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Annual Report 2009/2010


Our Vision Carnegie Mellon will meet the changing needs of society by building on its traditions of innovation, problem solving, and interdisciplinarity.

Our Mission To create and disseminate knowledge and art through research and creative inquiry, teaching, and learning, and to transfer our intellectual and artistic product to enhance society in meaningful and sustainable ways. To serve our students by teaching them problem solving, leadership and teamwork skills, and the value of a commitment to quality, ethical behavior, and respect for others. To achieve these ends by pursuing the advantages of a diverse and relatively small university community, open to the exchange of ideas, where discovery, creativity, and personal and professional development can flourish.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Our Values Dedication, as exemplified by our commitment to the critical issues of society and our uncompromising work ethic. Collaboration, as exemplified by our interdisciplinarity, our external partnerships, and our capacity to create new fields of inquiry. Measuring excellence by impact, as exemplified by our focus on issues critical to regional development, national interest, and global welfare. Entrepreneurship, as exemplified by openness to new ideas, prudent use of resources, and readiness to act. Depth driving breadth, as exemplified by our issue driven research, our context based g足 eneral education initiatives, and our focus on problem solving and creative production at all levels. Compassion, as exemplified by our focus on human welfare, on the betterment of society, and on the personal development of the members of our community. Integrity and inclusion, as exemplified by our attention to the highest ethical standards in all domains, and our commitment to being a community which welcomes talented minds from diverse backgrounds and challenges them individually and collectively to achieve their best.

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From the

President Carnegie Mellon University has a century-long tradition of aiming for the highest – in academics, in research, in mutually beneficial collaborations, in serving the community and in solving real-world problems. When we chose to partner with Qatar Foundation to offer three of our top programs in Qatar, Carnegie Mellon once again aimed high.   The relationship between Carnegie Mellon and Qatar Foundation continues to flourish each year. With the support of Her Highness Sheikha Mozah bint Nasser Al Missned, our academic programs are thriving and our research collaborations around the world are changing lives in meaningful ways.   Our undergraduate students in Qatar are shining examples of the university’s commitment to integrity, dedication and compassion. Our alumni are already making a difference across several industries in the Gulf Region and around the world, and they continue to be a vital part of the Carnegie Mellon Qatar community.   After six academic years, Carnegie Mellon is just beginning to tap into the possibilities we barely knew existed when we joined Education City in 2004. As we look forward, we know that our possibilities – as well as the possibilities of our students, faculty, alumni and staff in Education City colleagues – are endless.   Jared Cohon President, Carnegie Mellon University

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From the

Dean Andrew Carnegie once said, “no man can become rich without himself enriching others.” It is a simple statement such as this that drives the education and research mission of Carnegie Mellon University. As we close the 2009-2010 academic year, we see how these words continue to define our mission at Carnegie Mellon Qatar. In our sixth academic year, our faculty members continue to enrich our students by instilling in them a love of knowledge. Our academic programs are growing stronger each year with more students seeking to complement their classroom learning with research projects and internships. Many faculty and student projects have garnered funding from Qatar National Research Fund, which encourages our students to keep dreaming, keep reaching and keep discovering. Many of our students are spending their time enriching the lives of those around them through various community service projects, volunteer efforts and local outreach projects. One professor offered extra points to students who participated in volunteer work in the community, only to find many put in vastly more hours than the maximum for which they could get credit. By raising money for hurricane victims in Haiti or interviewing immigrant laborers for the Qatar Narratives series, our students are realizing that they gain just as much – if not more – as the people they are helping. As Education City continues to grow, our students are collaborating with other university students to form clubs, charity organizations and even sports teams. All of which enrich and enhance the Education City multiversity experience. Additionally, our faculty and staff continue to work with our sister institutions on a variety of cross-university projects. We had an especially close collaboration with Northwestern

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

University, as we welcomed them into our building, and jointly hired five faculty members to teach shared courses. The unique missions of Education City and Carnegie Mellon Qatar continue to enrich the community of Doha, the State of Qatar and the Gulf Region. We hosted several high profile guests to our campus this year, each one’s presence shining a global light on Qatar. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton visited campus to take part in a town hall meeting on Al Jazeera television. Our dedication to sharing our knowledge with young people in the Middle East was inspiring to her. Also on campus this year was U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Ph.D. A Nobel Prize winner, Chu talked about the vast potential for development in the field of alternative energy both in Qatar and the United States. These guest visits, the passion of our students, our dedicated faculty, our hard working staff and our unwavering support from Qatar Foundation show me that we have built a solid foundation on which Carnegie Mellon Qatar will continue to thrive and enrich others for many years to come. I am personally ending my time in Doha, and handing the reins over to Dick Tucker as dean. While I will not be physically present on the Qatar campus, my thoughts will often be with my colleagues and our students. I leave proud of the community we have built, pleased with the excellence we have achieved in and out of the classroom and optimistic for the future of Carnegie Mellon Qatar and our sister institutions at Education City. Chuck Thorpe Inaugural Dean, Carnegie Mellon Qatar 2004 - 2010


Highlights

July 2009 Summer College Preview Program. The Summer College Preview Program is a rare opportunity for rising high school juniors and seniors to spend three weeks learning what it takes to achieve success at a top American university. Thirty-nine local students took part in the program.

August 2009 Convocation. Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar celebrated the Class of 2013 Convocation, officially welcoming 92 new students and 7 transfer students to the Carnegie Mellon family. The 99 new students, along with Carnegie Mellon Qatar faculty and staff, participated in the formal event in the three-story atrium of the Carnegie Mellon Building in Education City. Fifty-two women and 40 men make up the Class of 2013. 10

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

September 2009 iSTEP-Innovative Student Technology ExPerience. A Carnegie Mellon Qatar student participated in this innovative technology research internship offering computing solutions in Tanzania.

October 2009 CIEP. Forty-four students enrolled in the Corporate Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program. The program is a nine-month, part-time executive certificate program offered by Qatar Science & Technology Park with a faculty consisting of professors from Carnegie Mellon. CIEP is focused on creating both capable entrepreneurs and successful technology innovations and ventures.


January 2010 November 2009 IbtikarQatar. The second IbtikarQatar kicked off with an informative workshop. Ibtikar, which means “innovation” in Arabic, is the Information Systems Innovation competition for high school juniors and seniors. CS4Qatar. CS4Qatar, the series of Computer Science workshops designed for computer science educators and students in Qatar, held another professional development workshop for teachers on the topic of developing a computer science first-year curriculum. Fifty-five teachers from 27 schools in Qatar applied for the program, a significant increase from last year.

Distinguished Lecture Series 2010. Aseel Al-Awadhi, Ph.D., member of the Kuwait National Assembly, was the first speaker in Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar’s Distinguished Lecture Series 2010. Al-Awadhi was followed by Patrick Awuah, founder and president of Ashesi University in Ghana, and Leila Ahmed, Ph.D., professor of divinity at Harvard Divinity School.

February 2010

Bridging the Language Divide lecture. Alex Waibel, Ph.D., professor of computer science at the Language Technology Institute at Carnegie Mellon and the Institute of Anthropomatics at the University of Karlsruhe, discussed technology solutions to communication challenges we face today.

Highlights

December 2009

Secretary of State visits. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton held a public question-andanswer session with an audience of students, faculty and members of the Education City community. Clinton talked on the importance of education and the role it plays in providing opportunities for the youth especially women - in the region. Secretary of Energy visits. U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Ph.D., gave a public lecture on U.S. energy policy, energy pricing and ways to reach a global agreement on reducing emissions. Chu is a distinguished scientist and co-winner of the 1997 Nobel Prize for Physics. He has devoted his recent scientific career to the search for new solutions to energy challenges and stopping global climate change. Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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Highlights

April 2010

March 2010 Professional Day. Forty-nine organizations from a broad range of industries set up booths and talked with Carnegie Mellon students at the Fourth Annual Professional Day. Professional Day is a career and networking fair that provides an opportunity for students and employers to meet and explore employment possibilities. Thirteen Carnegie Mellon alumni attended the event as recruiters for the organizations for which they work.

Education City Quiz Challenge. Carnegie Mellon Qatar hosted the Education City Quiz Challenge, which is a unique trivia challenge between the university campuses of Education City. The quiz was a high-speed, high-energy infinite bounce format of questions in various topics, including current affairs, geography, technology, sciences, sports, entertainment and pop culture. This event is an outgrowth of the mission of Her Highness and Education City to bring students from different universities and fields together.

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Undergraduate Conference in Information Systems. The Information Systems department held the Regional “Promises and Pitfalls of Information Communication Technology� Undergraduate Conference in Information Systems. The conference is a forum for undergraduates with an interest in information systems to present their work and engage in relevant discussions with peers, faculty and experts in the field. Students from Carnegie Mellon and the American University of Sharjah presented papers and posters on a variety of topics. Botball. More than 200 secondary students from 30 schools in seven countries took part in the sixth Botball high school robotics tournament. Teams spent eight weeks designing, building and programming autonomous robots for the competition. Several current Carnegie Mellon students who took part in Botball while in high school served as judges in the tournament.

Meeting of the Minds. More than 60 undergraduates, along with graduate students and faculty members, showcased a wide variety of projects at the Fourth Annual Meeting of the Minds undergraduate research symposium. A long-standing Carnegie Mellon tradition, Meeting of the Minds helps bridge the gap between conducting research and presenting it to a broad audience.


Highlights

May 2010 Graduation. Thirty-four students graduated on May 3, 2010: 25 in Business Administration, five in Computer Science and four in Information Systems. This is the third batch of students to graduate from Carnegie Mellon Qatar, and the first class to include graduates in all three academic programs. Dr. Hessa Al Jaber, Secretary General of ictQATAR, gave the keynote address.

Literary Translation Conference. In conjunction with Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation Publishing, Carnegie Mellon Qatar held a two-day conference designed to create a Gulf-based platform to discuss issues related to translation at both the theoretical and practical levels. Panels of top literary translators discussed philosophies and strategies of translation in general. Business Plan Competition. Undergraduate students and business professionals were invited to campus to present their ideas for new technology-based businesses. Sixteen business plans were accepted into the competition, everything from a coffee shop specializing in Arabic drinks to a Hindi radio station The winning teams – which were all made up of undergraduate students – won prize money and mentorship with local business experts.

June 2010 Summer School. Summer school was again popular with almost half of returning students taking classes at one or more of the universities in Education City. Carnegie Mellon Qatar offered 15 classes in which 117 students enrolled, including 13 students from other universities in Education City.

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Academics

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Academics at Carnegie Mellon With more than a century of academic excellence and distinguished research, Carnegie Mellon University is a leader in education with real-world applications. Consistently top ranked, the university has more than 11,000 students, 84,000 alumni and 4,000 faculty and staff globally. Core values of innovation, creativity, collaboration and problem solving provide the foundation for everything we do. At the invitation of Qatar Foundation, Carnegie Mellon joined Education City in 2004. Here, Qatar Foundation created a unique center for scholarship and research that is the ideal complement to Carnegie Mellon’s mission and vision. Students from Qatar and 30 different countries enroll at our worldclass facilities in Education City. Carnegie Mellon Qatar offers undergraduate programs in business administration, computer science and information systems. Carnegie Mellon Qatar provides its students an excellent liberal arts education with an emphasis in three pre-professional majors of Business Administration, Computer Science and Information Systems. Students in Qatar complete the same graduation requirements as their counterparts on Carnegie Mellon’s main campus in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Students are broadly introduced to the liberal arts and sciences during their first semesters; narrow their focus to their major core classes in the middle semesters; and broaden in the last semesters to complete minors that provide depth to their liberal arts education. The overall emphasis on liberal arts is seen in that only one-third of the courses in the curricular requirements fall within the narrow definition of required courses for the student’s major. Another one-third consists of required foundational courses in math, statistics, programming and English as well as breadth courses in history, philosophy, literature, economics and other areas. The final one-third consists of courses filling minor requirements, upper level electives courses in the student’s major and free electives. The broad-based liberal arts education of the Carnegie Plan of Education better prepares students for the modern world in which technologies, systems and even occupations change rapidly. The challenging 16

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

math and statistics courses hone analytical skills and, combined with exposure to different disciplines and approaches to problem solving, develop students’ ability for critical thinking. The emphasis on being good citizens and having respect for society and one another, reinforces the importance of ethical behavior in their professional lives. The focus on developing exceptional communication skills provides students with opportunities to develop first-rate leadership and teamwork skills both inside and outside of the classroom. The rigor of the course work teaches students the value of a commitment to excellence and provides a broad understanding of professional practices in their major area. The major programs offered at Carnegie Mellon Qatar are leaders in their areas. The Business Administration major is offered by the Tepper School of Business, which is among the world’s elite programs for undergraduate business education. Its success is based upon a rigorous academic curriculum rich in the technical aspects of management, with a global focus that emphasizes quantitative decision making and an analytical approach to problem solving for which Tepper is world renowned. The Computer Science major is offered by the School of Computer Science, which is one of the first computer science departments and a world leader in research and education. Its success is based on combining a solid core of computer science courses with the ability to gain real depth in another area through a required minor in a second subject. As computing is a discipline with strong links to many fields, this provides students with unparalleled flexibility to pursue allied (or non-allied) interests. The Information Systems Program at Carnegie Mellon University is an internationally-recognized undergraduate major for students who want to design and implement effective solutions to meet organizational and management needs for information and decision support. Graduates of the Information Systems program are ideally situated to take leading roles in shaping our information-based future.


