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BBEYOND JEWELLERY

Spectacular and Collectible Pieces

BBEYOND BOOKS 1


foreword BBeyond Jewellery: Spectacular and Collectible Pieces was conceived as a new loose leaf edition on some of the world’s leading master jewellers, with a nod to emerging designers, and a profile of a leading collector of historical significance pieces. From featuring rare gemstones, to concept jewellery, to outstanding craftsmanship, to collectible art deco pieces, the book offers a glimpse into the world of collectors who appreciate the truly exceptional. Some of the featured pieces are art objects in their own right and created for display only, while others are eminently wearable. We have tried to cover the full gamut: from the whimsical and quirky, to the subtly exquisite, to the grand statement pieces, to the show-stopping ones. We trust there is something in this edition for every reader and we have styled the pages as frameable prints.

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master jewellers Rare 1 Wallace Chan Daniel Brush Siegelson, New York Louisa Westwood Arte Oro Katie Brunini Rose Carvalho Vicente Gracia Valerie Jo Coulson Intisars Katherine Wallach Kazumi Arikawa

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RARE 1

David Birnbaum is the founder of, and guiding force behind, Rare 1, the brand extraordinaire conceived to fill a gap on the global market. As the name suggests, the firm deals in gems of ultimate rarity. “Clients globally come to us for the exceptional quality, rarity, beauty and value of the gems, certified by our brand signature.” Birnbaum’s vision? To create extraordinary pieces made with the “rarest of the rare” gems and offer the kind of exceptional personal service to match the quality of the jewels. Rare 1 showcases the largest selection of extraordinary collectibles at a private and discreet New York City salon - and boasts a worldwide clientele of super-discerning individuals. Prior to founding Rare 1, Birnbaum was a name principal at Andor & David Birnbaum, Inc., globally-known De Beers’ Sightholders. Rare 1, as a concept, deals in 10-250 carat gems: D colour, pink and blue diamonds, of vivid and intense luminosity, and sells to heads of state, billionaires, VIPs and private collectors. “We have the very top selection in the world, by far.” The firm equally offers a uniquely bespoke design service and is often called upon to create a piece around an extremely rare gem. The making of the carefully conceived and designed jewels is entrusted to a specific team best suited for each individual project. Birnbaum’s name is on every single piece by way of exclusive branding and quality certification.    Rare, high spec gems are, of course, an investment, as well as a statement on the part of the owner/wearer. Says Birnbaum: “95% of the investment is in the key center rare beauty gem.” “We look for both the visual and the technical when we source our gems; we need to be at the apex on both parameters.” The Birnbaum Rare 1 pieces have a classic, timeless look about them and let the gemstones shine. They are timeless, tailored, contemporary classics. Given the iconic status of the jewels, the brand sets great store by its legacy, defined by Birnbaum himself in these three words: Extraordinary. Timeless. Rare. The best contact mode for clients is by email: David.Birnbaum.NY@gmail.com

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5 Diamond Bracelet Rare 1 Designer Bracelet / 12 Pear Shape / D Color diamonds / Premium Clarity / average size 8 carats each / 95+ carats total diamond weight / in customcrafted platinum

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Rare1

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6 1. Blue Diamond (loose) 25+ carat Fancy Blue Pear Shape / Internally Flawless Diamond 2. BLUE Diamond (in ring) 10+ carat Fancy Vivid Blue Diamond / Pear Shape / Premium Clarity

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Rare1

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7 Pink Diamond 25+ carat Fancy Orange Pink Heart Shape / Internally Flawless Diamond

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Rare1

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8 Heart Shape Diamond 100+carat Heart Shape Diamond / D Flawless

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Rare1

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WALLACE CHAN

Wallace Chan is a jewellery creator and innovator whose curiosity and thirst for knowledge have led him beyond the boundaries of the conventional. He perceives jewellery as more than mere adornment – each piece is a storyteller, endowed with heritage; a reflection of our times and a realization of a dream of his. Gemstones are his language and through them he translates the messages of our universe. Chan’s designs are ingenious and intricate and his body of work has the hallmark of timeless legacy, not least for patenting a new material. “We are nothing without the past. All that we have today, we have built on the shoulders of the people before us. We become jaded about things we are used to seeing or having. With time, we forget what we were best at when we were children: asking questions in order to improve ourselves. Curiosity is the driving force behind each of my innovations, techniques, and creations. Growing up, my siblings and I had to share a single plastic spoon, while the adults in my family used porcelain spoons. I wondered: how would it feel if I could have the porcelain spoon in my hand, if I were to have a porcelain spoon all to myself? When I finally grabbed the porcelain spoon on the dining table, it slipped and broke. Why did it have to break? Years later, I asked myself the same question, and that led to another question: What do I have to do to make the material stronger? Those were questions that compelled me to find answers. After seven years of research on porcelain, I launched The Wallace Chan Porcelain in the summer of 2018, a material five times harder than steel.” Every one of Wallace Chan’s pieces is at once mysterious and iconic; close to nature yet enhanced through spectacular gems – they are “an art form that must interact with the human body to truly come alive”. “Gemstones are the memories of the universe, containing stories waiting to be told. I translate the messages of the universe hidden inside the gemstones, and unfold those stories through my creations. All creations need a soul, a mind, a philosophy, and a face. I find and express those elements through colour, form, texture, light, movements, etc. It is a mixture of many things, and when all those elements are present in a jewelry piece, it can be appreciated even when not worn.

www.wallace-chan.com

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On the other hand, jewelry is meant to be worn. To me, a piece of jewelry that is uncomfortable to wear is a failure by default. Therefore, during the creative process, I must take ergonomics and practicality into consideration.” “Every jewelry piece is alive and unique. They embody culture, aesthetics, craftsmanship, history, love, memories and the future. For me, it is important that a piece resonates with the collector because my creations are like my children – I could never pass them on to someone who does not commit to giving them love and taking care of them.” Chan’s iconic pieces amaze and challenge our preconception of jewellery – they are clearly created with a sense of legacy rather than based on a brief. “I don’t have a favorite piece. They are all unique in my eyes. For the 2020 TEFAF Maastricht exhibition I created spherical showcases that not only display the work, but also symbolize the moment of discovery, and The Snowflake echoes just that. By far my most recent, never-beforeseen piece, it is a transformable brooch that can be rotated to achieve two different looks, echoing the notion that no two snowflakes are alike. To create is to encapsulate the fleeting moments in life. This creation, like other creations of mine, has taken years to complete. It is hard materials in delicate forms. It is a symbol of rebirth, purity, uniqueness, transformation and new beginnings. Another piece is Mind Puzzle, a brooch that illustrates a chaotic yet orderly cluster of creativity, memories and experiences, accumulated throughout all stages of my life. My childhood, symbolized by the figure of a baby in blue porcelain, forever dwells inside and shapes my mind.” 9


