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Page 1

June/July 2016

À La Mode

GET THE SUMMER SCOOP

BRIGHT SPOTS PHOTOS FOR A SUNNY DAY

BOWLED OVER CRICKET WINS LOCAL FANS

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in this issue

20 27

Bowled Over by Cricket

Make Mine a là Mode Pie and ice cream are a perfect summer pairing

35

Cary Magazine’s Movers and Shakers

47 Power Professionals 55 The Magic Man

Cary magician enchants audiences of all ages

What’s Your Idea?

66 Meet Fanny Slater 74 Summer Dreams

A photo essay by Cary Photographic Artists

6

JUNE/JULY 2016

Zoe, a Papillon and Maltese mixed breed owned by Lesley Richmond, the owner of Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream, begs for a treat during a photo shoot. Read more about cool desserts on page 27.

Jonathan Fredin

60 The A-Ha Moment


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in every issue

CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

June/July 2016 • Volume 13, Number 5 EXECUTIVE

15

We Love

68 70 80

Exclusive Dish: Kailua Coupe from Fanny Slater

Ron Smith, Executive Publisher Bill Zadeits, Publisher

Charity Spotlight: Fill Your Bucket List Foundation Garden Adventurer: Tomato Troubles

EDITORIAL

Nancy Pardue, Editor Amber Keister, Editor CONTRIBUTORS

L.A. Jackson David McCreary PHOTOGRAPHY

Jonathan Fredin, Chief Photographer PRODUCTION

Jennifer Casey, Graphic Designer Ronald Dowdy, Graphic Designer Dylan Gilroy, Web Designer Beth Harris, Graphic Designer Amy Mangels, Graphic Designer Matt Rice, Webmaster/SEO Rachel Sheffield, Web Designer Jim Sleeper, Graphic Designer

departments 10

ADVERTISING

Editors’ Letters

12

Letters from Readers

82

Happenings

86

Write Light

ON THE COVER: Kristen Cleve, owner of Slice Pie Company, and Andia Xouris, founder of The Freezing Pointe, are friends and agreed to help us with our story

in the next issue

on pie and ice cream, a classic summer pairing. Photo by Jonathan Fredin

Kris Schultz, Associate Publisher PUBLIC RELATIONS

S&A Communications Chuck Norman, APR ADMINISTRATIVE

Mor Aframian, Events Assistant & Online Community Manager Cherise Klug, Traffic Manager Lisa McGraw, Circulation Coordinator Valerie Renard, Human Resource Manager Kristin Tighe, Accounting Cary Magazine © is published eight times annually by Cherokee Media Group. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Subscriptions are $18/year. CARY MAGAZINE

Westview at Weston 301 Cascade Pointe Lane Cary, North Carolina 27513 (919) 674-6020 • (800) 608-7500 • Fax (919) 674-6027 www.carymagazine.com This publication does not endorse, either directly or implicitly, the people, activities, products or advertising published herein. Information in the magazine is deemed credible to the best of our knowledge.

Back to School! Get ready for class and meet some amazing teens 8

JUNE/JULY 2016

Cary Magazine is a proud member and supporter of all five chambers in Western Wake County. The Cary Chamber of Commerce, Apex Chamber of Commerce, Morrisville Chamber of Commerce, Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce, and Garner Chamber of Commerce. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.


Our goal is good health for all. We get a kick out of providing world-class healthcare to the people of southwestern Wake County. With comprehensive services, unparalleled expertise, the latest in technologies and services, including a 24-hour ED and a full-service birthplace, we’re proud to play an integral part in making our communities healthier. Exceptional people. Exceptional care. For all of our communities.

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WakeMed Cary Hospital | 1900 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary, NC 27518 | 919.350.8000 | caryhospital.wakemed.org


editors’ letters PERHAPS IT’S an occupational

hazard, but I love quotes and sayings. Not the overdone Live-Love-Laugh kind, but ones that make me think, or remember. Example? My Embrace the Day sampler, picked up after an exhilarating day in the woods during which I climbed/was hoisted over a 14-foot wall by people who were, until that day, strangers. It hangs by our front door. A 50-cent thrift shop find asks me daily, What would you do, if you knew you could not fail? And this, pinned up here in my office: Failure isn’t the worst thing that can happen. Regret is. Having experienced both, I believe that. This issue, you’ll meet others who believe it too: Steven, who’s ditched the status quo to re-invent something we all

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

use every day. Peggy, spreading snippets of joy just when they’re needed most. And James, who knows the stats but refuses to give up hope. Their attitudes reflect those of our second annual Movers & Shakers honorees, a group of people who run to claim their “It,” rather than standing by, waiting. After all, one of them said: If you don’t try, you’ll never know what could be. Wonder if she’s got that stitched on a pillow? Thanks for reading,

Nancy Pardue Editor

Amber takes a swing before a cricket match as Morrisville Mayor Mark Stohlman acts as keeper.

FROM LATE SPRING until early fall, hundreds of cricket players across the Triangle gather for a few hours each week. At a recent game, good hits and skillful fielding were met with laughter and delighted shouts. I asked some participants if playing the game of their youth makes them feel like kids again. They responded with big grins, 10

JUNE/JULY 2016

and Anirudh Ullal said, “I wouldn’t have put it any other way.” Clearly these gentlemen understand the benefits of play. Many of us don’t give playtime the status it deserves. Another deadline, another appointment, or another activity gets in the way and soon we are feeling frazzled, tense and stressed. But studies show that a little unstructured enjoyment can work wonders. Play has been shown to relieve stress, improve memory and brain function, boost creativity, improve relationships, and keep us feeling young and energetic. All that from a little fun with your friends. In addition to the cricketers, this issue includes Magic Roman, a Cary magician who entertains audiences with corny jokes, balloons and some amazing tricks. We even had fun hanging out in the Page-Walker garden with our Movers & Shakers. Although a few turns at bat didn’t convince me to take up cricket, I plan to take more dog walks and build more sand castles this summer. So make time for playtime; it’s good for you!

Amber Keister Editor


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letters from readers

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“My name is Cheri Spitz and I have been the director of Resurrection Lutheran Preschool in Cary for 30 years. I’m retiring at the end of this preschool year, but wanted to thank you for the Maggy Awards before I leave my position. We have felt very honored to have been the recipient of the Maggy Award Honorable Mention for four years … We have heard from numerous parents who have come to register here, that the Maggy Award weighed quite heavily into their decision.  We also feel especially honored since we are just a small preschool and only have our parents’ votes compared with the multiple location daycares. Just wanted to let you know that RLP appreciates you!” Cheri Spitz, Resurrection Lutheran Preschool “I really do love your recipes. My hubby, Dave, and I always love cooking together. We actually used your recipe yesterday and it was yummy!” Jane, via CaryMagazine.com

“The Center for Volunteer Caregiving’s Red Carpet Rendezvous was a big success! Cary Magazine’s support helped us to strengthen our sponsorships and raise more money.  We had record sponsorship dollars this year, enabling us to exceed our event goal of raising $45,000. Thanks so much for supporting the Center.” Sharon Nell “On behalf of the families we serve, our board, volunteers and staff, our sincere thanks for volunteering to clean up and prune one of our property’s yards. Our mission of teaching homeless working families with children the life skills needed and families learning ‘how to fish’ for themselves is possible because of you. Thank you for your part in supporting that self-sufficiency!” Sameena Rashid, The Carying Place “Wow! Thanks so much for the extraordinary and complimentary article and accompanying (action!) photograph. … You certainly captured my feelings about the benefits of volunteering. … Great team!” – Anne Kratzer, Cary

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3

2

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We Love! COMPILED BY AMBER KEISTER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

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We Love!

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WHERE TO SHOP Paisley Boutique 117 W. Chatham St., Cary, and 1162 Parkside Main St., Cary (919) 698-9390 paisleync.com Something You 511 Broad St., Fuquay-Varina (919) 557-9984 SomethingYou.com Wilderness House 3651 SW Cary Parkway, Cary (919) 460-8151 facebook.com/wildernesshousecary

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2. LETTER PERFECT Spice up a plain jacket with a contrasting monogram; Charles River windbreaker, $36.95. SomethingYou.com

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Before a game of hard tennis ball cricket between the Burlington Blues and the RTP Panthers, Kirti Thakkar, right, of team Chikky Chikky Boom Boom practices his bowling as Rahul Patwardhan, left, umpires.

20

JUNE/JULY 2016


Bowled Over by Cricket

SPORT IS GAINING ATTENTION AND POPULARITY THANKS TO LOCAL SUPPORTERS WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

C

ricket is spreading its wings in the Triangle. Anirudh Ullal is used to the teasing, comparing the sport he loves to a chirping insect, but

this analogy is no joke.

In 2009 the Triangle Cricket League, which Ullal helped found, had 10 teams and about 180 play-

ers. Today the group has more than 1,300 people in its database. The majority are from the Triangle, but many drive from High Point, Greensboro, Greenville and Burlington to play here. With its diverse population, Morrisville is at the center of this cricket boom; roughly 30 percent of residents here are of South Asian descent, and want to play the game of their youth and share it with their children. “We have to account for the international flavor of the community here,” said Ullal, who grew up playing cricket in India. “We have a lot of people from India, the Caribbean, New Zealand or England. All these people have grown up playing cricket. We feel it provides an opportunity to reconnect with something we’re all very familiar with from back home.” Growing the sport

Traditional cricket is played with a hard leather ball and protective gear, and a game can last for days. Players here prefer hard tennis ball cricket, a modified game with a softer ball and continued on page 23

“Cricket is not necessarily a well-known sport. Often you’re explaining to people here that cricket is not just an insect or a game played in Harry Potter books,” says Anirudh Ullal with the Triangle Cricket League. That is changing as the game attracts more local players. CARY MAGAZINE 21


Devankur Thakur (second from right) gets high fives from Burlington Blues teammates after catching a fly ball in their match against the RTP Panthers. Other players are, from left, Ravi Anumak, Sushil Kumar, Kalyan Gummadi and Rajesh Vintha.

Machiket Bhawe of the RTP Panthers hits the ball during a match against the Burlington Blues at Shiloh Park in Morrisville. The Panthers won the match by 66 runs; the final score was 122-56.

22

JUNE/JULY 2016


“I want to see how we can spread the sport in different directions so it doesn’t become an Indian thing or West Indian thing or cricket just for expatriates.”

