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ACHIEVEMENT. IMPACT. THE YEAR IN REVIEW. Annual Report 2017–18


Acknowledgments Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar thanks His Highness Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, Amir of the State of Qatar, for his leadership and commitment to progress and education. As a proud partner of Qatar Foundation, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar thanks His Highness the Father Amir Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al Thani, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, Chairperson of Qatar Foundation, and Her Excellency Sheikha Hind bint Hamad Al Thani, Vice Chairperson and CEO of Qatar Foundation, for their vision and leadership.


Table of Contents 04 Introduction \\ Mission, Vision, Values \\ Message from the president \\ Message from the dean

04

10 Achievement and impact \\ \\ \\ \\

Graduation 2018 Alumni impact The Class of 2017 at work Networking and mentorship

20 Admission and enrollment \\ Pre-college programs \\ Admission \\ Enrollment

28 Academics \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

The CMU-Q faculty Biological Sciences Business Administration Computer Science Information Systems Arts and Sciences Academic support Interdisciplinary collaboration

44 Community engagement \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Our Qatar network Dean’s Lecture Series Impact on education Our Pittsburgh network Collaborations with Qatar Foundation Public relations

58 Student experience \\ The CMU experience in Qatar \\ Education City connections \\ Leadership, service and personal development

66 Research \\ Faculty research \\ Research collaborations \\ Student research

74 Appendices

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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10

20

28

58

44

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Vision, Mission, Values Our Vision

Our Values

Carnegie Mellon University will have a transformative impact on society through continual innovation in education, research, creativity, and entrepreneurship.

Dedication: reflected in our distinctive work ethic and in our commitment to excellence.

Our Mission To create a transformative educational experience for students focused on deep disciplinary knowledge; problem solving; leadership, communication, and interpersonal skills; and personal health and well-being. To cultivate a transformative university community committed to (a) attracting and retaining diverse, world-class talent; (b) creating a collaborative environment open to the free exchange of ideas, where research, creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship can flourish; and (c) ensuring individuals can achieve their full potential. To impact society in a transformative way— regionally, nationally, and globally—by engaging with partners outside the traditional borders of the university campus. 4

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Impact: reflected in our commitment to address critical issues facing society regionally, nationally, and globally. Collaboration: reflected in our interdisciplinary approach, our focus on internal and external partnerships, and our capacity to create new fields of inquiry. Creativity: reflected in our openness to new ideas and forms of expression, intellectual curiosity, willingness to take risks, and entrepreneurial spirit. Empathy and Compassion: reflected in our focus on improving the human condition and on the personal development of the members of our community. Inclusion: reflected in a culture and climate that seeks, welcomes, and advances talented minds from diverse backgrounds.


Integrity: reflected in our adherence to the highest ethical standards in personal and professional behavior, and in our commitment to transparency and accountability in governance and everything we do. Sustainability: reflected in our shared commitment to lead by example in preserving and protecting our natural resources, and in our approach to responsible financial planning.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Message from the president Since its inception in 2004, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar has reflected this university’s commitment to apply a globally inclusive mindset to our role as educators, knowledge creators and engines of economic impact. By empowering talented students with the tools they need in biological sciences, business administration, computational biology, computer science and information systems, we are preparing the next generation to be global leaders in a knowledge-based economy. Over the past 14 years, CMU-Q has graduated 769 young professionals, and today our diverse student population includes nearly 400 men and women from 35 nations. This past year was an especially exciting one with the appointment of Michael Trick as the new dean. Shortly after his installation, Dean Michael Trick led the entire CMU-Q community in celebrating CMU’s 50th anniversary. Through these events, we commemorated the moment we became a comprehensive research university and began the journey that led us from Pittsburgh to Doha. Of course, our success in Qatar would not be possible without the commitment and leadership of Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, whose inspirational vision for the future is grounded in the expansion of educational opportunity for all people. We remain deeply grateful for the generous support of Qatar Foundation and for their continued partnership with us. I invite you to explore the events and accomplishments from the past year that are outlined in this annual report, along with directions for the continued growth of CMU-Q. I congratulate you on what we have accomplished together, and I look forward to seeing what the coming years will bring. Farnam Jahanian President Carnegie Mellon University

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8

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Message from the dean Welcome to the Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar Annual Report 2017-18, a look back at an exceptional year of learning, growth and achievement for this campus. When I was appointed one year ago as dean of CMU-Q, my first task was to learn about the campus culture. Throughout the year, I learned that although the Qatar campus is located many thousand miles from the CMU main campus, our culture is quintessentially Carnegie Mellon. The Qatar campus, like CMU worldwide, is driven by a spirit of industriousness and creativity. We are guided by the CMU vision, mission and values, words that we use at the beginning of each Annual Report to set the framework for our achievements. As you peruse the many accomplishments of the year past, you will see the CMU vision, mission and values reflected throughout. I also set out to learn more about Qatar Foundation and Education City. I must extend my deepest appreciation to His Highness the Father Amir Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al Thani and Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser for envisioning Qatar Foundation as an international hub for collaboration, learning and excellence. Her Excellency Sheikha Hind bint Hamad Al Thani’s insights and guidance have likewise been invaluable. It has been an honor to learn more about this exceptional learning environment and the myriad ways that CMU-Q connects with, contributes to, and benefits from our Education City partners. Throughout the year I have had the privilege of meeting many leaders within the Qatar community. The relationships we forge with our strategic partners are important as we prepare our students to contribute to the knowledge-based economy. Annual Report 2017-18 is more than a collection of highlights: it is a celebration of CMU-Q’s impact. Our community is making meaningful contributions in thousands of ways—big and small—throughout Qatar and the world. As the number of CMU-Q graduates grows each year, we look forward to many years of work, achievement and service to the community. Michael Trick Dean Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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Impact There are nearly 800 graduates of Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar working within Qatar and around the world. CMU-Q alumni are a young group, with the first class graduating only ten years ago. Yet as these young professionals progress through their careers, they are making a profound impact.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


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1

1

Graduation 2018 2 Class of 2018 by the numbers Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar celebrated the graduation of the Class of 2018, with 90 students receiving their degrees in front of family, friends, faculty and alumni.

Boshra Al-Sulaiti Student Speaker Class of 2018

‘

‘

CMU-Q gave us the willingness to go the distance, to know ourselves better, to reach higher than we have ever reached before, and to never stop.

19

35

2

41%

42%

56%

nations represented

Qatari nationals

participated in research projects

Andrew Carnegie Society Scholars

earned University Honors

started or led a student organization

8 Biological Sciences

90

32

graduates

Business Administration 37

Computer Science Information Systems

13

Information sytems Computer science

12

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Business administration Biological sciences


3 1) Congratulations Class of 2018! 2) Graduates before the ceremony 3) Dean Trick with the Qatar Campus Scholars 4) Student speaker Boshra Al-Sulaiti

4

Outstanding Academic Achievement Awards \\ \\ \\ \\

Biological Sciences: Boshra Mohammed Al-Sulaiti Business Administration: Shahryar Nayyer Computer Science: Sabit Hassan Information Systems: Karen Youssef

Qatar Campus Scholars \\ \\ \\ \\

Aisha Fazal Kazi Syed Hammad Mahmood Aisha Hassan Mohamed Karen Youssef

Andrew Carnegie Society Scholars Throughout Carnegie Mellon University, Andrew Carnegie Society Scholars are selected to represent their class in service and leadership. This year, the society has extended two awards to the Qatar campus.

‘ ‘

The pursuit of knowledge is a lifelong commitment. Especially amid the rapidly evolving technological landscape, the world must be your canvas, your stage, your classroom. Farnam Jahanian President, CMU

You are thinkers, collaborators, problem solvers and innovators. You are leaders. Take what you have learned at Carnegie Mellon and shape your world. Michael Trick Dean, CMU-Q

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar recognizes graduating students for their outstanding academic performance, service and leadership.

Class of 2018 awards

\\ Aisha Fazal Kazi \\ Aisha Hassan Mohamed Annual Report 2017–18

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Alumni impact 11

Alumni live on

5

769

graduating classes

continents

graduates

Alumni are working at top international organizations Dublin - Facebook

London - Citi United Kingdom - KPMG

Zurich - Google

Barcelona - Ernst & Young

Amsterdam - Ernst & Young

Dusseldorf - McKinsey & Company

Munich - Fineway GmbH

Redmond - Microsoft

Kuwait City - Commercial Bank of Kuwait

Bellevue - Hotwire/Expedia Inc.

Seoul - Qatar Embassy in Korea

Seattle - Amazon

Beijing - Changjiang Wonderbay Private Equity Fund

Mountain View - Google

Lahore - Arbisoft

San Francisco - Airbnb - Amazon - Google

Dubai - General Electric - JPMorgan Chase & Co. - Procter & Gamble - Uber

Houston - ConocoPhillips

Adelaide - South Australian Cricket Association

Toronto - Morneau Shepell - RBC Investor & Treasury Services

Sydney - Ernst & Young

Cairo - Edita Food Industries

Melbourne - KPMG

80%

live and work in Qatar

‘

- Ooredoo - Qatar Airways - Qatar Biomedical Research Institute - Qatar Computing Research Institute - Qatar Development Bank - Qatar Investment Authority

‘

More than

Doha - ConocoPhillips - Ernst & Young - ExxonMobil - General Electric - KPMG - Microsoft - McKinsey & Company - PricewaterhouseCoopers

CMU-Q is a support network that provided me with not only the right tools to get to where I am today, but also realistic guidance from its many brilliant professors and staff. Haris Aghadi Co-founder, Meddy.co Class of 2014

Two of the Shnaita co-founders

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

- Qatar Foundation - Qatar National Bank - Qatar Petroleum - Qatar Shell - Sidra Medicine - Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy - Uber


1) The founders of Stellic 2) Nada Arakji

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Notable achievements

\\ Meddy, a startup created by CMU-Q alumni Haris Aghadi and Abdulla AlKhenji, was named tenth in Forbes Middle East’s “50 Startups to Watch in the Arab World.” \\ Sabih Bin Wasi, Rukhsar Neyaz Khan and Jiyda Moussa, co-founders of Stellic, will launch the interactive academic planning and advising platform at Carnegie Mellon University, Tufts University, Elon University and Northwestern University in Qatar. \\ Nada Arakji was named an International Olympic Committee (IOC) “Inspirational Young Change-Maker” for the 2018 Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

2 My advice to students is that if you’re unable to secure the job you want, forge your own path.

CMU-Q graduates make their own mark in the world. Regardless of their paths, they share an affinity for innovation, leadership and community service. This is a sampling of our alumni’s notable achievements in 2017–18.

Ahmad Al Salama Class of 2013

\\ Mohammed Rashid Al-Matwi, Noora Al Jardi and Haya Al Dirham, co-founders of Shnaita, a platform for selling gently used, high-end handbags, opened their first retail outlet in Doha. \\ Zaid Haque and Noshin Nisa’s startup, Symbiote, was a finalist for the FastCompany 2018 World Changing Ideas Award in the transportation segment.

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The Class of 2017 at work In the year since they graduated, members of the Class of 2017 have made significant strides in their new careers.

