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OUT OF THIS WORLD The Vail Valley's best restaurants


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EDITOR’S LETTER

VAIL DAILY MAGAZINE & MARKETING DIRECTOR Karen Suing | ksuing@vaildaily.com

EDITOR Wren Bova | wren@vaildaily.com

ART DIRECTOR Carly Arnold | carnold@cmnm.org

PHOTO EDITOR Dominique Taylor | taylordmedia@icloud.com

IDEA GUY Mark Bricklin | mbricklin@vaildaily.com

AD DIRECTOR Patrick Connolly | pconnolly@vaildaily.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS Kristin Anderson, Charles Townsend Bessent, Ashley Bratton, Chris Dillmann, Kirsten Dobroth, Kim Fuller, Jennifer Geisman, Linda Guerrette, Heather Hower, Emily Jaissle, John LaConte, Traci J. Macnamara, Justin Q. McCarty, Kimberly Nicoletti, John O'Neill, Beth Potter, Caramie Schnell

ADVERTISING DESIGN TEAM MANAGER Afton Pospíšilová | apospisilova@cmnm.org

ADVERTISING DESIGN TEAM Darin Bliss, Madelyn LyBarger, Malisa Samsel

ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR Chelsea Rosenthal | crosenthal@vaildaily.com

ACCOUNT MANAGERS Paul Abling | pabling@vaildaily.com Heidi Bricklin | hbricklin@vaildaily.com Carole Bukovich | cbukovich@vaildaily.com Tyler Demuth | tdemuth@vaildaily.com Amanda Picola | apicola@vaildaily.com Chris Pryor | cpryor@vaildaily.com Jennifer Wuebbolt | jwuebbolt@vaildaily.com

CIRCULATION MANAGER David Hakes | dhakes@vaildaily.com

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hicharrones. I didn’t even have to go looking for them — they found me. Putting together this edition of EAT, those crispy little pork bits kept cropping up. In a photo from Buffalos at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch. In another one we didn’t have room for on Boxcar’s page. As a garnish on the pork shank served at The Fitz. Crackly, crispy, porky, they’re a lip-smacking snack that will keep you occupied until the rest of your meal comes. Though they are featured in several cuisines, if you’re lucky enough to be in Mexico, you can get them as a taco, sauced with salsa verde. And they take me back to Mexico, because that’s where I first ate them on a road trip down the Baja Peninsula. While we waited for our carnitas tacos to be prepared, the woman at the counter gestured us over to the glass case lit by a dingy heat lamp. We reached in and scooped our own chicharrones, then sat on crooked chairs and gobbled them up while a telenovela blared out from the corner-mounted television. We were in heaven. And just as I was transported back to Mexico by seeing those photos, the chefs who put them on their menu were sharing the same. On travels, or in their own culinary heritages, they, too, experienced the ultimate snack food and wanted to make a place for it in Vail. So they did. It’s inspiring, and a gift from them to us. Welcome to EAT. These aren’t reviews, but overviews of many of the valley’s best dining establishments. From Colorado cuisine to Mexican delights, we cover a lot. This is no anonymous adventure for the writers and photographers — the restaurants owners and managers ask us to come. We do. We eat. We ask questions, and we write. And on the following pages are the tales we’re telling. Happy EATing, Wren Bova EDITOR

SWIFT COMMUNICATIONS PRESIDENT Bob Brown | rbrown@swiftcom.com

COLORADO MOUNTAIN NEWS MEDIA GM Jim Morgan | jmorgan@cmnm.org

SWIFT MAGAZINE DIRECTOR Susan Ludlow | sludlow@swiftcom.com

VAIL DAILY PUBLISHER Mark Wurzer | mwurzer@vaildaily.com

COLORADO MOUNTAIN NEWS MEDIA PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Bill Walker | bwalker@cmnm.org •••

The Vail Daily is a wholly owned subsidiary of COLORADO MOUNTAIN NEWS MEDIA 200 Lindbergh Drive | P.O. Box 1500 Gypsum, Colorado 81637 p. 970.328.6333 | f. 970.328.6409 Copyright ©2016 Colorado Mountain News Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited.

COVER PHOTO BY dominique taylor

Pastry chef Sebastian Schmitt's Moon at Splendido at the Chateau is a white-chocolate shell filled with coconut panna cotta, caramelized pineapple and passion juice. Coconut cream and frozen coconut foam make up the rest of the celestial scene.

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APRIL 5-9, 2017 APRIL 5-9, 2017

TICKETSSTARTING STARTING TICKETS AT AT $50$50

Rated among the Nation’s Top Food & Wine Festivals

Rated among the Nation’s Top Food & Wine Festivals byForbes.com, Forbes.com, USA Today the Travel Channel by USA Today and and the Travel Channel

www.tasteofvail.com www.tasteofvail.com

SPONSORS TO DATE SPONSORS TO DATE


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09 PHOTO GALLERY Eye-popping dishes that will delight. BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR & CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

14 THE EAT COMPENDIUM Snapshot views of the county's best restaurants. EAT STAFF

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THE SOMMS OF VAIL

TIDBITS

Educated 'winos' in Vail's restaurant scene help diners enjoy the wine experience.

Something to nosh on.

BY TRACI J. MACNAMARA

BY WREN BOVA

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CARLY ARNOLD

JENNIFER GEISMAN

Art Director Family food tradition Asian cuisine on Christmas Eve Inspired by Classic dishes with a new twist Ideal neighborhood joint Boxcar — delicious food, a warm ambiance and a great beer list Flavor du jour Garlic or Sriracha Go-to after-work treat Craft beer Kitchen appliance you could do without Microwave Culinary person, book or show that inspires you My mom "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." Noodles

Writer Family food tradition Hanukkah latkes. I grew up with the scents of onions and oil during the holiday season. My dad never cooked with a recipe, but, when he passed away, he gave me the most powerful gift when it came to cooking – intuition Inspired by Aromas. My dad taught me how to cook, and he said you don’t have to taste as much as you need to smell the fragrance of what you are making Ideal neighborhood joint A good soup place Flavor du jour Garlic Kitchen appliance you could do without My Cuisinart — I grew up chopping everything by hand Culinary person, book or show that inspires you Anthony Bourdain — he is a heart attack waiting to happen, but I am so fascinated by his diverse palate and willingness to, literally, try anything "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." A good stinky cheese and crackers

KIM FULLER Writer Family food tradition Fondue on New Year’s Eve!  Inspired by An inspired chef who loves to refine the craft and use great ingredients Ideal neighborhood joint A wine bar or bistro that’s lively and enchanting but always has a seat for me Flavor du jour I love all Indian spices Go-to after-work treat Red wine and Pirate’s Booty, cashews or crackers and cheese

CHRISTOPHER DILLMAN

CONTRIBUTORS

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Photographer Family food tradition Boiling kielbasa to skim the fat for Easter Ideal neighborhood joint Real, authentic Indian food Flavor du jour Fresh basil or rosemary Kitchen appliance you could do without I‘ve been without a microwave for two years now Culinary person, book or show that inspires you “Kitchen Confidential” by Anthony Bourdain

JUSTIN Q. MCCARTY Photographer Family food tradition Chicken taquitos on the sailboat at Lake Dillon Ideal neighborhood joint Taco stand on the beach Flavor du jour Fresh cracked black pepper Go-to after-work treat Freshly squeezed lime margarita "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." Tortillas and cheese

JOHN O’NEILL Writer Family food tradition Christmas morning my dad turns out an amazing eggs Benedict. It's actually amazing how good he is at it, knowing he only does it once a year Inspired by I love big taste … I envy the big, diverse flavor profiles a great chef can create on a single plate or over a course of meals Flavor du jour There is some saying out there about chopping onions is the start to any good meal; I'm a believer in that Go-to after-work treat Two fingers of bourbon whiskey and a few cubes of ice Culinary person, book or show that inspires you My friend Dan Wallis, who's a Kiwi, helped me gain an appreciation for food. We both ran for Colorado State University and fought an endless battle against Olive Garden as the team's choice for a pre-race dinner. The good standard we came up with for a quality restaurant was that it must have a chef in the kitchen "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." Carbs


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Writer Family food tradition A bazillion different Christmas cookies to eat while opening gifts Inspired by Fresh flavors, creatively combined Ideal neighborhood joint The Rose, in Edwards (cocktails, cool vibe) Flavor du jour Truffle everything Kitchen appliance you could do without Microwave