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continued from page 21

no pads, which only lasts a couple of hours. This spring 58 teams, with 11 players each, signed up for hard tennis ball cricket. Several more teams are on the waiting list. “Based on the number of teams and players we have, we are about three fields short,” said Ullal, the league’s secretary. “To accommodate more players — we know there are more people asking for opportunities to play — we would need more fields.” In Morrisville, cricket is played on multipurpose fields at Cedar Fork District Park, Shiloh Park and Crabtree Creek Nature Park. Other fields are nearby in Durham. The league also sponsors two 12-week sessions of youth cricket a year. Each session fields 10 teams of 17 to 20 kids each. More than 200 kids participate in the youth cricket program, according to Ullal. The most recent registration filled up in six days. “The main drive behind starting the Triangle Cricket League was our passion to introduce cricket to kids,” he said.

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The sport has also benefitted from the support of Morrisville officials and their willingness to respond to requests from residents. “The town has adapted existing fields and parks to enable cricket to be played, along with softball and other traditional sports,” said Mark Stohlman, mayor of

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continued on page 24 CARY MAGAZINE 23


SHOP | DINE | UNWIND

Wind Down Wednesday SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

JUNE 1st – JULY 27th June 01 Magic Pipers June 08 Band Of Oz

Pankaj Deshpande, captain of the RTP Panthers, holds a hard leather cricket ball. The traditional red ball is used in daytime matches, but a white ball is used when games are played under lights.

June 15 The Embers June 22 Restless Raleigh June 29 Jim Quick & Coastline July 06 Bull City Syndicate July 13 Spare Change

continued from page 23

July 20 SwivelHip

Morrisville. “The town has been really good about letting the Triangle Cricket League set up these pitches, maintain them and organize tournaments.” The town benefits as well, from the many visitors attracted by the sport. A National Youth Cricket League tournament held at Morrisville’s Cedar Fork District Park last July attracted hundreds of young players and their families from all over the country. “The sport is not going to go away. It’s going to grow like crazy,” said Stohlman, who took up the game last year.

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On the map

CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA • GARNER

At the intersection of Tryon and Kildaire Farm Road

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CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

24

JUNE/JULY 2016

Alvin Kallicharan, a former captain of the West Indies national cricket team and a two-time World Cup champion, moved to the area five years ago and has become an unofficial ambassador for Triangle cricket. “By speaking to Americans, local people, I want to see how we can spread the sport in different directions so it doesn’t become an Indian thing or West Indian thing or cricket just for expatriates,” he said. “I want everybody to understand the game.” The recently opened cricket pitch at

Morrisville’s Church Street Park will help generate interest throughout the region, Kallicharan says. “What Morrisville has done will have a tremendous effect toward bringing people from outside North Carolina to play in tournaments on a prestigious ground like this,” he said. As the only regulation-size cricket field between Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and New Jersey, the facility has already attracted out-oftown visitors. In November, officials from the International Cricket Council visited Church Street Park and were impressed by the cricket grounds, Stohlman says. The town hopes to eventually attract larger national tournaments. In the meantime, the field will host regional tournaments and exhibition games featuring national and international teams. “This regulation-size cricket field gives Morrisville something that no other town in North Carolina has and puts us on the map as a community that’s innovative, inclusive and willing to do something a little different from the rest of the towns,” Stohlman said. “It’s already paid off. There’s already so much excitement.” t


CRICKET SIMPLIFIED Much like baseball, two teams take turns hitting and fielding. As one team tries to score runs, the other team fields and tries to get the batter out. The team with the most runs wins.

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➨ Each team has 11 players, and each team bats once.

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The game ➨ For the batting team, one batsman stands at each end of the pitch, in the crease in front of the wicket. The striker must protect his wicket and score runs. ➨ The bowler throws from one end of the pitch to the striker at the other end. ➨ The striker hits the ball, and while the ball is in play, the striker and non-striker run between the creases, switching sides. Every time they switch sides safely, a run is scored.

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➨ An inning lasts until 10 outs or a predetermined number of overs, whichever comes first. Getting out There are many ways to get out, but among the most common are: ➨ The bowler hits the wicket with the ball. ➨ A fielder hits the wicket with the ball while the batsman is out of the crease. ➨ A hit ball is caught by a fielder, like a pop fly in baseball. ➨ The batsman uses his leg to stop the ball from hitting the wicket.

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Source: High Point Cricket Club CARY MAGAZINE 25


THE MAGGY AWARDS

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WRITTEN BY DAVID MCCREARY

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

WHEN IT COMES

e od

Ma

e k

e à la n i M M

to classic treats

We spotlight three local entrepre-

to enjoy this season, it’s hard to beat

neurs who craft artisan desserts worth

apple pie à la mode. After all, ice

pairing and sharing — perhaps at

cream and fruited pastry make for an

your next summertime soiree.

impeccable union.

continued on page 28

Apple pie from Slice Pie Company and vanilla ice cream from The Freezing Pointe in a classic summer combo. While the businesses aren’t connected, the two owners are friends and agreed to meet for some yummy pairings.

CARY MAGAZINE 27


continued from page 27

The Freezing Pointe

“Ice cream makes everyone happy.” — Andia Xouris, The Freezing Pointe

Andia Xouris founded The Freezing Pointe two years ago and now churns out flavors such as dark chocolate raspberry truffle, mocha macchiato and salted caramel. 28

JUNE/JULY 2016

Andia Xouris, who founded The Freezing Pointe two years ago at her kitchen table, draws inspiration from her humble upbringing. Her father developed a successful food distribution business, and she’s following in his footsteps. “I’m the only child of immigrants who came here for a better life,” said Xouris, who was born in Cyprus and now lives in Cary. Largely a catering and special-event enterprise, The Freezing Pointe was birthed after Xouris and her husband, George, an account executive at an RTP firm, earned certification from the Frozen Dessert Institute and traveled to several ice cream schools to learn the creation process. More than 40 flavors, like dark chocolate raspberry truffle and mocha macchiato, come out of Xouris’ 1,000-square-foot production kitchen, but salted caramel reigns supreme. “People come looking for it,” Xouris said with a smile. An onsite showroom allows for private tastings, and a membership club features a flavor of the month that people can purchase in quarts. The Freezing Pointe, which sources fruit from the Raleigh Farmers Market, often sets up sundae bars at weddings, parties and corporate events. The company’s baklava ice cream is available at Chapel Hill’s Kipos Greek Taverna and Gussy’s Place in Durham. Business has expanded into concessions spaces at the Raleigh Convention Center and Red Hat Amphitheater. As a small business owner, Xouris understands the importance of fostering relationships with customers. “It’s challenging to find time to accomplish everything, but I take satisfaction in knowing I can help make people’s special events memorable,” she said. “Ice cream makes everyone happy.” 10207-C Chapel Hill Road, Morrisville (919) 901-8560 thefreezingpointe.com


Kristen Cleve, founder of Slice Pie Company, delivers desserts, such as her signature apple pie, below, in a restored 1931 Ford Model A coupe.

Slice Pie Company

Before she was old enough to see over the kitchen countertop, Kristen Cleve began helping her father, Michael Mullins, bake scratch-made pies from cherished family recipes. Soon neighbors in her community near Swift Creek began receiving by-the-slice goodness. Their wildly enthusiastic response ultimately led Cleve to launch Slice Pie Company in 2014. Today, the pies are turned out daily from a commercial kitchen in a detached garage at Cleve’s childhood home. “We offer more than 20 varieties, but we can also make custom pies using other people’s recipes,” said Cleve, also known as The Pie Lady, wife of software engineer John Cleve and mom to 5-year-old Eliana. The signature apple pie, a tangy, triedand-true classic, won a blue ribbon when Cleve’s father entered it in the North Carolina State Fair competition back in 1997.

“Our pecan pie has a religious following,” said Mullins, who along with other family members, helps bake pies and fill orders. Whether you choose key lime or dark chocolate truffle, lemon meringue or strawberry rhubarb, you can’t go wrong. What makes these pies so distinctive? The irresistible, tawny crust. “Since it’s dairy-free, egg-free, soy-free

and nut-free, it’s essentially vegan as long as someone doesn’t have trouble with granulated sugar,” said Cleve. Pies are available by ordering online, and Slice ships nationwide. You can find them locally at The Butcher’s Market, Rey’s Restaurant, and Oak City Meatball Shoppe in Raleigh. Cleve even makes local deliveries in a beautifully restored 1931 Ford Model A coupe named Rosie. “In addition to selling our pies, we donate to local charities, because we believe in giving back to the community,” said Cleve. Cleve wants to show Eliana that it’s possible to be a good mother and a passionate entrepreneur. “I want to give my daughter all the love and attention she needs, but at the same time I want to empower her to succeed in life.” (919) 349-8499 slicepiecompany.com continued on page 31 CARY MAGAZINE 29


Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream offers cookies, homemade ice cream and popsicles. A planned shop will have other occasional treats including pies, cobblers and cinnamon rolls.

Lesley Richmond, founder of Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream, sold treats from several vintage carts when she started her business. She plans to open a shop in Holly Springs this summer.

30

JUNE/JULY 2016


continued from page 29

Mama Bird’s Cookies + Cream

Several years ago Lesley Richmond bought a small ice cream maker. Her husband and daughters loved the homemade treat so much they shared it with friends. “People kept telling me how good it was and encouraged me to find a way to sell it,” Richmond said. As a trial run, Richmond had several vintage carts custom produced and began selling ice cream, cookies, popsicles and other treats. She named the business Mama Bird’s after the nicknames of her youngest daughter, Averi, and oldest daughter, Taylor. Business is good enough that Richmond plans to open a storefront near downtown Holly Springs by this summer. “It’s scary to start a brick-and-mortar place, but we hope to be open Thursdays through Sundays at first,” said Richmond, who has teamed up with Sludge Coffee Roaster in the endeavor. She plans to make cinnamon rolls on Sundays. Mama Bird’s ice cream starts with a rich custard base, adding flavors like chocolate three ways, banana cream pie and maple bacon. “We’ll have various flavors of cookies, so people can customize their ice cream sandwich,” said Richmond, who also works full-time as outreach coordinator for Meals on Wheels of Wake County. Richmond believes Holly Springs, the town where her husband works as a firefighter, is the perfect spot to open her shop. “Everybody here has been extremely supportive of me,” she said, “and I want to repay that kindness by giving a portion of my proceeds back to charitable organizations in the community.” 304 N. Main St., Holly Springs (919) 698-9854 mamabirdsicecream.com CARY MAGAZINE 31


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CARY • APEX • MORRISVILLE • HOLLY SPRINGS • FUQUAY-VARINA

COMPILED BY NANCY PARDUE | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Movers Shakers FAITH. FAMILY. FRIENDS.