Enrollment

45 65

136

Business Administration Computer Science Information Systems

College Honors Enrollment for the 2009-2010 academic year

• 246 undergraduate students

Four graduating students successfully completed College Honors research projects.

Each year has seen increases in the size of the student and faculty bodies, and a commensurate increase in academic activities and accomplishments.

Student Achievements

Research Student and faculty teams are working on projects supported by the Qatar National Research Fund. Projects cover a diverse range of topics including 3-D visualization, computer security, Braille tutoring, reverse engineering, human robot interaction and documenting the status of immigrant workers. For example, Samreen Anjum, computer science senior, and Rishav Bhowmick (CS 2010) attended SIGCSE 2010 – the premiere computer science education conference – where they presented a poster entitled “Becker’s ++ : A Fun Approach to Learning Programming.” This poster was part of an Undergraduate Research Experience Program (UREP) project on developing different ways to teach computer programming using Becker’s as a foundation. Competitions and Conferences Students also gave presentations at outside conferences, participated in internal competitions and competed in regional and global programming competitions. Internal competitions • Business Case Competition, which again had an external sponsor. Students are given an elaborate business plan write up and only 14 hours to find solutions. • Programming Competition. Computer science students compete against each other in a timed computer programming event. • Liberal Arts and Sciences Brain Bowl. A fun and educational quiz open to all students.

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Saad Al-Matwi (BA 2010) Family Business in Qatar: Challenges and Sustainability

Aysha Siddique (CS 2010) Designing Mobile Phone Based Educational Games to Improve English Literacy Skills of Limited English Proficient Adults

Rishav Bhowmick (CS 2010) Rich Entity Type Recognition in Text

Mohammed Kaleemur Rahman (CS 2010) Education E-Village: Empowering Technology Educators in Developing Regions


External competitions • The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Regional Programming Competition held in Alexandria, Egypt. A regional computer programming competition. • Samreen Anjum (CS 2011) was selected for the Google Anita Borg Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to outstanding women who are studying computer science. Additional student accomplishments • Establishment of the first Association for Information Systems (AIS) student chapter in the region. This is one of only two chapters existing outside of the United States. • Undergraduate Conference in Information Systems - UCIS’2010. The opening of the AIS chapter led to the design and delivery of the first regional undergraduate student-run conference in information systems. Meeting of the Minds Meeting of the Minds is an undergraduate research symposium that helps students bridge the gap between conducting research and presenting it to a broad audience. A long-standing Carnegie Mellon tradition, Meeting of the Minds is held on the last day of the academic year. More than 60 undergraduates, along with graduate students and faculty members, showcased a wide variety of projects to hundreds of guests from the education and business communities in Qatar. Meeting of the Minds 2010 projects included: Business Administration posters • An Approach to Improve the Future of Entertainment • Family Business in Qatar: Challenges and Sustainability • Futuristic Hospitality • Hot Seat Solution Computer Science posters • Arabic Lip-Syncing for 3D Face Animation Applications • Autonomous Race Car Control Optimized Using a Genetic Algorithm • Becker’s ++: A Fun and Effective Way to Learn Programming • Compute the Distance Between K-Dimensional Vectors on Wimpy Nodes • Dynamic Path Planning and Traffic Light Coordination for Emergency Vehicles • Education E-Village: Empowering Technology Educators in Developing Regions

• Effective Cost Estimation for Market-Based Multi-Robot Coordination • Human Annotations Evaluation • I-GEST A Multi-Point, Low-Cost, Gesture-Based Input Platform • Mobile Phone-Based Educational Games to Improve Adult English Literacy • Recognizing Places Using Image Recognition • Rich Entity Type Recognition in Text • Statistical Language Translation into Morphologically Complex Languages • The Quantum Computer Alternative of a Common Algorithm • Training a Roboceptionist to Predict Input Classes • Using Eigenfaces to Guess Social Context • Your voice as your ID: A Biometric Approach

Information Systems posters • Carnegie Bazaar • Curriculum Development and Reflections on Teaching English to Migrant Workers • Fisheye KMS: A Manager’s View of a Technology Roadmap • ‘Onigiri’ or How IT Can Raise Awareness on Diabetes • StudentTRAK • Transactional Referral System Post-graduate posters • Assistive Educational Technology Project • Coverage Problem in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks • Hala the Bilingual Robot Receptionist Initial Findings on Provisioning Variation in Cloud Computing • Interference in Multihop Wireless Networks • LNG Pipe Vision • Open Domain Named Entity Recognition for Arabic • Student Modeling for the Adaptive Braille Writing Tutor • Task Allocation and Coordination in a Disaster Response Scenario • Task Allocation and Scheduling for Constrained Teams • Touch-Screen Interface Design for Multicultural Settings • Wireless Network Optimization Using Software- Defined Radios

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Awards The Carnegie Mellon Alumni Association selected senior Saad Al-Matwi (BA 2010) for its Student Service Award, which is one of the highest awards presented to undergraduate students at Carnegie Mellon University. The Alumni Association presented only three Student Service Awards in 2009-2010. The criteria for winning the award are that the recipient possesses a record of “an exemplary balance of outstanding academics and participation in extra-curricular activities, while providing exceptional service to the university, the student body and/or community.” Al-Matwi met the criteria in an extremely impressive way by combining a high level of academic accomplishment - the campus representative to the Andrew Carnegie Scholar Society - with strong involvement in all areas of campus life, including serving as student body president. Al-Matwi received the award at the Alumni Awards dinner in Pittsburgh.

Faculty Involvement The major-based faculty forums continue to enhance the quality of education at Carnegie Mellon Qatar. The Business Administration group is working with the Pittsburgh campus on an initiative to add several courses in international business to make Qatar the home for international business education 20

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

at Carnegie Mellon. Students studying international business in Pittsburgh would be encouraged to spend a semester in Doha. The Computer Science program’s focus on technology growth and development in this region and the developing world is an example of a faculty forum initiative. The Information Systems group offered a full four years of coursework for the first time in 2009-2010. The Liberal Arts and Sciences group is enriching the curriculum by offering a variety of environmental courses approaching global and local issues from multidisciplinary perspectives. Faculty members also challenge students to get involved outside of the classroom. Examples of course-related outreach include: • Community Service Learning course where students taught English to migrant workers in Reach Out to Asia’s Adult Literacy Program. Eleven students from Carnegie Mellon and Weill Cornell Medical College collaborated on this project. Other courses provided opportunities for students to tutor at local schools. Students also met course requirements by volunteering for a number of community service organizations including:


Family Consulting Center. A center in Doha that specializes in family consulting for married couples and those who plan to marry. Al-Fakhoora Campaign. An international campaign that aims to secure the freedom for Palestinian students in Gaza and the West Bank to obtain education. Qatar Guest Center. A website for people who want to learn more about Qatar, its culture and its people. Rumailah Hospital. A 200-bed hospital in Qatar that serves as a rehabilitation center for disabled adults and children. Habitat for Humanity. A non-profit organization that builds simple, decent, affordable housing in partnership with people in need. Earthquake Relief. Efforts to help the people in Haiti after an earthquake hit. Hamad Hospital. A non-profit health care provider in Doha. Reach Out to Asia. A fund raising campaign dedicated to supporting numerous relief efforts on the Asian continent. Qatar Youth General Authority. A youth-focused charity. Gawad Galinga. A non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating poverty and transforming communities. Qatar Charity. A non-government organization that supports the Qatari society and other needy communities abroad. Shafallah Center. A center that provides comprehensive services and care to individuals with developmental learning challenges, their families and the community.

Course Offerings The 2009-2010 Academic Year was the first year four full years of coursework were offered in all three majors: Business Administration, Computer Science and Information Systems. Some of the major and many of the elective courses were classes developed by Carnegie Mellon Qatar faculty, with approval from the home department at the university’s main campus in the United States. Courses offered: • 146 courses in 2009-2010. A 19 percent increase over the 123 classes offered in 2008-2009 • Enrollment in classes totaled 2,523 a 26 percent increase from the 2008-2009 enrollment of 2001 (The average student enrolled in 10 classes)

The increased enrollment raised the average class size from 16 students to 17 students and section size from 13 students to 14 students. In addition, independent studies overseen by faculty, both resident and faculty who taught in Doha in previous semesters, helped expand major and elective offerings. Independent studies are not included in the course count. Business Administration • 16 Business Administration instructors • 38 classes in business, statistics and economics • Average enrollment of 23 students • Average section size of 20 students

Most of the students were BA students but enrollment also included students working on the business minor and BA classes that counted toward other major’s general education requirements. New BA courses developed by Qatar faculty in 2009-2010 • Consumer Behavior • Managing the Enterprise of the Future • Marketing Strategy Computer Science • 15 Computer Science instructors • 23 classes in the major (including the foundational programming classes) • Average enrollment of 13 students • Average section size of 11 students Most of the students were CS majors but enrollment also included students working on the CS minor. New CS courses developed by Qatar faculty in 2009-2010 • Discovering Logic • Introduction to Cloud Computing Information Systems • 4 Information Systems instructors • 13 classes in the major • Average enrollment of 10 students • Average section size of 10 students Most of the students were IS students but enrollment also included students working on the IS minor. New IS courses developed by Qatar faculty in 2009-2010 • Information System Security • Networks & Telecommunications

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Liberal Arts Liberal Arts and Sciences had the most course offerings due to providing the general education requirements for three majors based in three different colleges at Carnegie Mellon, each college with its own requirements.

• 36 instructors • 71 courses, including

• History • Science • Engineering • Languages • Math • Design • Statistics • English • Average enrollment of 17 students • Average section size of 13 students New LAS courses developed by Qatar faculty in 2009-2010

• • • •

Islam in the United States Conflict and Dispute Resolution Design for Service Environment, Engineering & Society

Several of the new Liberal Arts and Sciences faculty were hired jointly with Northwestern University in a post doc program that allows both schools to increase their offerings in several hard-to-fill areas, including psychology, political science and philosophy. While some faculty members in Doha are full time, many others hold dual appointments with Carnegie

Mellon Pittsburgh. This means they spend one semester teaching in Qatar and the other semester teaching in Pittsburgh. Additionally, some faculty members are part time, adjunct or teleconference from the United States. These many options for appointment mean Carnegie Mellon Qatar students have the opportunity to learn from the expertise of 71 different professors from all over the world.

Cross Registration Cross registration is expanding partially through increased cooperation between the Education City branch campuses as demonstrated by a common schedule for summer terms, and, for the first time, an academic calendar with common start and in-semester break dates. The common scheduling greatly facilitates sharing of resources and encourages cross registration. Carnegie Mellon Qatar students are able to take an increasing number and variety of cross registration courses with the other Education City schools. These courses enrich offerings in the general education categories and are in line with the university’s over arching mission of interdisciplinarity, teamwork and collaboration. • 35 Carnegie Mellon students completed courses at other Education City campuses • 55 students from other Education City schools completed Carnegie Mellon courses • 10 Academic Bridge Program students enrolled in a freshmen level course as part of Carnegie Mellon’s effort to assist the Academic Bridge Program Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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The most popular Carnegie Mellon classes for Education City students: • Communication Design Fundamentals • Urban Design Methods • Community Service Learning • What Philosophy Is

Summer School Summer school is a good example of cross-campus cooperation. The common start date with the other Education City universities increases opportunities for students to take classes at more than one university. Summer school was again popular with close to half of returning students taking at least one course. The summer session was on the same six-week intensive schedule as the main campus beginning in late May and ending before July 1, 2010. • 117 students enrolled in the 15 Carnegie Mellon classes (This figure includes 13 non- Carnegie Mellon students) • 20 Carnegie Mellon students took classes at other EC schools

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The Carnegie Mellon students were a mix of those trying to catch up in the curriculum, get ahead in their coursework or taking an interesting class not previously offered.