Contributing to Qatar The majority of graduates from the Class of 2017 are working in Qatar, helping to build the knowledge-based economy. The top recruiter for this cohort was Sidra Medicine, who hired 14 graduates. Class of 2017 graduates work in a variety of sectors in Qatar, including government ministries,oil and gas, banking and small and mediumsized enterprises. Excellence in education A number of graduates have been recognized for their contribution to education in Qatar. Omar Al-Emadi received a 2018 platinum Education Excellence Award from His Highness the Amir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani and the Ministry of Education and Higher Education. Noor Al-Mana and Alanood Al-Muftah received 2018 gold Education Excellence Awards. Noor Al-Qaedi and Maha Al Thani were selected for the WISE Leaner's Voice Program. Top technology and consulting corporations With exceptional quantitative skills, teamwork proficiencies and experience in interdisciplinary collaboration, CMU-Q graduates are excellent candidates for technology and consulting firms. Members of the Class of 2017 are now working at Facebook, Microsoft and IBM, both in Europe and the United States. Several graduates are working for consulting firms, include Bain Consulting, Ernst & Young, KPMG and PricewaterhouseCoopers.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Graduate programs and medical school Following graduation, 14 percent of the Class of 2017 opted to further their studies at universities around the world. Graduate schools include: \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Carnegie Mellon University Hamad Bin Khalifa University Imperial College London McGill University Princeton University Technical University of Munich University College London University of British Columbia Western Ontario University

Four graduates from the Biological Sciences Program are now studying medicine at Alexandria University Faculty of Medicine, University of Auckland and Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar. Employment status one year after graduation 4 2 16

Employed Graduate school

Total: 109

Not in the market 87

Not employed

1) H  is Highness the Amir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani and Omar Al-Emadi 2) Members of the Class of 2017


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2


2

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Networking and mentorship

The roots of what I do in the corporate world can be traced back to CMU-Q. Take advantage of the opportunities presented because you won’t realize how useful they are until you’ve graduated.

Ammar Abouelghar Class of 2014

Networking CMU-Q alumni are deeply involved with the university community through a slate of networking and community-building events. This engagement with the CMU-Q community provides a living link between the university and the workplace. An evening with Dean Trick

Alumni Senior Social

More than 60 CMU-Q alumni members gathered to meet the new dean, Michael Trick. Members of the Carnegie Mellon leadership also attended, including interim provost Laurie Weingart, vice president and general counsel Mary Jo Dively, and Duane Seppi, The BNY Mellon Professor of Finance.

In the largest alumni event of the year, more than 100 members of CMU-Q alumni celebrated the Class of 2018 joining the Qatar campus chapter.

Five year reunion, Class of 2012 The Class of 2012 celebrated their five-year reunion with classmates and members of the CMU-Q faculty. Michael Trick noted: “You were the last of CMU-Q pioneers: when you started at CMU-Q in August 2008, our first class had just graduated. Thank you for blazing the trail and showing us how Carnegie Mellon graduates can shape Qatar.”

The alumni tent at Tarnival

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Tarnival alumni tent The annual CMU-Q carnival is a favorite event for alumni, who return to network with one another and reconnect with the university. More than 80 alumni attended Tarnival 2017.


1) The Class of 2012 reunion 2) Tartan Talks with alumni from the Information Systems Program 3) The Alumni Senior Social

3

Mentorship CMU-Q graduates often serve as mentors for current students, providing guidance, support and inspiration. Dinner with Twelve Tartans

Young Entrepreneurs

Twelve CMU-Q alumni from each of the programs met with students to offer career mentorship and guidance. The evening provided a casual setting for students to ask questions about building careers in Qatar.

Young Entrepreneurs, the high school outreach workshop that teaches young people how to start their own ventures, featured CMU-Q alumnae Maryam Al-Semaitt, creator of the startup, Makery, and Asma Al Kuwari, creator of the startup, @asmas.store.

More than a dozen alumni representing seven cohorts returned to CMU-Q to judge the 2018 Internal Case Competition. Each year, business students put their theoretical knowledge into practice for the weekend-long competition. Women in STEM forum Several alumnae who work in STEM fields shared their experiences at the CMU-Q Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics forum. The event brought together faculty members and alumnae in STEM fields to offer guidance to female students. Hackathon Hackathon, CMU-Q's annual student-led innovation competition, relies on the mentoring talent of alumni. This year, 12 graduate mentors helped participants to shape their projects during the 24-hour competition.

Tartan Talks Tartan Talks is an alumni panel interview series that delves into the challenges and opportunities after graduation. This year there were four Tartan Talks panels featuring 11 alumni who live and work in Qatar. Keys to Balance workshop Reem Al-Muftah, who is the head of organization development at Aspetar, held a workshop for students on health, wellness, fitness and balance.

The Women in STEM forum allowed me, as an alum who was once in the same position as these young ladies over a decade ago, to give insight from my professional journey so far. Rasha Mkachar Class of 2008

Internal Case Competition

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Each year, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar holds a slate of workshops, competitions and programs to inspire high school students to pursue the fields of biological sciences, business administration, computational biology, computer science and information systems. Each incoming class is a select and motivated group, adding to the dynamic, academically focused, and community-minded student body.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


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1

2

Pre-college programs Largest event:

27 pre-college events

Pi Day Math Competition

44%

of the 2017 incoming class participated in at least one pre-college program

al khaliji, ExxonMobil, and Qatar Stock Exchange

all sponsored pre-college events

Summer College Preview Program has run for

10 years

Workshops for secondary students Alice Middle East Programming Competition Biotechnology Explorers Program Botball • Ibtikar Qatar • Mindcraft Pi Day Mathematics Competition Summer College Preview Program Tajer – Investment for Qatar Winter Institute – Discovering Computer Science Young Entrepreneurs

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Through a rich offering of pre-college programs, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar introduces high school students to the fascinating, challenging areas of study available to them. Many students who attend the programs go on to apply and enroll at CMU-Q.

Highlights Summer College Preview Program celebrates 10 years More than 60 secondary school students from across Qatar explored career paths at the 2017 Summer College Preview Program. Based on a program at Carnegie Mellon’s main campus, SCPP is a three-week intensive program that helps students prepare for college. More than 1,000 students explore computing through Mindcraft CMU-Q held 13 Mindcraft workshops during the 2017–18 academic year, with 1,151 students participating. The day-long sessions introduce disciplines like robotics, cryptography and computational thinking.


3 1) The Pi Day preliminary round 2) Students negotiate at Tajer 3) The Botball 2018 finals 4) Creating projects at SCPP

Delhi Public School team wins Pi Day 2018 A team of four students from Delhi Public School took top honors in the third annual Pi Day Mathematics Competition, which encourages participants to explore the fun side of math. For the preliminary round, 360 students from 67 schools competed, with the top four teams advancing to the final round. Botball winners explore CMU Pittsburgh As the winners of Botball 2018, a team from Qatar Academy travelled to Pittsburgh to visit Carnegie Mellon’s world-renowned School of Computer Science. CMU-Q has hosted the robotics competition for high school students since 2005.

4 Alumni spotlight Aysha Fakhroo had inspiring words for the high school students who attended the Alice Middle East Programming Competition.

I am very happy to see so many of you who are passionate about computer science, and who are eager to take a complex problem and find a solution. Sometimes we fail, but in return we learn more than we expected.

Fakhroo is the regional business development manager at ExxonMobil and a 2008 CMU-Q graduate in computer science.

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1

Admission The admission process at Carnegie Mellon selects students who are motivated, talented and curious about their world. This careful process results in an engaged community of students who support and challenge one another to learn.

The Class of 2021

The freshman class also includes 48 Qatari nationals, which is the second largest intake since CMU-Q opened its doors in 2004. In a campus record, the Class of 2021 includes 26 students whose siblings have also attended Carnegie Mellon.

Recruitment for the Class of 2022 Qatar is the primary geographic focus for student recruitment. The Class of 2022 recruitment season began with Discover Education City, a two-day collaborative event that hosted more than 1,000 people. Following this, Education City admission staff visited more than 40 schools in Qatar. CMU-Q participated in the Education City roadshow in Kuwait, and also travelled to Oman, Lebanon, Jordan and Morocco to meet with prospective students.

For a full list of schools represented in the 2017 incoming class, please see Appendix F.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Dual enrollment with Academic Bridge Program During the 2017–18 academic year, two Qatari students participated in the Academic Bridge Program while taking classes at CMU-Q. Upon successful completion of Academic Bridge, students are eligible to enroll in a degree program at CMU-Q. Early Decision CMU-Q extended Early Decision acceptance to 17 students. The students and their parents were welcomed at a dinner where Saleh AlKhulaifi, who graduated from CMU-Q in 2010, delivered the keynote address. Marhaba Tartans CMU-Q welcomed newly admitted students to the Marhaba Tartans evening, an event where students can explore the academic programs and student experience opportunities. More than 100 admitted students and their families met their future professors and classmates.

I encourage our new students to savor every moment of the next four years and embrace the opportunities. Studying at CMU-Q will shape the rest of their lives.

In August 2017, the members of the freshman class officially joined the CMU-Q community. The Class of 2021 consists of 109 students from 20 nations, including the first citizen from Moldova and the first female students from China.

Michael Trick, at Early Decision Dinner 2018


1) The Class of 2021 2) Dan Phelps at Marhaba Tartans 3) Khaled Harras at the Early Decision Dinner

2

3

Student Recruitment (First-time, first-year) 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 900

800

700

600

500

400

300

Admitted

200

100

0

Applicants

Enrolled

From Factbook 2017–18, Volume 32, and Factbook 2013-14, Volume 28, Institutional Research and Analysis, Carnegie Mellon University

Alumni spotlight

Noor Al-Qaedi welcomed newly admitted students to CMU-Q at Marhaba Tartans 2018.

At CMU you won’t find professors, you will find life mentors. You will find a place to call home. No matter where you are coming from or where you want to go, CMU truly has a place for you.

After her graduation in 2017, Al-Qaedi was selected for the Learners’ Voice Program of the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE), a group that consists of 25 learners from 22 countries.

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Enrollment The CMU-Q student body population reflects the cultural diversity of the community, as well as a continued commitment to the human development pillar of Qatar National Vision 2030.

384

35

109

students enrolled

nations represented

first-year students

Students enrolled, by program 450

Biological Sciences

400

6

350 300

79

20 86

32

98

46

105

56

106

61

250

46 20

200

62

69

79

85

95

88

Business Administration 61

58

105

80

43 50 0

22

45

19

72

109

122

136

155

181

188

187

26

Male

72

Non Qatari

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Qatari

159

2017–18

Female

167

2016–17

56%

163

2015–16

44%

38%

182

2014–15

2013–14

2012–13

2011–12

2010–11

2009–10

2008–09

2007–08

2006–07

2005–06

2004–05

Student body composition

62%

94

47

49

100

Computer Science Information Systems

64 150

59

From University Factbook Volumes 19 to 32, 2004 to 2018, Institutional Research and Analysis, Carnegie Mellon University * Note: Computational biology students are included in the biological sciences total.


Countries represented

Albania Algeria Bangladesh Canada China Egypt France

Georgia India Indonesia Iran Iraq Japan Jordan

Kazakhstan Kenya Korea Lebanon Libya Moldova Morocco

Oman Pakistan Palestine Philippines Qatar Saudi Arabia Serbia

Somalia Sri Lanka Sudan Syria Tunisia United Kingdom United States of America

Financial aid There were six types of financial aid available to CMU-Q students in the 2017–18 academic year: \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Amiri scholarship, Qatar Ministry of Education and Higher Education Sponsorship from a national company Qatar Foundation financial aid Qatar Foundation scholarship Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar scholarship FAFSA loans for US citizens

Organizations that sponsored CMU-Q students \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Alfardan Group Amiri Diwan beIN Media Group Embassy of the Republic of Serbia Ministry of Education and Higher Education Ministry of Economy and Commerce Ministry of Transport and Communications Ministry of Administrative Development Labor and Social Affairs

\\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Ooredoo Qatar Airways Qatar Foundation QatarGas Qatar National Bank Qatar Petroleum Sidra Medicine Siemens Qatar

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Academics Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar offers five undergraduate programs in the fields of biological sciences, business administration, computational biology, computer science and information systems. Each program challenges students to think, create, collaborate and apply what they learn to make a real-world impact.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


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1

2

Academics at CMU-Q 5 undergraduate programs 3 semesters, 248 courses 5 or 6 courses in a minor

The Carnegie Mellon education begins with a broad introduction to the liberal arts and sciences during the first semesters, a focus on major core classes in the middle semesters, and deepening and broadening of scope in the last semesters through advanced electives.