SUZANNE HOFFMAN Writer Family food tradition Fried oysters on Christmas Eve and my grandma’s oyster dressing on Christmas Day Inspired by Sharing my south Louisiana and Sicilian culinary heritage Ideal neighborhood joint Small, locally owned and operated and frequented by people of all ages Flavor du jour Vanilla bean Go-to after-work treat A glass of Arneis Kitchen appliance you could do without None! Culinary person, book or show that inspires you Chef John Folse "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." Eggs and herbs

HEATHER HOWER Writer Family food tradition My grandmother made the most delicious chicken wings, no matter how I try, I can't recreate them Inspired by Trying new twists on the every day — sweet potato burrito with avocado spread from Cookie and Kate.com; I also like to try to make dinner from food that's in the pantry Ideal neighborhood joint Small plates, cozy, great staff, good wine list that doesn't break the bank Go-to after-work treat Red wine and roasted kale (not necessarily together) Kitchen appliance you could do without Microwave Culinary person, book or show that inspires you Thekitchn.com "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." Chickpeas

Writer Inspired by Local ingredients are always a favorite Ideal neighborhood joint A pad Thai joint on every corner would make this world a better place Flavor du jour Anything spicy Go-to after-work treat Quesadillas — quick, easy and delicious Kitchen appliance you could do without I've made it 2 years without a toaster, and aside from some burnt bread in the cast iron, I'm doing alright.

WREN BOVA Editor Family food tradition Planning our next meal while eating Ideal neighborhood joint Baja-style Mexican Flavor du jour Black pepper, always Go-to after-work treat Red, white or bubbly Kitchen appliance you could do without Microwave Culinary person, book or show that inspires you My sister — she can feed her family and still have energy left to enjoy dinner, it’s amazing "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." Pasta and parm

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CONTRIBUTORS

KIRSTEN DOBROTH

TRACI MACNAMARA

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DOMINIQUE TAYLOR Photo editor Family food tradition Roast lamb with the best roast potatoes. (Sunday roast, Christmas roast, birthday roast) Inspired by Street food from around the world — the simplicity of it Ideal neighborhood joint Small, cozy with good coffee, wine and interesting small plates Go-to after-work treat It's still curry and chocolate (sometimes together) Kitchen appliance you could do without My microwave Culinary person, book or show that inspires you Any of my friends who cook: Sebastian, the pastry chef at Splendido, Derek, the curry master, Daryl, the cocktail and meat master "As long as I have ____ I have a meal." Rotisserie chicken

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VAIL

A shot-through quarter from a sharpshooting grandfather linked to an arrowhead found by his grandson, all set in sterling silver.

DAN TELLEEN

Creating Heirlooms Since 1970

VAIL VILLAGE 970.476.4760


At Harvest by Kelly Liken, Greek yogurt and granola help start the day.

Breaking the Fast PHOTO BY CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT


The spicy tuna is served with crispy rice at Matsuhisa Vail.

take a

Dip

PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR


Raw Materials A variety of fresh fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices go into every Green Elephant Juicery concoction. PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR


Every day

PHOTOS BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

Nick Haley creates the pizza at Zino Ristorante in Edwards with lots of love.

is Pie Day


Cheers! Salute! Prost ! At The Fitz in Manor Vail Lodge, the 8200 Ft. cocktail includes illegal mezcal, Campari, Luxardo liqueur and fresh lime. PHOTO BY CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT


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EAT HERE NOW AT LARGE

EDWARDS

15 Red Maple Catering

42 Sato Sushi Bar & Restaurant 43 Harvest by Kelly Liken 44 Zino Ristorante 45 The Gashouse 46 Cafe 163 47 Juniper Restaurant 48 Vista at Arrowhead 49 Gore Range Brewery 50 The Rose 51 Delite & Bowl Noodle House

EAGLE 16 Capitol Bar & Bistro

AVON 17 Boxcar Restaurant & Bar 18 Maya Modern Mexican Kitchen & Tequilaría 19 Kiwi International Delights & Coffee Co. 20 Vin48 21 Green Elephant Juicery

BEAVER CREEK 22 Hooked 23 Allie’s Cabin 24 Toscanini 25 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill 26 Beano’s Cabin 27 Revolution 28 Osprey Fireside Grill 29 Zach’s Cabin 30 Dusty Boot Roadhouse 31 Mirabelle 32 Grouse Mountain Grill 33 Splendido at The Chateau 34 Bachelors Lounge at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch 35 Wyld 36 Buffalos at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch 37 Anderson’s Cabin 38 Daniel’s Bar & Grill at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch 39 Saddleridge 40 Black Diamond Bistro 41 The Metropolitan 63 Blue Moose Pizza

VAIL 21 Green Elephant Juicery 52 Bōl 53 The 10th 54 Almresi 55 Bistro Fourteen 56 La Tour 57 The Fitz Bar & Restaurant 58 Pepi’s 59 Matsuhisa Vail 60 Terra Bistro 61 Flame at The Four Seasons 62 Tavern on the Square 63 Blue Moose Pizza 64 Yama Sushi 65 Ludwig’s at Sonnenalp Hotel 66 The Remedy Bar 67 Elway’s Vail 68 Big Bear Bistro 69 Campo Di Fiori 70 Vintage 71 Game Creek Restaurant


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RED MAPLE CATERING

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LOCATED WHEREVER YOU’D LIKE 970. 401. 1769 | REDMAPLECATERING.COM

AT LARGE

by WREN BOVA photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

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nstead of making reservations, let the restaurant come to you —chefs, servers, bartenders… and of course the dishwashers. Jason Harrison’s Red Maple Catering is an entirely different catering group. He and his crew are just as adept at delivering a “comfort food dinner” for a family at home, serving an intimate 10-course dinner for four, and catering a tented wedding for 250 — in a mountain valley under the stars, naturally. In other words, they do it all, and they do it really, really well. Harrison came to Vail from Bellagio in Las Vegas, where a “big” event meant feeding 4,500 people. In love with cooking, eating and sharing, Vail’s discerning palates and educated clientele are a good fit for the talented chef. “We felt that a big missing piece in the valley was a true luxury fine dining experience that was available in the comfort of a residence — or out in a field for that matter,” exclaims Chef Harrison. “We looked at the local players

and realized the depth of our experience and dedication to excellence was well beyond that of anyone in the mountains.” Since launching, Red Maple Catering has created dining experiences for a diverse list of clients, from some of the worlds top CEOs, to athletes at the top of their game. They’ve been featured on “Keeping Up with the Kardashians”, and catered meals for celebrities in search of great food and privacy.  Clients come to Harrison and his crew for three reasons: • They want the best, and don’t want the stress of bringing their family and friends to a restaurant — or trying to get a reservation. • They want the details taken care of — and Red Maple has chefs, servers, a mixologist and even a sommelier on staff. • They want a true Colorado dining experience with ingredient-driven menus, and a real sense of location.  Also, Harrison is adept at conveying his passion for all things culinary in inspiring and innovative ways. His menus intrigue and delight. “Cooking to me is the greatest creative outlet there is,” he says. “It is both how I can express my creative side, and show my passion for ingredients at the same time.”

PRICE

Varies

•••

AMBIANCE

At your discretion •••

SIGNATURE DISH

What would you like?

And he agrees with Julia Child: People who love to eat are always the best people. So how does he keep it fresh? “I stay inspired by talking to, working with and reading about food every day,” he exclaims. “Ninety percent of my friends are chefs and some are within the best restaurants and hotels in the world. Keeping up with emerging dining trends is not easy, but with a strong network — and lots of food-focused travel —we keep pushing the boundaries.” • Buffalo short rib with Anson Mills parmesan grits, heirloom carrots and puffed quinoa. left Yukon Gold gnocchi with Colorado wild game bolognese and shaved pecorino. above

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CAPITOL BAR & BISTRO

343 CAPITOL ST. | EAGLE | 970.328.7990 CAPITOLBARANDBISTRO.COM

PRICE

Bar menu: $5 Mains: $12-$29 •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy, friendly neighborhood restaurant •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Smoked salmon with toast points and classic accoutrement •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Yes

by HEATHER HOWER photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

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nside the cozy log cabin on Capitol Street is a menu that delivers without fuss. Far from stuffy but definitely more upscale than a quick-dining joint, The Capitol Bar and Bistro fills the made-with-love, less-fussy fare niche perfectly. The family-owned restaurant welcomes families but is also a lovely respite for couples who want to feel a little bit spoiled for the evening. The cozy interior, affordable prices and wine list beckon diners to sit and stay just a little bit longer. The Capitol Bar and Bistro is celebrating 10 years in the little brown building that once was a house in Eagle. Nate and Tom McMullen, son and father owners, have revamped the menu recently when they changed from Paradigm’s to The Capitol Bar and Bistro — a restaurant promises delicious fare at fair prices. The food is prepared with care and with fun little twists. The mixed greens salad is heartier than most starter salads with seasonal fruit, avocado and feta cheese: crunchy, sweet, tangy.