Academic Performance to Date The classes in Doha are taught to the same rigorous standards as the courses taught on the university’s home campus in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Students are held to the same academic standards as their counterparts in the United States. The academic performance of Qatar students who study in Pittsburgh for a semester is a good indicator that we are successfully delivering the Carnegie Mellon education in Doha. Ten students studied in Pittsburgh, either in the fall 2009 term or the spring 2010 term. Six of the 10 students earned Dean’s List recognition, indicating that the curriculum in Doha satisfactorily prepared students for the transition to the main campus.


Dean’s List • 40 students earned Dean’s List recognition in one semester • 36 students earned Dean’s List ecognition in both fall and spring

Fall 2009 Dean’s List: Sara Abbas Edmond Abi Saleh Tarik Abou Galala Yazan Abu Hijleh Rawan Agha Hira Ahmed Buthayna Al Madhadi Eatidal Al Qatami Fatima Al-Fakhri Amna Al-Hitmi Abdulla Al-Kuwari Maryam Al-Kuwari Saad Al-Matwi Amna Al-Mazroei Zeyad Al-Mudhaf Mai Al-Naemi Shuaa Al-Nasr Aisha Al-Sada Ghanim Al-Sulaiti Sidra Alam Marwa Alfakhri Maryam Alsemaitt Mohammed Arsalan Arif Nahan Arif Siddarth Arora Shivani Arora Rifki Bahri Rishav Bhowmick Douaa Dalle Manoj Dareddy Abdallah Darwish Marie-Joe Germanos Khachan Zaid Haque Layal Hasan Mohamed Hussain Samira Islam Fahad Islam Shashank Jariwala

Jumanna Kahlout Batoul Khalife Rana Khalil Laila Khan Waleed Khan Hala Khashabi Joel Brian Manalastas Ramsey Massouh Mridula Mukundan Laila Murad Hadi Murtada Mohammed Rahman Urmila Rosario Yara Saeed Samya Sharab Omnia Shehabuddin Amna Sultan Shaereen Vencilao Nasreen Zahan

Spring 2010 Dean’s List: Sara Abbas Dania Abed Rabbou Edmond Abi Saleh Tarik Abou Galala Yazan Abu Hijleh Fatema Akbar Buthayna Al Madhadi Eatidal Al Qatami Mohammed Al Saad Naif Al Sowaidi Al-Hanoof Al-Emadi Fatima Al-Fakhri Amna Al-Hitmi Abdulla Al-Kuwari Maryam Al-Kuwari Saad Al-Matwi Amna Al-Mazroei Zeyad Al-Mudhaf Mai Al-Naemi Shuaa Al-Nasr

Issa Al-Sheeb Ghanim Al-Sulaiti Nofe Al-Suwaidi Sidra Alam Marwa Alfakhri Rashed Alkaabi Maryam Alsemaitt Hanan Alshikhabobakr Aeshah Anani Mohammed Arsalan Arif Nahan Arif Varun Arora Firas Bata Douaa Dalle Manoj Dareddy Abdallah Darwish Mohammad Dauleh Ahmed Emam Marie-Joe Germanos Khachan Asma Hamid Layal Hasan Harold Yew Jin Huang Mohamed Hussain Fahad Islam Shashank Jariwala Jummana Kahlout Batoul Khalife Rana Khalil Laila Khan Maria Khan Hala Khashabi Mridula Mukundan Hadi Murtada Urmila Rosario Yara Saeed Samya Sharab Mohamed Soudy Eman Tag Nasreen Zahan

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Academic Support

Library

Fall 2009 saw a return to a common curricular experience for all first-year students. The common curriculum allowed us to be more intentional in developing the skills and habits students need to be successful at Carnegie Mellon.

The library offers an inviting space for the campus community and provides resources and services in support of the current curriculum of the undergraduate programs of study. The physical space includes individual and group study tables, seating alcoves, seminar room, computer cluster, classroom, video conference room and an outdoor courtyard.

The common Fall 2009 semester for first-year students consisted of:

• English • Math • Programming • World History • Carnegie Skills Workshop classes • Major specific freshman seminar

The common Spring 2010 semester for first-year students consisted of:

• English • Math • Economics • Major specific requirements

The Academic Resource Center and seven faculty members who serve as academic advisors provided academic support for students. The ARC serves as Carnegie Mellon Qatar’s academic support center. Its programs are designed to help students master demanding course material, hone study skills and delve deeper into academic challenges. Individual and smallgroup tutoring remained the ARC’s core service during the 2009-2010 academic year. On average, 133 tutoring sessions were held each week, 70 percent of which supported core first-year courses. The ARC expanded beyond tutoring support this year by developing 57 targeted workshops to address difficult topics in eight mathematically-intensive courses. Additionally, two series of study skills workshops were offered, with topics ranging from “Achieving Your Goals” to “Debugging Code with Eclipse.” This year, the ARC launched a major new program entitled the Student Success Initiative. Developed in collaboration with Student Affairs, SSI offers structured support to first-year students who were in need of additional academic support at the end of their first semester at Carnegie Mellon Qatar. With the assistance of staff coordinators, the 12 participants developed and implemented individual plans for academic success, and met weekly during the spring semester for workshops on study skills. Preliminary data suggest that students who took part in SSI had a significant increase in both study skills and grades.

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Additional individual study carrels and a consultation room are being created by repurposing existing office space. The browsing print collection of approximately 12,000 volumes continues to grow. Additional print resources include a popular selection of local and international newspapers, magazines and journals. A new core collection of Arabic fiction, non-fiction and reference titles has been created in close collaboration with faculty. Electronic resources continue to expand, including a growing collection of titles on the Amazon Kindle e-reader platform. Professional librarians assist patrons in finding information and resources for research, a process that often requires navigating through thousands of print and digital journals and hundreds of general and specialized databases. Importantly, students are guided in the process of locating and citing relevant and reliable information, as well as differentiating between the large number of available resources, search platforms and online tools. Interlibrary services provide a mechanism for borrowing publications from an international network of libraries across the globe. New library initiatives include: • Textbook adoption, purchase and distribution for all academic sessions • Permanent loan program for faculty • Kindle-for-PC stations • Browsing DVD collection (to be launched in Fall 2010) • Textbooks on course reserves • Purchase-on-demand In response to suggestions and feedback from students, library hours have expanded until late evenings on most weekdays, as well as additional new hours on the weekends. Future offerings will include: • Kiosk computer workstations that will offer the public quick and seamless access to digital resources and online collections • Outreach services to the local community - including secondary education and industry - also are being planned for next year • Library hours are planned for expansion, including extended hours during midterm and final exams


Graduation Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar held its third graduation ceremony at the completion of the 2009-2010 academic year. Sixteen students completed a minor, with English and business as the most popular. Seventeen students earned University Honors, and four earned College Honors. 34 students participated in the commencement ceremony May 3, 2010 4 5

19

13

15

25

21

Business Administration graduates

Females

Qatari nationals

Computer Science graduates

Males

Other nationalities

Information Systems graduates

Nationalities of graduates

• • • • • • • • • • •

Bangladesh Egypt India Lebanon Oman Pakistan Philippines Qatar Tunisia United States Yemen

The retention and graduation rates of Doha students are similar to their Pittsburgh counterparts. 100

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90

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76

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82

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80

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60

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50

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40

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30

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20

20

10

10

10

Pittsburgh

Qatar

4 year

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Qatar

Pittsburgh

70

60

Qatar

85

Pittsburgh

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6 year


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Research & Planning

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Research and planning Carnegie Mellon Qatar continues to make progress toward building a solid research capability. Although the primary mission of Carnegie Mellon Qatar will be education for the foreseeable future, we will continue to nurture and grow opportunities for our faculty members to build research programs in their areas of interest and expertise. In Carnegie Mellon’s tradition of collaborative, interdisciplinary research, we continue to actively pursue opportunities for research collaboration with our colleagues at other Education City branch campuses, Qatar University, Carnegie Mellon’s home campus in the United States and other academic institutions around the world. Most research at Carnegie Mellon Qatar is funded by one of three research programs: • Carnegie Mellon Qatar’s internal Seed Research Fund • Qatar National Research Fund National Priorities Research Program (NPRP) • Qatar National Research Fund Undergraduate Research Experience Program (UREP)

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Seed Research Projects Carnegie Mellon Qatar faculty members who have agreed to teach in Qatar for at least three years are eligible to participate in the university’s Seed Research funding program. Faculty members may apply for research grants of up to $200,000 USD to initiate and fund research projects in their area of expertise. Many faculty members choose to spread these funds across multiple projects. The Seed Research program has been a resounding success. It has played a critical role in recruiting highquality faculty to the campus, and the faculty members whose projects have been funded under the program have been very effective at using the funds to initiate and build research programs. These programs have produced substantial research output, especially when viewed relative to total expenditures. The following statistics attest to the productivity of the Seed program. All figures are cumulative from the beginning of the program in 2004 through the end of calendar year 2009. • 36 faculty supported • 53 projects funded


• 80 collaborations initiated with corporations, government agencies and other universities • 40 external grant proposals generated • 17 have been funded • 168 total publications: books, journal articles, conference presentations and design exhibitions

Selected Seed projects that were active in the 2009-2010 academic year include: • Qatar Cloud Computing Center • Arabic natural language processing technologies • Entrepreneurship’s role in economic development • Classroom technologies for teaching Arabic • Qatari English corpora construction (Research in teaching English as a second language) • Delay tolerant networks • Intelligent Diabetes assistant • Mapping Qatar’s built environment with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) • Air quality monitoring at Education City • Welfare and Distributional Analyses of Public Fiscal Policy National Priorities Research Program (NPRP) Qatar National Research Fund’s National Priorities Research Program continues to be a major source of research funding. Carnegie Mellon faculty members completed two NPRP projects this year and continue to work on eight previously awarded NPRP projects. These projects represent more than $6.8 million USD in awarded grants.