Courses offered by program 31

Arts and Sciences Biological Sciences

98 66

Minors offered in 2017–18: Arabic Studies • Biological Sciences Business Administration • Computational Biology • Computer Science • Economics English • Ethics Global Systems and Management History • Information Systems Mathematical Sciences Professional Writing • Psychology

30

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Business Administration Computer Science

28

25

Information Systems


3

The CMU-Q faculty Faculty members at CMU-Q are experts in their fields, and dedicated to undergraduate education. With a very low student-to-professor ratio, students receive individualized attention and focused instruction that is almost unheard of at the undergraduate level. Faculty members by program 6

Arts and Sciences

10

25 Total: 64

Biological Sciences Business Administration Computer Science

18

5

Information Systems

Meritorious Teaching Award 2018 Chadi Aoun received the Meritorious Teaching Award at the graduation ceremony for the Class of 2018. Promotions Thomas Mitchell was promoted to associate teaching professor of English. Annette Vincent was promoted to associate teaching professor of biological sciences.

4

1) Annette Vincent in the biology lab 2) An information systems lecture 3) Fuad Farooqi teaching finance 4) Chadi Aoun receives the Meritorious Teaching Award

New faculty members \\ Nesrine Affara, assistant teaching professor, biological sciences \\ Peter Boatwright, Allan D. Shocker Professor of Marketing and New Product Development \\ Jennifer Bruder, visiting assistant professor, organization and behavior \\ Milton Cofield, distinguished service professor, business management \\ Aaron Jacobson, visiting assistant professor, history \\ Drew B. Mallory, visiting assistant professor, organizational behavior \\ Taeyong Park, visiting assistant teaching professor, statistics \\ Ryan Riley, associate teaching professor, computer science \\ Cecile Le Roux, visiting assistant professor, organization and behavior \\ Francesco Sguera, visiting assistant teaching professor, organizational behavior \\ Michael Trick, dean, Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor, Operations Research \\ Nui Vatanasakdakul, visiting associate professor, information systems \\ Mohamed Zayed, associate teaching professor, physics

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Biological Sciences The Biological Sciences Program provides students with rigorous training in biology, while building a strong foundation in all of the natural sciences. Students study biology at the macro and micro scales, focusing on the core areas of genetics and molecular biology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology and computational biology. Students tailor their education with advanced elective courses in neuroscience, virology, cancer biology, stem cell biology and immunology.

Students in research The Biological Sciences Program provides a solid foundation to scientific practice through inquiry-based, hands-on learning. In the 2017–18 academic year, biological sciences students applied their laboratory skills in a variety of challenging research settings. Carnegie Mellon Summer Research Institute Five students attended the Summer Research Institute at the Carnegie Mellon main campus. The 10-week program is an immersive research experience that involves recombinant DNA techniques and biochemical methods directed towards the functional analysis of proteins and enzymes.

Qatar Biomedical Research Institute Six biological sciences students completed the rigorous research-based summer internship program at Qatar Biomedical Research Institute. The students worked on projects in the areas of cancer research, neuroscience research and diabetes research. National Center for Cancer Care and Research CMU-Q and the NCCCR, part of Hamad Medical Corporation, collaborated for the purposes of research and education. Four students participated in medical observerships where they shadowed oncologists and carried out biomedical research.

Mohamed Bouaouina consults with a student researcher

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


3

1) Student Najlaa Al Thani in the biology laboratory 2) Nesrine Affara overseeing a student research project 3) The biological sciences faculty and staff

2 Senior honors theses

Faculty collaborations

\\ Testing the recruitment of pluripotent mRNAs and/or proteins into stress granules using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), Farah Ayman AbdelHamid AbdelAziz

CMU summer symposium

\\ Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with aspartame toxicity in kidney cells, Maria Ali \\ A novel post-transcriptional mechanism for inhibiting the expression of PTEN in breast cancer, Boshra Mohammed Al-Sulaiti \\ MAPK14 splicing as a novel biomarker in breast cancer, Nourhan Mohamed Saad ElKhatib \\ Studying phosphorylation of kindlin F1 loop and interactions with protein partners, Saad Rasool

Faculty from the CMU-Q Biological Sciences Program and the CMU Department of Biological Sciences organized a summer symposium at the Pittsburgh campus. The symposium included curriculum development workshops offered by Carnegie Mellon’s Eberly Center. Qatar Research Leadership Program Annette Vincent was the CMU-Q representative for the 2017 Qatar Research Leadership Program, part of Qatar National Research Fund. Central European Institute of Technology A CMU-Q faculty delegation traveled to the Central European Institute of Technology (CEITEC) to explore learning and research opportunities.

Alumni spotlight Umm-Kulthum Umlai attended the student-led Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math luncheon to share her experiences after graduation.

Studying at CMU-Q taught me to work effectively under pressure while balancing my work, family and social life. One of my favorite professors used to say, ‘Start early and don't let things snowball!'

Umlai graduated from CMU-Q in 2016 and then completed her master’s degree in biomedical research at Imperial College London. She is now pursuing her Ph.D. in genomics and precision medicine at Hamad Bin Khalifa University.

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1

2

Business Administration The Business Administration Program emphasizes real-world problem solving that provides a foundation for graduates to drive economic growth in a variety of careers, industries and organizations. Students are trained in accounting, finance, economics, marketing, operations, management information systems and business communications. Concentration areas provide in-depth study into specific areas, ranging from entrepreneurship to applying machine learning to solve big data problems.

Students in competition Competitions are an opportunity for students in the Business Administration Program to put their learning into practice. In 2017–18, students demonstrated their business acumen and creative problem solving in competitions within CMU, the region and around the world.

Business Administration Program. The winning team was Mohamed Hamdi and Emad Iqbal from the Qatar campus and Michael Kalnas from Pittsburgh.

CFA Institute Research Challenge, Europe and the Middle East

CMU-Q teams placed first and second at the Al Ruwad Business Case Competition, hosted by College of the North Atlantic-Qatar. CMU-Q has won the annual competition for the past four years. The winning team included Faisal Mir, Zain Sadeq, Dema Abou Samhadaneh and Haris Syed, and the second place team was comprised of Mohamed Hamdi, Emad Iqbal, Mahnaz Jalali and Aisha Kazi.

Representing Qatar, a CMU-Q team placed in the top eight at the CFA Institute Research Challenge in Dublin, Ireland. CMU-Q became the first Middle East team to reach the finals in the history of the competition. The team members included Fizza Aamir, Badis Glaied, Alfred Godwin, Anthony Lo and Shahryar Nayyer.

Al Ruwad Business Case Competition

Internal Case Competition Inspired by the UBA Internal Case Challenge at Carnegie Mellon, the CMU-Q Internal Case Competition is the longest running extracurricular event for students in the 34

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

The winning team presents at the Internal Case Competition


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4 1) John Gasper teaches economics 2) Serkan Akguc and the CFA Institute Research Challenge winning team 3) John O'Brien demonstrates Q-SmartLab 4) Business Administration Program faculty

Faculty collaborations Al Fikra Qatari National Business Plan CMU-Q was an academic sponsor of the Al Fikra Qatari National Business Plan, with George White serving as a main organizer of the competition. Serkan Akguc delivered a workshop to Al Fikra participants on financial planning. Al Fikra is an initiative of Qatar Development Bank. Q-SmartLab and FinTech in Qatar Under the direction of John O’Brien and Fuad Farooqi, CMU-Q’s Security Market Analysis Research and Trading Lab has been exploring financial technology in Qatar. Q-SmartLab developed a private blockchain, which will be deployed for educational purposes in the 2018-19 academic year.

Quick Startup competition for Qatar’s young entrepreneurs CMU-Q hosted 90 participants from universities across Qatar for Quick Startup, the annual three-day competition to develop a business plan and pitch an idea to industry judges. This year, organizer George White collaborated with Peter Boatwright, the director of CMU’s Integrated Innovation Institute, to arrange for a team of graduate students to serve as mentors and advisors throughout the competition. Qatar National Bank was a sponsor of Quick Startup 2018.

Alumni spotlight

Asma Al-Kuwari returned to campus to share her entrepreneurial journey at the Young Entrepreneurs workshop.

CMU-Q has been the foundation that I have built my career upon. From corporate life to entrepreneurial pursuits, my education has provided me the skills to be able to do it all.

After her graduation in 2011, Al-Kuwari has focused on entrepreneurial ventures. Al-Kuwari is also completing her master’s degree in digital humanities and societies at HBKU.

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Computer Science

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The Computer Science Program teaches students the fundamentals of computational thinking so they can explore, design and create the technologies that are transforming nearly every aspect of modern life. Students learn the core skills of mathematical reasoning, algorithmic thinking and the fundamentals of programming. A minor in a second discipline provides substantial depth in a different field, providing students with the flexibility to pursue their interests.

Students in exploration and research Students in the Computer Science Program learn the theoretical foundations that underpin all computing; they also learn how to apply these theories to solve real-world problems. Throughout the academic year, students developed practical experience through research and programming challenges.

Robotics Institute Summer Scholars program

BrainHub Neurohackathon

Senior honors theses

A team of CMU-Q computer science students placed second in the Neurohackathon competition at Carnegie Mellon University’s BrainHub. Sabit Hassan, Daanish Ali Khan, Shaden Shaar, Fatma Tlili and Mounira Tlili analyzed a data set of synaptic changes and identified morphological features that may be predictive indicators of Alzheimer’s.

\\ Interactive evaluation and training of classifiers under limited resources, Sabit Hassan

Meeting of the Minds

\\ A mixed initiative approach to survivable path planning using imprecise information, Rohith Krishnan Pillai

Fatma Tlili won the Best Project Award for her research into developing an automated process for detecting cracks and defects in concrete.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Three computer science students attended the Robotics Institute Summer Scholars program at Carnegie Mellon’s main campus in Pittsburgh. The 11-week summer undergraduate research program immerses a diverse cohort of scholars in cutting-edge robotics projects.

\\ Behavior analysis using multi-sensor data, Mir Mohammed Daanish Ali Khan \\ A learning approach to vision-based coarse robotics localization in industry, Aisha Hassan Mohamed

\\ Deep learning and pattern analysis for crack detection, Fatma Tlili


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1) Saquib Razak 2) The faculty of the Computer Science Program 3) Computer science students 4) Khaled Harras

Faculty collaborations Hamad bin Jassim Center for K-12 Computer Science Education CMU-Q partnered with the Jassim and Hamad bin Jassim Charitable Foundation to create a center to promote computer science within Qatar’s schools. The center will support two major CMU-Q initiatives: the Alice Middle East curriculum project led by Saquib Razak and the Mindcraft workshops for high school students led by Khaled Harras. Turkish Natural Language Processing Kemal Oflazer edited a comprehensive volume titled Turkish Natural Language Processing, and either authored or co-authored nine of the 16 chapters. The volume was published by Springer Verlag in 2018.

International workshops Giselle Reis served as program chair for the Encyclopedia of Proof Systems workshop in Brazil and the 13th International Workshop on Logical Frameworks and Meta-Languages: Theory and Practice in Oxford. IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing Mohammad Hammoud was appointed chair of the cloud software engineering track of the 2018 IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing. Lakeside Labs Research Gianni Di Caro delivered a keynote address titled “Robot Swarms: The human-in-the-loop” at the Lakeside Labs Research Days 2017, an interdisciplinary workshop held in collaboration with the University of Klagenfurt in Austria.

Alumni spotlight Naassih Gopee returned to campus for the Tartan Talks forum where alumni share their experiences with students.

I wish I had taken even more time to interact with faculty members while I was a student. They have so much knowledge and wisdom, I still come back and ask them for guidance.

Gopee, who graduated in 2016, is the technical co-founder of Inpleo, an enterprise procurement platform driven by artificial intelligence.