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The Snowflake, Transformable Brooch Yellow Diamond 1pc 7.86 ct, Aquamarine, Blue Topaz, Pink Sapphire, Green Tourmaline, The Wallace Chan Porcelain, Titanium Imagine this: a snowflake appears in the deep, deep silence of a winter night. It slowly makes its way through the air and lightly touches upon the branch of a tree. As time goes by, it melts, becomes a water drop and continues to travel in a different form. How many times of reincarnation does a water droplet have to go through before it could be reborn as a snowflake, one of its most magical and elegant forms?Â

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Wallace Chan

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11 Windows to the Universe, Parure Necklace: Diamond 8 pcs 9.97 tcw, Pearl 1 pc 21.83 ct, Pearl, Diamond, Pink Sapphire, Green Tourmaline, Tsavorite Garnet, White Agate, Lapis Lazuli, Titanium Ring: Diamond 1 pc 2.03 ct, Diamond, Green Tourmaline, Pearl, White Agate, Pink Tourmaline, Pink Sapphire, Titanium

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Wallace Chan

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12 Mind Puzzle brooch Fancy Colored Diamond, Sapphire, Pearl, Opal, Amethyst, Blue Topaz, Ametrine Lapis Lazuli, Titanium, The Wallace Chan Porcelain

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Wallace Chan

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13 The Emblem of Zen brooch Opal 1pc 69.78ct, Emerald, Sapphire, Diamond, Fancy Colored Diamond, Titanium

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Wallace Chan

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14 Garden of Dreams brooch Ruby 6 pcs 12.90 tcw, Fancy Colored Diamond, Diamond, South Sea Pearl, Titanium, The Wallace Chan Porcelain

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Wallace Chan

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DANIEL BRUSH

Daniel Brush is one of the most significant artists of our time. He expresses himself in a multitude of mediums, one of which happens to be jewellery – not necessarily the wearable kind, but the kind born out of creative impetus and often the product of years of fascination with something that his contemplative mind has zeroed in on. He is not a household name or a “brand” – the very notion is alien to him – rather, his work has acquired a cult-like following among cognoscenti and serious collectors around the world. Art critics are quasi-reverential; his work is exhibited at the Smithsonian as well as in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and no fewer than seven books have been published about him. His path leading to creating jewellery as a form of pure art is circuitous: he retired from a tenured professorship in 1978, moved to a historic building in New York and set out to be a “tough artist”. To this day, his work space – his universe - is home to hundreds of yards of canvas, paintings, materials, tools, other artists’ drawings, books, his wife Olivia’s looms... He is Proustian in his approach both to his work and to life in general in that he can get intrigued by anything, no matter how esoteric, and push the exploration of it to an extreme, aiming for “clarity of language” in the final creation. He is not, he says, interested in the usage, or utilitarian function/ decorative value of his work. “I’d prefer my jewels remain in a box, not worn.” Nor does he see the relationship between the making and the selling of jewellery. He would be the first one to admit that he has been fortunate to be discovered by a relatively small group of significant collectors who are prepared to wait years for a work to be completed. The question that gets you into the inner circle of would-be collectors is “Can I take care of your work?”

www.danielbrush.com

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For all that, Brush lacks the arrogance of “art for art’s sake” disciples. “I try to divest myself of ego because it gets in the way. I didn’t sign my work for 30 years. When I finally started doing so, I used a tiny signature but imbued with blood, tears and joy.” Rather, he sees his works are a dialogue between maker and viewer/ collector, hoping to “touch another person” in the way great historical pieces do. Museum pieces are so much more than the sum total of materials and technique, however intricate the latter – they are in the “realm of magic, a breath of God”, he says. This thought process is at his core as an artist. His goal was never to be successful in the conventional sense. “I have no end goal, other than another day of working.” Brush’s preoccupation with light, has led him to work extensively with aluminium and steel, creating jewels that “reflect and refract the light”. “Capturing the light is now all consuming.” He is also known as a master of granulation, but although fascinated with the technique (and Etruscan gold objects in particular), he insists that craftsmanship alone is not a motivation in itself. Brush is nevertheless aware of the legacy he has built. The body of work may well go to a single private collector ultimately, but he would rather it were a collector who puts it on display once in a while, by lending to museums. This, after all, is the responsibility of true collectors, he says: to document, protect and share art with the world at large, so that we may all draw an inspiration from it.

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Daniel Brush

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Daniel Brush

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Daniel Brush

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Daniel Brush

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Daniel Brush

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SIEGELSON, NEW YORK

In the rarefied world of jewellery collectors, Lee Siegelson needs no introduction. He reigns supreme as a purveyor of truly iconic pieces and is both a collector and a designer himself.

While purely utilitarian jewellery inhabits the realm intricate craftsmanship, Siegelson specialises in sourcing highly collectible items that are wearable works of art. “Jewelry is unquestionably one of the oldest forms of expression. The history of adornment likely started with hunter-gatherers entwining themselves with vines and flowers. The earliest identifiable jewelry, shells with manmade holes, appeared more than 100,000 years ago. By comparison, the earliest known examples of line art are cave paintings from about 40,000 years ago. Jewelry is intimately connected to our development and identity as people. Historically, jewelry has deep ties to religion, culture and personal aesthetics. It can symbolize many things, from personal affiliations, to wealth, to marriage. It is often considered part of the “Decorative Arts” with items that are utilitarian but also beautiful, such as lamps, windows, vessels, and furniture. In the hand of a master, such as Tiffany or Ruhlman, decorative items can be exquisite, but they are always functional. Jewelry can be worn, but it serves no utilitarian function in the way a Tiffany lamp provides light, the stained-glass windows of Chartres Cathedral keep out the rain, and a Ruhlman chair is for sitting in. Jewelry, much like paintings and sculpture, serves a primarily

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aesthetic and sometimes symbolic function. The fact that it can be worn is a question of how the work is shown. The best examples of jewelry display balance, harmony, and consideration of composition, all the elements that set apart a great work of art.” Collectors love what they collect and also view jewellery as an asset. In fact, historical pieces may be a safer asset class in the longer term, from an investment point of view, than contemporary art. Appreciation of design is subjective, but in terms of a single period that is more significant than others from an appeal/value point, Siegelson has identified the 1920s, an era of high octane glamour, immortalized by F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Great Gatsby. “The Art  Deco period in the 1920s came on the tails of World War I. Changes in technology and society affected all of  the arts, and especially jewelry, which is perhaps the most  intimate, worn as it is against  the body. During the war, men who had never left  home were suddenly traveling across the world, and women were stepping outside the home for the first time to hold down jobs. Once the war ended, things couldn’t go back to the way they were before. And travel by air, rail, boat, and car were suddenly all much more widely available. Where jewelry before the war was delicate and celebratory, full of tiny white sparkly diamonds in swags and festoons, meant to adorn a bodice and twinkle in gaslighting, jewelry after the war was


large and bold, full of colorful influences from exotic places and robust geometry taken from machine parts. The changes that appeared in the 1920s influence jewelry today, and some of the greatest pieces were created in this period.” A collectible piece is more than the sum total of the materials used in producing it. Beauty being subjective, there are several factors make it eminently collectible. Desire, scarcity, historical connection, provenance, brand recognition all factor in. “Desire is the most important aspect of a piece you are purchasing for yourself. If you find it beautiful, and you want it, you should buy it. We place each vintage piece that we sell in a historical context. The pieces sold by Siegelson are rare and beautiful, and important examples created by master artisans for wealthy clients with exceptional taste. They are treasures that get handed down in families and may come up for sale once in a lifetime. The quality of construction and the consideration in the design is unparalleled. Provenance adds a richness to the history of the piece. Museums value provenance because it enables them to tell a multi-faceted story and connect with audiences. Some private collectors who really want to wear their jewelry are most interested in the look and feel, but others who value the way a great piece connect to history appreciate the information about provenance.”