• Automated Tools for Effective Team Coordination in Emergency Response M. Bernardine Dias • Images of Muslim Women in Translated Mideast Media Sources: A Content and Discourse Analysis Amal Al Malki • Human-Robot Interaction in an Arabic Social and Completed NPRP projects Cultural Setting • Modeling Control of Infectious Diseases with Majd Sakr • Enhanced Education for the Visually and Aurally Behavior-Driven Infectivity Impaired Using Automated Tutors and Interactive Jon Caulkins • Intelligent Diabetes Assistant: Predicting and Computer Games M. Bernardine Dias Optimizing Blood Glucose Chuck Thorpe NPRP grant numbers for each project may be found in Appendix D Ongoing NPRP projects • Non-Destructive Gas Pipeline Inspection Using In addition to the ongoing projects, Carnegie Mellon faculty members submitted 35 NPRP Computer Vision project proposals in December 2009 for the third Brett Browning NPRP grant cycle, eight have been awarded. This • Improved Arabic Natural Language Processing total included proposals from each of our program through Semisupervised and Cross-Lingual areas -Business Administration, Computer Science Learning and Information Systems - as well as psychology, Kemal Oflaze English, bioinformatics, environmental engineering, • Automated Measurement of Galaxy Morphology mathematics and sociology. Building on Carnegie Alex Rojas Pena Mellon’s tradition of collaborative research, the • CameraNets: Coverage, Networking and Storage submitted proposals included collaborations with Problems in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks 18 universities around the world. Khaled Harras, Nael Abu Ghazzaleh

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Undergraduate Research Experience Projects Carnegie Mellon Qatar faculty members participate in Qatar National Research Fund’s Undergraduate Research Experience Project, undertaking a few projects each year. In general, the UREP program has been effective in encouraging students to get involved in research and in recognizing and supporting student research work, often in the form of senior theses. The following five UREP projects were awarded and active during the 2009-2010 academic year. • • • • •

Innovative Strategies and Tools for Teaching and Learning Programming Logic Effects of Emotional Arousal on Mathematical Learning Understanding complex physiological problems in medical education Information Flow and Strategic Decisions in Social Networks Economic impact of Integration of ICT in Qatar SMEs

Collaborating Institutions The following government, business and academic institutions have collaborated on one or more Seed research projects in the period 2005-2009. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 34

Al Jazeera Academy Al Noor School for the Blind, Qatar American University of Beirut, Lebanon Ashesi University, Ghana Asian University for Women, Chittagong, Bangladesh Australian Drug Policy Modeling Program Boeing Corporation Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania, USA Dohaland, Qatar Environmental Affairs of Qatargas ETE Q 2009 Teaching Excellence for Qatar Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar Hamad Medical Corporation Harvard University, Massachusetts, USA IBM IIT Hyderabad Imwiko Basic School, Zambia Information Communication Technology Qatar - ictQATAR Info TELL Inc INI, Kobe, Japan Khofi Annan Center of Excellence in ICT, Ghana Mathru School for the Blind, India Mezza Labs Michigan State University, Michigan Microsoft, India Mulambwa Basic School, Zambia NASA Jet Propulsion Lab Naval Research Lab, USA Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Portsmouth University, UK Project Educate, Pennsylvania, USA Qatar Businessmen’s Association Qatar Business Women’s Forum Qatar Diabetes Association Qatar Green Building Council Qatar Science & Technology Park – QSTP Qatar SEC Qtel Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA Saarland University, Germany Sefula School for the Visually Impaired, Zambia Stanford University, California, USA Technical University of Eindhoven, Netherlands Texas A&M University at Qatar Tianjin School for the visually Impaired, China Tianjin Polytechnic University, China TU Vienna United States Army Research Lab University Computing Center, Tanzania University of California - Irvine, USA University of California – Riverside, USA University of California - Santa Barbara, USA University of Dar es Salam, Tanzania University of Gainesville - Florida University of Nottingham, UK University of Pennsylvania University of Queensland Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar Western PA School for the Blind, Pennsylvania, USA Yahoo research Yes-Yahoo


Planning Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar has been working on developing a planning and institutional research capacity, including programs to assess student learning and overall institutional effectiveness. This is in line with the standards of the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, with focus on the following questions: • Do institutional leaders support and value a culture of assessment? • Are goals, including learning outcomes, clearly articulated at every level? • Have appropriate assessment processes been implemented? • Do assessment results provide convincing evidence that the institution is achieving its mission and goals, including key learning outcomes? • Have assessment results been shared in useful forms and discussed widely with appropriate constituents? • Have results led to appropriate decisions and improvements about curricula and pedagogy, programs and services, resource allocation, and institutional goals and plans? • Have assessment processes been reviewed regularly?

Priorities for Student and Campus Success Regarding overall institutional effectiveness, a two-day planning retreat was convened in January 2010 with senior faculty and staff. After reviewing accomplishments and challenges of the previous year, the team collaborated to bring the following priorities into focus. • • • • • •

Growing the research capacity, including research collaborations with corporate, institutional and government entities Strengthening support for faculty teaching, research and scholarship Ever increasing collaborations with Qatar Foundation – contributing to the success of Education City Ensuring effective internal communications that support the mission of the campus Becoming a thought leader in global education Deepening Carnegie Mellon’s relationships and contributions in Qatari society

The Committee for the Assessment of Student Learning and Development continues efforts to foster the evolving culture of assessment, especially as it relates to student success. Much of the assessment happens within the classroom where the professor is the primary evaluator. A variety of surveys have been used to gauge student learning and development, student perceptions and satisfaction and other aspects of institutional effectiveness. Most notable among these is the National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE). Carnegie Mellon Qatar has participated in the NSSE survey for the past three years. Each spring, the survey is administered to all first-year and senior students by the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research. The survey is a reliable measure of student engagement, which has been shown to correlate significantly with academic performance and overall success of undergraduate students. Three other universities in Education City participated in the survey. Once again, students at Carnegie Mellon Qatar and other Education City campuses indicate higher levels of engagement than most of the other students from the 595 universities in the survey. In most instances Carnegie Mellon Qatar scores near or above the top 10 percent. Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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Student Affairs

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Student Affairs

The core objective driving the student affairs mission at Carnegie Mellon Qatar is to create the ideal undergraduate experience where students will be engaged, challenged and supported. This year, our students have risen admirably to the challenges set before them. They have actively engaged with their community and have grown and thrived beyond our expectations. This is largely due to the formation of a cohesive network of academic and non-academic support created for them by the joint efforts of faculty, staff and student affairs. To achieve our goal, student affairs set multiple programming objectives based in our belief in the development of the student across a wide array of content areas, including personal, professional, social, emotional, physical and intellectual. Notably, our work was underscored by the constant provision of personal care and attention given to each student through daily interaction, particularly in our roles as “diwanis,� or advisors. This student-centered approach enriches the student experience and has contributed toward the ideal state that we seek. An integral part of our strategy has been to complement our work by forging multiple partnerships with our home campus in Pittsburgh, the Education City branch campuses and Qatar Foundation. These partnerships assist us in developing a web of strong connections that serve to further enhance our students’ experience.

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Professional Development In keeping with our mission to provide realworld application to student learning, the Office of Professional Development advises and assists students in exploring career options, connecting with employers and making informed career decisions.  The office provides a comprehensive range of services, programs and resources in the areas of career exploration and guidance, internships, professional fluency and graduate education. Ever mindful of the importance of building strong relationships with the corporate world and industry, the Office of Professional Development regularly invites prospective employers to campus as well as offers students visits to work sites.

Professional Day Professional Day is a career and networking fair that provides an opportunity for students and employers to meet and explore internships and career possibilities. Representatives from top organizations return every year because they appreciate the rigorous academic programming at Carnegie Mellon and wide range of extracurricular activities and projects in which students take part. • • •

49 companies from Qatar and Dubai from various industries attended 200 industry representatives in attendance 13 Carnegie Mellon Qatar alumni attended as recruiters for their organization

Making the Connection Lecture Series The Making the Connection lecture series brings to campus a diverse range of industry leaders to speak with students about their organization and their career path. Speakers for this year included: • • • • • •

Vikram Pandit, Chairman and CEO, Citigroup Grahame Maher, Chief Executive Officer, Vodafone Qatar Frederic Ribieras, Chief Financial Officer, General Electric – Oil & Gas Houssan Itani, Senior Manager, Advisory Services, Ernst & Young Michael G. Loudin, Manager of Global Geoscience Recruiting & Early Career Program, Exxon Mobil Michelle Dezember, Head of Education, Arab Museum of Modern Art

Professional Fluency Series The Professional Fluency Series is a collaborative partnership of programs between the division of student affairs and academic departments. This year’s professional fluency series was well attended by students and included 10 spring workshops on topics ranging from resume writing, to interviewing, blogging and online presence. The series also featured for the first time a career assessment MBTI workshop. (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) • • • • • • • • • •

Resume Workshop CS Resume Workshop Interviewing Skills Advanced Resume Workshop What is TartanTrak? Business Fashion Show Self-Assessment Workshop MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) Navigating a Career Fair Women’s Career Talk Personal Branding/Blogging Roundtable

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Graduate School Preparation The office also hosted the Third Annual Graduate School Information Series, an information panel that drew on the graduate experiences of Carnegie Mellon professors and featured the first Carnegie Mellon Qatar graduate who went on to earn a master’s degree. In addition, the office collaborated with partners on professional workshops and the delivery of a weekly series of GRE and GMAT prep classes. Several Carnegie Mellon Qatar graduates have gone on to study at graduate schools in the United States or Europe.

Student On-Campus Employment The Student Employment program is run in collaboration with Qatar Foundation’s Career Services Office. Since 2008 the program has doubled in the number of students who are employed on campus. Students now hold jobs in several departments including:

• Information Technology • Marketing and Public Relations • Information Systems • Computer Science • Academic Resource Center • Library

Conferences Attending conferences is a way for students to expand their breadth of knowledge by meeting peers at other universities and actively engaging with business professionals across many industries. • Harvard Undergraduate Women in Business Conference • Women in Careers-Women’s Leadership Program

Internships The Office of Professional Development encourages students to participate regularly in internships so as to apply their learning in hands-on, real-world situations. More than 80% of the graduates at Carnegie Mellon Qatar completed at least one internship program before graduation, and some students have taken on multiple internships. • 44 students participated in successful summer internships in the summer of 2009 • 23 different companies offered internships including: • Vodafone • UBS • Blackrock • Qatar Petroleum • RasGas • HSBC • Deloitte • TechBridgeWorld • PriceWaterhouseCoopers Additionally, the number of international internships has increased. • 2 Carnegie Mellon Qatar students worked in New York City for financial firms on Wall Street • 1 Information Systems student went to the island of Niue as part of the Technology Consulting in the Global Community program Carnegie Mellon students have access to TartanTrak, the university’s online recruiting system. More students are taking advantage of this valuable university resource. Job Placement • 83 percent of graduates are currently in the Qatar labor market • 93 percent of Carnegie Mellon’s 2009 graduates are employed in some of the region’s top organizations, including:

• Shell • Q-Tel • Qatar Petroleum • Ernst & Young • HSBC • Vodafone • General Electric

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Corporate partners

Personal Development

The Office of Professional Development has built relationships with companies across various sectors of business. Many attend Professional Day or speak in the Making the Connection lecture series, while others offer internships and career posts to students and graduates

The mission of the Office of Personal Development is to support and enhance student development and quality of life by attending to the personal, emotional, spiritual, interpersonal, developmental and mental health needs of students – both inside and outside of the classroom. In addition to counseling and consultation services, a wide range of holistic programs are offered to promote the curricular and metacurricular experience of the students.

Armana Steel Building and Contracting Arqaam Captial (Dubai) Aspire, Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation Publishing Commercial Bank ConocoPhillips Deloitte & Touche Consulting Doha Bank Dohaland Dolphin Energy Ernst & Young Exxon Mobil Fuego Digital Media General Electric GulfTalent.com HSBC Bank ictQATAR iHorizons International Bank of Qatar KPMG Maersk Oil Masraf Al Rayan Mashreq Bank Microsoft Occidental PricewaterhouseCoopers Qtel QAPCO QChem Qatar Airways Qatar Exchange Qatar Foundation Qatar Gas Qatar Islamic Bank Qatar Museums Authority Qatar National Bank Qatar Petroleum Qatar Olympic Committee Qatar Science Leadership Program QSTP RasGas Reed Shell Sidra Standard Chartered Bank Tasweeq Total United Development Company Vodafone

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Programs and Services Offered Peer-2-Peer (P2P) A program offered for incoming first-year students to help support the transition from high school to university. The program provides first-year students with an avenue to express concerns, provide support to one another and empower them to take ownership of their experiences and work toward enhancing their first year. The P2P “meetings” are an excellent place for conveying information, listening to concerns and providing students with the appropriate tools to take more control of their experiences. Depression and Eating Disorder screenings Both screenings were offered to students, in addition to programming on mental health issues aimed at raising awareness. Additionally, counseling services supported students through their personal and academic experiences. Celebrate Your Body Month This program was offered during the spring semester, in collaboration with the Office of Health and Wellness and Northwestern University. The monthlong program aimed to raise student awareness regarding issues such as body image, self-esteem and eating disorders. A series of activities emphasized awareness of body image issues, media influence and health. Student Success Initiative (SSI) A program offered in the spring semester to firstyear students who needed some additional supports to reach their academic potential. This program was in strong collaboration with the Academic Resource Center, and focused on various topics, including time management, goal setting and behavior motivation. Healthy Relationships Week This program presented students with the opportunity to engage in discussion about the components of a healthy relationship. Relationships with family, friends, parents, professors and partners were explored and discussed through a series of programs. A selfdefense class was offered for female students, which empowered them to establish personal safety in their life. A total of 21 percent of the student population participated in the program during the week.