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Information Systems

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The Information Systems Program challenges students to analyze the way information connects, design ways to solve problems, and implement these ideas to improve productivity and efficiency. Students learn the fundamentals of understanding problems: communication, quantitative methods and how organizations function. The program provides students with both the fundamentals of the discipline and the flexibility to pursue their unique interests.

Students in exploration and research The Information Systems Program teaches students to assess client needs, create solutions and evaluate their work. To practice these skills, students engage in academic competitions and research endeavors that challenge them to apply what they have learned.

Arab Innovation Academy

INJAZ Qatar Young Entrepreneur’s Competition

Senior honors theses

A team from CMU-Q won the INJAZ Qatar Young Entrepreneur’s Competition, Mubadara. Maryam AlMaadeed, Maryam Al-Naemi, Dana Al-Sheeb and Latifa Al Thani created TamaRun, a platform that helps people find the right fitness class or gym in Qatar. UM-Dearborn Business Idea Pitch Competition Avni Pherwani won the 2018 UM-Dearborn Business Idea Pitch Competition at the University of Michigan for her idea, 360-Review, a web application that uses big data to analyze online restaurant reviews and make recommendations to the owners.

Maryam Al-Naemi led the team that placed third at the first Arab Innovation Academy, which was held in Education City. Al-Naemi’s idea was to create an online platform to bring together restaurants and food suppliers.

\\ Using technology to bridge the communication gap between migrant workers and physicians: the example of Qatar, Ali Abbas \\ Mouse-click vs eye-gaze: A study of natural interactions with intangible digital cultural artifacts, Latifa Khalid Jabor Al Thani \\ Understanding the usage of technology amongst university students, Manisha Dareddy \\ RISE: Real-time information system for emergency detection, Umair Waheed Qazi \\ Technology and parents of children with autism, Layan Yousef \\ Measuring corporate transparency in sustainability reporting: A study of the energy sector, Mohammed Zakaria

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


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1) Students meet with clients for the junior project 2) Selma Limam Mansar 3) Divakaran Liginlal and Chadi Aoun with alumni 4) The Information Systems Program faculty, staff and senior class

Faculty collaborations Information Systems Program 10-year anniversary The information systems faculty organized celebrations for the program’s 10-year anniversary. The celebrations included a gala dinner and student project showcase for faculty, students, alumni and industry partners. Faculty members also launched the new Information Systems Anniversary Lecture Series that featured Robert Hein, CEO and founder of 004 Group, Hamad Suwaid, information technology manager for Nakilat, and Hatem Elsafty, partner, governance risk internal control, Mazars Ahmed Tawfik and Company. Outreach to high school counselors Divakaran Liginlal led a half-day workshop for high school counselors titled "Shaping tomorrow's information systems professionals."

The interactive program included a workshop on learning analytics and a demonstration of the Human Computer Interaction lab at CMU-Q. Information Security Conference Nui Vatanasakdakul spoke at the fourth Information Security Conference organized by Qatar Central Bank, sharing her views on the challenges and future directions of cyber security in the financial sector. Workshop on Modernization of Official Statistics in Qatar Chadi Aoun presented at the workshop hosted by the Qatar Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics. Aoun offered his perspective on using geographic information systems for effective policy development.

Alumni spotlight Salwa Al-Mannai delivered the keynote address at the Information Systems Program 10-year anniversary celebration.

Your education is what you make of it; you are the painter of a masterpiece. Every once in a while, step away to view the picture you painted. Decide how to make it better, stronger, and more beautiful. That’s the beauty of this degree.

Al-Mannai graduated in 2011 and is now head of policy and research at the Education Above All Foundation.

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Arts and Sciences Carnegie Mellon University follows a distinct approach to undergraduate education that combines professional training with a firm grounding in the arts and sciences. Students who have a strong foundation in the arts and sciences learn how to draw connections between disciplines and work effectively outside their focused area of study. Courses include requirements in areas such as chemistry, English, math and physics. Arts and sciences faculty members also offer elective courses in a wide variety of disciplines, including Arabic studies, design, history, philosophy and psychology.

Faculty collaborations Exploring Math lecture series

ROTA Adult English Literacy

Niraj Khare launched a new lecture series that delves into the beauty, impact and development of classical mathematical concepts. The lecture series is open to all members of Education City and the wider community who are interested in learning more about math.

Silvia Pessoa was a trainer for literacy tutors for the Reach Out to Asia community literacy program for migrant workers. Pessoa also mentors the student club “Language Bridges,” which is part of the RAEL initiative. Since 2010, Pessoa has supervised more than 500 students who have taught English to more than 1000 migrant workers.

The Simon-Tel Writing-Communication Initiative at CMU David Kaufer, Mellon Distinguished Professor of English and co-director of CMU’s Simon-Tel Writing-Communication Initiative, visited the Qatar campus to overview progress on the initiative and enlist CMU-Q faculty members to collaborate and lead innovation. The first writing center at CMU was on the Qatar campus. Negotiation workshop David Emmanuel Gray delivered three workshops on negotiation in collaboration with the Georgetown University in Qatar student club, The Future is Female.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Honorable mention, Best Article 2017 Silvia Pessoa and Tom Mitchell, along with co-author R.T Miller, received honorable mention for the Best Article Award 2017 in Journal of Second Language Writing for “Emergent arguments: A functional approach to analyzing student challenges with the argument genre.” A second article by Pessoa, Mitchell and Miller was selected for Best of the Journals in Rhetoric and Composition 2017.

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3

Academic support

4

CMU-Q supports students throughout their undergraduate studies with resources that help them succeed and thrive.

10,000

print volumes in the CMU-Q library

117

students employed as Undergraduate Course Assistants

Library The library supports the academic programs and research initiatives of students at CMU-Q. Housing a large collection of print volumes, databases, ejournals and ebooks, the library is an essential resource for students who are studying and researching. Gloriana St. Clair Distinguished Lecture Jason Griffey, an affiliate fellow at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, spoke at CMU-Q on how blockchain can be adapted to improve the way libraries store information. Griffey’s lecture was a Gloriana St. Clair Distinguished Lecture in 21st Century Librarianship.

1) Arts and Sciences faculty members 2) Niraj Khare 3) The CMU-Q library 4) The Academic Resource Center

1,523

hours of tutoring offered through ARC preferences of more than 10,000 college and university students in 21 countries. The study, which was published in PLOS One, shows that the majority of university students prefer to read their academic materials in print.

Academic Resource Center The ARC assists students in developing the skills, strategies and behaviors they need to be confident, independent and active learners. Freshman Summer Edge Program During summer 2017, the ARC delivered the second Edge program for incoming freshman students. Twenty-three students from four majors participated in Edge 2017.

Qatar National Library lecture

Student College Program

At a special lecture at Qatar National Library, Keith Webster, CMU’s dean of university libraries, spoke on the future of the research library in the United States considered against the backdrop of global best practice.

The ARC facilitated the new StuCo Program, which consists of mini courses designed and taught by students. The program is adapted from a similar initiative on Carnegie Mellon’s main campus.

Study on academic reading preferences

Qatar Creates

Alicia Salaz, along with co-authors Diane Mizrachi, Serap Kurbanoglu and Joumana Boustany, studied the reading format

The ARC coordinated a collection of text and artwork from the CMU-Q community to create the campus’ first creative journal, Qatar Creates. Annual Report 2017–18

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Interdisciplinary collaboration The unique culture at Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar encourages students and faculty members to reach beyond traditional program boundaries. Interdisciplinary study encourages creativity, innovative problem solving and teamwork.

Student projects IGEM competition at MIT

Algorithmic Trading Competition

A CMU-Q student team was awarded Bronze Achievement at the International Genetically Engineered Machines competition hosted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston. This is the first time CMU-Q has fielded a team at the annual IGEM competition, which included 310 teams from 44 countries.

The third annual Algorithmic Trading Competition brought together students from business administration, computer science and information systems to code a profitable and strategic program for trading in financial markets. The winning teams traveled to the Carnegie Mellon main campus to learn about autonomous vehicles and the interdisciplinary IDeATe program.

The team developed an easy, quick way for the oil industry to test if there is biofilm build-up in offshore pipelines. A rapid and reliable test could lead to the oil industry reducing their use of biocides, which would in turn lessen the negative impact on the marine ecosystem. The interdisciplinary student team included Yasmin Abdelaal, Albandari Al-Khater, Dina Nayel Al Tarawneh, Najlaa Al Thani, Aisha Fakhroo, Al-Reem Johar, Saad Rasool, Kawthar Alsadat Jafarian and Fatema Abdul Salik. The team received additional coaching by Cheryl Telmer, a research biologist at Carnegie Mellon’s Pittsburgh campus.

Hackathon student organizers

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

CarnegieApps Hackathon More than 40 students from four programs, as well as students from College of the North Atlantic-Qatar and Qatar University, participated in the 24-hour competition to create a tech project. The competition brings together students from a variety of backgrounds and education levels to work together in teams.


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1) Members of the IGEM team 2) Sustainable living exploration, Singapore 3) Freshmen learn teamwork from their first day 4) Discovering blockchain in Toronto

Academic travel Experiences in sustainable living In March 2018, 16 students travelled to Singapore to learn about environmental sustainability. Organized by information systems faculty members Chadi Aoun and Divakaran Liginlal and biological sciences program director Annette Vincent, students investigated 11 aspects of sustainability, including transportation, water recycling and hydroponic and vertical farming. Business of blockchain In May 2018, students travelled to Toronto to learn about different aspects of blockchain technology. Organized by faculty members from business administration, Fuad Farooqi and John O’Brien, and computer science, Khaled Harras and Giselle Reis, the trip explored research in blockchain, cryptocurrencies, mining, wallets and applications.

Alumni spotlight Lulwa Ahmed spoke at Tartan Talks to share her experiences building an interdisciplinary career.

I always wanted to be in a highly technical role, but then I recalled Professor Khaled saying that there are a range of different career paths to explore with a computer science degree.

In 2014, Ahmed became the first CMU-Q student to earn dual degrees in computer science and business administration. She now works as a project manager and business analyst at Gulf Business Machines, bridging the technical and business teams.

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Community Engagement As part of the global Carnegie Mellon community, CMU-Q has forged strong bonds within Qatar. These connections provide invaluable learning opportunities for our students; in return, CMU-Q helps build Qatar’s knowledge economy by sharing our expertise with industry, government and the education sector.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


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Our Qatar network Connections with leadership To better understand the needs of the Qatar community, CMU-Q maintains strong connections with Qatar leadership throughout the academic year. His Highness the Amir, Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani His Highness the Amir, Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, and Farnam Jahanian met during his first official visit to Qatar as president of Carnegie Mellon University.

Qatar business and community leaders Carnegie Mellon leadership from both the Pittsburgh and Qatar campuses connected with leaders in Qatar at a special luncheon hosted by Sheikh Faisal bin Qassim Al Thani.

Information Security for the Financial Sector Conference Farnam Jahanian, president of Carnegie Mellon University, addressed the fourth annual ISFS conference in Qatar. Jahanian discussed the impact of increasing cyberattacks on global business over the past decade. The ISFS conference is organized by Qatar Central Bank.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Memoranda of Understanding Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar signs memoranda of understanding with its partners in industry and government to promote learning and research and to provide opportunities for students and graduates. Qatar National Bank

Ali Al-Kuwari, CEO of QNB Group We are delighted to partner with CMU-Q to provide additional learning prospects to our employees and the opportunity for CMU-Q students to gain valuable skills through our internships and scholarships.

Qatar Petrochemical Company Mohammed Yousef Al-Mulla, Managing Director and CEO of Qatar Petrochemical Company (QAPCO)

We are excited to work with Carnegie Mellon Qatar to help provide opportunities and mentorship to young professionals in business, technology and science.