The members of this year’s class of Movers & Shakers truly understand that success is not a solo proposition. Amid all their nuts-and-bolts advice, they remind us that these “three F’s” are at least as important as a black-ink bottom line. They work hard. They give generously. And we’re lucky to have them as part of our Western Wake community. Turn the page, and meet the 2016 Cary Magazine Movers & Shakers.

Victoria Reed’s sculpture “Dapple” was featured in Cary Visual Art’s 2011 Outdoor Sculpture Show. It can now be seen in the garden at Cary’s Page-Walker Arts & History Center. Many thanks to the Page-Walker staff and the Town of Cary for allowing us to photograph the 2016 Movers & Shakers on the center’s grounds. CARY MAGAZINE 35


AMY BARDI POSITION: Founder and executive direc-

tor of global nonprofit Clothed in Hope, which teaches impoverished women sewing, entrepreneurship and life skills. AGE: 26 PROUD OF: Earning the title of “Mama Amy” to 120 Zambian women who are in our training program. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: By this we know

love, that Jesus laid down His life for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters. - 1 John 3:16 FUN FACT: My cure for hard days, and celebration for great days, is chocolate cake. Always chocolate cake. ADVICE TO OFFER: Behind the companies

and profits and spreadsheets are people. Put people first. Care about them, cheer them on, and encourage the best in them. Success will surely follow when you first care for your people.

LASHONZA BROWN

From left are Susan Silver, Lashonza Brown and Amy Bardi.

POSITION: Small business banker/branch

manager for Yadkin Bank; advisor, Cary High School Junior Bank Board; treasurer, Apex Festival Commission; ambassador, Cary Chamber of Commerce AGE: 38 PROUD OF: The ability to balance my busy

career with being a mom, wife and church/ community volunteer. Also, of being able to assist in the growth of our community by providing lending solutions to small businesses. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Honesty and integ-

rity are two core values important to me. I want to be as transparent as possible to my family, friends, coworkers and clients. FUN FACT: Over the last four years, I’ve

advanced from only running when chased, 36

JUNE/JULY 2016

to completing my first half-marathon in November!

at-risk students, and most recently, facilitat-

ADVICE TO OFFER: Surround yourself with

and my students to produce promotional

like-minded individuals who continuously look for ways to grow. Seek mentors who have achieved a level of success in which you aspire to achieve. Iron sharpens iron!

ing a partnership between the Town of Cary materials for the Spring Daze Arts & Crafts Festival. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Live according to

your authentic self. Demonstrate unconditional kindness, compassion and generosity

SUSAN SILVER

to all. My teaching philosophy: I have a

POSITION: Visual art teacher at Cary

wealth of knowledge and skill; I want to

High School; Principal’s Advisory Council member; GSA Safe Space co-coordinator; founder of RedBird Goods

share it with as many people as possible. FUN FACT: My wife and I recently launched

AGE: 35

der neutral clothing/goods with positive and

PROUD OF: Obtaining my National Board

Teaching Certification, developing an afterschool program to support academically

a business, Red Bird Goods. We design gencreative messages for infants and toddlers. ADVICE TO OFFER: Fear and risk are inevi-

table when pursuing your dreams.


JOY CURREY

SARA KATE STEADMAN

POSITION: Founder and president of non-

POSITION: Co-owner of Frill Clothing;

profit CORRAL Riding Academy; recipient of 2016 William C. Friday Award for excellence in leadership

founder of life and style blog Sara Kate Styling

in hearing others’ experiences. Also, don’t be afraid to ask for help or advice. You can’t do it all and there will always be people that are willing to lend a hand.

AGE: 25

COLIN CROSSMAN

PROUD OF: The fact that we were able to

POSITION: Owner of Rhea Hospitality,

turn $500 into a six-figure company in a matter of two years, and that we appeared on Shark Tank. 

operating The Mayton Inn and The King’s Daughters Inn; attorney AGE: 37

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Always seek ways

PROUD OF:10 years, 20 houses, two hotels,

AGE: 36 PROUD OF: Seeing young women who started with CORRAL as hurting, angry, scared middle school students now graduating from high school as healthy, strong young women matriculating into college — on scholarships! That makes me proud.  GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: If it’s not hard, it’s

not worth doing. FUN FACT: I started CORRAL with my

childhood horse, Rebel. ADVICE TO OFFER: Make sure you are a

leader of consequence. Address a real need in the community, work hard and build up those around you who share a passion to see that need addressed.

to differentiate yourself from those around you. Do this in your work ethic and the way you treat others. Always let it be known that you will be the one who will go above and beyond every single time. FUN FACT: I am a cancer survivor. As such,

I’m incredibly strong-willed, but I strongly believe that my fight with cancer made me the leader I am today. ADVICE TO OFFER: Always learn from those around you. There is incredible value

and one baby, all with my awesome wife. Enough said. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: While I’m not all

that consistent with it, a few years ago I was introduced to stoicism, and deeply appreciate the teachings of Seneca and Epictetus. Their philosophy toward life is as relevant today as it was when they were alive. FUN FACT: I love my recumbent bike. I get

a lot of weird looks, but it’s awesome! continued on page 38

Joy Currey, left, and Sara Kate Steadman

CARY MAGAZINE 37


GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Nothing in busi-

continued from page 37

ADVICE TO OFFER: Get a sufficient amount of sleep — you can’t be at your best and most effective if you’re overtired. If this means that you have to make some other sacrifices, so be it. Note: I rarely take my own advice.

ness is life or death (at least not in the hotel industry)! Perspective is so important. There is always a solution. Sometimes you just have to take a deep breath and walk away for a minute. FUN FACT: I love dill pickle potato chips. ADVICE TO OFFER: Stop and celebrate the

POSITION: Owner of Rhea Hospitality,

victories. Even the small ones. The process can often be long and hard and if you don’t take a minute to appreciate the little wins and how far you’ve come, it’s easy to lose perspective, and passion.

operating The Mayton Inn, The King’s Daughters Inn

DANIELLE CASTELLI STRADER

AGE: 36

POSITION: Owner and operator of Torrenti

DEANNA CROSSMAN

PROUD OF: We built The Mayton Inn from

the ground up. Countless locals and guests have come in and asked, “What was this building before you took over?” That means we did our job, to build a building that blends in with the existing downtown façade, and will be known as a beautiful historic downtown Cary building 50 years from now.

From left are Colin Crossman, Deanna Crossman, Andrew Valkanoff and Danielle Castelli Strader. 38

JUNE/JULY 2016

Cycles Inc., bicycle repair company AGE: 24 PROUD OF: Building my company is an im-

portant accomplishment because it serves as a vehicle for me to make a difference. However, I am most proud of the impact I am able to have in my community. That is a summation of both big and small accom-

plishments over time. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: My goal in life and

in work is to improve people’s situation, cycling or otherwise. I deliver excellent service, not just for the sake of running a good business, but because it is important to me to positively influence the lives of others. FUN FACT: I love old bluegrass music and playing the banjo. ADVICE TO OFFER: Adversity is just part of

the process to achieving your goals. Sometimes you have to work tirelessly to get where you want to go.

ANDREW VALKANOFF POSITION: Owner and operator of three

Dairy Queen Grill & Chill Restaurants AGE: 36 PROUD OF: Being a husband to Christina

and dad to Addison, Anderson and Anna Claire. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Lead people, man-

age details.


FUN FACT: I’m not very connected on

social media. No Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat. Just Twitter. ADVICE TO OFFER: Do something that wakes you up in the morning. It is so much fun to go to work.

JOSH DIES POSITION: Owner and head baker at Stick

Boy Bread Co., and co-owner of The Mill AGE: 36 PROUD OF: I’m most proud of the relation-

ship Katie and I have with each other; owning/operating two businesses with your spouse while raising two young boys is nearly impossible. I’m proud of the way we communicate, problem solve, and care for each other every day. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: The Golden

Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. FUN FACT: I love to create, and would like

to have my own woodworking shop. ADVICE TO OFFER: Lots of things are going to demand your time and energy. Make time for friends and family: Take a day trip to the zoo, meet a friend for lunch, or make breakfast for your kids. 

Kyle Greer, left, and Moss Withers

KATIE DIES POSITION: Owner and general manager of

Stick Boy Bread Co., and co-owner of The Mill AGE: 34 PROUD OF: I believe that everything I

have is from the Lord — my accomplishments are really blessings from Him. With that in mind, I am most thankful for the relationships He has orchestrated within my community and with my staff, and my two incredible boys. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: My life and work

are guided by my faith. FUN FACT: I was born in Chicago, and

LOVE deep dish pizza. continued on page 40

Josh and Katie Dies CARY MAGAZINE 39


Mónica Linares, left, and Kelly Shatat

continued from page 39

ADVICE TO OFFER: Don’t be afraid to say no. If a great opportunity presents itself but fails to align with your core values, or your business’ identity, say no. Another opportunity will come up.

W. KYLE GREER POSITION: Vice President of Economic De-

velopment at Cary Chamber of Commerce AGE: 36 PROUD OF: Having played a role in bring-

ing more than 4,300 new jobs to Cary, resulting in an investment of over $200 million in the last two years. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: I consider my

reputation to be my most valuable asset, so every day I strive to enhance its value. Also, hard work has never killed anyone! FUN FACT: I’m a really good juggler. ADVICE TO OFFER: Listen more than you

speak.

MOSS WITHERS POSITION: Commercial real estate advisor

at NAI Carolantic Realty; founder of VIII Oaks young professionals organization promoting community service; advisory board, Kraft Family YMCA AGE: 32

school I was in the percussion ensemble, regularly playing a marimba with four mallets, two in each hand. One show was entirely performed with the sounds I could create using a push broom.