Follow up the salad course with lump crab cakes with Dynamite Sauce that melt in your mouth. Tom McMullen gleefully explains the secret ingredient: real crab. This epitomizes Chef Nate’s philosophy: excellent food made with quality ingredients at a good price in a setting that feels like an extension of your home…. An extension that comes with a roaring fireplace, lively bar, semi-secluded backroom and a dining area that overlooks the expansive patio. The menu offers plenty of selection without being overwhelming: panseared salmon, prime rib with bleu cheese, mushrooms and onions, lamb T-bones, pasta or The Hamburger. A burger this good only needs to be called The Hamburger — and it comes with a side of decadent truffle fries. Not everyone wants to be ushered into the dining room for a full meal, nor does everyone want to spend an arm and leg on dinner — the McMullens get that. For a little town, the bar with ambient lighting, nestled near the fireplace, is often crowded with neighborhood faces and friends. Happy hour from 5 to 6 lures neighbors in, the $5 bar menu keeps them seated for a while. The bar menu is heavy on

seafood (crab cakes, shrimp cocktail, panko fish taco) but with plenty of offerings for everyone — sliders, jalapeño cake and cheese sticks. The kids’ menu is just as robust for the younger set, with homemade chicken nuggets and thin-crust pizza but also steak, homemade mashed potatoes and fresh vegetables. Kids will devour dinner because they’re singularly focused on the fireplace — the one where they can roast marshmallows and make s’mores after dinner. That’s right, indoor s’mores! The McMullens have brought the magic of

roasting marshmallows inside. There’s something about a kid roasting a marshmallow that draws people in: a perfect ending to a memorable meal. The Capitol Bar and Bistro is open for lunch Tuesday through Saturday from 11:30 to 2; it’s open for dinner Monday through Saturday from 5 till close. It can host group events for up to 93 people. • Classic smoked salmon with toast points appetizer. below The $5 slider with Dynamite Sauce, made with tomatoes, green onions and romaine lettuce. above


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BOXCAR RESTAURANT & BAR by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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here’s a food train you’ll want to jump on in Avon. Boxcar Restaurant & Bar is driven by its chef-owners and always on track with local purveyors and seasonal ingredients. This modern gastropub has been open for almost two years now, and has developed an increased focus on communitystyle dining and business practices. Their updated menu highlights bar bites and small plates that can be enjoyed by one person or passed around the table. Along with promoting a sense of culinary camaraderie among its guests, the Boxcar kitchen works closely with local companies like the nearby neighborhood butcher shop, Colorado Meat Company, to source farm-to-table products. The restaurant’s recent menu re-design was completed by 970 Design, a local creative marketing team. “We like to create a collaboration that emphasizes community, and the menu emphasizes that as well,” says Hunter Chamness, chef-owner of Boxcar with other chef-owner, Cara Luff.

Walk into the restaurant and the spacious entrance leads into a handsome horseshoe bar, fireplace lounge and a long central community table. It’s certainly a place you’ll want to linger for a cocktail, and then perhaps venture into the dining room that sidles up to Chamness and Luff’s open kitchen. Boxcar’s decor — all the way to the show-stopping wallpaper in the bathrooms — and most of Boxcar’s food and cocktail list takes on this vintage motif, a contemporary and creative initiative has stayed with the establishment from its fruition. “It’s comfort food with a twist,” Chamness explains. “We create everything to be a little bit more special for an overall better experience.” To start, a London Swizzle cocktail looks sweet but comes through with the perfect balance of bitter. It’s made with gin, Campari, bitters and lemon juice, and is nice alongside a bowl of popcorn to munch. This carnival-inspired treat is topped with a modern and unique flavor of brewer’s yeast and sweet jalapeño. Pick some selections of housemade charcuterie for the table to share. From pâtés to sausages and

rillettes, the delicious renditions are inspired from chicken liver, corned beef, duck confit and smoked salmon. All the succulent fat on these cured delicacies pair nicely with a grilled radicchio salad. This small plate has a strong bitter angle that cuts through your palate, but the dish stays balanced as a whole with pickled kale, quinoa and golden raisins. The entrées at Boxcar really put protein on a pedestal. Then when you order a round of sides for the table, everyone gets to try a little bit of everything. “From the grill, we just wanted to do something where we showcase the protein itself, rather than have so much composition within each entrée,” says Chamness. Try the 10-ounce New York strip, topped with a rich slab of gorgonzola butter. Fish lovers will dive right in to the half-grilled Idaho trout, prepared with toasted almond and fennel. Don’t leave without trying a dessert, namely the banana cinnamon roll bread pudding with bacon maple ice cream, pecan and bourbon caramel. The best part about community dining is that you’ll have friends to roll you out the door, or just stay for another round. •

182 AVON RD. | 970.470.4121 BOXCARRESTAURANT.COM

PRICE

Bar bites and small plates: $5-$18; Entrées: $24-$65 •••

AMBIANCE

Modern mountain gastropub •••

SIGNATURE DISH

House-made pâtés, sausages and rillettes to share; 10-ounce New York Strip •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

Bar bites and small plates on the newly updated Boxcar menu feature local and seasonal ingredients and promote community-style dining.

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MAYA MODERN MEXICAN KITCHEN & TEQUILARÍA 126 RIVERFRONT LANE, WESTIN RIVERFRONT RESORT & SPA | AVON | 970.790.5500 | RICHARDSANDOVAL.COM/MAYABC

by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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ven though Maya is tucked inside The Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa, this modern Mexican kitchen and tequilaria is no normal resort hotel restaurant. It’s a destination in itself, known for a buzzing, tequila-fueled bar scene and for cuisine inspired by celebrity chef Richard Sandoval. Come by early in the evening for après-ski cocktails, or cozy up around a table with friends for the night at one of Maya’s high-backed circular booths. For starters, guacamole and tequila cocktails are a must-do at Maya. Served tableside-style, the guac comes in four varieties, and if you’re a purist, choose the traditional, but adventurers have some exciting options including the bacon, crab or tuna tartare guacamole. Of these, the

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tuna tartare is a standout, garnished with piquant fresno peppers, chipotle aioli and crunchy jicama strips. With more than 100 varieties of tequila available at Maya, the drink menu reads like a tome, but a specialty margarita list makes it easy to choose from among the best concoctions. The prickly pear margarita proves to be a mellow and balanced choice, with cactus-juice-infused tequila and citrus that come together nicely, neither too sour nor too sweet. Try a few small plates before moving on to the main course to get more of Maya’s flavor. Creative tacos come in threes, stuffed with pork belly or carne asada or grilled mahi mahi, perfect for sharing. The Calamari Azteca also works well as a shared appetizer, and these chile ancho-crusted calamari rings served with mango salsa, ginger

lime aioli, and blood orange chipotle go down oh-so-smoothly when interspersed with margarita sips. Among Maya’s entrées, the shrimp and crab enchiladas are a special treat, stuffed with lump crab, shrimp, roasted poblano pepper, corn, creamy mascarpone cheese and topped with a roasted tomatillo sauce. And this is your chance to try the signature slow-roasted pork carnitas, tastefully and colorfully adorned with avocado puree, requesón cheese, blue corn tortilla, black beans and a pickled vegetable citrus salsa. “The ingredients that go into this style of food are naturally accommodating for people with food allergies or sensitivities,” says Kevin Delonay, Maya’s food and beverage director and former executive chef. “Nearly all of our menu is gluten free, and we’re also vegetarian friendly.” In this way, the contemporary adaptations of Mexican classics that you’ll find on Maya’s menu can appeal to a wide variety of tastes. Maya’s melding of the modern and traditional continues beyond dinner and into dessert. Of course, you’ll find Mexican fried ice cream here for an after-dinner indulgence, but the Spanish coffee and caramel crepes provide a decidedly decadent way to end a meal at at Maya. •