Executive and Professional Education CMU-Q enhances its ties with industry and government through executive education courses. Last year, 243 executives from partner institutions attended the sessions. \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Climate change sustainability, Chadi Aoun Negotiating across cultures, Milton Cofield How to manage digital risks, Nui Vatanasakdakul Leadership for change, Milton Cofield Fundamentals of incident handling, Dan Phelps and Jerome Marella

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Dean’s Lecture Series The Dean’s Lecture Series is a forum that brings together prominent industry leaders, government officials and members of the business community to share their expertise.

H.E. Sheikh Abdulla bin Mohammed bin Saud Al Thani Chief Executive Officer, Qatar Investment Authority Qatar Investment Authority: Global portfolio strategy September 13, 2017

H.E. Dr. Khalid bin Mohamed Al-Attiyah Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of State for Defense Affairs Electronic attacks and their economic and social effects September 26, 2017

H.E. Sheikh Abdulla bin Saoud Al Thani

Abdulaziz bin Nasser Al-Khalifa

Governor, Qatar Central Bank Strategic plan for the financial sector: challenges and opportunities January 18, 2018

Chief Executive Officer, Qatar Development Bank The role of QDB in support of entrepreneurship and national production January 23, 2018

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Yousuf Mohamed Al-Jaida

Rashid Ali Al-Mansoori

Chief Executive Officer, Qatar Financial Center The role of the QFC in national economic development November 8, 2017

Chief Executive Officer, Qatar Stock Exchange The role a stock exchange plays in economic growth and sustainable development November 21, 2017

Ali Ahmed Al-Kuwari

Andrew Waugh

Group Chief Executive Officer, Qatar National Bank Qatar National Bank’s business strategy and its role in building the national economy March 21, 2018

Director, Waugh Thistleton Architects Construction revolution April 9, 2018

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Impact on education As an educational institution, CMU-Q has the expertise to help build the knowledge-based economy in Qatar. Through targeted programs, CMU-Q is enhancing the learning opportunities in key areas.

Hamad bin Jassim Center for K-12 Computer Science Education In a new partnership, CMU-Q and the Jassim and Hamad bin Jassim Charitable Foundation created the Hamad bin Jassim Center for K-12 Computer Science Education. The center aims to educate students in the importance of computer science for a knowledge-based society.

Alice Middle East curriculum

Mindcraft workshops

The center will implement a curriculum based on Alice, the educational, interactive software that was first developed at Carnegie Mellon. Alice guides students through the fundamentals of programming as they create their own animations and games. CMU-Q adapted the software to a Middle East context, created a curriculum and conducts training workshops for educators.

The Hamad bin Jassim Center will also provide support for Mindcraft, a CMU-Q workshop that introduces high school students to computer science. The sessions delve into topics such as robotics, cryptography and computational thinking using fun and interactive activities.

In the 2017-18 academic year, all Ministry of Education and Higher Education government schools that taught information communication technology included Alice Middle East in the 11th-grade coursework. Approximately 5,000 students learned programming through Alice Middle East during the 2017-18 academic year. The Alice Middle East Programming Competition

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

In the 2017-18 academic year, more than 1000 students from 42 schools throughout Qatar attended Mindcraft workshops.

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Sheikh Jabor bin Yousuf Al Thani Vice Chairman, Jassim and Hamad bin Jassim Charitable Foundation

1) Students program a robot at Mindcraft 2) Khaled Harras explains Mindcraft 3) The signing ceremony for the Hamad bin Jassim Center 4) Saquib Razak describes Alice Middle East

Computer science education is a key component of increasing Qatar’s human development. We are pleased that CMU-Q and the Jassim and Hamad bin Jassim Charitable Foundation are partnering to promote this important area of study in Qatar’s schools.

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The Hamad bin Jassim Center’s mission is to create and promote critical thinking and problem-solving skills in students, particularly by implementing a computer science curriculum that will foster their computing knowledge and experience of Qatar.

Fawziya Al Khater Assistant Undersecretary for Educational Affairs, Ministry of Education and Higher Education

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Our Pittsburgh network CMU-Q fosters a living connection with the Carnegie Mellon community through intercampus visits, collaborations and joint projects. This connection infuses the Qatar campus with the spirit, culture and high standards of Carnegie Mellon.

Campus connections Dean’s installation ceremony Michael Trick was officially installed as the third dean of CMU-Q at a ceremony that brought together CMU leadership, Qatar Foundation officials and members of the Qatar community. Trick has served as a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University’s main campus since 1989. The installation ceremony was capped by the presentation of a ceremonial quaich, a traditional Scottish vessel that symbolizes friendship, trust and new ventures. Mary Shaw distinguished lecture in computer science Mary Shaw, the Alan J. Perlis University Professor of Computer Science at CMU’s Institute for Software Research, shared her perspective on the ongoing development of the engineering discipline of software. Shaw’s presentation was an A. Nico Habermann Distinguished Lecture in Computer Science, named after the founding dean of CMU’s School of Computer Science. Laurie Weingart, Michael Trick, and Farnam Jahanian with the ceremonial quaich

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Middle States Commission on Higher Education Carnegie Mellon University underwent reaccreditation in 2018, a comprehensive process that engaged the university community in rigorous self-study to identify areas of strength and opportunities for improvement and growth. As part of their review, the Middle States Commission reaccreditation team visited CMU-Q, which is the only CMU undergraduate branch campus. Following their review, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education formally affirmed Carnegie Mellon University’s accreditation through 2026, reporting that CMU meets or exceeds all required standards, which include more than 50 criteria.


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4 1) Mary Shaw and Dean Trick 2) The installation ceremony of Dean Trick 3) The Qatar IMPAQT team in Pittsburgh 4) CMU 50-Year Celebration 5) Project Rwanda

Student ties 50-year celebration of CMU The CMU-Q community gathered to celebrate the 50-year anniversary of Carnegie Mellon University. Carnegie Mellon University was officially formed in 1967 when the Pittsburghbased Carnegie Institute of Technology and the Mellon Institute research center merged. Bringing together the two institutions was transformative, catapulting Carnegie Mellon to worldwide influence.

Twenty students from the Pittsburgh and Qatar campuses participated in this year’s IMPAQT program. IMPAQT, which stands for Initiating Meaningful Pittsburgh and Qatar Ties, is an annual student exchange that takes place during spring break. Project Rwanda Students from the Pittsburgh and Qatar campuses traveled to CMU Africa in Kigali, Rwanda, to teach information technology to local educators.

Under Dean Trick’s leadership, I am confident that CMU-Q will continue its development as an integral part of the Qatar landscape, representing CMU’s dynamic global capacity. Farnam Jahanian, President Carnegie Mellon University

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IMPAQT 2018

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Collaborations with Qatar Foundation Carnegie Mellon Qatar takes a leading role in developing programs, courses and activities that span Education City.

Educational collaborations Cross registered students

Fall: 13 students

Spring: 27 students

Education City universities

CMU-Q Fall: 45 students

Winter: 45 students

Convocation 2018

Innovation in Teaching

The CMU-Q Class of 2018 also attended the Qatar Foundation convocation ceremony in the presence of His Highness the Father Amir Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al Thani, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, Chairperson of QF, and Her Excellency Sheikha Hind bint Hamad Al Thani, ViceChairperson and CEO of QF.

John O’Brien spoke on “Technology in the Classroom: An Active Learning Approach” at the opening session of the first Qatar Foundation Innovation in Teaching Week. CMU-Q hosted a session later in the week.

The ceremony honored 778 graduates from Hamad Bin Khalifa University and the eight partner universities in Education City. Hamad Bin Khalifa University In the fall semester, 23 students from the HBKU Computer Engineering Undergraduate Degree enrolled in CMU-Q courses. 54

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Academic Bridge Program During the 2017–18 academic year, two students participated in the Academic Bridge Program while taking classes at CMU-Q. Upon successful completion of Academic Bridge, students are eligible to enroll in a degree program at CMU-Q.


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4 1) CMU-Q students are recognized at QF Convocation 2) Health and Wellness Fair 3) Education City Career Fair 4) Darb Al Saai 5) NU-Q's Scott Curtis speaks at CMU-Q for Innovation in Teaching Week

Community connections Darb Al Saai CMU-Q celebrates Qatar National Day at Darb Al Saai as a part of Qatar Foundation’s activities. For Qatar National Day 2017, CMU-Q showcased two programs to bring computer science to young people: Alice Middle East and Mindcraft. Education City Career Fair

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CMU-Q contributed to the fourth annual Education City Career Fair, a networking platform for students, graduates and potential employers. The annual event brings together around 70 companies from different sectors as well as students and alumni of all Education City partner universities. Health and Wellness Fair CMU-Q worked with Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Georgetown University in Qatar, Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Northwestern University in Qatar, Texas A&M University at Qatar and VCUArts Qatar for the Health and Wellness Fair to introduce the community to the many health resources available in Qatar. Breast Cancer Awareness Walk CMU-Q worked with the Education City community for the Breast Cancer Awareness Walk in Oxygen Park. The walk was part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Step into Health Step into Health is a dynamic program initiated by Aspire Zone Foundation to promote daily physical activity. CMU-Q competes with other Education City universities each year during the Step into Health challenge.

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Public relations The office of marketing and public relations serves an essential function for the university, sharing achievements, providing information and expertise, and attracting bright and ambitious students to pursue their education at CMU-Q.

CMU-Q in the news

Top news stories

Local, regional and international media published 455 articles about Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar’s events and accomplishments over the academic year. Published article breakdown

August: CMU-Q welcomes Class of 2021

September: CEO of sovereign fund outlines investment strategy at Carnegie Mellon

October: Carnegie Mellon Qatar welcomes new faculty members

November: CEO of Qatar Stock Exchange emphasizes commitment to economic sustainability

44% Arabic English 56%

December: Bronze Achievement for Carnegie Mellon Qatar at MIT competition

January: Qatar Central Bank Governor: Financial technology is building momentum in Qatar 47% 53%

Online Print

March: Al-Kuwari: QNB is dedicated to developing human potential May: Carnegie Mellon Qatar celebrates 90 new graduates

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

February: CMU-Q honors 134 students on Dean’s List

April: Carnegie Mellon Qatar signs MoU with the Jassim & Hamad bin Jassim Charitable Foundation


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3 1) Dean Trick meets with local media 2) Social media is a primary communication tool 3) Local and regional media regularly cover events at CMU-Q

2,110

admission leads through Google Search, Google Display and Facebook

21,000

clicks for digital display ads

Your Day campaign

613,432

unique ad engagements for social media campaigns

Digital channels The primary target audiences for CMU-Q are prospective students, their parents and potential employers. Increasingly, these audiences are searching for information online and through non-traditional channels like social media. CMU-Q is active across our digital platforms, posting content throughout the academic year. This year, CMU-Q launched the dean’s official twitter feed, @DeanTrick.

CMU-Q ran a major campaign for potential students called Your Day. The photo and video campaign featured snapshots of daily life for CMU-Q students and ran on all social media platforms, the public website, digital signs and print and online advertising. The online photo tour had 4300 visitors with an average visit duration of over three minutes.

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194,000

264

130

news posts

unique website visitors

tweets from @CarnegieMellonQ and @DeanTrick

organic Instagram posts

150

Facebook posts

118,000 minutes watch time on YouTube

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Student Experience Over the four years that students spend at CMU-Q, they transform into young leaders, with the passion and drive to change their world. CMU-Q plays an integral role in this transformation, providing a safe, supportive environment for students to explore their interests and learn new skills.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


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The CMU experience in Qatar The student experience at CMU-Q reflects the culture, values and aspirations of the main CMU campus in Pittsburgh. At the same time, the Qatar campus is unique: the students, alumni, faculty and staff form a close-knit, diverse community that is enthusiastic, supportive and energizing.