Big Questions Dinner In collaboration with the Office of International Education, this program was offered twice during the academic year to all students who wanted the opportunity to sit down with fellow classmates, faculty and staff to engage in discussions related to the ‘big questions’ in life. A total of 27 percent of student population participated in the program. Some examples of questions: • If you could invent one thing that could make the world a better place, what would it be? • Do our daily actions become who we really are? The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) This assessment was offered to students throughout the academic year. The MBTI is a personality assessment whereby participants learn more about their personality type and how it applies to career, learning styles, conflict resolution and interaction with others. New Program Initiatives The Sophomore Experience is a focus for the upcoming year, as the office will explore current programs that are targeted for sophomores, promote and create new initiatives with the sophomore experience in mind. Assertiveness Training will be offered to empower students with appropriate strategies for balancing needs while being respectful of others. Learning how to express opinions, feelings, needs and beliefs while effectively communicating to others is a skill that will be enhanced in participants. Walk in Their Shoes is an opportunity to “walk in someone else’s shoes” by shadowing someone whose job keeps Doha “running” (i.e. baker, garbage man, farm worker). Students will engage in reflective discussion and practices to increase critical thinking skills with respect to society. Doha Community Engagement Program is a pilot program for 2010-2011. This program will provide students with an opportunity to engage the Doha community through developing a program that will significantly impact a group of people and their quality of life. Participants will have the opportunity to have their program funded and see their idea become reality.

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Health & Wellness Preventative health is one of the major objectives of the Office of Health and Wellness. • Carnegie Mellon Qatar was the first university in Education City to reach 100% immunization compliance • H1N1 and seasonal flu shots were provided to all members of the campus community • Alcohol Awareness and HIV/Aids education were introduced to students • Organized a weeklong focus on breast cancer awareness with help from the Active Womens Club • Male health issues were addressed at an information booth on testicular cancer The Office of Health and Wellness partnered with the Office of Personal Development in providing students with tools to improve their academic performance. • Information booths on the importance of sleep during exam week • Information booth on eating right for final exams • A stress-free zone was provided for students to relax and have a healthy snack during final exams • A weeklong campaign focusing on eating disorders and the role the media play in the development of unhealthy body image. Students competed for the campaign slogan and T-shirt designs with the winning slogan “Love Who You Are” Students also were encouraged to give back to the community. This was done by taking part in a blood drive and by having more than 20 students take part in an eight-hour course to become First Aid and CPR certified.

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Student Activities First Year Programs  The newly established Office of First-Year Programs offers co-curricular programs that equip first-year students with the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in their first-year at Carnegie Mellon and beyond. The office launched four successful programs this year. The Involvement Passport is an incentive program that encourages students to participate in a broad range of activities including:

• • • • • • • •

Student Organizations Academic Exploration Community Service Global Awareness & Cultural Competence Health & Wellness Leadership Development Life Skills Professional Development

Students receive stamps in their passports each time they complete an activity in each respective category. Twenty-nine students (35 percent of the freshmen class) successfully completed the program by participating in at least one activity in each of the six categories. The Involvement Passport successfully accomplished the goal of encouraging first-year students to explore and discover new interests.  First-Year Trip. The Class of 2013 spent two-and-a-half days during the fall semester creating meaningful connections with each other, faculty, student affairs and the Academic Resource Center staff. Students competed alongside faculty and staff in challenging team-building activities that helped break down barriers. In addition, students had the opportunity to participate in outdoor adventure activities such as biking, kayaking, and rock climbing for the first time. Many students stated that this experience was the highlight of the year. Additionally, faculty reported that the trip encouraged more positive interactions with students in the classroom. Next year, the Office of First-Year Programs will focus on enhancing communication between faculty and staff regarding the first-year experience.  Tartan Activities Fair. One of the contributing factors to the growth in student involvement was the Tartan Activities Fair, which was held at the beginning of the fall 2009 semester. The purpose of the fair was to make students aware of the many opportunities to get involved on campus, including clubs and organizations, sports, leadership programs and service opportunities at Carnegie Mellon and throughout Education City and Qatar. Family Day. The inaugural Education City Family Day was held to welcome families of current students to Education City and help them to better understand the college experience. The day was a joint effort between Qatar Foundation’s Education Division and the university partners. Carnegie Mellon had a large turnout of approximately 75 students and their families. Family Day successfully informed parents and siblings about the Carnegie Mellon experience, and, as a result, parents are more likely to encourage their sons and daughters to be fully engaged with all that Carnegie Mellon has to offer.

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Student Organizations Student organizations create meaningful opportunities and experiences that enhance the growth and development of students, promote campus involvement and university citizenship and complement our academic mission. The number of student organizations increased this year from 17 to 23. Carnegie Mellon Qatar students are increasingly engaged in meta-curricular activities outside of the classroom. In particular, our Qatari student population is taking on leadership positions within student organizations. Another exciting development regarding student organizations is the increase in faculty advisors. Fifteen professors committed to helping advise 17 student organizations in a formal capacity. This represents a large increase in the number of faculty-advised organizations from the previous year. Research suggests that strong advising support leads to more successful student organizations, resulting in greater leadership development and learning for students. Student Organizations Active Women. Organizes activities that promote women’s empowerment Activities Board. ‘Tartanizing’ campus since 2008 with various activities All-Around. The student newspaper since 2004 D.I.Y. A/V Club. Do-it-yourself Audio/Video education and creation Best Buddies. Promotes friendships with students with special needs CCSC (Computer Science Club). Organizes computer science events and competitions CMba, Business Club. Organizes business events and competitions Culture Club. Focuses on events promoting cultural awareness and exploration Cultural Exchange Club. Organizes cultural opportunities DSO (Development Solutions Organization). Focuses on international development solutions Al Fikr Club. Organizes community discussions on various intellectual topics Football Fever. Promotes fan support for football team Health and Fitness Club. Promotes healthy lifestyles among students Human Rights Club. Promotes awareness of different local and global issues IS Club. Organizes information systems events and competitions. LiveGreen. Promotes awareness of environmental and sustainability issues Music Club. Organizes opportunities for music education and exploration Photography Club. Organizes photo exhibits and competitions Qatari Student Network. Promotes awareness and appreciation of Qatari culture Qatar Debate. Practice and compete in formal debating Sparks Entertainment. Organizes campus social activities Student Majlis. Campus governance body that oversees student organization funding Tartan Chefs. Organizes cooking competitions and educational programs

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Sports In addition to student organizations, sports teams are growing in popularity. We currently offer four sports: • Men’s Basketball • Women’s Basketball • Men’s Football (soccer) • Cricket Faculty and staff coach all the teams, with the exception of cricket. While the number of students participating in each sport has stayed constant, the amount of time dedicated to each team and the resulting success of the team has increased significantly. In particular, men’s football achieved great success by winning the Fall Ramadan 5-a-Side Tournament as well as entering two teams in the spring tournament and winning both first and second place. Looking forward, next year we hope to increase the number of female students participating in sports.  Leadership Development More than 70 students (30 percent of the entire student body) participated in at least one of the six student activities leadership development programs.

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Freshman Leadership Seminar GPS 1.0. Another successful session of the GPS 1.0 Freshman Leadership Seminar was held this year. Sophomore Leadership Seminar GPS 2.0. In addition to the GPS 1.0 Freshman Leadership Seminar, Student Activities offered a new Sophomore Leadership Seminar GPS 2.0 that allowed students to explore their leadership capabilities through personal story and reflection. School Without Walls. After completing the fall seminar, students applied their new leadership skills by designing and implementing a leadership workshop for grade 5 students from Gulf English School. Women’s Leadership Program. Participation doubled, empowering women to take on leadership roles in the Carnegie Mellon community, with their families and in the work environment. Leadership Success Series. This workshop series focused on skill development for student leaders had twice as many sessions this year and had a significant increase in participation.


Leadership Steering Committee. Comprised of representatives from all faculties as well as students and staff, this committee reconvened at the beginning of the fall semester and has made great strides in laying a foundation for growth of leadership development opportunities on campus.

Doha Community Engagement Program. Next year, the Office of Personal Development looks forward to offering DCEP, a pilot program that will provide students with an opportunity to engage the Doha community through developing a program that will significantly impact a group of people and their quality of life.

Service Learning Experiences Qatar Academy Tutoring Program. This program is in a stable state and is now fully organized and run by Carnegie Mellon Qatar students. 

One Laptop Per Child. The first student-led, crosscampus service initiative took three Carnegie Mellon Qatar students to Rwanda to work alongside eight Pittsburgh students with the One Laptop Per Child program. The group spent 10 days teaching with the laptops at Nonko Primary School in Kigali, developing and implementing their own lesson plans alongside the local teachers. Additionally, they had an opportunity to meet one of the founders of OLPC as well as the Minister of Education of Rwanda.

Make a Difference Day. The daylong service program where students engage in service around Qatar, is an example of successful collaboration with all Education City branch campuses. The program saw a significant increase in student participation. 

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International Education The Office of International Education aims to provide all students with a global world view through the delivery of cross-cultural educational programs and activities. These include exchange programs, services for international students and a variety of programs to help students understand themselves better in relation to their diverse, multicultural environment. The 2009-2010 academic year brought a variety of new initiatives and accomplishments that support Carnegie Mellon Qatar’s commitment to interdisciplinarity and the open exchange of ideas. Programs Offered • Pizza and Politics. Continuing to build on one of its most successful programs, the Office of International Education has integrated this community forum into other aspects of the students’ experiences. In the fall, students participating in the GPS 1.0 leadership program took on the responsibility of facilitating the Pizza and Politics discussion as a means of learning about the value of ‘Controversy with Civility.’ In February, students in the Carnegie Skills Workshop course facilitated the program’s discussion as a means of understanding and synthesizing information on a topic with multiple perspectives. • Qatar’s Bid for World Cup 2022 • Dress Codes on Campus? • Protecting the Free Exchange of Ideas • AIDS and Immigration: Denying Entry, Stay and Residence Due to HIV Status • Won’t You Be My Neighbor?  (Sharing a Building with NUQ) • IMPAQT: An Inter-Campus Dialogue International Students With a dramatically larger first-year class entering in the fall, this office saw its international student population more than double in just one year. • 25 international first-year students joined campus this year • 19 international students were already enrolled at Carnegie Mellon Qatar • 44 total international students on campus this year Together, the international student community has added vibrancy not only to the Carnegie Mellon Qatar community, but also to International Education’s cornerstone spring program: International Day. The daylong event featured a photography gallery, an exhibit of cultural artifacts and food and an evening of more than 12 cultural performances with more than 100 individuals in attendance.

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Campus Exchange The campus exchange program with the university’s home campus in the United States continues to flourish and provides students on both campuses the chance to learn about another culture while continuing to pursue rigorous educational opportunities. Next year, in addition to the Pittsburgh campus, Carnegie Mellon Qatar students will have the opportunity to study at Singapore Management University. One Qatar student has already committed to studying in Singapore next fall, and early indications show that two SMU students may study in Qatar in the spring of 2011. New Initiatives The Office of International Education looks forward to the implementation of a new set of educational programs and activities for the 2010-11 academic year. In partnership with the Office of Personal Development, the office will offer a new educational program entitled ‘Food for Thought,’ which focuses on the role of food in cultural and religious traditions. Additionally, the office will introduce a series of workshops aimed at deepening the conversation about culture and how it impacts students’ personal and professional development, as well as a set of peer facilitator training workshops meant to increase students’ interpersonal, communication and leadership skills. International Trips/Initiatives IMPAQT. The “Initiating Meaningful Pittsburgh and Qatar Ties” IMPAQT program aims to strengthen Qatar-Pittsburgh partnerships and actively develop cross-campus initiatives. This year a group of 14 Carnegie Mellon Qatar students visited the Pittsburgh campus, while 8 students from the Pittsburgh campus ventured to Doha during their respective spring breaks. In addition to participating in cultural exploration activities that introduced each city and campus, students worked on collaborative projects to benefit the Carnegie Mellon community. One such project currently under development and initiated by a group of Qatar IMPAQT students is an online forum for Pittsburgh and Qatar campus students to interact digitally. Singapore. In an effort to introduce this new exchange site to students, the Office of International Education partnered with Information Systems faculty to coordinate a spring break trip to Singapore. Eleven students participated in the one-week excursion that incorporated the global classroom course ‘Global Project Management’ and involved students in the cultural pre-departure orientation. As a result of this international trip, participants reported an increased sense of self-efficacy and decision-making skills as well as deep cultural learning.