PRICE

Starters: $10-$18 Entrées: $14-$30 •••

AMBIANCE

Hip, modern Mexican kitchen •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Slow-roasted pork carnitas •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, with a fun coloring menu available

Crab and shrimp enchiladas, tomatillo sauce with Chihuahua and mascarpone cheeses. left Carne asada tacos on homemade tortillas. above


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KIWI INTERNATIONAL DELIGHTS & COFFEE CO. 142 E. BEAVER CREEK PLACE | AVON | 970.949.4777

story & photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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iwi International Delight and Coffee Co. is not your typical ice cream parlor. With between 50 to 60 flavors of house-made ice cream, sorbet, gelato and fruit bars offered daily — made with fresh, natural, organic ingredients and no processed sugar — the brightly colored cafe located in the heart of Avon may have the healthiest frozen dessert selection in town. Owner Martha Trillo boasts 170 different flavors, and using allfresh ingredients, she creates unique sweet, savory and seasonal flavors, like the pumpkin spice gelato, kiwifruit fruit bars and avocado ice cream. She also offers dairy- and glutenfree options, using both almond and coconut milk in some of her desserts, as well as gluten-free ice cream cones. After a big day of flying through powder on the mountain, ice cream may not be the first food that comes to mind. Although this is what Kiwi International Delights and Coffee Co. is most known for, they also offer plenty

of warming winter delights to heat you up before or after a cold day on the hill.  The internationally-inspired cafe specializes in all-natural sweet and savory snacks and drinks from around the world. Start your day with a fresh organic juice or smoothie. For Trillo, who grew up in Mexico and never had soda in her house, fresh fruit juices and smoothies are part of her background.  “The same fruits I use for the juices, I use for the sorbet. You can pick any of the juices or smoothies and I can make it into a sorbet or visa versa.” she says. If you need something a little stronger to kick-start your day, try one of the dozen international coffees, like the strong, sweet Greek coffee or a French cafe au lait: a shot of espresso topped with hot flat milk.  This winter, Trillo added housemade empanadas to her menu. These Argentinian-style hot pastry pockets of goodness are baked entirely from scratch many times a day in a dozen different flavors. At $3.50 a pop, two hot empanadas with flavors like chicken and pesto, and a traditional meat variation with boiled egg and

egg and chorizo are a quick, easy and filling meal on move. You can also order them by the dozen for parties, either hot or frozen to bake at home. Finish off your ski day relaxing in one of the cafe’s comfortable couch seats, warming up with one a unique hot beverages and a gluten free crepe. Read a book from the communal bookshelf in the back while sipping on a rich Mexican-style spiced hot chocolate and snacking on a mozzarella, pesto, mushroom crepe, or try the ponches, a Mexican-style hot fruit punch made with citrus fruits, apples and cinnamon and garnished with pecans. Top it off with the ever-popular banana-strawberry Nutella crepe topped with ice cream and chocolate sauce and feel the last of the day’s aches melt away. •

PRICE

Frozen delights: $3-$7.50; light fare: $6.95-$10.95 •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy dessert destination with light dining options •••

SIGNATURE DISH

All-natural frozen juice bars •••

KID-FRIENDLY? top left A winter warming meal from Kiwi International including a selection of freshly baked empanadas, a cappuccino, a Mexican style hot choclate with cinnamon and other spices and a ponches, a Mexican hot "fruit punch" with citrus fruit, apples and cinnamon. top right Mint, basil, parsley and avocado gelato.

Yes, absolutely

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VIN48

48 E. BEAVER CREEK BLVD. AVON 970.748.WINE | VIN48.COM

by SUZANNE HOFFMAN photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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n December 2007, long-time locals with impressive gastronomic pedigrees, Collin Baugh, Greg Eynon and Charles Hays, opened vin48 in Avon, steps from Beaver Creek’s front door. The trio quickly developed a loyal following among valley residents and guests. The warm, welcoming atmosphere draws crowds daily for après work or play libations in the lively signature bar dominated by a 32-bottle Enomatic machine or full-on dining experiences from the restaurant’s imaginative dinner menu. “We are like a band and each one of us wants to get our songs onstage,” is how executive chef Hays describes himself and his two sous chefs he involves in all menu decisions. With his longtime kitchen cohorts, Brandon Woodhall and McLean “Mac” Hyde, Hays delights in their biannual exercise of creating new seasonal menus that showcase

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Colorado’s best culinary products. Chef Hays divides his menu between small and large plates with equally creative side dishes, snacks and desserts. Hyde constructed this season’s burrata salad out of a boule of the popular velvety fresh cheese, roasted beets, blood orange segments, watercress from local Knapp Ranch, house-pickled hearts of palm and black truffle vinaigrette topped with cracked pepper and fleur de sel. Lovers of Spanish octopus will enjoy vin48’s take on the Mediterranean cephalopod. After hours of aromatic poaching, the tentacles are grilled over a Colorado Western Slope fruitwood fire and served with a potato pave and mint jus topped with house-pickled mustard seeds and lemongrass-ginger foam. From his well-curated, expansive and ever-changing wine list, co-owner and wine director, Greg Eynon, recommends pairing the octopus salad with Cieck Erbaluce di Caluso 2013 from Alto Piemonte. Eynon described the white varietal from the upper reaches of this

under-discovered Italian wine region as “lively and fresh with crisp acidity that lends a citrus lift to the meaty texture of the Spanish octopus.” The fresh sea scallops from the cold northeast waters of the USA – obtained through the sustainable Sea-to-Table program – are seared and served with house-made kimchi over cashewcoconut puree and served with a slightly sweet sesame crisp inspired by Chef Hyde’s Lebanese roots. The chefs’ porc du jour specials highlight the large-plate selections. Every two weeks Hays receives a heritage breed pig from Mountain View Ranch in Meeker, Colorado. The chefs then answer only to their whims in concocting pork dishes they prepare in their colossal smoker that Hays purchased from a local goat rancher. New this season is Chef Woodhall’s grilled Colorado bone-in lamb loin served with couscous and bulk merguez – a North African-style lamb sausage – basil date chutney and fried chickpeas. Eynon recommends pairing the Moroccan inspired dish with 2015 Jean Royer Le Petit Roy. He believes the Grenache-heavy South Rhone red blend – in essence a declassified Chateauneuf-du-Pape – “lends a brambly fruit profile of pepper and Provencal herbaceousness that stands up to the basil date chutney.” There are many more choices on the menu and from the restaurant’s cellar of over 500 brands of wine to insure diners a fun, lively and always delicious time at vin48. •

PRICE

Small plates: $9-$15 Large plates: $26-$32  •••

AMBIANCE

Energetic locals’ spot with great views and a warm welcome •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Meats and fish grilled over fruitwood fire  •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Of course!

Seared sea scallops, cashew-coconut purée, house kimchi, sesame crisp. left Grilled Spanish octopus, potato pavé, pea shoots, mint jus, lemongrass, pickled mustard seed. above


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DRIVE THRU 2111 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD | WEST VAIL | 970.688.5247 * 150 EAST BEAVER CREEK BOULEVARD | AVON | 970.470.4042 616 W. LIONSHEAD CIRCLE, UNIT 206, CONCERT HALL PLAZA | VAIL | 970.470.4206 | GREENELEPHANTJUICERY.COM

by EMILY JAISSLE photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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he more plants you eat, the better you feel, and in turn the more your body craves,” explains Osha Groetz and Leo Flynn of Green Elephant Juicery. “Changing the perception of healthy food,” and “using the beautiful ingredients the earth gives,” are inspirations behind delivering 100 percent organic ingredients procured in every single item for sale. Green Elephant Juicery’s mission is simple: Make it easy for people to eat healthy foods. This goes for visitors with mindful eating habits, locals for their daily fix, and kids and adults of all ages. The clean and green interior of the flagship location in Avon invites clientele to indulge in cold-pressed juices, smoothies, organic foods, juice shots and desserts. Customers can grab and go daily-prepared containers or sit down to eat. While fueling up you may even wonder, “can this really be healthy?” Absolutely! Employees and loyal customers practice investing in health now with organic whole foods to avoid paying for it later with medical bills and doctor visits. This mindset is not arrogantly being pushed but is provided on a silver platter with a warm smile — great for first timers or regulars alike. The Avon location offers refuge

PRICE

Juice and smoothies $9.50, grab-and-go meals and snacks $3.95-$10 •••

AMBIANCE

So fresh and so clean, and always convenient •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Ruby juice, and Black Bean and Guacamole Wrap •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

from the blustery winter with a hot Tempeh Reuben. Ruby beet calendula kraut, tempeh and a cashew sage dressing are layered on sourdough from the beloved Avon Bakery for a protein-packed lunch. Another route would be to start the day with a delicate Lavender Lemon Parfait or a lush Acai Bowl. All options leave you with bright energy for the day and likely coming back for more. If favorites sell out, don’t fret: A new flavor fusion is awaiting in the next row over to soothe your hunger pangs.