Student experience at a glance

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sessions on health, wellness, and work-life balance

students travelled for service learning or leadership

Task Force on the Student Experience In 2016, the CMU main campus embarked on a review of the student experience. With CMU’s encouragement, the Qatar campus created a task force to ensure that students have the breadth of learning opportunities, personal and academic support, and campus resources to thrive. Several of the task force's recommendations have become new initiatives, including:

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career counseling appointments

events organized by students

Student clubs and organizations 4

7

Academic Cultural

8 4

Service Special Interest

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Sports

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

\\ Introducing student-led courses (StuCos) \\ Launching BeWell@CMU, the Carnegie Mellon-wide initiative that fosters a culture of personal wellness \\ Announcing the Uplift Challenge, an opportunity for students to reimagine campus spaces \\ Encouraging cross-campus collaboration, which saw 46 Qatar students study in Pittsburgh in the summer and fall semesters of 2017


1) Brain Bowl, spring 2018 2) Tarnival 3) Qatar National Day celebration 4) Tartans Got Talent

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A strong, connected community Celebrations at CMU-Q showcase the diversity and close connections of the entire community. Events bring together students from all programs, as well as alumni, faculty and staff, to relax, have fun and learn about one another.

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Tarnival

Brain Bowl

Led by student government, the annual Tartan carnival draws students, alumni, faculty and staff for an evening of food, games, entertainment and fun.

Held once per semester, students match wits with their classmates and professors in a raucous celebration of trivia and brain teasers.

Qatar National Day Celebration The Qatari Student Association welcomes the CMU-Q community to celebrate the culture and heritage of Qatar.

Tartans Got Talent Students and alumni sing, dance and entertain at the annual student-organized talent show.

Ma3salama Tartans The student body gathers at the end of the academic year to bid farewell to the graduating seniors.

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Education City connections CMU-Q students actively contribute to the Education City community, reaching out to their classmates at partner universities to celebrate, connect and help Education City flourish.

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Student collaborations International Night More than 500 students, alumni and members of faculty and staff from across Education City came together to celebrate International Night. The event, which featured international cuisine, cultural activities, a fashion show and musical and dance performances, was a collaboration between students at CMU-Q and Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar. CMBA Business Fashion Show To prepare for the Education City Career Fair, the Carnegie Mellon Business Association hosted a business attire fashion show to educate students about professional dress and presentation. This year's show was organized in collaboration with VCUArts Qatar and Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar.

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Backyard Battle of the Bands A musical group from CMU-Q won this year’s Backyard Battle of the Bands. The annual competition brings together students from universities across Education City in an evening of spirited and enthusiastic musical competition. This year’s event was held at Carnegie Mellon. Photography exhibition at HBKU Student Center The student-led Photography Club hosted an open exhibition at the Hamad Bin Khalifa University Student Center. The exhibition featured a selection of photos that were submitted by members of the CMU-Q community.


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Inter-university leagues and competitions Athletic leagues CMU-Q had a stellar year in the area of athletics, with student teams competing in football, basketball and volleyball. The men’s basketball team, which included students from both CMU-Q and Northwestern University in Qatar, placed second in the HBKU Basketball League. The men’s football team placed third in the Qatar Foundation University League.

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5 1) The CMBA Fashion Show 2) CMU-Q at Battle of the Bands 3) International Night 4) CMU-Q and NU-Q's combined basketball team 5) Organizers of the Photography Club exhibition at CMU-Q

Carnegie Mellon Debating Society CMU-Q fielded competitive teams throughout the Qatar Universities Debate League season, placing second overall. Students also represented CMU-Q in Mexico City for the World University Debating Championships.

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Leadership, service and personal development

1) New student orientation organizers 2) The WiSTEM luncheon 3) Dean Trick and the Student Majlis 4) Service learning in Cambodia

The CMU-Q student experience involves more than academic studies: students learn the skills of leadership, community service and teamwork that they will carry with them throughout their careers.

Leadership

Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Club

New student orientation

The WiSTEM Club at CMU-Q hosted their second annual luncheon that brings together students, alumnae, faculty and staff members, and professional leaders. The luncheon is a forum to discuss the challenges that women in STEM fields face as they build their careers.

Each year, student leaders organize the freshman class orientation, an intensive introduction to the resources, expectations and opportunities at CMU-Q. A team of Head Orientation Counselors plan, recruit student volunteers and lead this weeklong experience for the new students. This year, they welcomed the Class of 2021. Student government The Student Majlis has an executive board that is comprised of seven students who are elected each year by their peers. This board helps to guide activities and represent the students in the university community.

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Peer Health Advocates PHA volunteers raise awareness about college health issues and promote healthy behavior choices among their peers. Events and programs include projects that have an impact on health, particularly wellness and stress management. Andrew Model United Nations The student club Andrew MUN hosts an annual conference for high school students to promote knowledge and understanding of global issues. This year’s conference hosted more than 100 students from local schools.


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Community service and personal development Language Bridges The Language Bridges program is a student-led club that teaches English and basic computing skills to service workers. The Language Bridges literacy program focuses on functional language relevant to the workers’ jobs and lives. Internship Showcase At Internship Showcase 2017, five CMU-Q students shared their experiences interning at some of Qatar’s leading organizations. Service learning travel This year, students travelled to Rwanda, Portugal, Cambodia and Sri Lanka. Each trip focuses on specific service projects within the community. Leadership and personal development travel The Healthy Tartans trip explores holistic wellbeing, including how environmental, physical and emotional health are interconnected. This year’s Healthy Tartans trip took place in New Zealand. A group of students also travelled to Brussels for the annual Women’s Leadership Trip.

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Senior Leadership Awards 2018 Senior Leadership Awards are given to graduating seniors who have demonstrated extraordinary leadership through campus engagement and have made substantial contributions to the community. \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Ali Abbas Alawiya Al-Husseiny with distinction Maryam Abdullatif AlNaemi with distinction Manisha Dareddy Joyce Ann De Guia Galang Farha Naved Khan with distinction Kholood Ali Nooh Umair Waheed Qazi Rohith Krishnan Pillai Saad Rasool Alaa Amro Shouhdy Mohammed Zakaria Mohammad Adel Zakzok

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Research A research institute like no other, Carnegie Mellon is home to the world's leading experts in a range of fields. In this tradition, Carnegie Mellon Qatar nurtures and develops opportunities for faculty members and students to build regionally relevant research programs in their areas of expertise.

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Faculty research Research in 2017–18

New projects Language Policy in Globalized Contexts

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ongoing NPRP research projects

book chapters

new seed grants

journal articles

Dudley Reynolds will be conducting research for a monograph titled Language Policy in Globalized Contexts, to be published by the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) in conjunction with its 2019 summit. The monograph will present case studies of how a school or system has responded to local needs in order to craft a program of multilingual instruction.

Incoming sub-awards With Qatar University

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NPRP grants over 10 cycles

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conference presentations

QHCN: Towards reliable and efficient mHealth system with multimodal processing and communications for effective remote patient diagnosis Lead PI: Amr Mohamed, Qatar University PI: Khaled Harras, CMU-Q With Hamad Medical Corporation Personalised drug selection for cancer treatment in Qatar LPI: Peter Coveney, University College London Co-LPI: Mohamad Ussama Al Homsi, Hamad Medical Corporation PI: Valentin Ilyin, CMU-Q

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1) Dudley Reynolds 2) Michael Trick 3) Khaled Harras 4) Valentin Ilyin 5) Nesrine Affara 6) Serkan Akguc 7) Mohammad Hammoud 8) Taeyong Park 9) Giselle Reis 10) Mohamed Zayed 11) Ryan Riley

New seed grants

In the news

\\ Delineating the role of cancer-associated fibroblasts in solid tumors Nesrine Affara

Michael Trick was part of an FCC team that was awarded the 2018 Franz Edelman Award for Achievement in Advanced Analytics, Operations Research, and Management Science. The team created a revolutionary approach to meet the demand for the spectrum used for wireless communication in North America. American Security Today

\\ Addressing the sample selection bias issue in finance research using private firms, with a particular focus on the effect of national culture on key corporate decisions Serkan Akguc \\ A distributed system for estimating triangle counts in graph streams Mohammad Hammoud \\ Longitudinal analysis of media coverage and public attention: data mining and applications Taeyong Park \\ Automating the meta-theory of proof systems Giselle Reis \\ Structural and electronic properties of quantum magnets Mohamed Zayed

A research team has discovered BranchScope, a variant of the Spectre security vulnerability that could allow an attacker to access sensitive data through a side-channel attack method. The team included CMU-Q’s Ryan Riley. Security Week Mohamed Zayed, working with a large international team of researchers, observed a novel quantum phase transition that lay the groundwork for new technologies that could transcend semiconductor-based circuits in computers. Nature Middle East

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Research collaborations Annual Research Conference

Ongoing NPRP projects

The research from CMU-Q played an important role at Qatar Foundation’s Annual Research Conference 2018 (ARC’18), contributing to advances and developments in crucial areas to Qatar.

The National Priorities Research Program (NPRP) is the main funding program of Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF). CMU-Q faculty members continued work on 13 projects during the academic year.

Highlights of CMU-Q at ARC’18

\\ Role of the PDZ and LIM containing protein Zasp in integrin-mediated cell adhesion Lead PI: Mohamed Bouaouina

Michael Trick presented an overview of the CMU-Q research activities, highlighting new funded projects that fall within the Energy and Environment Pillar, the Health and Biomedical Pillar, and the Computing and Information Technology Pillar. Within the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities Pillar, Dudley Reynolds presented his research “How English teachers think about professional development.” John O’Brien spoke on a panel about the future of financial technologies. CMU-Q’s project, Alice Middle East, was featured as part of the Qatar National Research Fund booth as a project that has made a significant impact on Qatar. The QNRF booth included Meddy, an online physician referral service that was developed by two CMU-Q alumni.

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\\ Arab author profiling for cyber-security Lead PI: Anis Charfi PI: Abdelmajid Ben Hamadou, Centre de Recherche en Numérique de Sfax (CRNS), Tunisia PI: Paolo Ross, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain \\ New mathematical models for the large stratin swelling response of biological tissues: Applications to edema, inflammation, and pregnancy Co-Lead PI: Hasan Demirkoparan Lead PI: Thomas Pence, Michigan State University \\ Teams of aquatic/aerial robots for marine environmental monitoring (TARMEM) Lead PI: Gianni Di Caro PI: Enrico Simetti, Interuniversity Center of Integrated Systems for the Marine Environment (ISME), Genova, Italy PI: Filippo Arrichiello, Interuniversity Center of Integrated Systems for the Marine Environment (ISME), Cassino, Italy

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\\ Scalable analytics engine for big graphs on the cloud Lead PI: Mohammad Hammoud PI: Tamar Elsayed, Qatar University PI: Rami Melhem, University of Pittsburgh \\ Towards mobile opportunistic cloud computing: Enabling generic computation offloading to extreme heterogeneous entities Lead PI: Khaled Harras \\ MADAR: Multi-Arabic dialect applications and resources Co-Lead PI: Kemal Oflazer Lead PI: Nizar Habash, New York University Abu Dhabi \\ Testing English reading comprehension through deep text analysis and question generation Lead PI: Kemal Oflazer PI: Teruko Mitamura, Carnegie Mellon University \\ SLATE-Q: Scaffolding literacy in academic and tertiary environments: The case of communication in information systems Lead PI: Silvia Pessoa PI: Susan Hagan PI: Divakaran Liginlal PI: Selma Limam Mansar PI: Thomas Mitchell PI: Ahmar Mahboob, University of Sydney PI: Ryan Miller, Kent State University \\ Bringing computer science to secondary schools – Curriculum design and implementation Lead PI: Saquib Razak

1) Members of the SLATE-Q team 2) Dean Trick addresses ARC'18 3) Alice Middle East display at ARC’18 4) Dudley Reynolds 5) The Meddy display

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\\ Automated verification of properties of concurrent, distributed and parallel specifications with applications to computer security Co-Lead PI: Giselle Reis Lead PI: Iliano Cervesato, Carnegie Mellon University PI: Carsten Schürmann, University of Copenhagen \\ Using bacteriophages as biomonitoring tools for water quality measurements Lead PI: Annette Vincent PI: Valentin Ilyin PI: Basem Shomar, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), HBKU \\ Molecular profiling of breast cancer transcriptome and splicing aberrations Lead PI: Ihab Younis

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Student research Research is an essential element of the undergraduate experience. For some students, undergraduate research will be just the beginning of a career in scientific exploration, experimentation and analysis. For others, the intellectual rigor of research is invaluable experience in problem solving, which is a critical skill for every professional discipline.