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Vietnam. A group of 17 students spent 12 days in Vietnam, mostly in the Northern mountainous region of Sa Pa near the Chinese border, with the purpose of helping build a community craft center for a small rural village. In addition to physical labor, the students also contributed significant financial resources to help establish the center and will continue to support the center from Qatar through various means including helping to develop a website. More than any other service trip in the past, this project has the potential to make the greatest and longest-lasting impact on any of the communities we’ve worked with since the start of these service trips. That is due to the center providing a venue for sustained economic and social development for years to come.

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Collaborations with Education City branch campuses and Qatar Foundation Student Affairs continues to collaborate with Qatar Foundation and other Education City branch campuses on a variety of initiatives. This year we worked jointly on: Family Day. A joint effort between Qatar Foundation’s Education Division and the university partners that welcomes families of students to Education City to help them better understand the university experience. Carnegie Mellon welcomed more than 75 families to the event. International Education Week. Yearly event that features programs to promote the meaningful exchange of knowledge, ideas and culture.


Three-day Young Professionals Institute - Qatar. Hosted in Education City, YPI is a shared learning experience where 27 participants from University of Maryland and University of San Diego traveled to Doha to engage with participants from eight local institutions to address real challenges faced by higher education in the Arabian Gulf.

Community Development Adviser training. Coordinated by Qatar Foundation Housing & Residence Life staff, CDA training topics include emergency response, conflict management and mediation, housing & residence life policy, program planning, sustainable living and other necessary position-related skills.

Education City Student Life Committee. Representatives from all Education City branch campuses and Academic Bridge Program collaborate on Education City-wide programs such as Student Leader Workshop, Arts Week and International Education Week.

International Student Orientation. Organized by Qatar Foundation, this orientation provides students coming from outside of Qatar an opportunity to settle in, begin immigration procedures and explore a bit of the city and campus.

Celebrate Your Body Week. This week highlights the importance of having a healthy body, not just focused on size but on having total health that includes, physical, mental and social well being.

Make a Difference Day. Education City students come together to give back to their community by participating in a variety of service projects all over Qatar.

Nutrition Week. A weeklong focus on the importance of nutrition and how it contributes to the academic success of students. Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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Admission

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Admission

23 46 30

At Carnegie Mellon, every applicant is treated as an individual. No single grade, factor or score will automatically gain or deny a student admission. We consider many factors when making admission decisions, including academic performance, exam scores and extracurricular activities. We take great care to make our admission decisions fair, thorough and sensitive. Carnegie Mellon is interested in students who can be successful at the university, while taking full advantage of all the university has to offer and enriching the campus community. We also seek students who best embody our core values of dedication, collaboration, entrepreneurship, compassion, diversity and integrity.

New students enrolled by major in August 2009 Business Administration Computer Science Information Systems

700 600 500

627 528

400 300 200

231 166

100

Recruitment in Qatar Qatar is the primary geographic focus for student recruitment. To kick off the student recruitment season, two major events were held in Doha during October 2009. • Sixth Annual Local Counselor Visitation day, held in the Texas A&M University at Qatar building • Fifth Annual Discover Education City student recruitment kickoff event, proudly hosted by Carnegie Mellon Qatar. More than 1,000 people were in attendance Carnegie Mellon Qatar cooperated with the other Education City branch campuses to schedule local school visits. In total, the Education City teams visited approximately 45 secondary schools in Qatar. Some schools were visited more than once, and some had separate fairs or programs in addition to the school visit, so the total number of visits and events is approximately 80.

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2009

2010

2009 2010

99

87

2009

2010

Student Recruitment 2009/2010 Admission Cycle Statistics

Applied

Accepted

Enrolled

700 600 500 400 300

380

411

200

198

100 2009 2010

222

2009 2010

Applications From Within Qatar

Increased 8 percent from residents of Qatar (both citizens and non-citizens)

Increased 12 percent from Qatari nationals


700 600 500 400 300 200 100 57 2009

103 2010

Applications From Outside Qatar Increased 81 percent from GCC countries (excluding Qatar) Increased 12 percent from Qatari nationals Increased 5 percent over last year from other countries in the Middle East and northern Africa

Recruitment Outside of Qatar Outside of Qatar, the GCC is defined as the secondary recruitment market. Recruitment in the GCC is done jointly with Qatar Foundation’s Education Division and the other universities in Education City. During October and November of 2009 Carnegie Mellon visited • Bahrain • Oman • Abu Dhabi • Dubai • Kuwait In each location, Carnegie Mellon visited between 10 and 15 schools, hosted a dinner for local school counselors and hosted a Discover Education City university fair. In addition to the GCC recruitment, staff visited several schools in Istanbul, Turkey and hosted a series of university fairs in India. In January 2010, Carnegie Mellon, the other five universities in Education City and Qatar Foundation sponsored the Fourth Annual Education City Regional Counselor Program. The goal of the ECRCP is to showcase Education City so that influential counselors throughout the Middle East will return to their schools and encourage their students to apply. Twenty-five university counselors and advisers from countries such as Oman, Jordan, Egypt and Bahrain attended the twoday program. Financial Aid Four types of financial aid options are available to students who enroll at Carnegie Mellon Qatar. • Government Scholarship from Qatari Supreme Education Council • Covers full tuition and fees • For Qatari nationals only • Sponsorship from a national company • Typically covers full tuition and fees • Usually awarded to Qatari nationals

• Qatar Foundation Loan Program • Need-based • Only non-Qataris are eligible • No repayment necessary during full-time enrollment • Repayment options after graduation are monthly installments or time served working in Qatar • Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar Scholarship • Merit-based • Various amounts ranging from $10,000 to full tuition • Renewable annually contingent on good academic standing Enrolled students came from the following secondary schools and foundation programs: Academic Bridge Program Al-Bayan Scientific School M.E.S. Indian School Qatar Academy Amna Bint Wahab American School Of Doha Ideal Indian School International School Choueifat - Doha Lahore Grammar School Qatar International School Bangladesh MHM High School Global Academy Middle East International School Omar Bin Al-Khattab Scientific School Weill Cornell Medical College Aga-Khan School Al-Fayha High School Al-Kawthar High School Al-Khor International School Al-Andalus School Boys Azzan Bin Qataris Private School Baku Oxford School British School In Baku Dukhan English School Elaraki Secondary School Emirates International School-Meadows Fergusson College International School Choueifat - Abu Dhabi Karachi Grammar School Kuwait English School Landesgymnasium fur Hochbegabte Lebanese School Pakistan International School Park House English School Roots School System SAR Secondary Girls School Shahid Ezhe’ei School -Isfahan Sharjah American International School St. John’s Secondary School Taman Molek Secondary School Tunisian School In Qatar

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For the 2009-2010 Academic Year, 215 Carnegie Mellon Qatar students received financial aid or sponsorship to pay their tuition and fees. Fourteen students received money from both Carnegie Mellon University and Qatar Foundation. • Government Scholarship from Qatari Supreme Education Council • Emiri Diwan 2 • Higher Education Institute 47 • Bahrain Government 3 • Kuwait Government 2 • Oman Government 2 • Corporate Sponsorship from a national company • Barwa (admin by QP) 1 • Dolphin Energy 1 • Qatar Petroleum 17 • Qtel 7 • RasGas 3 • Qatar Foundation Loan Program • Qatar Foundation Financial Aid 99 • Qatar Foundation Sponsorship 2 • Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar Scholarship • Carnegie Mellon Qatar 29

Pre-College Programs

Pre-College programs are a way in which Carnegie Mellon Qatar can reach out into the community and help bridge the gap between secondary school and university life. The programs are designed in a way that encourages secondary students to focus on their studies and challenge themselves inside and outside of their school curriculum. The programs also inform students about the three majors offered at Carnegie Mellon Qatar, what it takes to enroll in the programs and what types of careers are available to graduates. Summer College Preview Program 2009 Modeled after Carnegie Mellon’s highly successful Summer Academy for Math and Science (SAMS), the program is designed to introduce intelligent and academically motivated students to the demanding curriculum of selective American universities such as the ones in Education City. SCPP takes students through an academically intensive four-week experience with classes in mathematics, English composition, a hands-on project and SAT preparation. Students attended classes five days a week and completed four SAT diagnostic (practice) tests during the program. • • • 58

Held in the new Carnegie Mellon building from June 28 through July 23 39 students enrolled 46 percent of the students were Qatari nationals Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Ibtikar Qatar Ibtikar, which means “innovation” in Arabic, is the Information Systems Innovation competition for high school juniors and seniors, It was created as a holistic approach to service learning where high school students try to solve a real-world issue using information technology while at the same time raising their interest in the dynamic field of Information Systems. Ibtikar Qatar challenges students to use Information Systems to make businesses and organizations more effective. • 72 students enrolled • 10 different schools took part in the competition • Launched by the Information Systems department to pique the interest of high school students in the dynamic field of Information Systems


CS4Qatar CS4Qatar is a developmental workshop designed to teach high school students about computer science and how it is applied to all aspects of life. The goal of CS4Qatar is to help spread this awareness among the younger generations. Carnegie Mellon Qatar’s Computer Science Department does this by reaching out to the students and exposing them to technological and computer science basics. Interest in the student workshop exploded in 2009 as more than 300 students applied for 120 available spots. This two-day developmental workshop was designed to teach high school students about Computer Science and how it is applied in all aspects of life. The workshop consisted of three rotating sessions • CS Puzzles • Becker’s Graphical Robots • Programming

Botball BOTBALL is a U.S.-based organization that introduces robotics to high school students. Teams are equipped with a Lego© Mindstorm robot, along with instruction on how to design and program it to move autonomously through a course to complete a specific task. After working on the robots for eight weeks, student teams are pitted against one another to see whose robot can score the most points in two-minute competitions. Teams also must demonstrate the work they’ve done in order to create and program their robot.

High School Programming Competition The High School Programming competition was designed to allow high school students to compete against their peers in a computer science-based contest. The competition challenged teams of three students to work together to solve six computer problems in less than four hours. Students used their knowledge of computer programming languages such as JAVA, C and C++ to solve their problems. A panel of Carnegie Mellon faculty worked as judges to determine if the programming code executed the correct solution. • 14 teams from nine high schools competed in an intense four-hour programming marathon sponsored by the Computer Science department

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar brought BOTBALL to Doha in 2005. Four teams took part in the inaugural event. In 2006 the competition increased to six teams in Doha, and in 2007 it expanded three fold to include 12 teams in Doha, three teams in Kuwait and three teams in the U.A.E. In 2008, more teams from around the Gulf Region joined the competition along with three teams from Egypt. This year, a team from Zimbabwe joined the competition. The overall winning team was sent to the United States to participate in the Botball world finals as well as take part in the Global Conference on Educational Robotics in Leesburg, Virginia. • More than 200 students from 30 schools in • Egypt • Kuwait • Qatar • Saudi Arabia • United Arab Emirates • Zimbabwe

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Excellence. At Carnegie Mellon. + Business Administration + Computer Science + Information Systems

With more than a century of academic excellence and innovative research, Carnegie Mellon University is a global leader in education with real-world applications. At the invitation of Qatar Foundation, Carnegie Mellon joined Education City in 2004. The campus is a key component of Carnegie Mellon’s continuing mission to provide students around the world with the highest level of knowledge and preparedness for a changing world. To learn more, visit www.qatar.cmu.edu.

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Marketing & Public Relations

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Marketing and Public Relations The goal of the Office of Marketing and Public Relations is to extend the University’s global brand throughout the region and promote the unique benefits of Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar. We collaborate with our colleagues at the main campus in Pittsburgh, our university partners in Education City and colleagues at Qatar Foundation. The university continues to experience an increase in media attention, not only in Qatar–but also the Middle East region and the rest of the world. The Marketing and Public Relations office has four main areas of focus: • Creative (publications, design, writing, editing, new media, web) • Media relations • Special events • Alumni relations 62

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Creative The Marketing and Public Relations office published numerous items during the fiscal year. Many were published for marketing and admission purposes, while others were published for individual classes, events or activities. Akhbar. As the official magazine of Carnegie Mellon Qatar, Akhbar aims to share the interesting and innovative stories that highlight the university and its role in the Gulf Region and the world. This year, Akhbar has expanded to include a full Arabic edition. Additionally, all issues are on the university’s website in an easy-to-read and easy-tonavigate format.

akhbar

• Summer/Fall 2009 issue Issue highlights: Bill Gates as keynote in the ICTD Conference, outdoor education and a special mural as a gift to Her Highness Sheikha Mozah.