“To create pieces today that collectors will want 100 years from now, we look to the great designs of the past. They are beautiful and well made. We strive to achieve that in the modern designs by Siegelson. Whether a client wears a piece of jewelry or puts it on display, I just want them to love what they buy.” Siegelson is variously referred to as a treasure hunter and a tastemaker. He is credited with ‘discovering’ well-established but forgotten names. He insists that he simply strives to buy “what I love and to offer it to clients with clear documentation of the art historical importance.” “There were some wonderful designers in the Art Deco period. Cartier in the 1920s was a family firm that was well-established, but created groundbreaking work that reflected the changes in society. They had access to the best stones and created fantastic designs, drawing influences from exotic locations. Suzanne Belperron was another influential designer who created iconic curvaceous designs often including carved hardstone. And the cutting edge artist jewelers, Dunand, Despres, Sandoz, and Templier, made strong geometrical creations that were not reliant on the value of the materials. Sandoz said, ‘It’s possible to make very beautiful jewelry simply with gold and to make horrors with rivers of diamonds,’ which I completely agree with.”

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28 The Tibbett Suite: A Citrine and Diamond Belt with a Buckle Necklace and Earrings by Paul Flato, New York, circa 1940, Bracelet by Lambert Brothers, New York, circa 1950

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Siegelson, New York

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29 Carved Coral, Emerald, and Diamond Chimera Bangle by Cartier, Paris, circa 1960

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Siegelson, New York

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30 Diamond and Onyx Fan Earrings by Siegelson, New York

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Siegelson, New York

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31 Chroma Drops A Pair of Ceramic, Spinel, and Amethyst Ear Clips by Siegelson, New York

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Siegelson, New York

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32 Platinum and Diamond Necklace by Van Cleef & Arpels, Paris, 1948

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Siegelson, New York

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33 Art Moderne Silver and Black Lacquer Bracelet by Jean DesprĂŠs, Paris, circa 1931

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Siegelson, New York

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LOUISA WESTWOOD

Louisa Westwood is a London-based, independent jeweller, who caters primarily to a private clientele. Her pieces are one-offs and limited editions, highly collectible, and acquired by connoisseurs worldwide. She also undertakes private commissions to create bespoke items. Each piece is distinctive in juxtaposing and combining elegant restraint and boldness of design and execution. Louisa Westwood creates intricate statement pieces that are traditional in terms of craftsmanship, yet edgy, unusual and eminently remarkable: works of art in their own right.

tanzanites and tsavorite garnets, especially when set against yellow gold”. The stone’s relationship to the overall design of the piece is important, and unusual gems are incorporated, where appropriate:

Jewellery as art is, of course, not a new concept, but appears to be a differentiator in a busy market space. Is it wearable art or strictly collectible?

“Collector gems, which are often too soft to be used for everydaywear, are also extremely beautiful. For example, sphalerites from the Aliva mine in Spain have a very high dispersion of light, which gives them more fire than diamonds.”

“Artist jewellery targets a niche audience, so buyers of my pieces tend to be those who want to wear them as a way to express their personality; and those who collect them, without wearing, as works of art. I do not mind whether my jewellery is treasured privately or displayed publicly; the most important thing to me is that the buyer finds magic in the piece. This is usually because they are moved by the inspiration behind the piece or because they are captured by the design.” Statement pieces clearly appeal to clients with a penchant for originality. What do they say about the wearer? “It does take a certain amount of confidence and strength of character to wear bold jewellery. However, I have a passion for statement pieces, yet am reserved and quiet by nature. I hope this shows that the wearer of a statement piece is not necessarily an extrovert person, as one would first assume, but rather, that the wearer is using that piece as a voice to express their individuality. I believe that everyone is unique, and that to embrace being different is to value self-expression, diversity and creativity.” Louisa Westwood sources gems from different parts of the world, and has a preference for “rich, opulent colours, such as rubellites,

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Louisa Westwood has an unusual background. She is a trained lawyer by profession; jewellery-making began as an interest, gradually evolving into a full-time business over the course of ten years. “The brand is unique, not only because of the unusual designs, but also because everything is handcrafted at my workbench without the use of CAD/CAM. The desire to preserve old-fashioned craftsmanship extends to all areas of production, from timeless letterpress printed business cards to bespoke leather boxes.”

Featured pieces

“My most important pieces incorporate all three qualities of scale, power and beauty. Inspiration for these pieces is frequently drawn from the visual splendour of ancient civilisations and classical works of art depicting powerful female figures. My aim, when designing and making important jewels, is to create highly individualistic pieces that are striking, elegant and capture the imagination.”

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35 Persepolis Griffin necklace 18ct yellow gold, tanzanites, diamonds and lapis lazuli.

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Louisa Westwood

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36 Ruby Dragon necklace 18ct yellow gold, rubies, diamonds, sapphire, natural untreated druzy and kyanite beads.

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Louisa Westwood

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ARTE ORO

Arte Oro, Singapore, was founded by Danilo Giannoni who is also the primary creative drive behind the brand. Born in Alessandria, Italy, Giannoni studied jewellery design and model-making at the Institute of Jewellery in Valenza, graduating top of his class, and subsequently working at such prestigious brands as Leo Pizzo, Luca Carati, Damiani, Crivelli and Bulgari. A great craftsman loves the process of making a jewellery piece: from developing the design to the technical details, through the discussion about materials, to the finishing; much as an artist would. A great craftsman brings a piece of jewellery to life so that it would be deeply meaningful to the wearer. A custom piece of jewellery is valuable both for the gems it incorporates and its design, the gem being the centrepiece - the soul of it. When presenting a project to a collector, Arte Oro first narrate the story of the gem. A design is then developed to a point where gem and design will meet and complement each other, becoming a masterpiece. “When we customise create, we factor in the client’s personality because we want the piece to reflect that.” The reputation of a master jeweller is critical in this context. Danilo is known for his ability to “give life to gems” but is equally conscious of the fact that a custom piece of jewellery represents an important investment too. “When we receive a briefing for a new project, we always ask if it is primarily an investment piece. If the answer is yes, we embark on a journey that could take a year or longer. We are currently working with a client looking for a Burmese Pigeon Blood Ruby over 10ct – a gem

that is unobtainable at present. The few available stones have been rejected because of inclusions or shade. We enjoy the chase even if we have to wait a long time to find the perfect gem. A client who is not prepared to compromise on quality doesn’t mind waiting either.” While the iconic jewellery brands have created exceptional pieces of historical significance, the heirlooms of tomorrow are created across different brands and are underpinned by different values, not least responsibly sourced gems. Sourcing gems ethically is of the utmost importance to Arte Oro who regularly visit the mines without prior notice and support blockchain technologies for greater industry transparency. “We use primary gem stones such as Diamonds (pink ones are breathtaking), Rubies (nothing beats a perfect ruby!), Emeralds and Sapphires, but have recently become partial to Spinels, Grandidierite, Alexandrite, unheated Tanzanite and Tsavorite. The main factors are size, colour and clarity. Only one stone will be selected out of all we see and the selection is made by a trade expert together with Danilo. The stone is then sent to the best laboratory to be retested.” “As an artist, I love creating something that has been personally made for the client, which becomes part of their journey and that they will pass on to the next generation.”

www.arteoro.com.sg

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38 Grandidierite Ring Gem-quality transparent faceted grandidierites rarely exceed one carat and to this date, no grandidierite of size and quality similar to this 10.43ct gemstone has been reported. Set in the centre amongst blue and white diamonds, this is a masterpiece.

