education: Workforce and Program Development, from the University of West Florida. She was recently awarded Teacher of the Year 2013-14 Ashley Bates is a professional writer and social media manager. An Orlando native, Ashley graduated from the University of Central Florida. and then moved to Saint Augustine from Gainesville, Ga. She got her start in journalism writing sports articles for The (Gainesville, Ga.) Times and moved onto writing arts and entertainment, food and religion features. She was lucky enough two receive two awards from the Georgia Press Association for “Writer of the Year” in religion reporting. Today her hobbies including spending time with family and enjoying good food and wine. 

Originally from Hagerstown Maryland, Justin Itnyre’s photographs have been featured on several covers of local magazine Old City Life. His architectural photography has been published in Homes & Land Jacksonville Magazine, Unique Homes, and the book, Historic Sites of St. Augustine and St. Johns County. Internationally arete images hit the press for Volvo Powertrain, New Beauty Magazine, and Blue Green Corporation. www.justiniphoto.com

Raphael Cosme earned a Master Degree in Archaeology from the Center of Advance Studies of Puerto Rico and later a degree in communications and public relations. In 1978, he discovered the Ponce de Leon site in Puerto Rico. He is specialized in Museum Management Collections from the Smithsonian Institution. A historian who has written hundreds of articles about Pre-Columbian and Spanish Colonial Art, moved from the Old San Juan, Puerto Rico and has found in Saint Augustine the mirror of his Spanish heritage. He and his wife Perla have three children: Angela, Samantha, and Raphael, Jr.

Jeanne Maron, owner/operator of The Gifted Cork, has been at her location for two years, specializing in fine wines from around the world. Maron is the Vice Charge-de-Presse of North Florida Chapter’s Chaîne des Rôtisseurs. She also serves as Chairman of the Board of Children’s Home Society, Buckner Division, in Jacksonville. To have Jeanne answer your questions about wine call 810.1083 or visit thegiftedcork.com.

Tommy Addison is an international & national award winning photographer who has resided in Saint Augustine for the past 25 years. His work is widely published throughout the world and has been a long time contributor to Old City Life Magazine. Addison is an avid world traveler who has traveled around the world (4) times on countless overseas adventures. He is the owner of Photographic Arts Inc. (Commercial and Fine Art Photography) and is currently the Photographic Manager for Leonard’s Studio.

Nicole and Robert Nettles are long time residents of Saint Augustine and owners of Blue Water Jewelers. They invite you to visit their state of the art custom design and jewelry facility. Blue Water Jewelers is a family owned business specializing in strong relationships and personal service. Meet their wonderful staff of two master jewelers, two trained watch repairmen and CAD/Custom Design Specialists at 500 Anastasia Blvd. bluewater-jewelers.com. Rick McAllister spent 20 years in the corporate world of New York City, a year on a Congressional program in the U.S. House of Representatives, has owned several small businesses, managed and taught scuba diving in the Florida Keys and most recently was an assistant at World Golf Village. Throughout this varied career and travels around the world, Rick has developed and honed his photographic and writing skills. A Vietnam Vet, he continues to enjoy traveling, kayaking, golf and time with his daughter Lauren and her family in New Jersey. Rick’s photography can be seen atfotowurks.com and he can be contacted or at 904.501.7777.

Alan Bratic is a 1997 graduate of Flagler College with a degree in Business and Economics. He lives in Saint Augustine with his wife and three children. Bratic is a Certified Financial Planner, Registered Investment Advisor, Branch Manager with Linsco Private Ledger and holds series 7, 24, 63 and 65 licenses. He can be contacted through the ThompsonBaker Agency, Inc. at 904.824.1631 ext. 4203.

Chris Bodor left his NY City job of ten years and moved

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Kimberly Leonardi and her husband Kevin have run Leonardi’s Nursery for more than twenty years and strive to give back to the community that has supported Leonardi’s for the past 48 years. They are members of the Florida Nursery Growers Association and the Florida Native Plant Society. Please feel free to send any questions or comments to leonardisnursery@msn.com.

to Saint Augustine in the summer of 2003. In New York he was known as the “Train of Thought Commuter”, because of the volumes of poetry that he composed during his daily commute. With no train in Saint Augustine, Bodor began the arduous task of reinventing himself. He runs his own imprint, Poet Plant Press, with his wife Mary Beth. The couple will celebrate 23 years of marriage in June and are collecting poems on the subject of Florida for a 2014 release.

Barbara Hunt Hanrahan is a writer/journalist/editor as well as a nurse. Barb earned her Master of Arts Degree in Communication from Emerson College in Boston, her Bachelor of Science Degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, and her Nursing Certification from First Coast Technical College. She has been a writer/journalist/editor for 20 years. She also teaches and coaches group exercise classes, gymnastics and horseback riding. Following a faith filled life is her greatest passion in life.

Dr. Douglas L. Johnson of the Saint Augustine Oral & Facial Surgical Center is a Board Certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. He completed a certified fellowship in Facial Cosmetic Surgery before starting his own practice here over eight years ago. He resides in Saint Augustine with his wife and four children. For more information on procedures offered please visit floridafacedoc.com or call 904.460.0505.

Kim Miller has been in the health field her entire adult life. A full-time personal trainer and wellness coach, she holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Health and Physical Education, certified as a personal trainer through the American Council on Exercise and a certified wellness coach with Wellcoaches. She is owner of Bodysmart Inc, and blogs on health and wellness on her Bodysmart Fitness Through The Ages site bodysmartinc.com or 904.501.6002.

Kate Gardiner a seasoned photojournalist, turned her camera towards weddings and families after leaving a job at a major daily newspaper in Connecticut to move to Florida in 2007. Her eye for story-telling shows in her style of photographing couples and the joy they are share Kate’s fashion work has been published in Old City Life Magazine as well as Jacksonville Bride Magazine and editorial work in newspapers and magazines world wide. She has also been the proud recipient of the Best of St Augustine award for Best Photographer for 4 years running.

Cindy Norman is a professional trainer, clinician and personal equine coach. She owns Norman Natural Horsemanship, where she teaches horsemanship to humans and develops horses using natural horsemanship techniques. Cindy is a member of the St Johns County Horse Counsel and a Board Member of the Northeast Florida Equine Society. She lives on her St. Augustine farm River Horse Run (www.riverhorserun.com) and travels around the US training horses and people. volume 8

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Life’s Not Perfect.

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Hunter Conrad • Julie K. Kurtz • Patrick T. Canan • Andrew Morgan volume 8

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Issue 2

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Old City Life Magazine - February 2014  

The Saint Augustine, Florida Lifestyle Magazine

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