PROUD OF: That’s easy — being the father

ADVICE TO OFFER: You are who you

of two beautiful little girls! GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: God, family and

community. I would never be where I am without the positive impact of Christ, my family, and many community influences that still shape me on a daily basis. I now do my best to give back to those that have made me who I am.  FUN FACT: As a child, I rode in the Cary

Christmas Parade with Mayor Koka Booth for several years … celebrity status! In high 40

JUNE/JULY 2016

surround yourself with. Find something that you are passionate about and get involved. The work you provide will change your community for the better and the relationships you build will assist on a professional level.

MÓNICA LINARES POSITION: Artist and workshop coordinator

at Waverly Artists Group Studio & Gallery; docent at North Carolina Museum of Art AGE: 43

PROUD OF: Having the honor to raise the two most incredible people in the whole world. Professionally, being part of a wonderful tribe of artists at the Waverly Artists Group and to be one of the Painting Miles founders, our special open studio group. Also, I feel proud every time I connect with artists I admire and get to invite them to teach a workshop in our gallery. Getting to know them and the students is enriching! GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Make meaningful connections, transmit joy, never stop learning, and of course, dream big! FUN FACT: I would love to go to Mount

Everest base camp one day. I will always be a hiker at heart. continued on page 42


2008 Green Oaks Parkway | Holly Springs, North Carolina 27540 | 919.557.6850 | 12oaksnc.com

Š2016 WSLD 12 Oaks, LLC. Equal Housing Opportunity. The amenities and features described and depicted herein are based upon current development plans, which are subject to change without notice. Actual development may not be as currently proposed. References to housing products, builders and prices are subject to change without notice as well.

ZumbaÂŽ in the mornings and nature trails in the afternoon. A wine tasting this weekend. Gourmet cooking class on Tuesday. And not a moment spent on an unmowed lawn. Easy living means your higher priorities get priority. Homes from the mid $300s to $1 million+ and townhomes from the $260s. Live well at 12 Oaks.

CARY MAGAZINE 41


continued from page 40

ADVICE TO OFFER: Be clear with what you

want, dream about it, surround yourself with people in tune with you and your dream, work for it ... and be patient. It will happen.

KELLY SHATAT POSITION: Founder, designer and CEO for

Moon and Lola AGE: 44 PROUD OF: Spreading happiness, providing

careers, and making a positive impact on the community. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Feel the fear and

do it anyway. FUN FACT: I love rap music. ADVICE TO OFFER: Follow your instincts and be deliberate in your choices. Trust your gut even when you’re afraid.

JENNIFER MARTIN POSITION: Executive director of Shop Lo-

From left are Becca Smith, Steve Rao and Jennifer Martin.

cal Raleigh, covering all of Wake County/ Greater Raleigh Merchants Association; creator and director of Brewgaloo festival AGE: 36

STEVE RAO

citizens and received great ideas.

PROUD OF: Brewgaloo! A vision for a small, all-local festival which is now the largest in the state and it’s right here in Wake County! Every year we learn something new, we add something that is bigger than who we are and every year it continues to be a success.

POSITION: Mayor pro tem for Town of

FUN FACT: I was shy and unconfident,

Morrisville; business development manager at Alphanumeric Systems AGE: 45 PROUD OF: Helping to start Hottovation in

largely because I was very sick as a child. I got more confidence through sports, having supportive parents, and was inspired by my late grandfather, Major S.V. Rao. ADVICE TO OFFER: Learn every day from

in college to help pay for my tuition, selling men’s hunting and fishing sample clothing!

Morrisville, which supports the growth of small businesses; helping start an English as a Second Language Class in Morrisville; and developing relationships with federal and state leaders that I believe have positioned us better for transportation and economic investment.

ADVICE TO OFFER: Leadership starts with

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: To meet and learn

POSITION: Director of marketing for Smith

leading by example. Follow this statement and commit to being the best leader you can be.

from people from all walks of life. The best moments during my last two terms have been my office hours; I have met interesting

& Smith CPA; board member and incoming president of Life Experiences; co-chair of Cary Visual Art’s Art Ball

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Keep Him first, do

all things as if I am working for Him, and know He will always guide my path. FUN FACT: I started my own eBay business

42

JUNE/JULY 2016

others, look for the best in everyone, and no matter what you do, try to make a difference in your community or impact the world in some way.

BECCA SMITH


AGE: 35

PROUD OF: Owning my own successful

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Abstain from

PROUD OF: Without a doubt, having a

business.

flexible job, amazing family, and incredible friends that support me. They allow me to be involved in many community service projects and nonprofits, all of which I love so much!

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Always try your

best, give back to your community, and live by the Golden Rule.

negativity. Always hold myself to the highest level of integrity. Volunteer within the community to help those in need. Surround myself with good people.

FUN FACT: I was in Kappa Delta Sorority,

FUN FACT: I spent six years at three univer-

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Be willing to

at East Carolina University.

try new things and ideas, go on different adventures and stay active. I’ll sleep when I’m dead.

ADVICE TO OFFER: If you can dream it,

FUN FACT: When I was 17 years old, I had

PATRICK MCCOY

the opportunity to work in an orphanage and school campus in South Africa as a missionary. It was a life-changing experience.

POSITION: Founder and president of

ADVICE TO OFFER: In all the places you go and all the things you do, ALWAYS be willing to make a new friend!

LAUREN KING POSITION: Owner of Paisley Boutique, with

two Cary locations AGE: 24

you can achieve it.

Whiteboard Creations & Review Primer; board member for Cary MacGregor Rotary Club and The Carying Place AGE: 33 PROUD OF: A few short years after starting

Whiteboard, at age 28, I was student loan and car loan debt free, while also being able to buy my first home. I work hard every single day to accomplish this. I will never forget those feelings of personal success and joy.

sities for one degree which led to zero jobs for my degree. However, I carved my own path and couldn’t be happier every day. ADVICE TO OFFER: Go after anything and everything that makes YOU happy. Ask questions and absorb responses. Take calculated risks. Don’t expect handouts. And maintain a tireless work ethic.

TYLER WATT POSITION: Owner and founder of Phar-

macy Bottle Beverage AGE: 36 PROUD OF: Being a part of bringing on old building back to life in Downtown Cary. continued on page 44

From left are Patrick McCoy, Lauren King and Tyler Watt.

CARY MAGAZINE 43


GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: There is an old

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Colossians 3:23:

Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the Lord.

GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Enjoy what you do and where you spend your time.

saying that you have to be in the right place at the right time. Unfortunately you never know when the right time is, so I always put myself in the right place and wait for the right time to occur.  FUN FACT: I enjoy watching WWE.   

FUN FACT: Prior to opening Pharmacy I

ADVICE TO OFFER: Be patient and

confident. Not many things are achieved overnight. You need to be confident in your ability and have the patience to wait for the result. 

ADVICE TO OFFER: Be the change you want to see. Don’t ever give up on your dreams and goals. My dad knew my dream to play baseball and he always told me growing up, “Somewhere someone is practicing; is that person you?”

WESLEY MOYER

JONATHAN PIERCE

PHILLIP LIN

POSITION: Financial representative for

POSITION: Owner and operator of The

POSITION: Entrepreneur and owner of Ca-

tering By Design, The Spa at Stone Creek, and Maui Wowi

Modern Woodmen Fraternal Financial; member of Apex Town Council

Mason Jar Tavern, with two Wake County locations

AGE: 34

AGE: 26

AGE: 39

PROUD OF: My family is my No. 1 ac-

PROUD OF: Providing jobs through our

PROUD OF: Helping my employees to grow

complishment. Also, earning a scholarship to play Division I baseball at UNC-Chapel Hill, and most recently, being elected to the Apex Town Council.

restaurants. As of May 2016, our company has provided 184 jobs in our communities. I love being able to give people a chance to provide for their families and helping

continued from page 43

spent close to a decade in Denver, working in corporate finance. ADVICE TO OFFER: There’s nothing wrong

with being outside your comfort zone if you are chasing a goal.

professionally, and being able to create jobs from my various companies for people I trust. From left are Phillip Lin, Wesley Moyer and Lissy Wood.

44

JUNE/JULY 2016

FUN FACT: I married my high school sweet-

heart, and I’m a huge Eric Church fan. I also enjoy listening to bluegrass music.


them grow their own business. Also, to be working alongside my beautiful wife, Maggie, the best business partner I could ask for. She’s a full-time engineer by day and helps run the restaurant by night. Our partnership is what makes our dream exciting! GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: My

available at

FUN FACT: I know all the lyrics to “Ice,

LOCH MER E PAVILION

Ice Baby.”

2425 KILDAIR E FAR M R D | CARY, NC 919.858.5884

ADVICE TO OFFER: Stay humble. I’m

happy to jump in and help wash dishes, clean toilets, and do whatever it takes to make our business successful. Lead by example and people will follow.

©2016 ALEX AND ANI, LLC

faith in Christ guides my life and work. I have Jonathan Pierce felt called to open a restaurant and be on mission within the communities we serve.

LISSY WOOD POSITION: Founder and head of school at

Wake Academy; educator AGE: 38 PROUD OF: Opening a school for kids that

meets the needs of gifted children. GUIDING PHILOSOPHY: Always treat

others like you want to be treated. Always try your hardest. Life is not perfect but you have to trust that it all happens for a reason. FUN FACT: I make my own syrup. And,

we have a pet snake. ADVICE TO OFFER: If you never try, you

will never know what could be. If you try, you have nothing to regret later. If you don’t try, you might always wonder what could have been. t

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CARY MAGAZINE 47


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JOSHUA FURR Broker/Rental Specialist, Block & Associates Realty CREDENTIALS: Joshua Furr is a Rental Broker and Relocation Specialist, specializing in leasing rental properties throughout the Triangle over the last 13 years. He has been the #1 Independent Rental Broker since 2012 and running strong! SERVICES: Joshua’s services include exceptional rental assistance for property owners, builders, investors, Realtors and corporations. Each year thousands of property owners in the Triangle rent their homes and depend on Joshua to provide them with a High-Caliber tenant who will treat their property as if it were their own. “Residential Leasing is a fast-paced, high-volume, ever-changing business that always keeps me energized for the next opportunity,” he says. CLIENTELE: Joshua has been able to utilize his exceptional customer service skills to the maximum, which allow him to easily relate to clients of various personalities, demographics and backgrounds, and adapt to their unique situations and needs. Joshua’s flexibility to be available to have their best interest at heart, and his uncanny skill to put a deal together, bring clients back again and again. With such an incredible passion for Real Estate, it’s easy to see why Joshua has achieved such success! For more information on Joshua Furr with Block & Associates, please call (919) 606-3461, visit JoshuaFurr.com or email JFurr@BlockRealty.com.