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Arte Oro

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39 Gold Tourmaline and Coloured Diamond Ring The 15.8ct Gold Tourmaline is framed with multiple fancy coloured diamonds, each fastened with a double ring setting which allows movement and a slight hint of jingle.

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Arte Oro

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40 Blue-Green Sapphire Ring Accompanying the unique and rare 13.52ct Blue-Green Sapphire are two customcut Colombian emeralds in a geometrical setting.

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Arte Oro

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KATEY BRUNINI

Katey Brunini is a fine jewellery artist who is the recipient of the Women’s Jewelry Association Award of Excellence in Design, the American Gem Trade Association’s Editors’ Choice Spectrum Award, the International Pearl Design Competition Award and the MarCom Platinum Award for website design, among many others.

Brunini’s work has been featured in the San Diego Museum of Natural History, the Carnegie Museum, the Gemological Institute of America’s Permanent Collection, the Headley-Whitney Museum (Smithsonian adjunct), as well as at Art Basel Miami.

conversation pieces, the use of organic materials alongside precious gems and metals providing an interesting counter point. This, she says, is a play on raw and refined, good and evil. The idea is to flip it on its side, and then flip it again.

She was raised in a small beach community north of San Diego. “My family was a nomadic tribe of sorts. Education and experiences are important to us. I studied history, art history, design, religion, and gemology, as well as done apprenticeships in jewelry in Italy and California.  K. Brunini jewels was launched in the 1990’s and has global brand recognition for design, ethics, and authentic creativity influenced by Mother Nature’s rhymes, and interconnected to a universal rhythm.”

“Life is boring when everyone looks and acts the same. Individuality has to be earned in earnest at the age that celebrates “followers”.  Decades of thoughts and ideas and millennia of practical techniques merge in our pieces.  Conventional rules have blurred edges and they flow into a bigger picture.  I find the prettiest ugly, and the ugliest pretty. Timelessness is the goal. The pieces say, “ I stand out in the crown, not because I am the loudest or the flashiest, but because silently, I touch the depths.”  Our clients know what this means  - they are not followers.”

Her collections are thematically created and organised – an interesting concept in itself. “I grew up with a librarian mother, so everything in my life has become a series of book chapters organized like the Dewey Decimal system. I don’t really believe in chronological time, thus threads of feelings and sentiments guide my thought process. Themes rise like cream to the top when freed from boundaries and boxes.” Brunini’s pieces are complex and intricately built, some with a hint of Edwardian grandeur; others with a tribal whimsy or bohemian chunkiness. The rings, in particular, are definitive statement/

Brunini loves rubies and opals, especially together. “They pair exceptionally well.....unexpectedly”. She does create on commission, as well as a retail range. “I feel the most important aspect of creating a commissioned piece is to be a focused and good listener.  I am a conduit to the combined sensitivities of the creator and the wearer.  The jewel is meant to be worn, not hidden away, so it must resonate with the adorned.  I have no ego involved with the final creation, I am merely a surrogate of beauty.  There must exist a unilateral trust. I trust in the grace and violence of Mother Nature.”

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FEATURED PIECES: SPIRIT ANIMALS COLLECTION

Katey Brunini

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FEATURED PIECES: STEPPING STONES COLLECTION

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FEATURED PIECES: STEPPING STONES COLLECTION

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FEATURED PIECES: DNA COLLECTION

Katey Brunini

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ROSE CARVALHO

Rose Carvalho founded her eponymous brand a quarter of a century ago and in the course of two decades plus has developed 40 collections of highly conceptual design and unexpected visual impact. A native of São Paulo, she is now based in Rio de Janeiro but has an international clientele and following. She credits a number of philosophers for influencing her path, but the creative element is purely hers. “I channelled all my skills as a designer into jewellery that is based on extensive research about symbols and signs, and the human mind. People think and project forms in the collective and the meaning of these forms, along with the symbolic question, led me to studying Carl Jung and the master of psychosomatics, Rüdiger Dahlke.” Rose Carvalho’s jewellery is visually stunning because of the way it captures light and plays with optical dimensions. She says this evolved as an expression of her personal aesthetic and constitutes her “design fingerprint”. “My father was a very modern man who liked new technologies and this was imprinted in the family core. I was born in the 50s and grew up in the 60s, a revolutionary period for breaking with old values and embarking on an era of bold creations. The visual evolution of my jewellery came to me as I was looking at my pieces through a magnifying glass. I was already making pieces with textures that referred to the surface of the sun, the moon, the planets, and seeing them through a magnifying glass gave them incredible dimensions. That was when I had the idea of designing, cutting and polishing Brazilian gems as

lenses to enhance these textures. From then on, the sky was the limit. Even the pieces that don’t have the stone lenses possess a concave shape in gold that creates the same visual effect. I was also influenced by Gothic churches and temples with their mandalas and domes where the light comes through the stained glass and induces a state of contemplation.” Being a native of Brazil, a country of vast and unparallel gem resources, she naturally uses locally sourced stones. “The variety and beauty of gems here is incredible and I need transparency in my stones because things happen inside them. That is why I use a lot of amethyst, prasiolite, citrine, topaz, crystal quartz, to name a few.  I have no favorite because all are equally important to my work, but there is a gem that I like very much: the tourmaline.  In a single rough stone, you can find a multitude of colours.  I use them in my Colours of the Universe collection.”  What does a Rose Carvalho piece say about the individual wearing it? “My pieces are made from the absolute best quality materials and by the most accomplished craftsmen. The individual wearing them is someone who prizes quality but also has an appreciation for jewellery that’s beyond mere decoration – rather, a symbol that represents and speaks to one’s subconscious, to their memory and deeply embedded desires.”