This winter, Green Elephant will be rolling out a seasonal cocktail project to ensure quality mixers. The Canyon Fire 8 ounce (a mini-me to the Red Canyon) blends tomato, carrot, and celery with added flavors of garlic, black pepper and cayenne. A healthy cold-pressed Bloody Mary mixer at your fingertips for brunching and après alike — just add vodka and horseradish. Don’t forget the kiddos with a peanut butter and jelly smoothie or Spiced Hot Cider for their après indulgence. The largest menu of juice and food can be found in the Avon shop.

A drive thru in West Vail, a shop in Lionshead, and other local businesses such as Yeti's Grind, Color Coffee and Village Market service on-the-go green options. Mountain Soul Yoga in Edwards has a kiosk in their studio. Green Elephant provides weekly and monthly subscriptions, online ordering and delivery options for locals and vacationers to keep health at their fingertips and energy levels ignited. • The Canyon Fire "Bloody Mary" mix made with mixed fresh vegetables. left Hot Tempeh Reuben sandwich. above

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GREEN ELEPHANT JUICERY

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HOOKED 122 THE PLAZA | BEAVER CREEK 970.949.4321 | HOOKEDBC.COM

by KIM FULLER photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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eave it to Hooked to make you feel close to the ocean while you’re in the middle of the mountains. The fresh fish house in Beaver Creek receives the best-of-the-best sushigrade fish from Japan, Hawaii, California, New Zealand, Spain and beyond. Guests can order appetizers like oysters and ceviche, then entrées of fish tacos, king crab legs, and for the turf lovers, 7x steak. But what Hooked is really known for is its whole fish preparation. Pick a fish for your table, like a New Zealand Tai, and the chefs will prepare it in a variety of raw and cooked renditions. “We have everything from big ol’ groupers that taste like butter, to itty bitty flying fish that are steak-like,” explains Evan Biner, front-of-house manager,” so we have a big variety.” Start with the chef’s variation of your raw fish, like a sushi roll filled with avocado and cucumber, topped with roasted serrano aioli and bacon. Try the hand-grated wasabi for an authentic taste of spice. “Our chefs get really creative and bring out some really cool,

fascinating stuff,” says Biner. “We have some fun here.” Thank local owner and chef, Riley Romanin, for the unique experience he has created at Hooked. While he was originally trained in French cuisine, he fell for fish and was determined to elevate ocean flavor in the mountains. Choose between eight different cooked techniques for your table fish, like pan seared or steamed, flame broiled or flash fried. Purists will like Beachside — served simply with extra virgin olive oil, charred

PRICE

Dinner appetizers: $8-$30; Large plates: $22-$55; Whole fish preparation: Market Price •••

AMBIANCE

Fresh fish house •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Half raw and half cooked whole fish preparation •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

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lemon and sea salt. Most fish are served on the bone, so you can pull off the tender pieces yourself. Seafood lovers shouldn’t stop there, but enjoy ocean specialties of oysters, king crab legs or a steamed lobster. Check the chalkboards to see what in-season specials are in house for the evening. Order a bottle of sake to share, like the Dreamy Clouds Junmai Nigori, or a draft craft beer from one of the bar’s five rotating taps. Dessert can be a drink: the barrel-aged Mai Tai made with rum

and house-made almond puree. The sweet ending leaves you with a taste of Tiki, so you can linger “by the sea” for a little bit longer. Hooked can be your off-theslopes lunch or après ski stop as well. Tacos and sandwiches dominate the menu from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., and happy hour on the patio rolls from 3:30 to 5 p.m. • top Fresh fish served Beachside — extra virgin olive oil, charred lemon and sea salt. above Cocktails are handcrafted with care. left Daily fish selections are on display.


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FEATURED WINERIES

Simi

22 DECEMBER 2016

Chateau Montelena Winery 29 DECEMBER 2016

Far Niente

5 JANUARY 2017

Wild Horse Winery & Vineyards 12 JANUARY 2017

Seghesio Family Vineyards 19 JANUARY 2017

Van Duzer Vineyards 26JANUARY 2017

Beringer Vineyards 2 FEBRUARY 2017

Z.D. Winery

9 FEBRUARY 2017

Chalk Hill Winery 16 FEBRUARY 2017

Cakebread Cellars

23 FEBRUARY 2017

Darioush

2 MARCH 2017

Paul Hobbs Winery 9 MARCH 2017

Duckhorn Vineyards 16 MARCH 2017

Caymus Vineyards 23 MARCH 2017

Grgich Hills Estate 30 MARCH 2017

Domaine Drouhin Oregon 6 APRIL 2017

Ramey Wine Cellars

ALLIE'S CABIN by CARAMIE SCHNELL photo by BOB WINSETT, VAIL RESORTS

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s dining experiences go, Allie’s Cabin Thursday night wine dinners are memorable experiences not soon forgotten. Replete with a sleigh ride, front row seats to a fireworks show and five succulent courses each paired with a different glass of wine, it’s no wonder the dinners have really started to build momentum. And don’t plan on catching a show after dinner — at Allie’s, the whole dining experience is a show. Up until a few seasons ago, if you weren’t a member of the club, you wouldn’t have a chance to experience Allie’s Cabin, a membersonly private dining option on Beaver Creek Mountain. But chef Kirk Weems and general manager Robert Battle wanted to give the public an exclusive sneak peek and introduced weekly

LOCATED ON BEAVER CREEK MOUNTAIN 970.754.5545 | BEAVERCREEK.COM

Thursday night featured winery dinners. This is the fourth season for the wine dinners and the restaurant will host 17 of the exclusive evenings beginning Dec. 15 and continuing through April 6. And most of those dinners will include the Thursday Night Lights fireworks display, a weekly tradition at Beaver Creek. “They literally shoot the fireworks off about 150 yards downhill from us so it’s right in front of our window,” Battle says. Getting to Allie’s is part of the experience. Guests check in for the dinner at the base of Beaver Creek Mountain before enjoying an open-air sleigh ride up to the rough-sawn timber cabin, set amid a grove of aspens. The dinners themselves are slow, leisurely affairs that can take as long as two-and-a-half hours. “We slow things down on this night,” Battle says. “It’s an expression

of food and wine that are meant to be enjoyed together, at the pace they’re meant to be enjoyed.” The menu for each dinner is different. Last year Chef Weems created 80 unique courses. “I get the tasting notes from the winemaker and the chef builds the menu around those tasting notes,” Battle says. “Last year we didn't repeat a single course.” New this year, on select weekends and other special nights, Allie’s Cabin will host Family Dinner. Adults can enjoy a three-course prix fixe meal, and kids can avail themselves of the kid-friendly buffet. “This is meant to give families an enjoyable, but nice and not crowded dining option when the resort is busy,” Battle says. • Beaver Creek's Thursday Night Lights are visible from the deck at Allie's Cabin.