(919) 606-3461 • JoshuaFurr.com JFurr@BlockRealty.com 48

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LISA HIGGINBOTHAM 5Star Awards, Inc. CREDENTIALS: With 17 years of awards industry experi-

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lationships with customers and are proud to still have the first customer from when Lisa started the business in 1999. We serve the awards and recognition needs of our community, near and far. Clients come to 5Star from across the nation for the quality, customer service, and timeliness they receive — and they return year after year. MISSION: We are dedicated to impressing our customers with the “wow” factor with every order and interaction. Lisa simply says, “We are not here to be average — we are here to be AWESOME.”

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CARY MAGAZINE 49


POWER PROFESSIONALS

CREDENTIALS: Before Brendan’s career as a Financial Advisor with Raymond James & Associates, he served for more than 20 years in the United States Marine Corps as an Officer. He served in combat where

BRENDAN RODDEN Financial Advisor, Raymond James

he commanded a tank company in Iraq and also served as executive officer of a 1,200-person task force in Afghanistan. One of his more interesting duty assignments was serving as an instructor at Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One in Arizona. This is the Marine Corps equivalent of the U.S. Navy’s “Top Gun” school! Before retiring from the Marine Corps, Brendan was accepted into the Wall Street Warfighters Foundation program, enabling him to receive training at the Securities Industry Institute at Wharton. Brendan earned his bachelor’s degree from Towson University, has a certificate in Financial Planning from Boston University and has passed the CFP® Certification Examination, making him a candidate for CFP® certification. He is also a Chartered Retirement Plans Specialist. After being stationed all around the country and traveling all around the world while serving his country, Brendan and his family now call Wake County home.

SERVICES: Brendan’s financial services are specifically designed for each individual or family. With the resources available at Raymond James, he can provide options to meet the needs of professionals, corporate executives, and business owners.

CLIENTELE: Brendan has developed long-term relationships with individuals, families, business owners, professionals, and corporate executives. He has been able to utilize Raymond James’ vast resources to find customized solutions for his clients. Brendan is available when clients need him. As a fee-based financial planner, he uses his skill in financial planning to help clients prepare for their families’ or business’ future.

MISSION: Brendan strives to manage the events of the present so that he and his team can help bring about a better future for those they serve. With thorough planning and a philosophy of “teach, coach, and mentor,” Brendan works with individual clients and businesses to develop, implement, and manage their financial plans in a complex and uncertain world.

1380 Environ Way, Chapel Hill, NC 27517 (919)918-4880 Raymond James & Associates, Inc. Member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC 50

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leader in custom publishing, branded content and media. CMG also publishes multiple titles in the automotive and finance markets, and runs a series of successful B2B conferences and events throughout North America. SERVICES: Public relations, digital and content marketing, creative services, event management and custom publishing. CLIENTELE: B2B and B2C organizations in multiple industries throughout North America. MISSION: Creating and delivering powerful content that changes attitudes and impacts behavior.

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Roman Alexander entertains Madelyn Bekerman, 6, and her brother Joey, 4, at Sassool restaurant in Raleigh, which hosts Magic Roman every Tuesday. “The adults enjoy being able to have a meal, and the kids are entertained,” says Noelle Scott, the restaurant’s general manager.

WRITTEN BY AMBER KEISTER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Magic Man CARY PERFORMER ENCHANTS AUDIENCES OF ALL AGES

CARY MAGAZINE 55


“It’s the thrill of making other people happy; it’s exciting, it’s exhilarating.” — Roman Alexander

I

t’s a magical night at Sassool, but then every Tuesday night at the restaurant is magical. Roman Alexander, aka Magic Roman, goes from table to table, making objects vanish, guessing cards, bending coins, eliciting gasps and laughter. A roving magician might seem quaint, but the families here are happy to be amazed, and Alexander is happy to oblige. “It’s the thrill of making other people happy; it’s exciting, it’s exhilarating. And to have that influence on someone is powerful,” he said. Alexander, who is from Cary, has been performing at the north Raleigh restaurant for two years, and Noelle Scott, the restaurant’s general manager, says the success of its Tuesday family night has much to do with him. “We wanted to give people a reason to come to family night besides the free kid’s meal,” she said. “Due to him, because he’s awesome, it became such a big thing. There are so many children now, he’s like crowd control, making sure they’re entertained and not running around the store.” Quick thinking needed

Alexander also performs at private parties, awards banquets, trade shows and other business events. An office might be an odd place for a magician to show up, but Alexander says the magic brings people together. He tells of one show where he had to boost morale — quickly. “I’ve done shows at offices where I’ll go from cubicle to cubicle, or I’ll stand in the lunchroom and do magic. So I’m doing that basic show for these employees, but the mood was awful,” he said. It turned out several employees had been laid off that day, and he had to entertain those who were left. “I grabbed the bosses and the team leads, and brought them around with me. I won’t call it making fun, but I had fun with them,” he said. “I made the employees laugh at their bosses, and that made the bosses happy.” Magic also has cross-cultural appeal, and can smooth social interactions, he says. Recently SAS hired Alexander to perform at a meeting with 56

JUNE/JULY 2016

In addition to his area performances, Roman Alexander writes for The Linking Ring, a trade magazine for magicians, and is working on a documentary about life as a magician.

the company’s international partners, many coming from India and China. Although everyone could speak English, it was with varying fluency. “I had to use the miming, the acting, the smiling and the body language to get some of these people to interact,” he said. “I had to work not to bore the people who could speak English, and at the same time, not confuse the guys who may not know what an American coin looks like.” ‘I know how this one’s done’

But sometimes magic can be a tricky business; not everyone likes to be deceived. Confusion is common and occasionally peo-


ple will get angry, Alexander says. And then there are the hecklers. “It’s very common in the magic world for people to say, ‘I know how this one’s done,’” he explained. “There are fun hecklers, silly hecklers. My mom is a sweet heckler. She will say, ‘Hey do the one …’ and she’ll spoil the trick by revealing the end.” The details of his tricks are easily found out thanks to YouTube videos, but the real magic lies in practice and preparation. Alexander’s muscled, calloused hands attest to the hours he spends manipulating cards and coins. “I practice every day, all day, pretty much everywhere I go,” he said. “There are cards in my friends’ cars. I leave cards and

To See Magic Roman ■ 5:30-8:30 p.m., Monday, June 20, at Sassool, 1347 Kildaire Farm Road, Cary ■ 5:30-8:30 p.m., Tuesdays at Sassool, 9650 Strickland Road, Raleigh ■ Every third Saturday at Prestonwood Country Club, Cary ■ More information at magicroman.com

continued on page 58 CARY MAGAZINE 57


Dustin Williams, 5, is happy to help Magic Roman with a card trick during a Tuesday “kid’s night” performance at the Raleigh Sassool. The Cary location will host the magician Monday, June 20.

“It’s all about connecting, breaking the ice at a social event.” — Roman Alexander

continued from page 57

coins for practicing at restaurants. There are coins, pieces of string and rope, in my car. I practice with paper clips, with rubber bands. It’s a constant, regular practice.” Because the profession demands years of work to gain proficiency, few young magicians are picking up the top hat and trick cards, says Alexander, this despite a common grade-school fascination with magic tricks. Alexander didn’t have Harry Potter to pique his interest, but he did have a talented uncle. Alexander remembers seeing his first trick when he was 6. “My uncle Thomas Marsh took a block of wood, put it in my hand, wrapped his hands around mine — and made it vanish. I opened up my hands and the block of wood was gone,” said Alexander, 46. “To this day, I’m not sure exactly how he did it.” A distastrous beginning?

That trick sparked his interest, and his first performance fanned the flames. 58

JUNE/JULY 2016

“At a talent show in middle school, I did a card trick and a vanishing egg trick,” said Alexander. “They both went miserably, terribly wrong.” At first, everything was fine. He found a volunteer’s card, and made an egg disappear. Then a heckler broke his concentration; his nervous fingers let his props hit the stage, cards scattering, egg breaking, leaving him with a gooey mess and acute embarrassment. But he did hoodwink some of his classmates. “They came to me later, asking ‘How did you make that girl pick the card you said she was going to pick?’ and ‘How did you make the egg vanish?’ I couldn’t believe I’d actually fooled someone.” The horrible performance didn’t deter him; in fact it just egged him on. His delight in actually succeeding made him want to do more magic. More than 30 years later, this delight still fuels his work. “It’s nice to be paid to have fun,” he said. t


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THE

A-Ha Moment WHAT’S YOUR IDEA? WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

N

ecessity is the mother of invention, so the Greek philosopher Plato reportedly said. But in this modern world, just what does it take to be an inventor?

“I had my a-ha moment in Afghanistan,” said Steven Walther of Cary. A

Green Beret and Special Forces medic, he was tasked with teaching Afghan villagers how to brush their teeth. Many were using a toothbrush for the first time. “They used it like a crowbar,” said Walther, 36, now an operations manager for a pharmaceutical firm. “I wanted to say, through the interpreter, ‘Be gentle!’ Aggressive brushing can cause gum wear, and enamel wear.” Because the myth invent as part of their The inventor mindset that brushing harder jobs in the worlds of involves two things: equals brushing better biotech, medicine exists here at home too, and technology, often Curiosity — I’m always Walther invented the within professional reasking, ‘Is this the best it Toofinger Brush. He search settings. can be?’ and perseverance, says its smaller, wider Others are what to keep going to find a handle, used in a pinch he calls “garage invengrip, generates just 25 tors,” devising updates solution percent of the force of on items like barbecue — Steven Walther a full-handed grip. grills or humidifiers. “The concept is pretty simple. After all, Some license their idea to a company for if you want to pluck your eyebrows you use production, while others see their product a tweezer, not pliers,” Walther said. “Modify- through to market, to maintain control. ing the tool changes everything.” “My favorite part of this job is being the second or third person to hear about an Garage inventors idea,” Passe said. “But most of my clients say, Local patent attorney Jim Passe, of Passé ‘This is my second invention. I didn’t do anyIntellectual Property LLC, says some people continued on page 62

.”

60

JUNE/JULY 2016

Steven Walther of Cary developed the Toofinger Brush to encourage gentle brushing of the teeth. Because it has a smaller, wider handle, used in a pinch grip, the brush generates just 25 percent of the force of a full-handed grip.