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51 Desires Mandala Pendant 18k White gold with palladium and prasiolite and diamonds

Spirituality Mandala Ring 18k White gold with palladium, amethyst, and one diamond

FEATURED PIECES: THE LENSES COLLECTION

Rose Carvalho

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Amazon Cerrado Flower 18k yellow gold, quartz and diamonds

Time Mandala Ring 18k white gold with palladium, white topaz and diamonds

Amazon Monkey Abricรณ Flower 18k yellow gold and quartz


52 1. Stardust necklace 18k yellow gold, 24k gold and diamonds 2. Stardust rings 18k yellow gold, 24k gold and diamonds 18k white gold with paladium, 24k gold and diamonds 3. Stardust earrings 18k yellow gold, 24k gold and diamonds

FEATURED PIECES: THE STARDUST COLLECTION

Rose Carvalho

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53 Observatory ring, earrings and pendant 18k yellow gold and diamonds

FEATURED PIECES: THE OBSERVATORY COLLECTION

Rose Carvalho

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VICENTE GRACIA

Vicente Gracia is an artist jewellery creator. He has had a long and illustrious career path, with enough awards and international recognition to fill a book of his own. He is a creative force that melds avant-garde techniques with tradition to craft pieces that are incredibly elaborate, colourful and conceptually idiosyncratic. “The most complex exercise of design for me is to give the traditional a contemporary twist. When I use the word “tradition” I refer to the jewel as a poetic and mystical object that tells legends, speaks of hidden treasures and is steeped in the deepest and most spiritual history. This has happened repeatedly throughout history and the real challenge is to turn a piece into a contemporary one.” Vicente’s own creative spirit is woven into his collections even when he is working on a commissioned piece. A multitude of differently cut gems often co-exist in a single design simulating either the sea floor or expressing an allegory or the human condition, which is the approach of contemporary art in general. “We design both for collectors/clients and exhibitions but we always try to express that human condition, something that art does in abundance. I consider it imperative that the art of jewellery is also wearable art.” Vicente’s creations tend towards the boldly complex and it follows that his clients have a personality to match: “individuals who like to wear an artistic object rather than just an ornament”. He works with a vast range of gems, but does have his favourites: the fire opal, the turquoise blue of perse, Alexandrite, and all the variety of possible opals. Vicente’s dream project is to create a chess set with precious stones.

www.vicentegraciajoyas.com

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55 RĂ­o de la Vida Bracelet of the River of Life made with gold mesh, enamelled palms, diamonds and a central river made of aquamarines with yellowa gold and diamonds

FEATURED PIECES

Vicente Gracia

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1. El RuiseĂąor y la Rosa This ring contains a micro mosaic, with our original design of the nightingale and the rose, is mounted in yellow gold and accompanied by two rubies. Working according to the same ancestral mosaic system, but made in miniature. We have collaborated with the school of Rome of the micro mosaic for the development of this piece.

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FEATURED PIECES

Vicente Gracia

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Guardianes del Tesoro The necklace tells the sufĂ­ story of the Kingdoms King (portrayed by the lion made of pure gold) who takes care of the spring. The animals who drink that crystal clear water will transform into precious stones.


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FEATURED PIECES

Vicente Gracia

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El Secreto de la Alhambra The Quitessence of our work. The brooch, packed with diamonds of different colours and sizes, imitates the Comares Palace in the Alhambra of Granada. The seven skies of the Islamic cosmography are represented on it’s ceiling. This ceiling is the starting point of the mudÊjar art and shows the ideal symbiosis between East and West. Unity is represented by a 5 carat central diamond and the concentric stars are champagne, cognac and black diamonds.


VALERIE JO COULSON

Valerie Jo Coulson is an American designer whose brand is strongly defined by her personality and philosophy. Coulson majored in Fine Arts with three semesters in jewelry making and recognized quickly that this was the medium for her expression. “From there on, I have been a self learner.” She has worked as an independent studio jewelry artist since 1979.

All of her pieces, unique as they are, have strong emotional and literary connections and are created first and foremost for herself, but “within the context of communicating a collective consciousness.” “By the age of nine, I was well on into my immersion in the arts and cognizant of its power and importance to humanity. At the time, reading Irving Stone’s The Agony and the Ecstasy, life of Michelangelo, I experienced what I might describe as an epiphany, compelling me to proclaim that I was going to live my life as an artist. My work in essence is a visual biography, steeped in existential contemplations synchronically with history and events which inform, inspire and perplex me.” Collectors of her jewelry would appreciate the unique and stunning aesthetic of each piece all the more if they are aware of the narrative behind it. They would also relate to it subliminally. “The defining thread of my beliefs and transcription through my work is woven within the philosophy of Sacred Geometry…the interconnectedness and inseparability of the part from the whole. Geometries are the archetypes of a universal language that describes the seen and unseen order of nature and the cosmos; rhythms and cycles, relationship of form, movement, space and time. I believe this is an intrinsic narrative which resonates through energies/vibrations. Aesthetically and no less paramount, is beauty manifested through symmetry and order. My father in his tutelage often said to me ‘simplicity is beauty’.”

“I like to refer to them as ‘Character stones’, because each has its own script and unique reveal. My heart beats a little faster when I look at stones that have a chatoyant effect (from the French verb “chatoyer” meaning to shine like a cat’s eye): Opal, Tiger Iron/Tiger’s Eye, Rutilated Quartz, Moonstone. They are also the most difficult to inlay as the orientation and cutting is crucial to optimize the beauty, the play of light. The architecture of the jewel is configured via traditional, time honored metal working techniques of fabrication and forming. This structure or bridgework creates the windows or compartments within which to inlay the stone. In this methodology, I can create sculptural form and painterly canvas utilizing a modicum of these precious materials. This is integral to me in a spiritual connection to the land. The entirety of the work is by my own hands, with the exception of several pieces in the last couple of years incorporating elements which are 3D printed and cast such as the linkages for the Concatenation d’etoiles necklace.” Each Coulson piece is striking in its own way, inspired as it is by specific events, moods or other works of art, yet at the same time the artist’s signature style throughout the collection is unmistakable. Clients are primarily collectors who buy specifically the Valerie Jo Coulson creation as well as what is ultimately a statement piece of wearable art.

Coulson’s traditional fabrication methods and the prolific and intricate use of stone inlay, as well as her choice of materials make a strong visual impact.

www.valeriejocoulson.com

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59 The Chiaroscuro Necklace 18k Gold, Opal, Lapis Lazuli, Turquoise, Sugilite

FEATURED PIECES

Valerie Jo Coulson

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60 Firenze Bracelet Sterling Silver, Tiger Iron, Purple Agate, Cady, Mountain Agate

FEATURED PIECES

Valerie Jo Coulson

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61 Echinacea Teapot Sterling Silver, Pink Rhodonite, Chrysoprase

FEATURED PIECES

Valerie Jo Coulson

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62 The Gauntlet 22k Gold, 14k Gold, Queensland Black Boulder Opals, Black Jade, Chrysoprase, Coober Pedy Opal, Ruby, Almandite Garnet

FEATURED PIECES

Valerie Jo Coulson

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63 Concatenation d’etoiles Necklace Sterling Silver, Tourmalinated Quartz

FEATURED PIECES

Valerie Jo Coulson

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INTISARS

Sheikha Intisar, the founder of the eponymous brand, is a royal princess of the Al-Sabah family of Kuwait. She is also a passionate philanthropist, entrepreneur, author and columnist who likes to share her continuous pursuit of happiness, love and fulfilment with others in order to positively impact their lives.