Student research at a glance

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College Honors theses

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students presented at international research conferences

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Qatar StudentInitiated Undergraduate Research Program (QSIURP) awards

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Meeting of the Minds undergraduate posters

International conferences \\ IGEM 2017 Giant Jamboree Competition, Boston, USA Yasmin Abdelaal, Albandari Al-Khater, Dina Nayel Al Tarawneh, Najlaa Al Thani, Aisha Fakhroo, Al-Reem Johar, Saad Rasool, Kawthar Alsadat Jafarian, Fatema Abdul Salik \\ OurCS 2017, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA Zeina Darwiche, Katharine Phelps, Shaden Shaar and Fatma Tlili \\ 23rd International Conference on Cancer Research and Pharmacology, Edinburgh, Scotland Nourhan El Khattib, Boshra Al Sulaiti \\ ACM MobiCom, Snowbird, Utah, USA Aliaa Essameldin \\ Very Large Databases Conference, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Omar Khattab \\ 32nd AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, New Orleans, USA Rohit Krishnan Pillai

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1) Meeting of the Minds 2018 2) Fatma Tlili wins Best Project 3) Dr. Barak Yehya 4) Dean Trick and Munir Tag present the QNRF awards

QNRF awards

The annual Meeting of the Minds symposium featured more than 50 research posters, including 36 from undergraduate students. The first Meeting of the Minds was held in 1995 at Carnegie Mellon University’s Pittsburgh campus, and CMU-Q has held its own annual event since 2007.

\\ Qatar National Research Fund provided a panel of judges who selected projects in each of the areas of biological sciences, computer science and information systems.

Best project \\ Fatma Tlili won the Best Project Award for her research into developing an automated process for detecting cracks and defects in concrete. Tlili used a combination of image processing and deep learning techniques to identify and map potential cracks using images taken by drones. Best Poster \\ Latifa Khalid Al Thani was recognized with the Best Poster award for her project to recreate virtually how visitors interact with museum artifacts.

For a full list of Meeting of the Minds award winners, please see Appendix G.

Munir Tag, Senior Program Manager, ICT Qatar National Research Fund

Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics awards \\ The Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics recognized five projects that contributed to Qatar’s future.

These five projects were judged based on how aligned they are with the second National Development Strategy 2018–2022 of Qatar. All of the projects showed very valuable research, and all the students involved should be proud. Dr. Barak Yehya, Expert, Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics

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The expert judges represented organizations from across Qatar.

It was very difficult to make these selections, because these were all great projects from great students. QNRF is very proud to support these young researchers.

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Appendices Joint Advisory Board Dean’s Office Faculty leadership Senior staff Faculty members Schools represented in the 2017 incoming class Meeting of the Minds award winners Meeting of the Minds posters Press releases Community partners About us About the design

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Appendix A: Joint Advisory Board

Appendix B: Dean’s Office

Qatar Foundation members

Michael Trick Dean Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Operations Research

H.E. Dr. Hessa Sultan Al Jaber Chairperson, The Qatar Satellite Company, Es’hailSat H.E. Sultan bin Rashid Al Khater Undersecretary, Ministry of Economy and Commerce Ahmad Hasnah President, Hamad Bin Khalifa University Ahmed Elmagarmid Executive Director, Qatar Computing Research Institute Carnegie Mellon University members Farnam Jahanian (Fall 2017) President Laurie Weingart (Spring 2018) Interim Provost Mary Jo Dively Vice President and General Counsel William Scherlis Director, Institute for Software Research Professor, School of Computer Science

John O’Brien Senior Associate Dean Area Head, Business Administration Associate Professor, Accounting and Experimental Economics Selma Limam Mansar Senior Associate Dean, Education Area Head, Information Systems Teaching Professor, Information Systems Kemal Oflazer Associate Dean, Research Area Head, Computer Science Teaching Professor, Computer Science Fadhel Annan Assistant Dean, Government and Corporate Affairs Edna Jackson Director, Dean’s Office Richard Mundy Chief Operations Officer

Duane Seppi The BNY Mellon Professor of Finance, Tepper School of Business

Kara Nesimiuk Executive Director, Marketing and Public Relations

Independent members

Khalid Sarwar Warraich Chief Information Officer

N. Balakrishnan Associate Director, Indian Institute of Science Gabriel Hawawini The Henry Grunfield Professor of Investment Banking, INSEAD Kurt Mehlhorn Director, Max Planck Institute for Informatics Saarland University Ex officio members Mounir Hamdi Dean, College of Science and Engineering Hamad Bin Khalifa University Michael Trick Dean, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

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Appendix C: Faculty leadership

Appendix D: Senior staff

Khaled Harras Program Director, Computer Science Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science

Lisa Ciletti Director, Human Resources and Operations

Patrick McGinnis Program Director, Business Administration Distinguished Career Professor, Business Communication Marion Oliver Area Co-Head, Arts and Sciences Teaching Professor, Mathematics Daniel Phelps Program Director, Information Systems Associate Teaching Professor, Information Systems Dudley Reynolds Area Co-Head, Arts and Sciences Teaching Professor, English Gordon Rule Area Head, Biological Sciences Professor, Biological Sciences

Faten El Ayache Employer Development and Career Consultant Angela Ford Senior Editor Elissar Hajjar Director, Facilities Management Gloria Aoun Khoury Assistant Dean, Student Affairs Stephen McCarty Director, Safety and Security Mohammed Mirza Career Development Specialist Jarrod Mock Director, Admission Meg Rogers Director, Research Office

Annette Vincent Program Director, Biological Sciences Associate Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences

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Appendix E: Faculty members Nesrine Affara Assistant Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences Mustafa Akan Associate Professor, Operations Management Serkan Akguc Assistant Teaching Professor, Finance Chadi Aoun Associate Teaching Professor, Information Systems Ravichandra Bachu Assistant Teaching Professor, Chemistry Ilker Baybars Dean and CEO Emeritus George Leland Bach Chair Professor, Operations Management Peter Boatwright Allan D. Shocker Professor of Marketing and New Product Development Serra Boranbay-Akan Assistant Teaching Professor, Economics Houda Bouamor Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Mohamed Bouaouina Assistant Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences Jennifer Bruder Visiting Assistant Professor, Organization and Behavior

Fuad Farooqi Associate Teaching Professor, Finance John Gasper Associate Teaching Professor, Economics David Emmanuel Gray Assistant Teaching Professor, Philosophy Susan Hagan Associate Teaching Professor, English Mohammad Hammoud Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science Khaled Harras Program Director, Computer Science Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Erik Helin Special Lecturer, Spanish Adam Hodges Visiting Assistant Professor, English Ludmila Hyman Assistant Teaching Professor, English Zeinab Ibrahim Teaching Professor, Arabic Studies Valentin Ilyin Associate Teaching Professor, Computational Biology Aaron Jacobson Visiting Assistant Professor, History Lansiné Kaba Thomas M. Kerr Distinguished Career Professor

Stephen Calabrese Visiting Associate Professor, Economics

Christos Kapoutsis Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science

Anis Charfi Associate Teaching Professor, Information Systems

Niraj Khare Assistant Teaching Professor, Mathematics

Milton Cofield Distinguished Service Professor, Business Management Hasan Demirkoparan Associate Teaching Professor, Mathematics Gianni Di Caro Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science

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Ramesh Krishnamurti Professor, Architecture Finn Kydland Nobel Laureate (2004) The Richard P. Simmons Distinguished Professorship University Professor, Economics Cecile Le Roux Visiting Assistant Professor, Organization and Behavior


Divakaran Liginlal Teaching Professor, Information Systems

Giselle Reis Assistant Teaching Professor, Computer Science

Selma Limam Mansar Senior Associate Dean, Education Area Head, Information Systems Teaching Professor, Information Systems

Dudley Reynolds Area Co-Head, Arts and Sciences Teaching Professor, English

Teresa MacGregor Director, Library

Ryan Riley Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science

Drew Mallory Visiting Assistant Professor, Organization and Behavior

Gordon Rule Area Head, Biological Sciences Professor, Biological Sciences

Patrick McGinnis Program Director, Business Administration Distinguished Career Professor, Business Communication

Alicia Salaz Senior Librarian and Information Scientist

Thomas Mitchell Associate Teaching Professor, English John O’Brien Senior Associate Dean Area Head, Business Administration Associate Professor, Accounting and Experimental Economics Joyce Oates Assistant Teaching Professor, Psychology Kemal Oflazer Associate Dean, Research Area Head, Computer Science Teaching Professor, Computer Science Marion Oliver Area Co-Head, Arts and Sciences Teaching Professor, Mathematics Taeyong Park Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor, Statistics Silvia Pessoa Associate Teaching Professor, English Daniel Phelps Program Director, Information Systems Associate Teaching Professor, Information Systems Saquib Razak Associate Teaching Professor, Computer Science Benjamin Reilly Associate Teaching Professor, History

Francesco Sguera Visiting Assistant Teaching Professor, Organizational Behavior Peter Stüttgen Visiting Associate Teaching Professor, Marketing Michael Trick Dean Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Operations Research Stephen Vargo Visiting Assistant Professor, Business Administration Nui Vatanasakdakul Visiting Associate Professor, Information Systems Annette Vincent Program Director, Biological Sciences Associate Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences George White Distinguished Career Professor, Entrepreneurship Zelealem Yilma Assistant Teaching Professor, Mathematics Ihab Younis Assistant Teaching Professor, Biological Sciences Mohamed Zayed Associate Teaching Professor, Physics

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Appendix F: Schools represented in the 2017 incoming class Albania Hasan Riza Pasha College China Hangzhou #14 Mid Sch-Zhej, China Liaocheng No 1 Middle School, China France Middle School Lycée Saint-Vincent Providence Lebanon Al Jarmak School Pakistan Aitchison College Homeschooled Lahore Grammar School Roots Ivy International School Qatar Academic Bridge Program ACS Doha International School Al Arqam Academy Al Jazeera Academy Al Khor International School Al Khor Girls School Al Maha Academy Al-Bayan Girls School Al Eman Independent School Alpha Omega Academy

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American Academy American School of Doha Amna Bint Wahab School The Cambridge School Doha British School Egyptian Language School English Modern School Global Academy Gulf English School Ideal Indian School International School of Choueifat – Doha The Lebanese School Lycee Français Bonaparte M.E.S Indian School Michael E. Debakey High School Middle East International Modern Indian School Newton International School Omar Bin Al Khattab School Park House English School Qatar Academy Qatar Academy Al Khor Qatar International School Rabaa Aladwya School Tariq Bin Ziyad Secondary School Saudi Arabia College Preparatory Center United States American Heritage School Bethesda Chevy Chase High School Lakeview High School Notre Dame High School William P. Clements High School


Appendix G: Meeting of the Minds 2018 award winners Best Project 1. F  atma Tlili, “Deep learning and pattern analysis for crack detection.” Advisor: Gianni Di Caro 2. M  ohammad Osaama Bin Shehzad, “Classification of bacterial diversity in Qatar ballast water samples using QIIME bioinformatics pipeline.” Advisors: Annette Vincent, Basem Shomar, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute 3. M  uhammad Ali Bashir, Umair Qazi, “RAES: Road accidents and emergency services in the United States.” Advisor: Chadi Aoun Best Poster Latifa Khalid Al Thani, “Communicate through your eyes: A study of natural interactions with a digital cultural artifact.” Advisor: Divakaran Liginlal QNRF Awards Biological Sciences: Boshra Al-Sulaiti, Reem Elasad and Ettaib El Marabti, “A novel post-transcriptional mechanism for inhibiting the expression of PTEN in breast cancer.” Advisor: Ihab Younis

Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics Awards Boshra Al-Sulaiti, Reem Elasad and Ettaib El Marabti, “A novel post-transcriptional mechanism for inhibiting the expression of PTEN in breast cancer.” Advisor: Ihab Younis AlReem Johar, “Life bacterial detection using RNA extraction from ballast water sample.” Advisor: Annette Vincent Aya Nour and Fatema Abdul Salik, “Testing for the presence of genetic modifications in common corn products — tortilla chips and corn flour.” Advisor: Annette Vincent Mohammed Zakaria, “Measuring corporate transparency in sustainability reporting: A study of the energy sector.” Advisors: Divakaran Liginlal, Chadi Aoun Postgraduate: Ossama Obeid, Salam Khalifa, Nizar Habash, Houda Bouamor, Wajdi Zaghouani, Kemal Oflazer, “MADARi: A web interface for joint Arabic morphological annotation and spelling correction.”