CARY MAGAZINE 61


question is, how do “I The penetrate this very established market with very limited resources, and find opportunities to stand out and gain market traction?

— Steven Walther

INVENTED IN NC ➨ Universal Product Code, or Barcode, Research Triangle Park 1969 ➨ Putt Putt Miniature Golf, Fayetteville 1954 ➨ Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, Winston-Salem 1937 ➨ Texas Pete, Winston-Salem 1929 ➨ Cheerwine, Salisbury 1917 ➨ BC Headache Powder, Durham 1906 ➨ Pepsi-Cola, New Bern 1893 ➨ Vicks VapoRub, Selma 1890 ➨ Overalls, Clinton 1859 Source: onlyinyourstate.com

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continued from page 60

thing with my first idea, and now I see it all over the market.’” That’s true for Walther; he didn’t get far with his first invention, a hanger with telescopic arms to prevent dimples in shirt shoulders. This time, hands-on is important. After studying the science behind the brushing motion, he made early handle prototypes with a wooden dowel and a Dremel tool, then glued them to existing brush heads. Later versions were created by a 3-D printer at Cary company Touchstone 3D. “You’ve invented something when you’ve solved a problem,” said Passe, who also leads Meetup group the RTP Inventors Guild. “But upping from inventor to product is a different story; not all inventions are sufficient to become a business. “A patent only means you have the right to have no competitors,” he explained. “Only

70 percent of patent applications make it through, (the rate drops significantly for biotech) and it’s a very slow-moving process.” That expensive process begins with a patentability search and the filing of a written application that’s a combination of a legal and scientific paper, Passe says, to obtain patent pending status, followed by input from examiners. “It’s an average of four years from file date to patent,” he said. “But patent protection starts at the file date, and you can license the product while you’re waiting.” Latest development

Walther obtained a provisional patent for the Toofinger Brush, and set up a booth at the North Carolina Dental Society convention to test his wares. “The response was overwhelmingly positive,” he said. “One older dentist (who was skeptical at first) put his hand on my shoul-


der and said, ‘Son, you’ve just reinvented the mousetrap!’ “Then I started calling manufacturers.” Parallel to his inventor’s journey, Walther earned a master of business administration degree that’s helping him with the commercialization of his product. “This is a very mature market,” he said. “I’ve spent the past year and a half working on understanding it, on long-term thinking and business planning. The question is, how do I penetrate this very established market with very limited resources, and find opportunities to stand out and gain market traction? “Until everyone is familiar with it, the onus to communicate the Toofinger message is on me, the entrepreneur.” What about appearing on a national TV show like Shark Tank? “That would be a game changer, an opportunity to communicate the value of the product to a lot of people,” Walther said. “But meanwhile, I’ll keep working.” Currently, the $3.99 Toofinger Brush is available at specific dental offices in our area, or online at toofingerbrush.com. You can even get an online subscription, meaning Walther will mail you a new toothbrush every 90 days, a changeover recommended by dentists. And for each brush purchased, another is donated to North Carolina Missions of Mercy, an outreach program of the North Carolina Dental Society. Walther’s latest development, coming soon to market, is a Toofinger brush with a child-sized bristle head and a tongue scraper. It’s sized so that kids can use it themselves, or parents can brush for them. “The inventor mindset involves two things,” Walther said. “Curiosity — I’m always asking, ‘Is this the best it can be?’ and perseverance, to keep going to find a solution.” t

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CARY MAGAZINE 63


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Keep Your Summer Smile Shining It’s time for that new smile!

Our patients are our main focus. We stress prevention, restoration and overall health while improving the smiles of those we serve. Our smile services include: porcelain veneers, Lumineers, porcelain crowns, tooth colored onlays and fillings, Zoom! chairside tooth whitening and Invisalign. Our digital ITero scanner replaces the need for messy impressions and provides accurate results with maximum patient comfort. We can restore your smile with implants.

We welcome new patients! Schedule a new patient exam and mention this ad to receive a complimentary take home tooth whitening kit or an electric toothbrush kit as a gift to you from us.

Please visit our website and read our reviews.

om www.CaryCosmeticDentist.c

431 Keisler Drive • Cary, NC 27518 • 919.859.1330


Demonstrating Ginger & Lemongrass Shrimp Summer Rolls is Rachael Ray Show regular Fanny Slater, author of Orange, Lavender & Figs: Deliciously Different Recipes from a Passionate Eater. “It’s lighter and fresher than the Chinese style spring roll, in a rice paper wrapper, not fried,” she said, and served with a tropical sauce.

Meet Fanny Slater WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE | PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

For more about Slater and her book, visit fannyslater.com. 66

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FANNY SLATER, who grew up in Wake County, is the winner of The Rachael Ray Show’s 2014 Great American Cookbook Competition, a frequent guest on the show and now the author of Orange, Lavender & Figs: Deliciously Different Recipes from a Passionate Eater. Slater lives and works in Wilmington these days, so we grabbed the chance to chat with her during a recent book tour stop in Holly Springs.

Cary Magazine: You were a foodie

long before Tin Foil Surprise (her breakfast sandwich with orange-lavender-fig jam) won you the Rachael Ray competition. What’s the draw? SLATER: I grew up around wonderful homemade food, filled with love. My parents both love to cook; my mom founded (the nationally acclaimed) Rachel’s Brownies back in 1975. Eating has always been an event for us. Even when we go on trips, we get out a pad and pen and plan every meal in advance. So how could I not love food?


Slater’s tips: Cut shrimp into thirds to put a bite in each roll but save the budget. To easily and safely pull the skin off a ginger bulb, pull down on it with the back of a spoon. And use citrusy lemongrass to flavor oil.

My concept for the contest was “tastes like childhood,” and the cookbook is full of updates to my childhood favorites.

is what’s totally unexpected, ingredients you wouldn’t think to use. Every time I walk into the kitchen, I’m experimenting.

How has winning the competition changed your catering business, Fanfare? Catering was my way of doing food and sharing it with people. After Rachael Ray and working on the cookbook, I found a new way to do food. Fanfare has transformed into food writing, restaurant reviews, and recipe development. For example, I work with a small winery in Italy. They send me the wines, I taste them and recipes come to me. I look for how I can put flavors together.

You tweak leftovers into “Flippidy Doos?” Yes! Take advantage of leftovers. You can travel around my book and figure out ways to turn leftovers into something fun, and stretch them into another meal or two. That’s why I’ve included so many sauces.

Your food style is “sophisticated yet approachable.” What does that mean? It’s approachable enough for the home cook, and sophisticated in that it’s out of the box, creative, fun and playful. “Fanny flair”

What are your best kitchen tips? Use the freezer. Grilled chicken is cheaper when you buy it in bulk, so cook it and put three or four quesadillas in the freezer for a quick meal later. You can freeze fruit or veggies too. Two, use simple enhancements like fresh herbs and citrus zest for sprucing up meals. They brighten flavors. You can also mash the herbs with oil. These things up

your cooking skills and make dishes pop. And shrimp tell you when they’re done; they start to curl into a C shape. C means cooked, O means overcooked! The most important thing about cooking is, “Here’s the idea; take it and have fun with it.” The kitchen is a playground, and there are no rules. What’s next for you? The Rachael Ray Show has helped me step up to the next level. I want to expand my recipe development and writing. I have a producer, an agent, a publicist, all these great people, but I have to move myself forward. And when the time is right, I want to have my own food show. I believe it’s waiting for me. Editor’s note: Special thanks to event host the Holly Springs Chamber of Commerce and event venue Devil’s Ridge Golf Club. CARY MAGAZINE 67


exclusive dish Kailua Coupe with Balsamic Fig Syrup

From Slater’s cookbook, Orange, Lavender & Figs, Deliciously Different Recipes from a Passionate Eater Serves 4 ¼ cup unsweetened shredded coconut flakes ¼ cup roughly chopped pistachios

WRITTEN BY FANNY SLATER PHOTOGRAPHED BY FRANCES JANISCH

Kailua Coupe with Balsamic Fig Syrup IF YOU’VE NEVER been to Hawaii, this treat is your first-class ticket.

1 cup chopped fresh pineapple

No sunscreen required. This decadent dessert is stacked with tart sorbet,

1 cup chopped mango

fresh island fruit, and toasted coconut flakes. Drizzled with a syrupy bal-

Balsamic fig syrup, recipe follows Several small fresh mint leaves as a garnish 1 pint lemon sorbet

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spread the coconut flakes onto a small baking sheet and bake, keeping a very close eye as it burns easily, until lightly golden, 2 to 3 minutes. In a dry small skillet, toast the pistachios over medium-low heat, tossing frequently, until lightly golden and very fragrant, about 5 minutes. Immediately remove the nuts from the pan and transfer to a bowl to stop the cooking process. In four clear, 2-cup coupe glasses or dessert goblets, stack the pineapple, mango, coconut, pistachios, and several of the balsamic-infused figs. Garnish with a light drizzle of the balsamic fig syrup and the mint leaves and then scoop the sorbet over the top. Balsamic Fig Syrup

Makes ¼ cup ½ cup balsamic vinegar ¼ cup stemmed and halved dried black Mission figs (4 to 6 figs)

In a small pot, combine the vinegar and figs and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until thick and syrupy, 6 to 8 minutes. Fanny’s Flippidy-Doo: For a sweet and savory crostini, spread toasted baguette slices with creamy rich Brie and drizzle the Balsamic Fig Syrup over top. Garnish with fresh thyme sprigs for a bright pop of color. 68

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samic fig reduction, every bite is as harmonious as a sundrenched day on Oahu’s Kailua Beach.


Your Neighborhood Family Dentist We value each patient as if they were a member of our family and we offer our treatments based on what is best for your needs.

GENERAL DENTAL // COSMETIC DENTAL // KIDS AND FAMILY // EMERGENCY VISITS

We accept all major insurances and we have an alternative insurance plan for those without dental insurance.

3420 Ten-Ten Road, Suite 310 // Cary, NC 27518 // 919-342-8509

kildairefamilydental.com


charity spotlight

Quality Time: Fill Your Bucket List Foundation WRITTEN BY NANCY PARDUE PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONATHAN FREDIN

Peggy Gibson Carroll and the Fill Your Bucket List Foundation grant wishes to adult cancer patients, through locals’ donations of airline and hotel points, activity tickets, loans of vacation homes and more.