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar Summer/Fall 2009

Bill Gates Microsoft founder visits Doha as ICTD keynote speaker

akhbar Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar Fall 2009/Winter 2010

Hala the bilingual

robot receptionist is on the job

• Winter 2009/Spring 2010 issue This is the first issue to be printed in both English and Arabic Issue highlights “Hala” the bilingual robot receptionist, using filmmaking in computer science research and graduates who are pursuing advanced degrees. First public Annual Report for the 2008-2009 academic year A new general brochure Individual information sheets on all three of the majors

As a key part of our communication strategy, a Facebook page was created to take full advantage of the social media phenomenon. Facebook is the number one social networking site in the world. The site has changed the face of communication with people of all ages and all walks of life engaging in two-way communications on the site. This past year, an advertising campaign on Facebook from January through May yielded a tremendous amount of exposure for Carnegie Mellon Qatar. Facebook advertising campaign goals: • Broaden awareness of Carnegie Mellon’s presence in Qatar • Drive traffic to Carnegie Mellon Qatar’s new website • Drive fans to the Carnegie Mellon Qatar Facebook page • Change perception regarding Qatar as a destination for a university experience • Increase the number of inquires and applications for admission from prospective students in the Gulf Region, the Middle East, Northern Africa and South Asia.

A one-page fact sheet in both English and Arabic that gives “quick facts”

Facebook statistics as a direct result of the ad campaign

A building tour and fact sheet in English and Arabic

• Fans of the official page climbed from 900 to more than 60,000

These publications and brochures are simple and effective tools to reach various audiences. Materials were designed and printed for • Summer College Preview Program • CS4Qatar • High School Programming Competition • IbtikarQatar • IS Student Conference • Hala the robot receptionist

• 1,572,223,915 impressions were made of Carnegie Mellon Qatar ad • Advertising impressions were targeted toward key countries • 403,353 individual clicks were made to the ad, which guided viewers to our webpage More information on Facebook may be found in Appendix E.

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Media Relations The university has had an outstanding relationship with the local and regional media. Our events and press conferences were well attended by representatives from both Arabic and English media. Additionally, most of the events on campus were conveyed to the local and regional media through press releases. All releases are distributed in both English and Arabic. Two events received global coverage: • Dialogue with U. S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton • Lecture with U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu See Appendix F for a list of press release dates and topics. See Appendix H for press clippings.

Special Events Special Events focuses on developing event concepts, planning the logistics, coordinating technical aspects and maintaining brand integrity while executing an event that meets the standards of the university. With more than 30 events reaching out to varied audiences, the MPR office hosted more than 4,000 guests to campus this year. Hillary Clinton Townterview. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton visited Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar to hold a public question-andanswer session with an audience of students, faculty and members of the Education City community. The event was organized and moderated by Al Jazeera in collaboration with Qatar Foundation and Carnegie Mellon Qatar. Distinguished Lecture Series 2010. The Distinguished Lecture Series features eminent individuals in social or political activities, in the arts and sciences, or in some other realm of contemporary significance to enrich our campus and our community. The lectures are free of charge. The Distinguished Lecture Series is supported and hosted by Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar. • Aseel Al-Awadhi, Ph.D., member of the Kuwait National Assembly, gave a talk entitled “Gulf Women and Politics: the Kuwaiti Experience.” • Patrick Awuah, Ph.D., Founder & President, Ashesi University, Ghana, spoke about working at Microsoft for almost a decade, than returning home to Ghana to cofound Ashesi University, a small liberal arts college that aims to educate Africa’s next generation of leaders. • Leila Ahmed, Ph.D., a renowned professor and prominent author of Women’s studies and Near Eastern studies, delivered an insightful address titled “Contemporary Trends in American Muslim Women’s Activism.” 64

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Steven Chu Lecture. U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Ph.D., delivered a lecture and dialogue session to an audience of students, faculty, members of the Education City community and guests from the oil and gas industry. Chu is a distinguished scientist and co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1997. He has devoted his recent scientific career to the search for new solutions to energy challenges and stopping global climate change. IS Student Conference. The conference program was organized under the theme of “promises and pitfalls of information communication technology” (ICT), addressing the impact the new trends in the field have had on the way people and society interact in the world today. Undergraduate students from Qatar and the region were invited to submit research projects based on this theme, evaluating the effect of ICT solutions currently in practice. Graduation. Thirty-four students made up the third graduating class. Twenty-five graduated in Business Administration, five in Computer Science and four in Information Systems. Dr. Hessa Al Jaber, Secretary General of ictQATAR, gave the keynote address to an audience of more than 700 family members, friends, faculty, staff and members of the Doha community. See Appendix G for a list of all events.

Alumni Relations Alumni Relations planned three events this year: A Movie Under the Stars, an Afternoon on the Terrace and a dialogue and reception with Richard Branson, founder and chairman of The Virgin Group. Each of these events were well attended and provided opportunities for alumni interaction and engagement with the university. The process of electing officers for the Qatar Alumni Association has begun. Many alumni expressed interest in being involved in leadership roles. Goals for this coming year include solidifying the structure of the alumni association and producing events that have an even broader appeal.

Looking Ahead to 2010-2011 Major initiatives planned for the 2010-2011 fiscal year include the following: • Major enhancements of the www.qatar.cmu.edu website • Printed version of Akhbar in English and Arabic • Advertising campaign in Oryx (Qatar Airways magazine) and Meed Magazine • Continue using various social media platforms to extend the Carnegie Mellon Qatar message to a global audience • Have a fully-functioning alumni chapter. • Continue to refine our advertising strategy so that it reaches key markets Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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Operations

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Operations Human Resources

Information Technology

The Carnegie Mellon Qatar Human Resources Department supports faculty and staff in various governmental and non-governmental entities such as the Immigration Department, Traffic Department, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Customs and Port Authority and foreign embassies located in Qatar.

This year, the Information Technology Department focused on improving the computing and communications infrastructure in Carnegie Mellon’s new building while helping faculty to develop new learning environments for our students. Our goal is to provide the technology and services that enable worldclass education and research at Carnegie Mellon.

HR also assist in many non-governmental entities such as banks, service industry, communications companies, car agencies and dealers, and provides employees with an overview of international and domestic insurance benefits, allowances and HR policies and guidelines. One of HR’s services is delivering a thorough orientation to all new faculty and staff. The orientation covers such topics as: • Cultural relocation and the fundamentals of cross-cultural awareness • An introduction to Islamic and Qatari culture by the Qatar Culture and Islamic Center • A security presentation by Jim Gartner, senior director of global security It is the goal of the Qatar Human Resources team to enable, serve and support faculty and staff by providing timely and accurate information about the university resources and delivering quality services. 68

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Major accomplishments include: • Transitioned the Internet connection to Qatar Foundation’s Global Ethernet to increase bandwidth and enhance reliability • Upgraded the wireless network throughout the building to improve coverage and performance as mobile computing continues to grow in importance • Continued work on server virtualization as we upgraded the VMware infrastructure while keeping up with the constant need to identify, test and deploy security updates • Responded to more than 300 service requests per month and provided multimedia technology and support for university events • Worked with the Information Systems Department to set up a new lab for IS students • Worked with the Computer Science Department on the cloud computing environment


• Worked with Northwestern University to help ensure a successful start to its inaugural class • Teleconferencing technology was used in a variety of courses and IT expanded the service to foster better communication with our colleagues in Pittsburgh and around the world • Building on the results from a campus-wide survey, IT started several new initiatives including support for Macintosh computers

Facilities Facilities Management provides services for the needs of our ever-evolving education and research activities. Facilities Management services include: • Conference and event support to campus, Qatar Foundation and branch campuses • FM Help Desk • Building maintenance • Space management • Service attendants • Vehicle management • Transport services • Customs clearance for international shipping • Inter campus mail services • Stationery supplies • Catering • Cleaning • Access control • Building security • Staff housing Over the past 12 months Facilities has successfully supported all staff and faculty operational needs for the delivery of all campus teaching and learning requirements. We have successfully supported the delivery of summer school and Summer College Preview Program. We have provided venue, delivery and support to a wide range of internal and externally sponsored events. Facilities is dedicated to providing a wide range of support services which fully meet the university’s present and future needs. In achieving this goal, we will continue to provide a safe and secure environment in which effective teaching, research, working, residential and recreational activities can take place. We partner with our stakeholders, Qatar Foundation Engineering Department and Qatar Foundation Health Safety and Security Department.

Global Security The Global Security program for Carnegie Mellon University was established in 2003 on the Pittsburgh campus and relocated to Qatar in 2006 as a means to further grow and develop the program and better support the university’s interests in Qatar. The program continues to grow and expand into new areas. A core component of the program is the Qatar Crisis Preparedness Plan, which ensures that trained professionals are prepared to act decisively on behalf of the Carnegie Mellon community in the event of a disaster, whether security, natural disaster, medical or other calamity. In furthering professional development, the senior director continues to serve as the Chairman of the local Doha Council for the U.S. State Department sponsored Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC), working closely with officials at the U.S. Embassy as well as senior security professionals representing most major multinational companies conducting business in Qatar. Global Security, in conjunction with contracted security consultants who specialize in Middle East security matters, continues to conduct regular risk and threat assessments and carefully communicate the appropriate messages to the Carnegie Mellon community without causing panic or unnecessary concern. In addition, an important feature of the security program is the periodic security assessments of residential compounds, as well as addressing all resident faculty and staff concerns in a timely manner.

Finance The Carnegie Mellon Qatar Finance office supports Carnegie Mellon Qatar in the areas of accounting and finance, and is a central resource/liaison for the departments in Pittsburgh and Qatar. The Qatar Finance office maintains close coordination with Qatar Foundation’s Finance Department. Carnegie Mellon Qatar Finance plays a vital role in the process of decision making, budget control, reporting and planning. The Qatar Finance office also is actively involved with Qatar Foundation’s Finance Committee and in providing information for Carnegie Mellon Management as well as the Joint Advisory Board.

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Appendices

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Appendix A

Appendix B

Joint Advisory Board (JAB) Members

Senior Staff

CHAIR

Richard Mundy (effective March 1, 2010) Chief Operating Officer

Fathy Saoud, Ph.D. President Qatar Foundation CO-CHAIR Mark Kamlet, Ph.D. Provost and Senior Vice President Carnegie Mellon University MEMBERS Abdullah Al Kubaisi, Ph.D. Executive Director Her Highness’ Office Rashid Al Naimi, Ph.D. Vice President of Administration Qatar Foundation Abdullah Al Thani, Ph.D. Vice President for Education Qatar Foundation Ilker Baybars, Ph.D. Professor and Deputy Dean Tepper School of Business Carnegie Mellon University Mary Jo Dively Vice President and General Counsel Carnegie Mellon University Ahmed Hasnah, Ph.D. Associate Vice President of Higher Education Qatar Foundation William Scherlis, Ph.D. Professor and Director Institute for Software Research Carnegie Mellon University Charles Thorpe, Ph.D. Dean Carnegie Mellon Qatar SECRETARY Mark Gambone COO Carnegie Mellon Qatar INDEPENDENT JAB MEMBERS Kurt Mehlhorn, Ph.D. Vice President Max Planck Society N. Balakrishnan, Ph.D. Associate Director, Indian Institute of Science Gabriel Hawawini, Ph.D. Henry Grunfield Professor of Investment Banking INSEAD

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Mark Gambone Acting Chief Operating Officer Mohamed Dobashi, S.J.D. Director of Strategic Initiatives starting March 1, 2010 Murry Evans Director of Marketing and Public Relations Jim Gartner Senior Director of Global Security Gloria Khoury Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Kevin Lamb Assistant Dean Steve Huth Chief Information Officer Bob Monroe, Ph.D. Associate Dean John Robertson, Ph.D. Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs Erin Stewart Galloway Director of Human Resources Chuck Thorpe, Ph.D. Dean Bryan Zerbe Director of Admission Aaron Lyvers Director of Finance Lisa Ciletti Director of Operations Ray Corcoran Director of Facilities