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PRICE

Cost for wine dinner: $165-$215 Cost for family dinner: $79 for adults, $35 for children •••

AMBIANCE

Private mountainside cabin with plush décor •••

SIGNATURE DISH

A wine dinner at Allie’s Cabin is a signature experience, made special by an entirely new menu every week •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

BEAVER CREEK

15 DECEMBER 15 2016

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TOSCANINI

60 AVONDALE LANE | BEAVER CREEK PLAZA | BEAVER CREEK 970.754.5590 | TOSCANINIBEAVERCREEK.COM

by ASHLEE BRATTON photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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here is a secret menu at Toscanini. You have to ask for it, and if you do, the attentive staff armed with professional culinary knowledge and dressed in crisp, black attire will help direct you to the really good stuff. Once you walk past the array of fire pits lining the ice rink in Beaver Creek Plaza and past the wall of wine leading to the main dining room overlooking the winter wonderland of Beaver Creek, just nestle into the warmth of the restaurant and enjoy a glass of Prosecco or homemade lemoncello and toast the winter season. Of course everything at this elegantly modern Italian restaurant located just steps from the Villar Center for the Performing Arts is delightfully delectable, but there is an additional menu specifically tailored to glutensensitive guests created by Executive Chef John Zavoral that may be sans gluten but definitely does not lack in varietal choice, visual appeal or flavor. Think gluten-free means flavor-free? Not at this fine-dining establishment. Some restaurants may offer up an option or two, but Beaver Creek’s Toscanini goes a step further and has an entire menu tailored to its guests that mirrors the original menu. Indulge in gourmet gluten-free pizzas from the Figura with poached figs, parma ham and First Snow goat cheese with a balsamic reduction to their Zucca butternut squash soup with allspice crème fraiche and toasted pumpkin seeds. Known as the “collaborative chef”

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when working on his creations, Chef Zavoral enjoys playing with ingredient options in order to bring the best of both worlds together. Plus, he’s not opposed to substitution twists on any menu item to accommodate guests, including dairy-free, gluten-free and kosher requests. Perhaps the ability to blend worlds comes from his roots on his family’s 165-acre farm in Minnesota that mingles with his food artistry background, allowing him to leave his own menu mark.

“Why does it have to be froufrou? It’s real Italian food the way Italians do it: simple, with quality ingredients,” Zavoral says, smiling slyly as he talks about the influence of southern Italy on his pastas. “Besides, making and rolling pasta is like therapy to me. I love it.” There’s not a boring dish on the menu. The Quadriefore braised duck with pecorino cheese, mushrooms and farm fresh peas and tomatoes “tastes like winter,” beams General Manager Dana Gerimonte. The Pettine pan-seared scallops in mushroom risotto and truffle butter sauce is a chef favorite but certainly not to be outdone by the beef tenderloin with truffle aioli, manchego and crispy potato. What’s an authentic Italian dinner without a little Italian sorbet to polish off the evening? Their signature berry cobbler topped with a temptingly sweet white chocolate ice cream that contrasts the berry trio is the perfect way to top off an evening in Beaver Creek — whether you enjoy something off the secret menu or not. • Barbabieotla: roasted beets, candied walnuts, First Snow goat cheese, apple vinaigrette and arugula. left Spigola: seared Colorado bass, white bean-bacon ragu and a tomato vinaigrette. above

PRICE

Starters: $9-$25 Mains: $13-$38 Desserts: $5-$12 •••

AMBIANCE

La dolce vita, with stylish, contemporary cuisine and authentically Italian flare. •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Vitello Piccata •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

With a kids menu and a live pizza chef, are you kidding?


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•••

AMBIANCE

Mountainside bistro meets neighborhood grill •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Chef's cattle tasting: Colorado Wagyu, Argentinian grass-fed Angus, Nebraska grainfinished Holstein •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

8100

MOUNTAINSIDE BAR & GRILL

by JOHN LACONTE photos by CHRISTOPHER DILLMANN

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he question on chef Christian Apetz's mind hasn't been where's the beef, but where's the beef industry headed, and what's out there for consumers to try. After engaging in an extensive search of the various types of cattle on the market today, Apetz decided that this year at 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill, he wanted to offer beef lovers the variety of what's available and let them decide for themselves what is best. "We went on a venture to figure out what truly is the best tasting beef out there," Apetz says. New for this year, the Chef's Cattle Tasting puts 5-ounce New York Strip cuts of several different forms of beef in front of the guest for a side-by-side comparison. You get to try a grass-fed Angus from Argentina, a Mishima Reserve Wagyu from Colorado and a grain-finished

Holstein out of Nebraska, three of the best forms of cattle available today. "It's an exploratory dish for steak lovers," Apetz says. "We really had to do our homework to get this on the menu." After figuring out which beef you like best on your first visit to 8100 this season, you can get that steak hand cut to order on your next visit, which is also a new twist for this winter from 8100. "You pick the size, you pick the style, and our butchers are going to cut it to your liking and specifications," Apetz says. With all that exploration and discovery, you may assume that the steak will be the most memorable element of your first trip to 8100 this year. But that's probably not going to be the case, says Apetz. "We just rolled out, literally, a pastry-shop trolley this year, which has been wildly popular," he says. Apetz's daughters got the first glimpse of the trolley. They couldn't stop thinking about the white chocolate snowman, complete with Oreo cookie top hat. But that's just one of the scores of dessert bits that will roll through the dining room

50 WEST THOMAS PLACE | PARK HYATT BEAVER CREEK 970.827.6600 | HYATT.COM/GALLERY/BEAVE8100

during your visit. The trolley was a nice touch from 8100's new pastry chef, local legend Amy Andrews, formerly of Sweet Basil. "People love the trolley for its impulsive quality," Apetz says. "When it rolls by you, you just want to reach out and grab a little treat from it. People were talking about it and taking pictures of it on its very first trip through the dining room, it just makes for a memorable experience for the whole family." • Elk T-bone with garlic tomato chutney, bacon-wrapped asparagus and crispy Brussels sprouts with butternutlemon salad.

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8100 Seafood Tower with a whole lobster, king crab, oysters, shrimp and a crab cocktail. top

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PRICE

Sides, Snacks & apps: $6-$23 Entrées: $17-$40

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BEANO’S CABIN

BEAVER CREEK MOUNTAIN VIA SLEIGH RIDE 970.754.3463 | BEANOSCABINBEAVERCREEK.COM

by BETH POTTER photos by KEVIN ERVING AND JACK AFFLECK

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e hum “Sleigh Ride,” the whole way up to Beano’s Cabin, wrapped up in blankets and gazing at snowflakes dropping out of the night sky. Guests are warmly greeted when they arrive at the private cabin, located up on a hill accessed only by sleigh and snowcat at Beaver Creek Resort. After exchanging snowy boots for warm slippers, diners sit down in the highceilinged dining room replete with antler chandeliers and a roaring fireplace. Chef Kevin Erving cooks with the finest products he can find. Bacon jam and bison sausage is made in-house with local ingredients. A peach trifle for dessert is put together with Colorado peaches preserved at the height of freshness, after Erving ate a juicy Palisade peach once that “blew up in my face.” “We try to cook the best within the season,” Erving says. Diners start with a warm, comforting soup, a prelude of things to come. Appetizers start coming, along with perfectly paired wines. Sommelier Brian Helt likes to explain his choices to guests – the unusual Antigua after-dinner wine from California is served with the crunchy (and mouth watering) braised pork belly, for example. An Australian sauvignon blanc lends a crisp counterpoint to the ahi tuna poke, which is, itself, a nod to Erving’s time as a chef in Hawaii. Other standouts include the Oysters Bacon Feller, made with Kumamoto oysters, and the bison sausage atop creamy polenta.

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The room takes on a rosy glow, punctuated by laughter from a nearby table. We feel enveloped in warmth and goodwill. Then it’s on to the main course, with the menu offering traditional mountain staples of venison and beef alongside fish dishes such as salmon and striped bass. “I’d say we’re mountain and

coast,” Erving says. “I like bright flavors and robust flavors.” Rubbed with spices and grilled to perfection, the Colorado lamb is a standout, paired with minted carrots and parsnips and served on a delicate celery root puree, the lamb is then finished with a chimichurri. "All together they will take your senses on a wonderful culinary journey which is representative to the cuisine at Beano's Cabin," assures Erving. The roasted venison holds its own, the smoky flavor of the coffee rub offset by a drizzled pomegranate reduction sauce. The restaurant has a loyal local following, which insists that some menu items never go away, including a potato gratin that Erving says gets smoked outside the back door. When it comes time for dessert, the chef pulls out all of the stops, just when you think you can’t eat another bite. A brown butter ice cream tastes just like caramel, served with warm apple pie. Beano’s cheese plate is a simpler end to an exquisite meal — an assortment of Colorado cheeses, served with Beano’s Cabin honey, house preserves and crusty bread.