Fifty percent of Intisar Jewelry proceeds go to The Intisar Foundation, a charity that “helps women recover from psychological traumas caused by war, allows them to rediscover their inner strength, grow their resilience and offers them a new perspective on life”. Sheikha Intisar designed her first piece in 2015 - an amulet conceived as a powerful reminder that we connect with jewellery on an emotional level. The amulet started a journey of creativity that produced several collections aimed at affirming women’s uniqueness and self-confidence. Her jewellery range is at once inspirational and spiritual, based on the teachings of Dr. Masaru Emoto whose RESEARCH PROVED that water could react to positive thoughts and words. Given our body is 70% water, Sheikha Intisar picked 7 recurrent “super” words appearing on her jewellery pieces and designed to make up for any experienced emotional deficiency. Interestingly, one can choose items from the collections based on “power words” such as Astounding, Exceptional, Exquisite, Loving and Luminous, all written in Arabic calligraphy, to reflect the wearer’s personality and to influence their energy upon touching the skin, generating subconscious feelings of positivity. The same technique is applied in a pictorial approach upon rotating the ring core to visually reiterate the power word

and embed it on the subconscious, engendering a sense of empowerment and self-confidence. The selected words are reminders of love and self-esteem and can be customised to each personality through a quick quiz available on the Intisar website. The words have further been selected to convey positive connotations to mitigate insecurities and challenges faced by women today. Ethically sourced gems are used and Intisar takes its social and community responsibility very seriously alongside its partners in production. “Our gems are sourced from different parts of the world; mother of pearl comes from Tahiti, ruby from Burma, while diamonds, black or white, are from India and come in F/J color and VS clarity. My all-time favorite is mother of pearl, as it reflects Kuwait’s history of natural pearls diving and trading.” Intisar has a number of collaborations and ambassadors globally. The Intisar Ambassadress is “THE ‘Woman’ in all her facets, shapes and forms: diverse and educated, well travelled yet attached to her roots, spiritual, loving, positive and above all distinctive. She is a giver, a worker, an employer and an essential part of the community where she exercises her influence and invests quality times to support other women.”

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The “Aqqal collection� combines Arabic tradition with the uniqueness of design inspired by the Aqqal, the head cord authentically and originally worn by Arab men on their heads. The Aqqal signifies pride associated with tradition, honour and excellence. The Aqqal collection, selective by its name, exclusive by its features, allows every woman to carry in her heart and on her wrist (through a secret compartment incorporated within the design) the scent of the man she loves.

FEATURED PIECES

Intisars

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The “Me Oh Me” Pave and full Pave as well as our slim “Me Oh Me” creations. This collection, made of 18 CT gold, uses the Power of Words technique, featuring seven powerful words, which will be added to in future. The current words are: Astounding Courageous, Happy, Exceptional, Exquisite, Loving and Luminous. Each piece empowers the wearer with a hint of self-confidence.

FEATURED PIECES

Intisars

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KATHERINE WALLACH

Katherine Wallach is a New York City based jewellery designer who likes to describe herself as a “jewellery channeler”. Her pieces are distinctive for their quirkiness and boldness. She is an imaginative visionary.

“The elements and materials I am attracted to inform me of their eventual reincarnation. I would find an insect brooch at a flea market and it immediately morphs into its fully finished piece right before my eyes. Or I’d be in a church staring at the incredible colours of a stained glass window when suddenly those colours turn into stones set in a fully realized golden ring. I feel a great responsibility to “listen” to this instinct to its fullest extent. Anything can inspire me: nature, grocery store labels, churches, sex, antiques, performance, old car paint and details, animals, teeth, mourning, religion, tools, body parts, old toys and then some.”

“In art as in life humour transcends generations. It dispels negativity, judgement and prejudice; it is inclusive, light hearted and encourages personal expression. I choose to express myself through jewellery and use my whimsy, as well as predominantly classic techniques and materials, to surprise and delight. This creates a distinct dichotomy between the subject of the piece and its chronically intricate execution.”

The trajectory that led her to becoming a commercial, as opposed to a hobby jewellery designer started with serendipity.

“There is no “typical client”. These include princesses, bartenders, farmers, actors, lobbyists, boat captains, painters, wine makers, my best friend and my sister. My designs appeal to people who “get it”; who feel the calling of the piece and the desire to not only own it but put it on and never take it off. One of my hugest joys is when someone who doesn’t like jewellery, who never wears it, just has to have and wear my piece.”

“ Thirty years ago, I had an appointment with the Barney’s store buyers as an optical rep. One of them asked me whose necklace I was wearing. “Mine”, I responded. “Very funny” she shot back. Although these ladies were well aware of my sense of humour, they quickly realized I was telling the truth. “We’d like to see your collection” The necklace was made of a re-purposed rosary so, many flea markets later, the first of my Sacred Profane Collection was born. This was the beginning of a magical seven year run of that and other jewellery collections for Barney’s, which led to my most cherished 10+ year collaboration with the Paul Smith Shops.” Just as some jewellers focus on the quality and size of the gems, Wallach’s focus is on design and quirkiness.

www.katherinewallach.com

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The Wallach collections aficionados do not need to make a statement by wearing the largest gemstone.

Katherine likes working with Opals (mostly from Australia’s Lightening Ridge Mines), Mexican Jelly Opals, Columbian Emeralds, Keshi Pearls, Tourmalines, Champagne and Old Mine Cut Diamonds. “Defining materials used in my pieces are stick pins, enamel cufflinks, monkeys, hands, teeth, pigs, pansies, compasses, miniature knives, the number 13, erotica, taxidermy eyes, beach stones, insects, religious metals, shells....” “I use mostly old English chain in 10 or 14kt as they have such a beautiful , often pinkish gold hue, and well worn lustre. I never rhodium plate white gold as I find its original, slightly gold colour so much richer than its super shiny “rhodium pated” modern counterpart.”

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68 Pig Charms

FEATURED PIECES

Katherine Wallach

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69 The Magnificent Seven

FEATURED PIECES

Katherine Wallach

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70 Gorgeous Garnet

FEATURED PIECES

Katherine Wallach

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71 The Girls

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Katherine Wallach

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72 Lady Chatterley

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Katherine Wallach

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73 Happy to See You

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Katherine Wallach

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74 Jesus Speaks

FEATURED PIECES

Katherine Wallach

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KAZUMI ARIKAWA

The world of Kazumi Arikawa is one filled with the most exquisite beauty – that of the ultimate, collectible jewellery pieces ever created. Juxtaposing this with the “profound darkness of my soul”, a self-awareness he acquired in the study and practice of Buddhism, has a captivating effect on the listener. Which is probably how he intends it... Capture the interlocutor’s attention at the outset of what is, undoubtedly, a rich narrative of an eventful life and a vertiginous trajectory of success in the realm of the rarest of rarities. If this trajectory was pre-ordained by his mother’s choice of trade (she developed a small jewellery business which was eventually taken over by Kazumi’s sister), there was little to nothing in his early years to suggest it. While still a student, Arikawa married his long-standing girlfriend. A restless soul, he wanted to variously be a politician, an economist, an academic and a Buddhist monk. The latter wish took a serious turn when, shortly after starting his graduating from university studies, the young Arikawa met a hugely inspirational monk and quit academia left everything behind in favour of life in a monastery.