Computer Science: Rohith Krishnan Pillai, “Mixed initiative system for survivable path planning in cluttered environments.” Advisor: Gianni Di Caro Information Systems: Ali Abbas, “Doctor-patient communication in Qatar.” Advisor: Selma Limam Mansar

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Appendix H: Meeting of the Minds posters Biological Sciences Effects of different stresses on pluripotent stem cell fate Are you sure your soy is non-GMO? Phenotypic and behavioral characterization of MDA-MB 231/468 breast cancer cell lines Detection of CP4-EPSPS and other GM genes in soy milk variants A novel post-transcriptional mechanism for inhibiting the expression of PTEN in breast cancer Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with aspartame toxicity in kidney cells Is corn syrup used in processed products extracted from genetically modified corn? Classification of bacterial diversity in Qatar ballast water samples using QIIME bioinformatics pipeline Identification of post transcriptional regulatory factors of PTEN expression in breast cancer cells Investigating the presence of 35s promoter, CRY1A(b), Bat and Pat genes as markers for genetic modification in three commercial Zea Mays (Corn) food products MAPK14 splicing as a novel biomarker in regulating breast cancer Analysis of genetically modified (GM) marker genes in maize-based products using multiplex PCR and ELISA Life bacterial detection using RNA extraction from ballast water sample

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Truncations of Drs1 arms provide insight into their possible functions Testing for the presence of genetic modifications in common corn products – tortilla chips and corn flour Studying phosphorylation of Kindlin F1 loop and interactions with protein partners Investigating oxidative stress induced by aspartame in human embryonic kidney cells The varying amount of genetic modifications in non-GMO labelled products from the USA and Europe Computer Science An oracle characterization of the polynomialsize alternating hierarchy Interactive evaluation and training of classifiers Minimizing cost of accuracy estimation of automated classifiers Behaviour analysis using multi-sensor data A learning approach to vision-based coarse robotics localization in industry Computational analysis of the role of MTCP1 in T-cell leukaemia Mixed initiative system for survivable path planning in cluttered environments Relating children’s automatically detected facial expressions to their behavior in RoboTutor Deep learning and pattern analysis for crack detection


Information Systems

Postgraduate posters

Doctor-patient communication in Qatar

Delay tolerant computing

Trust in commerce through Instagram in Qatar

The MADAR Arabic dialect corpus and lexicon

Communicate through your eyes: A study of natural interactions with a digital cultural artifact

Guidelines and annotation framework for Arabic author profiling

Parents of children of autism and technology use by the children

Teams of aquatic and aerial robots for marine environmental monitoring

RAES: Road accidents and emergency services in the United States

Offloading mobile storage to underutilized edge devices

A study on the use of educational tools amongst university students

Extending the range via ad-hoc communication for cooperative robotic watercraft

RISE: Real-time information system for emergency detection

RAMOS: A resource-aware multi-objective system for edge computing

NEOS: Saving receipts electronically

MADARi: A web interface for joint Arabic morphological annotation and spelling correction

Measuring corporate transparency in sustainability reporting: A study of the energy sector

Event coreference using neural network classifiers Fine-grained Arabic dialect identification Formalization of financial trading systems in a concurrent logical framework (CLF)

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Appendix I: Press releases July 2017 \\ CMU-Q researchers awarded NPRP grants August 2017 \\ Carnegie Mellon grads explore emerging fields at Sidra \\ Michael Trick appointed dean of CMU-Q \\ Carnegie Mellon summer program offers glimpse into careers of the future \\ CMU-Q welcomes Class of 2021 September 2017 \\ CEO of sovereign fund outlines investment strategy at Carnegie Mellon October 2017 \\ CMU-Q students reflect diversity, commitment to Qatar National Vision \\ Carnegie Mellon Qatar welcomes new faculty members \\ Carnegie Mellon Qatar recognizes 126 students on Dean’s List

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November 2017 \\ CMU-Q committed to educating Qatar’s next generation of entrepreneurs \\ Carnegie Mellon Qatar formally installs Dean Michael Trick \\ CEO of Qatar Stock Exchange emphasizes commitment to economic sustainability December 2017 \\ Bronze Achievement for Carnegie Mellon Qatar at MIT competition \\ CMU-Q Class of 2012 celebrates 5-year reunion \\ CMU-Q celebrates Qatar National Day January 2018 \\ Qatar Central Bank Governor: Financial technology is building momentum in Qatar \\ Carnegie Mellon and Qatar Development Bank collaborate to meet real business needs of Qatar \\ CMU-Q welcomes the first members of the Class of 2022


February 2018 \\ CMU-Q honors 134 students on Dean’s List \\ CMU-Q Hackathon challenges students to think, innovate and solve March 2018 \\ Qatar Academy wins CMU-Q’s Botball \\ Three CMU-Q alumni honored by Amir for academic excellence \\ Farnam Jahanian named 10th president of CMU

May 2018 \\ Carnegie Mellon Qatar celebrates 90 new graduates \\ CMU-Q’s top research award: detecting flaws in concrete using deep learning \\ CMU-Q students showcase programming skills June 2018 \\ QNB signs MoU with Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

\\ Al-Kuwari: QNB is dedicated to developing human potential \\ Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar announces winners of Pi Day Math Contest April 2018 \\ Qatar University trio takes top prize at CMU-Q’s Quick Startup \\ Top Qatar employers convene at Carnegie Mellon \\ Carnegie Mellon Qatar welcomes Class of 2022 \\ Carnegie Mellon Qatar signs MoU with the Jassim & Hamad bin Jassim Charitable Foundation

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Community Partners Carnegie Mellon has built relationships with companies and organizations across various sectors. Our partners work closely with us by speaking through our Career Development Office, providing internships and jobs, participating in Executive Education courses, judging at Meeting of the Minds, sponsoring students, sponsoring events and strengthening ties through Memoranda of Understanding. \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

004 Arabia ADabisc Adecco Group Al Emadi Enterprises Al Faisal Holding AlFaisal Without Borders Foundation Alfardan Group Ali Bin Ali Group Al Jazeera Media Network Al Khalij Commercial Bank (al khaliji) Al Sawari Holding Amiri Diwan A.T. Kearney Bain Bayt.com beIN Media Group Boeing Canon Careem Center for GIS Qatar Cisco Coca-Cola Commercial Bank of Qatar Cosette Solutions Council of Ministers DHL Darwish Holding Davidson Consulting Deloitte Digital Incubation Center EBLA Computer Consultancy Company Education Above All Embassy of the Republic of Serbia Ernst & Young ExxonMobil Qatar General Electric Georgetown University in Qatar Girnaas Gulf Bridge International Gulf Business Machines Hamad Bin Khalifa University Hamad Medical Corporation Henkel

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\\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Hilti Hochtief Vicon Huawei INJAZ Internal Security Force (Lekhwiya) Intesa Sanpaolo Jassim and Hamad Bin Jassim Charitable Foundation Katara Cultural Village KPMG Maersk Oil Qatar Malomatia Mazars Mazaya Qatar McKinsey & Company Meddy Medihealth Solutions At-Home-Doc Microsoft Ministry of Administrative Development Labor and Social Affairs Ministry of Defense Ministry of Development Planning and Statistics Ministry of Economy and Commerce Ministry of Education and Higher Education Ministry of Finance Ministry of Foreign Affairs Ministry of Interior Ministry of Municipality and Environment Ministry of Transport and Communications Modaris Nakilat National Center for Cancer Care and Research NestlĂŠ Northwestern University in Qatar Olympic Stars Omani Embassy in Doha, Qatar One Foods Oola Sportswear Ooredoo Oryx GTL PricewaterhouseCoopers Qatar Airways


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Qatar Armed Forces Qatar Biobank Qatar Biomedical Research Institute Qatar Business Incubation Center Qatar Cancer Society Qatar Central Bank Qatar Computing Research Institute Qatar Credit Bureau Qatar Development Bank Qatar Electricity & Water Co. Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute Qatar Fertilizer Company Qatar Finance and Business Academy Qatar Financial Center Qatar First Bank Qatar Foundation Qatar Foundation Research and Development QatarGas Qatar Investment Authority Qatar Mobility Innovation Center Qatar Museums Authority Qatar National Bank Qatar Petrochemical Company (QAPCO) Qatar National Research Fund Qatar Olympic Committee Qatar Petroleum Qatar Science and Technology Park Qatar Shell Qatar Solar Technologies

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Qatar Stock Exchange Qatar University Qchem QInvest Rheinmetall Barzan Advanced Technology (RBAT) Academy SDK Marketing SAP Salam Technology Saleh Hamad Al Mana Co. Senseta Sidra Medicine Siemens Qatar Silatech Standard Chartered State Audit Bureau Subol Innovation Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy Teach For Qatar TESOL International Association Texas A&M University at Qatar Trio Investment U.S. Embassy in Qatar VCUArts Qatar Vodafone Qatar Weill Cornell Medicine—Qatar Woqood Zomato

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About us For more than a century, Carnegie Mellon University has challenged the curious and passionate to imagine and deliver work that matters. A private, top-ranked and global university, Carnegie Mellon sets its own course with programs that inspire creativity and collaboration. In 2004, Carnegie Mellon and Qatar Foundation began a partnership to deliver select programs that will contribute to the long-term development of Qatar. Today, Carnegie Mellon Qatar offers undergraduate programs in biological sciences, business administration, computational biology, computer science, and information systems. Nearly 400 students from 38 countries call Carnegie Mellon Qatar home. Graduates from CMU-Q are making a deep impact in Qatar and around the world. Most choose careers in top organizations, and many have completed graduate studies. A growing number are pursuing entrepreneurial projects. With 11 graduating classes, the total number of alumni is nearly 800. To learn more, visit www.qatar.cmu.edu and follow us on: \\ \\ \\ \\ \\

Twitter: @CarnegieMellonQ Instagram: @carnegiemellonq Facebook: CarnegieMellonQ YouTube: CarnegieMellonQatar LinkedIn: Carnegie Mellon Qatar

________________________________________________________________________ Contact \\ \\ \\ \\

Dean’s Office: deans-office@qatar.cmu.edu Research Office: cmuq-research@qatar.cmu.edu Admission Office: ug-admission@qatar.cmu.edu Media inquiries: mpr@qatar.cmu.edu

About the design The wall of the main walkway of the Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar building is an intricate pattern in colored Egyptian glass, sandstone and steel. Created by artist Pilar Climent, the wall is the largest piece of art that architects Legorreta + Legorreta have ever integrated into a building. For the CMU-Q community, this art piece forms the backdrop for the challenges, celebrations, connections and achievements of university life. We have incorporated the triangle motif into Annual Report 2017–18 to symbolize the shared experience of this academic year.

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar


Annual Report 2017–18

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P.O. Box 24866, Education City, Doha, Qatar Phone: +974 4454 8400 www.qatar.cmu.edu

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Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar

Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar's Annual Report for 2017-2018  
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