PRICE

$129 for the five-course menu •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy mountain cabin •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Roasted Colorado lamb sirloin •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

On the way back, we share stories with other diners about their trips to Beano’s: a perfect end to a perfect ski day. • Colorado lamb sirloin with celery root puree, parsnips, carrots and chimichurri. left Beano's Cabin is located midway up the mountain. above


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by KIM FULLER photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY & CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT PRICE

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hile trends come and go, a revolution is the catalyst for lasting change. Chef Riley Romanin knows what the modern foodie is looking for on a menu: quality, simplicity and intelligent flavor. His newest restaurant in Beaver Creek has been open for less than two years, but it’s definitely setting a high bar for ingredient-inspired innovation. Located inside the Beaver Creek Lodge, Revolution is warm with a buzz, like an inviting bistro that’s hidden but urban, as if in an alley of a strip like Vegas, Times Square or Hollywood. Waves of dim red lighting flood the ceiling in the bar and open kitchen — both set right at the entrance to the restaurant, while its name is spelled out in rows of shiny pennies set into the tile floor. Cozy seats by the fireplace and the sight of snow falling outside reminds you you’re still in the mountains, and the ingredients reflect that. What Romanin has created is a fun and lively scene, paired with every angle of full dining satisfaction. Colorado meat is the star of the show here, and homemade sauces the ensemble. Steakhouse style, guests can pick turf or surf options like 7x rib-eye or Colorado rack of lamb, Skuna Bay salmon or Maine lobster. Then you pick a style: blackened and blue or carne asada, the Asian-inspired kalbi style or mushroom with truffle butter. There are more than styles to choose from — some better for

Cocktails & Dreams: $10-$14 Apps: $8-$25 Featured Butcher's Block: $22-$42 Handhelds: $19-$30 Sides: $5-$8 •••

AMBIANCE

Upscale & 'revolutionary' •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Rotisserie Mountain View Porchetta; the 7x prime rib •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

With food rotating on hot spits, are you kidding?

steak and some better for poultry and fish, so it’s truly a chooseyour-own adventure experience. “We just use really, really good product,” Romanin explains, “and let the guest drive it from there.” Start the evening with a homemade cocktail like the Woody Creek Mtn Sour, a nicely balanced blend of Woody Creek bourbon, lemon, simple syrup, egg whites and a carpano antica float. Bread service is where it’s at here, with homemade naan bread and

tortillas served with a selection of Revolution’s signature sauces. Order the warm, pumpkin seed-crusted goat cheese salad as an appetizer, and for the table to taste, a mind-blowing plate of 7x bone marrow with a serrano jam and an onion marmalade. The restaurant is named for its revolutionary approach to preparing food, but equally for the revolving action, or revolutions, that take place with a rotisserie. This is the way Romanin and his kitchen staff prepare meat here, and selections like the bacon-wrapped Boulder chicken

breast, and the center-cut 7x ribeye are so tender and succulent. Be sure to at least try Revolution’s R1 sauce — it’s their own, horseradishbased steak accompaniment. “We definitely have evolved, and Revolution is a steakhouse by cuisine, but rotisserie by technique,” explains Romain. “We focus on food, simplicity, and everything being done just right on the rotisserie.” • The 7X rib-eye is cooked on the rotisserie, as all the meats are. left The dramatic room is perfect for cocktails. above

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REVOLUTION

26 AVONDALE LANE | INSIDE THE BEAVER CREEK LODGE | BEAVER CREEK 970.845.1730 | REVOLUTIONDINING.COM

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OSPREY FIRESIDE GRILL BASE OF STRAWBERRY PARK EXPRESS LIFT | 10 ELK TRACK ROAD | BEAVER CREEK 970.754.7396 | OSPREYATBEAVERCREEK.ROCKRESORTS.COM/DINING

PRICE

Starters: starting at $8 Main dishes: starting at $14 for sandwiches/burgers and $24 for entrées •••

by JOHN O’NEILL photos by CHRISTOPHER DILLMANN

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he Osprey’s Fireside Grill at the base of Beaver Creek’s Strawberry Park lift, offers a redhot fireplace enshrined by a big stone hearth to warm your hands and toes, and a selection of shareables and cocktails to warm your spirit while swapping stories from a day on the mountain. With a ski-in/ski-out backdoor, you can be at the bar or near the fireplace

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with amuse-bouche on the way in under a minute flat. This is model après and something that executive chef Ryan Murray has turned from a neat convenience in years past into a worthy dining destination this winter. “My vision is to get people in off the lift, snow coming off them, and have them sit down in front of a nice big fire, watch others come down off the mountain, get a drink and some dishes made for sharing and enjoy their company,” Murray says. “Maybe they’ll look at the entrée menu and decide to come back for the Wagyu

strip or the buffalo rib-eye.” They’d have cause to both come in and come back. Murray displays a fine attention to detail, transforming simple dishes into sublime creations through a sometimes-arduous process. The short rib mac and cheese is divine but the preparation is not effortless. The fork-tender short rib comes alive with flavor only because of the carrot, onion, celery, garlic, tomato and red wine mix that it’s braised with. The three-cheese blend for the macaroni is perfectly silky, and the scallion sour cream adds perfectly to the moist texture and rich taste. Murray also wafts incentive to anyone coming down President Ford’s when he smokes meat out back. The curing aroma from items such as bacon over peach wood for the Osprey burger, wings that have brined overnight, or duck breast for Murray’s smoked duck breast entrée could tempt a bear out of hibernation as high as Thresher Glade. “We’re doing all this stuff right here, keeping the food simple and letting it speak for itself,” Murray says. “The comfort, homey food is just what you need after a big day of skiing.” Then there is that après amuse-bouche. Three selections: a hot toddy made with 10th Mountain Division bourbon served with a chorizo-stuffed, bacon-wrapped fig; Bloody Mary served with a vodka-

AMBIANCE

Upscale casual •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Elk tenderloin with garlic confit mashed potatoes, roasted cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and shallot demi •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Absolutely

marinated shrimp skewer, and a Kir Royale paired with a raspberry and brie filo cup. None of what’s aforementioned even touches on a selection of après-après mains that includes Murray’s Wagyu Strip, smoked duck breast and buffalo rib-eye. It’s clear Murray takes a tremendous amount of pride in what he presents. One taste shows that he’s succeeding. • Mac and cheese with creamy aged cheddar with braised short ribs. top right White wine poached Bosc pear salad stuffed with gorgonzola with toasted walnuts with warm greens and cranberry vinaigrette. left Wagyu New York strip steak with roasted fingerling potatoes and grilled asparagus. The sauce is an in-house Breckenridge brown ale and a cabernet. top left


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by KIMBERLY NICOLETTI photos by RIC STOVALL / VAIL RESORTS & AUSTIN DAY

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here’s no better way to begin an intimate dining experience than cuddled up under a blanket as the sleigh ascends Bachelor Gulch and arrives at Zach’s Cabin, a luxury stone-and-log structure characterized by soft light emanating from the expansive windows and long icicles hanging from the snowy rooftop. Inside, Zach’s Cabin envelops guests with its warm glow. Crisp white napkins, crystal glasses and an enormous fireplace create a welcoming ambiance, high on the hillside. Named after one of the area’s original homesteaders — a sheriff’s deputy killed in the line of duty, Zach Allen, Zach’s Cabin is one of the finest restaurants in the Vail Valley, not only because of its romantic and invigorating open-air sleigh ride, but also because of its refined cuisine and wine. This winter, Chef Ron Jackson, who hails from the historic Hotel Colorado in Glenwood Springs, has taken the reigns. His wide array of culinary experience spans the globe. “Having been involved in opening more than a dozen new hotels and restaurants and consulted in rolling out concepts ranging from Pan Asian to traditional American, British, Italian and French cuisine, we are confident that Chef Ron will elevate our members’ and guests’ dining experience,” says Jamie Sloman, dining and events manager. Jackson has added interesting ingredients to the flavorful menu, but has kept it mostly the same in early season, blending Colorado staples with fresh coastal dishes. However, expect an exciting, revamped menu

in January. In addition to presenting chile-rubbed elk tenderloin and jalapeño-crusted trout, one of Jackson’s specialties includes his mom’s favorite: the Boulder natural chicken. Intimate tables situated against windows with majestic mountain views, or set against a warm, inviting fireplace, create a perfect setting for romantic getaways, special occasions, or anyone looking for an unparalled rustic dining experience. Some guests even snowshoe up. Winner of the Wine Spectator “Best Of” Award of Excellence for

over 10 years, Zach’s wine program includes approximately 500 selections representing the most famous wine regions around the world. A dozen or so wines by the glass offer an eclectic mix, ranging from the wildly popular Frank Family cabernet to unknowns like nortico albarhino and Otto's Constant Dream, a pinot noir from New Zealand." “No wine list is complete without smaller and larger bottles for those looking for something a little less or a trophy piece to sit atop of a table throughout dinner.” In addition to a robust sparkling section, Zach’s white wines represent all major countries and include lesser known regions like Greece and Portugal, while still concentrating on wines from California and France. The heart of Zach’s wine list is reds by the bottle, with nearly a quarter of the selections featuring California cabernets and pinot noirs from Oregon and California. The entire spectrum of producers and vintages is assured to please any connoisseur. “My job — other than the service of our guests — is to accurately and respectively represent the world of wine on the excellent list up at Zach's Cabin in the same manner that winemakers have had in the production of their products,”