while which he had founded earlier. The rigours of monastic training stood him in good staid – he developed discipline and focus, and his inquisitive mind sharpened in the process. A complex mind is more often than not distinguished by contrast and contradiction. Kazumi Arikawa is not afraid of incongruity – he positively embraces it. Men who think and pronounce themselves good are patently not so, he would tell you, because they self-evidently lack humility. Yet, in the same breath, he points out that he has achieved the title of “the greatest supreme” because of his own competitive spirit. “I aim for have to be the best the summit in at all things”. In those early days, when he built up his mother’s business through quick and judicious deals, he must have been a capitalist personified. Today, he thinks capitalism, with its over-consumption and depletion of the earth’s resources, is mankind’s great scourge.

His recurrent fascination with Buddhism and subsequent forays into becoming a monk are well-documented. Much less well explored is the circuitous path to his fascination and quasi-obsession with jewels, and the correlation he has constructed between spirituality and gems.

The world according to Kazumi Arikawa

Having established that he didn’t quite have the fortitude or ascetic inclination to dedicate himself to monkhood, Arikawa left the monastery resumed his studies, married and, came back to his wife young sweetheart and the secular world. and ran his own successful For a while he was involved in the tutorial establishment school for a

Kazumi experienced it at least twice: once when he embraced Buddhism and the second time when he visited a Victoria & Albert exhibition of Edwardian jewellery. Simultaneously dazzled and enlightened by its majestic and all-consuming radiance, he returned to his native Japan determined to reinvent himself and his business.

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Epiphany comes to us in different and wondrous ways, and some of us never even get to experience it.


His sister suggested he contact two reputable antique dealers, one of whom agreed to consign some collectible pieces, which Arikawa quickly sold to private clients. Being successful enabled him to pursue a passion that requires not just knowledge, contacts, time and expertise, but vast resources. He says he has frequently overpaid for rare, historical pieces, but that value to him is not purely monetary.

to change our perception of beauty and our approach to natural resources. He finds himself in the company of a vast generation of young activists who fear our planet is doomed to extinction unless we stop the inexorable march of consumerism.

Buddhism , Western religion and history had, by then, given him a different perspective. In Buddhism, jewels worn by Buddha, in statues and paintings, “represent the beauty of truth”. In Western culture, exceptional pieces were created for royalty as awe-inspiring, empowering and bestowing a sense of custodianship and stewardship. Pieces of enlightenment rather than mere adornment...

Is he aware that he is quoting Hamlet when he tells me that “the readiness is all”? I don’t know and don’t have the time to ask because he throws a powerful truism at me: if revolutionaries banked on success alone, there would have been no revolutions, no seismic changes, no progress.

Arikawa has transferred the above analogy to give jewellery a whole host of different dimensions: - the spiritual perspective: beauty in its purest form versus simplistic commoditisation and rampant commercialisation - the art perspective: inspirational works versus luxury items. - the nature perspective: all matter strives for stability, purity and order, the ultimate expression of which is crystalisation. Gems are, thus, one of nature’s greatest gifts to mankind. Kazumi Arikawa has cast himself in the role of an unlikely, yet passionate and vocal environmentalist who is spearheading a crusade

It is a battle for our very souls, he says, and a mission that we must all be prepared to fulfil.

I doubt Arikawa San is a revolutionary himself – practising Buddhists are anything but. He does, however, espouse harmony between man and earth and in this, he is truly an enlightened 21st century man. “Beauty and art have the power to transform our value system, to promote earth-centered values, driven by an understanding that mankind co-exists with other forms of life on earth, which must be maintained in its ideal state.” Kazumi Arikawa will be opening a museum in Japan that is dedicated to the world’s finest collectible and historical jewellery. He is the President of the Albion Art Co., Ltt and of the Albion Art Jewellery Institute and a Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

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ALBION ART

Kazumi Arikawa

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78 Boucheron Choker

FEATURED PIECES

Kazumi Arikawa

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79 Sevigne Brooch

FEATURED PIECES

Kazumi Arikawa

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80 Morelli Napoleon Cameo

FEATURED PIECES

Kazumi Arikawa

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81 Koch Aquamarine Tiara

FEATURED PIECES

Kazumi Arikawa

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emerging designers Hannah Carnegie 83 ZeacolÂŽ 89 Zeemou Zeng 95 Eraya Diamonds 100

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HANNAH CARNEGIE

Hannah Carnegie has been a jewellery designer since she was 13, but only launched her brand recently. She is the daughter of Gogo Ferguson, founder of Gogo Jewelry, and a scion of THE Carnegie family who defined modern day philanthropy. Hannah was raised on Cumberland Island, a natural reserve that has belonged to the Carnegies for generations. The unadulterated wilderness and raw beauty of the place have informed her mother’s range (“jewelry inspired by nature”) and inspired her own take on the world and creativity. “Growing up surrounded by nature makes my love for its geometry and symmetry come pouring through into my work. I have always been highly creative but it was my experience working with my mother that instilled the joy of creating a design that then becomes a tangible object to treasure and take with you wherever you go.” Hannah works closely with Sergio Carrión Miró who advised her on a piece she created for the Prince’s Trust. This led to talks about producing their own jewellery collection and the Hannah Carnegie brand was born shortly after. Hannah’s first retail collection focuses on beetles because, she says, she loves “the incredible diversity of colour and pattern that can be found in nature, frequently repeated across species, both plant and animal”. “I have always thought that beetles and insects are one of the most significant examples of this. I have been playing around with ideas for this collection for years. As there are limitless possibilities for future designs, it seemed perfect to have this be our inaugural collection.” Hannah loves working with emeralds and sapphires, but finds it “incredible fun to play with diamonds in many different colours as they offer such contrasting brilliance and light”. One of the most original aspects of her collection is its interchangeability – its portability. “The goal was to create a collection that would allow for the pieces to be worn in more ways than one. Traditionally you buy a pair of earrings and that is that, but with this system, you can transform your earrings into part of the bracelet or the ring. It allows you to wear the pieces in different ways and is a beautiful way to build on your collection over time. It is also perfect if you are someone who is traveling a lot and can’t take your entire jewelry collection along.” Hannah Carnegie’s jewellery collection is available to order privately, although trunk shows are also being planned in the near future.

www.hannahcarnegie.com

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Hannah Carnegie

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Hannah Carnegie

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Hannah Carnegie

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Hannah Carnegie

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FEATURED PIECES

Hannah Carnegie

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® ZEACOL

Claudia Fischer is the founder of the award-winning brand, Zeacol®, making exquisite Murano glass jewellery pieces that are remarkable for their bright colours. Murano glass beads are hand-made individually, using arcane craftsmanship, on the island of Murano/Venice. The combination of selected gemstones and Swarovski® crystals, as well as high quality gold and silver components, all acquired in Germany, Austria and Italy, results in luminous individual and unique creations, hand-crafted by Claudia herself at her studio in Germany. Zeacol® was a winner of the German Design Award 2021. Colour variety is an important element/USP of the brand.