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WHAT WOULD you do, if you knew you were running out of time? That’s the premise behind the Fill Your Bucket List Foundation, a Cary-based nonprofit that grants wishes to adults battling cancer, while creating memories to live on in their families and friends. “Cancer can be a gift if you allow it to be. It’s a chance to do the things you want to do and say things you want to say. It puts life in perspective,” said Fill Your Bucket List founder Peggy Gibson Carroll. When her own father, Charles “Chuck” Gibson, was diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer, Carroll saw her personal and professional lives collide. She’s retired from a career that includes extensive oncology and advocacy experience. “My whole career, I was trying to help patients navigate cancer,” she said. “From that work, I knew we didn’t have much time. I asked Dad to write down his bucket list.” The family marked off each item — game nights, meals together, visits with friends. The day after they finished the list by watching Carroll’s daughter perform with her school marching band, Gibson died. “We did it all, we said it all,” Carroll said. “They were special times.” Since 2014, the foundation has fulfilled the wishes of nearly 20 people, among them James Byers, who died 10 months after his family’s trip to Disney World.


“Cancer can be a gift if you allow it to be. It’s a chance to do the things you want to do and say things you want to say. It puts life in perspective.”

February. The score didn’t go White’s way, but they had a great time. “When somebody tells you you’ve got something that could kill you, and you don’t know how long you have, it’s good to have something to take your mind off what’s happening,” said White. “And if something does happen to me, it was an experience Steven can tell his kids about one day.” Diagnosed with stage four cancer last fall, White is currently undergoing chemo— Peggy Carroll therapy treatments. “So far I’m improving, but I’m not cured yet,” he said. “Cancer puts life in a different light, quick. I’m trying to do as much as I can with, and for, my family. “But watching the game, I wasn’t thinking about cancer. Peggy and Fill Your Bucket List are nothing but a positive in my life — The Fill Your Bucket List Foundation gathers to send James Byers and his family off people who don’t to Disney World. know you but are His wife, Rebecca, says the trip was a there for you, on your side.” “dream vacation.” Carroll says new wish recipients are be“The hardest thing for James was want- ing proposed by their doctors, friends and ing us to be OK without him,” Byers said. family. The foundation recently added its “He was always the provider, working 50 first paid employee and hosted its second and 60 hours a week to make sure we had annual Bucket Bash fundraiser in April. what we needed. “People can help by connecting us “We had always wanted to go to Dis- to those who will donate airline and hotel ney, but finances didn’t allow it. The trip points, activities and gifts in kind,” Carroll meant the world to James. He thoroughly said, “or loan us their vacation home. And enjoyed watching our boys swim with the they can volunteer, as grant directors, on dolphins, and back at home he would just the Bucket Bash committee, or as corporate stare at the pictures. partners. “What Peggy is doing, helping fami“A cancer diagnosis forces us to live life lies, is phenomenal. My job now is to move to the fullest every day. The wishes teach us us forward, to make sure the boys remember that what’s important is spending time with the parts of James he left with us.” the people we love.” James White of Garner is another wish recipient. He and his son, Steven, attended Learn more at fillyourbucketlistfoundathe UNC vs. Duke basketball game this past tion.org.

We are an Italian dining ristorante with a comfortable and casual atmosphere. We strive to provide each guest with an experience they will remember.

Open 7 days a week Mon.–Thurs. 11:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. 11:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m. Sun. 11:30 a.m.–9 p.m. 1060 Darrington Drive, Cary (919) 468-7229 www.luganocary.com

CARY MAGAZINE 71


WINNER 2006

HONORABLE MENTION 2007

Recognized by Cary Magazine readers as one of the best special occasion restaurants

THE MAGGY AWARDS

HONORABLE MENTION 2013

HONORABLE MENTION 2016

Hours: Mon.-Thurs.: 5-10pm Fri.-Sat.: 5-11pm

5 private rooms seating 6-200 guests!

HONORABLE MENTION 2014

Contact: Christina Reeves Sabin Christina@ReysRestaurant.com HONORABLE MENTION 2015

1130 Buck Jones Rd., Raleigh NC 27606

919.380.0122 ReysRestaurant.com

Main Event Sponsor: Platinum Circle Sponsors

Bronze Circle Sponsors

WRAL News 5

The Board of Directors

AARP

Friends of The Center Sponsors Aware Senior Care

Gold Circle Sponsors

Ralph and Daphne Ashworth

Believe in You Life Coaching

BlueCross BlueShield of North Carolina

Linda Folger

Cary Magazine

Duke Energy Progress

O’Brien/Atkins Associates, PA

Tavant Technologies, Inc.

First Citizens Bank

RBC Wealth Management

Silver Circle Sponsors

Gelinne Family Fund

Right at Home of Wake County

Sports Endeavors, Inc.

Hardison & Cochran Attorneys at Law

Trisure


THE CARY THEATER What’s Beyond Ordinary This Summer?

Film Day-Fun Day

It’s hard to sit still when you are a tiny person! We agree so we’ve created Film Day Fun Day! Our littlest guests can sit on play mats and bring toys as they enjoy kid-approved films! Hey kids - nobody will shush you, make you sit in your seat, or tell you that you’re having too much fun! This is a fun, interactive film experience that allows kids to enjoy films in ways that connect with them.

Summer Series for Seniors

Matinee showings of the summer’s best films. Select Thursdays at 2 p.m.

Frame by Frame 70s Summer School Created with the cinephile in mind, this series helps film lovers delve deeper into the art and craft of film making. In partnership with The Modern School of Film. Featuring five amazing films from the 1970s.

122 E. Chatham St., Cary, NC 27511

(919) 462-2055

thecarytheater.com


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“Summer Splash 1,” left, and “Summer Splash 2,” above, by Michael Guin of Morrisville. “Nothing is more exciting for a child than playing in water on a hot day. I was able to capture my grandchildren with that excitement on their faces as they played in the splash pad at the pool.”

Summer Dreams Summertime: What does it mean to you? Ask 10 people and you’ll get 10 different answers. Ask members of Cary Photographic Artists, you’ll get photos. It’s water and sand, sun and shade, but mostly summer is blue skies and time to dream. Special thanks to Barbara Guin of Cary Photographic Artists, who helped choose our collection of summer images, seen on the following pages. The group is open to photographers of all skill levels, offering educational programs and exhibitions including the ninth annual Juried Exhibition coming in late September. Meetings are held on the second and fourth Wednesdays at 7 p.m., at The Cary Theater, 122 E. Chatham St. caryphotographicartists.org CARY MAGAZINE 75


“Tobacco Crop,” by Burnette Blakeley of Cary; inspired by traditional North Carolina farming.

“Tree on a Dirt Road,” by James Jay Jillson of Cary. “This photo was taken in the beautiful tree farm area of Northwest North Carolina.”

“Duck Sunset Lady,” by Barbara S. Guin of Morrisville. “I was photographing the sunset along the Duck boardwalk when I noticed a woman reading at the end of the pier. I was inspired by the way we were each enjoying the same beautiful evening in our own way.” 76

JUNE/JULY 2016


“Outer Banks,” by Bobby Nicks of Cary. “This was taken at Corolla, on the Outer Banks. We had been out shooting the wild horses of Corolla most of the day, and we were getting tired. I happened to look over at the sand dunes, and they looked so peaceful and quiet, I just had to take a picture of them.”

“Starfish at Fort Macon Beach,” by Ed Wase of Cary. “OBX Horses,” by J.B. Lawson of Raleigh.

CARY MAGAZINE 77


“Pearson Falls, Saluda, NC,” by Walter C. Ballard of Cary. “I love taking pictures of waterfalls in North Carolina in the western part of the state, in the mountains. Great hiking, great scenery, great pictures to be taken.”

“Vick-Benson Farm Field of Gold,” by Robert Cassanova of Battleboro. “The Vick-Benson Farm is located near the Battleboro community and has been actively farmed since the early 1900s. Scenes and patterns of furrowed fields, crops, rustic buildings and seasonal shifting of light create a visually fascinating panorama. The glow of the afternoon sun on the red barn and golden field of wheat is a visual metaphor for the sacred renewal of farm life.”

“Elizabeth City Sunrise,” by Harry O’Connor of Apex. “We were headed to Currituck to attend a duck decoy festival. We decided to make a weekend of it, staying in Elizabeth City the first night. While my wife slept in, I got up early and went down to a city park, where I photographed the sun rising over the Pasquotank River.”

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Ask us about our same day

crowns!


garden adventurer

WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY L.A. JACKSON

Tomato Troubles IDYLLIC IS the tomato harvest of perfectly round fruits

shining in a glow of flawless red. But in the real world of vegetable gardening, bad bugs, diseases and physiological problems can produce less-than-pristine fruits. Listed below are four of the latter disorders and tips on how to deal with them. Blossom end rot. This yucky, dark brownish blotch

on the bottom of an otherwise pretty tomato comes from stress due to extended periods of wet-dry-wet-dry conditions. A 3- to 4-inch mulch and regular watering when the rains don’t come will help stabilize the ground moisture supply and prevent such ugliness from occurring. A shot of calcium will also slow down this problem. Powdered lime is a good source of calcium, but it reacts slowly with the soil. For quicker results, spray tomato leaves with a diluted solution of calcium chloride, which is available at most local garden centers. Sunscald. It first appears as a yellowish, discolored spot on top of a tomato, and then eventually turns the afflicted area about as ugly as a bad case of blossom end rot. True to its name, the cause of this blemish is Ol’ Sol — too much sun. Sunscald usually happens on tomatoes that ripen on the upper branches of plants. With less shade, these fruits easily become overexposed to relentless rays. However, conservative pruning (especially in the top branches) and using a light covering such as cheese cloth over the plants will help prevent the sun from doing such damage to ripening ‘maters. Cracking. This condition is marked by concentric, unappetizing rings circling the stem or vertical splits along the sides of the fruits. It is the result of tomatoes growing too fast and literally bursting out of their skins. This problem usually occurs when a big rain falls after a long dry spell. Too much water too soon becomes too much of a good thing, and it causes the tomatoes to crack. Mulching the plants will help steady the moisture supply, and watering regularly during dry spells will also prevent this disorder. Catfacing. Have any disfigured or deeply scarred tomatoes? They are probably the victims of catfacing, so named because, with a lot of imagination, you can sometimes see cat faces formed by the odd shapes. This problem starts early in the development of fruit. Cool weather can 80

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Too much sun or not enough water can yield disappointing tomatoes.

cause abnormal growth in young tomatoes that magnifies as they get bigger, meaning early spring plantings are usually more susceptible to catfacing. So, if your first crop of tomatoes show signs of this weirdness, don’t worry — any fruit that follow should be free of this disorder as temperatures rise during the growing season. L.A. Jackson is the former editor of Carolina Gardener Magazine. Want to ask L.A. a question about your garden? Contact him by email at lajackson1@gmail.com.