Appendix C

Appendix D

Faculty Members

Research Projects

Nael Abu Ghazaleh, Ph.D. Amal Al Malki, Ph.D. Dan Baumgardt Brett Browning, Ph.D. Angela Brunstein, Ph.D. Stephen Calabrese, Ph.D. Justin Carlson, Ph.D. Lynn Robert Carter, Ph.D. Jon Caulkins, Ph.D. Iliano Cervesato, Ph.D. Alexander Cheek April Conkey, Ph.D. Yonina Cooper, Ph.D. Hasan Demirkoparan, Ph.D. M. Bernardine Dias, Ph.D. Mohamed Dobashi, S.J.D. Kira Dreher S. Thomas Emerson, Ph.D. Rami el Samahy Hoda Fahmy, Ph.D. David Gray, Ph.D. Khaled Harras, Ph.D. Erik Helin Starling Hunter, Ph.D. Kelly Hutzell Zeinab Ibrahim, Ph.D. Lansine Kaba, Ph.D. Krishnapuram Karthikeyan, Ph. D. Andreas Karatsolis, Ph.D. Sham Kekre, Ph.D. Ian Lacey, Ph.D. Divakaran Liginlal, Ph.D. Selma Limam Mansar, Ph.D. J. Patrick McGinnis Robert T. Monroe, Ph.D. Alan Montgomery, Ph.D. Terrance Murphy, Ph.D. Kemal Oflazer, Ph.D. Marion Oliver, Ph.D. Silvia Pessoa, Ph.D. Daniel Phelps, Ph.D. Saquib Razak, Ph.D. Benjamin Reilly, Ph.D. Dudley Reynolds, Ph.D. John Robertson, Ph.D. Alex Rojas Ph.D. Majd Sakr, Ph.D. Thierry Sans, Ph.D. Patrick Sileo, Ph.D. Christopher Sparshott, Ph.D. Jeffrey Squires Charles E. Thorpe, Ph.D. George White, Ph.D. Dale Winter, Ph.D.

Completed NPRP projects Modeling Control of Infectious Diseases with BehaviorDriven Infectivity Jon Caulkins | NPRP 20-6-7-6 Intelligent Diabetes Assistant: Predicting and Optimizing Blood Glucose Chuck Thorpe | NPRP 29-6-7-43 Ongoing NPRP projects Non-Destructive Gas Pipeline Inspection Using Computer Vision Brett Browning | NPRP 08-589-2-245 Improved Arabic Natural Language Processing through Semisupervised and Cross-Lingual Learning Kemal Oflazer | NPRP 08-485-1-083 Automated Measurement of Galaxy Morphology Alex Rojas Pena | NPRP 08-643-1-112 CameraNets: Coverage, Networking and Storage Problems in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks Khaled Harras, Nael Abu Ghazzaleh | NPRP 08-562-1-095 Automated Tools for Effective Team Coordination in Emergency Response M. Bernardine Dias | NPRP 1-7-7-5 Images of Muslim Women in Translated Mideast Media Sources: A Content and Discourse Analysis Amal Al Malki | NPRP 29-6-7-9 Human-Robot Interaction in an Arabic Social and Cultural Setting Majd Sakr | NPRP 29-6-7-24 Enhanced Education for the Visually and Aurally Impaired Using Automated Tutors and Interactive Computer Games M. Bernardine Dias | NPRP 30-6-7-91 For more information on NPRP grants, visit http://www.qnrf.org/fund_program/nprp/.

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Appendix E Facebook facts ANNUAL FACEBOOK CAMPAIGN - 2010 Start date - January 15, 2010 Statisitics as of June 30, 2010 Countries

TOTAL IMPRESSIONS

TOTAL CLICKS

Tier 1 Qatar 93,124,408 Jordan 42,660,773 Kuwait 42,374,488 Oman 17,856,771 Lebanon 67,974,682 Egypt 196,968,864 Bahrain 49,991,970 Singapore 112,725,658 India 85,250,765 South Korea 59,118,206 Taiwan 59,477,798 Subtotal Tier 1 827,524,383 Tier 2 UAE 85,334,372 Saudi Arabia 96,346,350 Palestine 26,037,689 Iraq 15,919,424 Pakistan 25,207,019 Subtotal Tier 2 248,844,854 Tier 3 Turkey 189,418,060 Bangladesh 27,030,597 China 18,174,634 Malaysia 121,234,782 Sri Lanka 17,310,873 Hong Kong 101,131,731 Indonesia 14,080,942 Morocco 7,473,059 Subtotal Tier 3 495,854,678 Grand Total 1,572,223,915

26,867 16,950 11,025 6,382 19,473 62,815 9,190 13,020 23,627 10,600 7,544

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207,493 22,043 32,894 8,584 4,793 12,249 80,563 49,120 8,979 3,399 29,797 6,277 7,741 6,048 3,936 115,297 403,353


Appendix F Press Releases • TechBridgeWorld launches iSTEP program: Carnegie Mellon Qatar student participates in this innovative technology research internship offering computing solutions in Tanzania • Alumna garners position as Top 30 under 30: Jinanne Tabra is identified as part of the next generation of Arab leaders according to CEO Middle East • 15 new faculty members join Carnegie Mellon Qatar for 2009/2010 • QSTP & Carnegie Mellon kick off Corporate Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program 20092010: Forty-four students enrolled in the 9-month executive education program • “New First-Year Programs Office”: A new program is launched to help incoming freshman transition into university • ETE-Q 2009: National English Teachers’ Conference addresses student transition to university-level English • Ibtikar Qatar and CS4Qatar workshops • “Bridging the Language Divide” lecture Charles E. “Chuck” Thorpe to step down as dean • Students develop online patient referral system: System aims to improve communication between health care centers and the Qatar Diabetes Association • Distinguished Lecture Series hosts Kuwaiti Parliamentarian Aseel Al-Awadhi • Second Annual Ibtikar Qatar Competition: The Charismatic Doctors team from Al Resala School wins first place in the poster competition • Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar shares its Tablet PC know-how with teachers at Qatar Academy • Hillary Rodham Clinton visits Carnegie Mellon’s campus in Qatar

• Fourth CS4Qatar computer science workshop for high school students is a success • Carnegie Mellon Qatar Names Interim Dean • Steven Chu, Ph.D., U.S. Secretary of Energy, visits Carnegie Mellon Qatar as a distinguished guest lecturer • Faculty members and industry leaders discuss the role IT plays in an organization • Botball kicks off with workshops in Doha and Cairo • Qatargas Education City Quiz Challenge held at Carnegie Mellon Qatar • Distinguished Lecture Series hosts Professor Leila Ahmed • Carnegie Mellon Qatar holds its 4th annual Professional Day • Carnegie Mellon Qatar holds Inaugural Undergraduate Conference in Information Systems • “HAZAWI: Stories from Everywhere” - Carnegie Mellon Qatar hosts book launch event • Hessa Al-Jaber, Ph,D., director of ictQATAR, is announced as graduation speaker. • Al Ru’ya Bilingual School from Kuwait victorious as Regional Botball Champions • Media Advisory: Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar’s Graduation Ceremony • Fourth Annual Meeting of the Minds symposium Carnegie Mellon Qatar celebrates its third class of graduates • Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation Publishing and Carnegie Mellon hold Literary Translation Conference • Business Plan Competition • Carnegie Mellon and Sidra collaborate on women’s health project

• Distinguished Lecture Series hosts Patrick Awuah, Founder and President of Ghana’s Ashesi University

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Appendix G Special Events August 23, 2009 Class of 2013 Convocation: Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar’s 6th Annual Convocation welcomed the Class of 2013 to the Carnegie Mellon Qatar family. The 92 freshmen, along with Carnegie Mellon Qatar faculty and staff, participated.

February 16, 2010 Patrick Awuah, Ph.D., Founder & President, Ashesi University

November 14, 2009 The Teaching of English in Qatar: The Transition to College: A one-day conference for English teachers in Qatar involved in the transition from High School to College English. Will consist of a plenary speaker, three panels, and poster presentations.

February 25, 2010 U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Ph.D., visited Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar and delivered a lecture and dialogue session to an audience of students, faculty, members of the Education City community and guests from the oil and gas industry.

November 18, 2009 Dean’s List Dinner

February 26, 2010 BOTBALL Workshop

November 21, 2009 CS4 Qatar for Teachers

March 12, 2010 Bill Brown Ride

November 21, 2009 Ibtikar Qatar Workshop

March 21, 2010 Leila Ahmed, Ph.D., professor and author of women’s studies and Near Eastern studies

December 2, 2009 Movie Night Under the Stars: Hosted by MPR and Alumni Relations December 7, 2009 Alex Waibel, Ph.D., professor of Computer Science at the Language Technology Institute at Carnegie Mellon and the Institute of Anthropomatics at the University of Karlsruhe, gave a lecture on technology solutions to communication challenges we face today, as societies do not yet share a common global language platform. January 25, 2010 Distinguished Lecture Series 2010 Aseel Al-Awadhi, Ph.D., member of the Kuwait National Assembly January 30, 2010 Ibtikar Competition February 15, 2010 U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton visited Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar to hold a public question-and-answer session with an audience of students, faculty and members of the Education City community on Sunday. The event was organized and moderated by Al Jazeera in collaboration with Qatar Foundation and Carnegie Mellon Qatar.

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February 19, 20, 2010 CS4 Qatar for Students

March 24, 2010 Professional Day: Forty-nine organizations representing a broad range of industries set up stands, distributed informational brochures and spoke with students about their company and possible summer internships and job positions after graduation.   March 31, 2010 Senior Class Dinner April 3, 2010 Alumni Event: An Afternoon on the Terrace April 7, 2010 Special Lecture by Dean Thorpe “Six Quotes from Six Years in Qatar. Dean Thorpe’s farewell speech reflecting on what he has learned from his time in Qatar. April 16-17, 2010 “Promises and pitfalls of information communication technology” was a student organized conference that addressed the impact the new trends in the field have had on the way people and society interact in the world today. Undergraduate students from Qatar and the region were invited to submit research projects based on this theme, evaluating the effect of ICT solutions currently in practice.


April 19, 2010 CS Distinguished Lecture: Reid Simmons April 21, 2010 Marhaba Tartans April 23,2010 BOTBALL Competition April 24, 2010 High School Programming Competition April 27, 2010 Meeting of the Minds: More than 60 students showcased their research and course projects through posters, videos, presentations and demonstrations at the annual Meeting of the Minds undergraduate research and project symposium. May 2, 2010 Senior Celebration: An evening of awards and accolades and remembrances. Academics awards were given to top students and families enjoyed an evening of celebration with their graduating senior.

May 3, 2010 Graduation Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar celebrated the graduation of its third class of students. Hessa Sultan Al-Jaber, Ph.D., the Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Information and Communication Technology, ictQATAR, delivered the keynote address. May 13, 2010 Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Brand, visited campus to talk global business and entrepreneurship with students and alumni. May 19 & 20, 2010 Translation Conference: Literary translation was the topic at hand for the Continuing the Conversation: Bridging Civilizations through Translation two-day conference. Held in conjunction with Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation, the conference was designed to create a Gulf-based platform to discuss issues related to translation at both the theoretical and practical levels.

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Appendix H Press Clippings Subject: Ibtikar Source: Date: 23 November 2009

Date: Section:

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Subject: Distiguished lecture series Date: 26 January 2010

Subject: KuwaiƟ MP kicks oī CMU-Q 2010 lecture series Source:Distiguished Gulf Times newspaper Subject: lecture series SecƟon / page: Local Date: 26 January 2010 / 6 Date: 26 January 2010

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Appendix H Press Clippings Subject: Steven Chu visit Date: 25 February 2010

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Subject: CMU Hosted a Computer Science workshop. Date: 3 March 2010

Subject: CMU Hosted a Computer Science workshop. Source: Al Sharq newspaper Section / page: Local / 20 Date: 3 March 2010

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Appendix H Press Clippings Subject: Carnegie Mellon University Holds Professional Day. Date: 31 March 2010

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Subject: Meeting the Minds. Source: Peninsula newspaper Section / page: Local / 4 Subject: the2010 Minds Date: Meeting 28 April Date: 28 April 2010

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar | P.O. Box 24866 | Education City, Doha, Qatar Phone: +974 4454 8400 | www.qatar.cmu.edu

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Annual Report 2009-2010