“Colours are our passion”

“The entire spectrum of the rainbow and the colours of nature are a central element of our collections and of the brand itself. This reflects my personal sense of aesthetic. Intense colors are increasingly rare in the living environment and, I believe, all the more important. In addition to being a jewellery designer, I also work as a gerontologist (Master of Science), which makes me appreciate the importance of colours from a scientific point of view. They enhance the quality of life of all human organisms and are critical to people’s health and well-being in ways that are not commonly understood. Colours are primarily absorbed through the eyes and therefore work within the body from the outside, as well as from the inside. For this reason it is not only beneficial but indispensable to surround oneself with one’s favorite colors. On a subconscious level, an individual’s behavior is aligned towards this which is reflected for example in the choice of garment colour pallets, which can vary depending on mood of the day”

The colour variety of gemstones and Swarovski® crystals perfectly complements and underlines the wonderful, bright, incomparable and intense colours of original hand-crafted Murano glass. No two pearls are the same. An inlay of gold leaf, white gold leaf, or silver leaf reflects the incident light and further enhances the exceptional luminosity of the beads and the jewellery itself, giving it unique and incomparable beauty. Affordable innovative jewellery resonates strongly with the contemporary aesthetic while Murano has a perennial iconic appeal. Additionally, Murano glass is of exceptionally high quality and durability, making it eminently sustainable. Murano glass does not change its appearance over its entire lifespan. Likewise, gemstones and Swarovski® crystals keep their beautiful appearance forever. The jewellery pieces are timeless in a world of disposable, shortlived products. The brand’s packaging is equally sustainable, using FSC®Certified boxes made of timber from forests grown under stringent management. “Murano glass is not only iconic, but from my perspective, it is as much a UNESCO cultural heritage as the mother city of Venice. I would like to contribute to the preservation of this heritage with my jewellery.” If you had a dream bespoke project, what would that be? “My dream project would be to equip a Hollywood film or series production, or a Broadway play with my jewellery. It is also important to me personally to promote the awareness of Murano glass globally.”

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90 Spring Passion Handcrafted Murano glass beads, gold leaf insert, gemstone rock crystal, all parts 925 sterling silver

FEATURED PIECES

ZeacolÂŽ

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91 Autumn Love Handcrafted Murano glass beads, gold leaf insert, gemstone smoke quartz, all parts 925 sterling silver gold plated

FEATURED PIECES

ZeacolÂŽ

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92 Violet Reverie Handcrafted Murano glass beads, white gold leaf insert, gemstone amethyst, all parts 925 sterling silver

FEATURED PIECES

ZeacolÂŽ

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93 Golden Paradise Handcrafted Murano glass beads, gold leaf insert, gemstone citrine, all parts 925 sterling silver gold plated

FEATURED PIECES

ZeacolÂŽ

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94 Blue Water Handcrafted Murano glass beads, white gold leaf insert, gemstone rock crystal, all parts 925 sterling silver

FEATURED PIECES

ZeacolÂŽ

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ZEEMOU ZENG

Zeemou Zeng is the founder and designer of his innovative eponymous brand which launched in 2017 and has already won a number of awards. Distinctive for their signature element, namely movement, these fine jewellery pieces are ingeniously crafted and reflect the personality of the designer who has conceived them in the spirit of ‘freedom and independence’. Zeng’s retail range is complemented by a bespoke design service based on the same principle of fluidity, and Zeng cleverly takes these bespoke pieces to a new level to resonate with the personality of the client, thereby making a definitive statement about the wearer. “Fluidity, moving gemstones, functionality and beauty are all elements I incorporate when designing a bespoke piece.” Zeng transcends the boundaries of classic and contemporary and doesn’t wish to be defined as one or the other. “I think we can always find a balance point between classic and contemporary. “Classic” is about craftsmanship and history, while “contemporary” takes into consideration the importance of the past - a contemporary jewellery piece can be equally timeless and defined by a classic approach or technique.” Zeng works with different gemstones, with a special penchant for coloured gems: emeralds, sapphires, rubies... “Gemstones have so many unique characteristics including inclusions, colours and different shapes, making each of them different and unique. A knowledge of the materials and the gemstones I work with is really important. I believe every gemstone speaks and reacts – as if it has a soul. If we look at a gemstone carefully, we can glimpse a fantasy world inside.” Zeemou Zeng also has an accessory and cut crystal range which he developed in the process of working with different materials and textures. He enjoys “playing” with new components. “As a jewellery designer, I never limit myself. With the accessory and cut crystal range I wanted to create something functional as well as beautiful. My crystal ware is also based on my jewellery concept - combining jewellery and crystal together to create a new product is very exciting for me.”

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FEATURED PIECES: EYE COLLECTION

Zeemou Zeng

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FEATURED PIECES: EYE COLLECTION

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FEATURED PIECES: MELODY COLLECTION

Zeemou Zeng

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FEATURED PIECES: MELODY COLLECTION

Zeemou Zeng

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ERAYA DIAMONDS Hima Yalamanchili is the founder and chief designer of Eraya Diamonds, a brand with a strong emphasis on ethically sourced gems. Hima likes working with coloured diamonds as well as yellow, blue, black and precious stones: rubies, emeralds, sapphires, tourmalines, freshwater cultured pearls, Akoya pearls. She will be incorporating South Sea pearls in her new range and also works with semi-precious stones: onyx, lapis and others. The gems are sourced from a vendor in India and are certified conflict-free. “I have always had a distinctive style in all things, be it clothing, jewellery, shoes or even food. I have long been partial to bold colours which is not necessarily everyone’s cup of tea. I love experimenting with food. Designing jewellery is an expression of my personality and a way of affirming my sense of aesthetics. I am a doctor, visual artist, photographer, interior decorator but above all, a jewellery designer. I am driven by an intense passion for design and modern art, both of which have come together to inspire the launch of Eraya Diamonds. While still very young, I was fascinated by designer pieces that I couldn’t afford, so I would go to a jewellery maker and show them my sketches and ideas. That is the motivation for making unique and beautiful pieces that are also affordable and accessible (we offer a payment plan).” Hima wants everyone to feel special when they wear her designs, which is why each piece is different and a statement in its own right, even if it is a part of the same collection.

www.erayadiamonds.com

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BBEYOND JEWELLERY

Spectacular and Collectible Pieces

BBEYOND BOOKS 2020

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Profile for Beyond Black Books

BBeyond Jewellery: Spectacular and Collectible Pieces (2020)  

BBeyond Jewellery: Spectacular and Collectible Pieces was conceived as a new loose leaf edition on some of the world’s leading master jewell...

BBeyond Jewellery: Spectacular and Collectible Pieces (2020)  

BBeyond Jewellery: Spectacular and Collectible Pieces was conceived as a new loose leaf edition on some of the world’s leading master jewell...

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