To Do in the

GARDEN

12 9

3 6

June • Any holes that remain in the flower bed can be quickly filled with heat-seekers such as sun coleus, celosia, nicotiana, portulaca and zinnia that thrive in the summer sun. • Now is a great time to add blooming

Unique Specialty Pizzas, Piled-High Salads, Fresh Baked Calzones, Monumental Hoagies, and much much more!

magic to the backyard pond by dropping in a few tropical water lilies. Don’t forget to add specialized water garden fertilizer tablets to each of the plants’ pot, as these heavy-feeders need the extra nutrients for the best flower shows. • Pinched tomato suckers can produce this fall’s tomato crop. Place each sucker in a 2- to 3-inch container of potting soil and keep them moist in a lightly shaded spot. The suckers will quickly root and be ready to plant when you prepare your midsummer vegetable garden. • To encourage extended harvests, lightly side-dress fertilizer around any established vegetables that have begun to set crops.

July • When irrigating plants, water thoroughly and deeply to encourage roots to penetrate down, down, down into the soil. Plants with shallow roots are more susceptible to stress during the hottest and driest times of the summer. • Herbs are usually at their harvesting best just before flowering when they contain the maximum in essential oils. Pick herbs early in the morning before the sun heats the plants and reduces the concentration of oil in the leaves. • Houseplants vacationing outside should be watched for signs of bad bug mischief. Egg-laying could mean an infestation once the plants are brought back inside in the fall. Wiping the leaves occasionally with a damp cloth will help

Pumpkins

TIMELY TIP Who says it’s too early for Halloween? Pumpkin seeds started by the middle of June outdoors should mature into hauntingly handsome jack-o-lanterns just in time for October’s spookfest. Grow pumpkin plants in well-worked, heavily amended soil in a sunny location, and water them thoroughly when the rains don’t come. Keep the vines thickly mulched with compost, and add either a commercial timerelease fertilizer at planting time or a diluted natural fertilizer such as fish emulsion or compost tea at least every three to four weeks. For more symmetrical shapes, gently shift the bases of pumpkins’ contact with the ground once a week. Want to go big, big, BIG? For bragging-size pumpkins, after the plants set fruit, reduce the number of pumpkins to only two or three per vine.

Try our BURGERS!

THE MAGGY AWARDS

WINNER 2016

4300 NW Cary Parkway Cary, NC 919-463-7779

waylay egg-laying activities. CARY MAGAZINE 81


happenings

Booth Exterminating in Cary is Family-owned and operated

Registered nurse

Vashti

Johnson of Cary was selected as

celebrating its 50th

the Southeast Finalist for Nurse of the

year in business.

Year by BrightStar Care, in a nationwide

The company was

call for exceptional nurses. BrightStar

founded by Cary

Care of Cary franchise owners John and

native Russell

Lori Kemeny held a surprise reveal for

Booth, pictured,

Johnson, complete with a trophy, cake and

and his brother

monetary prize. brightstarcare.com/cary    

Lewis in 1966; at age 91, Russell still works part time. His son-in-law, Brack Lee, and grandson-in-law, Tony Crowell, continue the family tradition. boothexterminating.com

Appointed as the new police chief for

Patrice Andrews,

J.J. Raia

the Town of Morrisville is

who will begin work

J. J. RAIA

on June 6. She holds

Cary resident

a Bachelor of Science

and White Photography Contest,” a project of the Reynolda House Museum of American

degree in criminal justice from North Carolina Central University, graduated from

was named a finalist in “The Modern Landscape: Black

Art in Winston-Salem, and the Modern Automotive auto group. The competition celebrates the beauty of the American landscape, as exemplified by the work of artist-photographer Ansel Adams. The exhibition “Ansel Adams: Eloquent Light” will be on view at Reynolda House through July 17. reynoldahouse.org

West Point Leadership Academy in 2011, and from the 263rd session of the FBI

CARY FAMILY DENTAL

National Academy in Quantico, Va. Most

Dentistry From the Heart event on April 23, where Dr. Allan

recently, Andrews served as a commander in

Acton and the Cary Family Dental team, along with Drs. Gabriel

the Criminal Investigations Division of the

Fitz, Ken Benson, Robert Stutts and Christina Maresca, provided

Durham Police Department. A community

approximately $80,000 in free dental care to 197 adults. To date,

welcome is planned for Thursday, June 16. townofmorrisville.org 82

JUNE/JULY 2016

held its fifth annual

this Cary Family Dental event has served more than 800 adults Dr. Allan Acton

and provided nearly $330,000 in free care. carydental.com


happenings SCORE, a national nonprofit dedicated to mentoring small business owners, has named skin care

SugarKANE Sugaring of Cary a winner firm

of The American Small Business Championship, made possible by a $595,000 grant from Sam’s Club. Girl Scouts-North Carolina Coastal Pines’ robotics team, the

GADGET

SugarKANE Sugaring, owned by Robin

GIRLS, was presented with the 2016 Imagery Award at the FIRST North Carolina

Ky’ Lockhart, is one of 102 small business

District Wake County Robotics Competition, held March 12-13. Over a six-week design

winners nationwide, and is now eligible

period, the team conceptualized, designed, built and programmed their robot, which is

to receive the $25,000 grand prize at

adorned with Girl Scout Cookie boxes. The team also designed a T-shirt and hot pink hard hats to round out the aesthetics. Pictured from left are Gadget Girls team members Raven Davis, Amanda Lugo, Vera Gettinger, Julianna Serpe, Alex Settle and Tiffany Miner.

the SCORE awards in September. championship.score.org

nccoastalpines.org

The Moving Truck is Leaving! Are you ready to learn about your new community?

Your local welcome team is ready to visit you with a basket full of maps, civic information, gifts, and gift certificates from local businesses. From doctors to dentists and restaurants to repairmen...we help newcomers feel right at home in their new community! For your complimentary welcome visit, or to include a gift for newcomers, call 919.218.8149. Or, visit our website, www.nnws.org.

CARY | APEX | MORRISVILLE | HOLLY SPRINGS | FUQUAY-VARINA | GARNER ANGIER | WILLOW SPRING | CLAYTON | CLEVELAND CARY MAGAZINE 83


happenings

Cary Visual Art Providing Protection for Your • Home • Auto • Business • Life • Health

has announced the winners of its second annual CVA Young Cary Artists Scholarships, awarding $2,500 scholarships to high school seniors who demonstrate artistic excellence and plan to continue their artistic studies at an

512 West Williams Street | Apex, NC 919-362-8310 | info@rogersinc.net www.rogersinc.net

...a neighbor, someone you know, someone you can trust and respect.

accredited college or university in the fall.

Call today and talk to a real person who cares about your family’s protection and security.

artistic merit, interdisciplinary creativity,

Proudly Representing

The recipients are selected on the basis of

community involvement, leadership potential, and extracurricular activities. They are: Madeline Denton, Athens Drive High School; Felix Chang, Green Hope High; Lavanya Gunturi, Green Hope High; Emerald Johnston, Cary High; and Julia McGillicuddy, Cardinal Gibbons High. caryvisualart.org

Dr. Lucy Daniels, founder of the Lucy Daniels Center

MAKE IT A

for Early Childhood and the Lucy Daniels Foundation in Cary, has published her sixth book,

At the Y, learning doesn’t stop when school is out. YMCA School Programs focus on achievement, belonging and relationships. You can feel better knowing your child is learning to make good choices while being active and enjoying time with friends.

Maritime Magistery. A

REGISTER NOW for Before & After School,

collection of stories how the environment

Tracking Out and Teacher Workday/Holiday Care

can impact the human spirit and the

YMCATriangle.org/backtoschool

workings of the subconscious. The

Cary Family YMCA • 101 YMCA Drive, Cary Kraft Family YMCA • 8921 Holly Springs Rd., Apex

renowned psychoanalytic psychologist, Daniels reveals in this

book is set on the North Carolina coast. lucydanielscenter.org

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JUNE/JULY 2016


happenings

Among 19 finalists selected by Belk for its 2016 Southern Designer Showcase competition is

Zankhna

Parekh of Cary. Parekh will compete for the opportunity to have her collections sold in select Belk stores and on Belk.com in spring 2017. zankhna.com

Lisa Higginbotham CSR, of 5Star Awards in Cary, was

Enjoy A Quiet Getaway The Bhaven log cabin, located just outside Blowing Rock, is a great weekend getaway yet big enough to stay the entire week. Just minutes from Grandfather Mountain and Tweetsie Railroad, the spacious cabin sleeps six, has two baths, living area and game room and full kitchen. And the view is outstanding as you sit on the porch and look at mountains over an old Christmas tree farm. Ask for Bhaven cabin in rustic cabins section.

installed as a board member of the Awards and Personalization Association at its International Expo, held in Las Vegas. She will serve a three-year term on the board, and will chair APA’s Education Committee for 2016-2017. Higginbotham is a Certified Recognition Specialist and has owned and operated

www.blowingrockresortrentals.com 828-295-9899 | 866-800-9899 (toll free)

5Star Awards with her husband, Jeff, for 17 years. 5starawards.net CARY MAGAZINE 85


write light

BY JONATHAN FREDIN

W’SUP? Standup paddleboard (SUP) racers — as well as some who are just along for the ride — compete in the 3.5-mile Harbor Island race April 23 during the sixth annual West Marine Carolina Cup at the Blockade Runner Beach Resort in Wrightsville Beach. More than 800 paddlers of all ages and abilities competed in a weekend of races, including the grueling 13.2-mile Graveyard Course, which drew competitors from around the world.

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Profile for Cary Magazine

Cary Magazine June/July 2016  

Meet the 2016 Movers & Shakers, learn about cricket, and have a slice of pie à la mode.

Cary Magazine June/July 2016  

Meet the 2016 Movers & Shakers, learn about cricket, and have a slice of pie à la mode.