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ZACH'S CABIN

MOUNTAINSIDE | BACHELOR GULCH 970.754.6575 | ZACHSCABINBEAVERCREEK.COM

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PRICE

Appetizers: $14-$27; Entréess: $31-56.  •••

AMBIANCE

Fine dining in a rustic cabin •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Chile-rubbed elk tenderloin, jalapeñocrusted trout •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

says Zach’s Sommelier Sean Costa. With spectacular views of the Gore Range and unparalleled rustic elegance, Zach's Cabin is sure to be a highlight of any day on Beaver Creek Mountain. • Zach's Cabin is perched midmountain in Bachelor Gulch. left Butternut-apple soup with butterpoached lobster. above

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DUSTY BOOT ROADHOUSE by KRISTA DRISCOLL photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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he Dusty Boot Roadhouse in Beaver Creek is teeming with people, and Wally Walling weaves his way in and out of the tables, greeting families and delivering dishes with the flair and repose of a socialite hosting one giant dinner party. “Everyone decided to eat dinner at the same time tonight,” he says with a gracious smile. This year marks the Dusty Boot’s 20th anniversary, and Walling has been there nearly as long, graduating from expeditor

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through the ranks to general manager. “I’ve grown up with the place,” he says simply. The menu has grown up over the past year or so, as well, with about 50 percent of the old items replaced by new dishes, many of which are inspired by dining trends that have percolated through the Roadhouse Hospitality Group’s dozen or so other restaurants scattered across the mountains and the Front Range. The new list has a slightly more upscale approach while maintaining reasonable price points, Walling said. Gone is the traditional pile of nachos, replaced by homemade ranch potato chips stacked with pork carnitas, barbecue sauce,

210 OFFERSON ROAD | BEAVER CREEK PLAZA 970.748.1146 | DUSTYBOOTBEAVERCREEK.COM

creamy onion horseradish and cheese. Other snacks include Brussels sprouts with goat cheese and a sweet and spicy sesame sauce and a brand new chef’s board, with prosciutto, smoked elk sausage, salami soppressata, Italianmade burrata, traditional accouterments and toasted rosemary bread. Each of the salads comes with a chef’s protein recommendation, from the grilled pear gorgonzola salad to the Roadhouse signature Thai salad: crispy wontons alternating with layers of avocado, cubed mango, peanuts and more, with a suggested coupling of seared ahi tuna. Much of the protein on the menu is sourced from Colorado, from the hormone-free beef used in the Dusty Boot’s signature burgers to the pan-fried locally sourced striped bass to the 1855 Black Angus New York Strip, served with homemade shoestring fries and a duo of tri-colored peppercorn cream sauce and honey-chipotle molasses. Some of the restaurant’s favorites remain, albeit with a slightly new look. The Boot Pasta, for instance, has dropped its Cajun trappings and now features fresh, locally sourced pappardelle pasta, with blackened shrimp, andouille sausage, and spinach in sun-dried tomato cream sauce. The new menu items have had an overwhelmingly positive response, Walling said, adding that the younger

PRICE

Starters are $9-$19 Mains: $12-$39 •••

AMBIANCE

Laid back and convivial •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Homemade ranch potato chips, Boot Pasta, steak frites •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

set is particularly fond of the s’mores fondue. The dish comes in a small cast-iron skillet, with perfectly toasted marshmallows crowning a stratum of crushed graham crackers and Ghirardelli chocolate finished with a caramel drizzle and a side of more grahams for scooping. • Steak frites with tri-colored peppercorn cream and honey-chipotle molasses. top right S'mores fondue. left The cocktails rely on fresh herbs and fruit. top left


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by ASHLEE BRATTON photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ime stops as you pull into the private parking lot tucked just behind the gates of Beaver Creek and enter into the beauty and serenity of Mirabelle, Beaver Creek’s oldest original homestead nestled and hidden away in her own winter wonderland. Step onto the wrap-around porch lit up for the holidays and into the farmhouse foyer for a drink at the bar, or take a seat on one of the couches by the fireplace and enjoy the views of the surrounding forest. Mirabelle’s location and Nottingham Ranch heritage is unique to the area of the Vail Valley and is truly the

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55 VILLAGE ROAD | BEAVER CREEK | 970.949.7728 | MIRABELLE1.COM

only one left of its kind. The quaint charm and warm ambiance is met with culinary perfection headed by a husband-andwife team that married their European roots with the history of Beaver Creek. Daniel and Nathalie Joly have been operating the four-star business since 1992 and recently secured the property and land from Vail Resorts, an endeavor they’ve been working on for over 25 years. Mirabelle is finally theirs. Chefowner Daniel Joly proudly quips, “The magic of Mirabelle is more than just good food. It’s almost a perfect storm of uniqueness and charm that comes together in one location.” This master chef and his wife are the story and part of the magic that is Mirabelle. “We see ownership in Mirabelle giving us reason

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MIRABELLE

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to continue to invest in and enhance Mirabelle for generations to come, much as restaurateurs do in Europe.” Mirabelle is the fruition of a lifelong dream. This handsome devil now decked with flecks of grey vowed as a 15-year-old that one day he would own a restaurant, graduated from the Culinary Institute of Brussels, cooked in Michelin-starred restaurants in Belgium (where he was named the nation’s best chef at age 20), and landed at Beaver Creek’s Mirabelle in 1992, which he purchased from founder Luc Meyer seven years later. The European flair peeks out from the tomato and rosemary flatbread artfully displayed with a stone made specifically for this particular appetizer’s exhibition. Even the names of the cocktails have their own personality, labeled after famous moments in the golf world. Try the “Hanger” named after Tiger’s chip shot in the 2005’s Masters, or the “One Iron” commemorating Jack Nicklaus’s shot into the wind in the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. Bruce, Mirabelle’s long-time bartender since 1996 can point any patron in the right direction for any libation needs or questions these cocktails inspire. From the foie gras doused in a green tea and cranberry reduction with gingerbread dust to the homemade red kuri squash ravioli with honeysmoked paprika, there’s something for every patron to discover and enjoy. The tempting pecan pie tartlet with cinnamon

PRICE

Starters: $12-24 Mains: $32-$48 •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy farmhouse with exquisite European cuisine •••

SIGNATURE DISH

North Sea Dover sole •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Children’s menu available

crème anglaise and gingersnap crumble will make even the most full and satisfied patron want one more bite and to stay in the magic of Mirabelle and the glimmer of the Joly legacy a few minutes longer. • Seared halibut veggie "fry-fry" with marmalade, olive oil, fennel and cherry tomatoes. top right Maine lobster "a la plancha" out of the shell, spicy calamari, ink risotto, littleneck clam, butter broth. left Mirabelle chef-owner Daniel Joly and his team of chefs dive into a hazelnut Belgian chocolate mousse dome. top left

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GROUSE MOUNTAIN GRILL 141 SCOTT HILL ROAD | THE PINES LODGE | BEAVER CREEK | GROUSEMOUNTAINGRILL.COM | 970.949.0600

by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR PRICE

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t’s the little things that make an evening at Grouse Mountain Grill truly memorable: snowflakes falling outside on the patio, jazzy tunes floating into the dining room from the piano bar, comfy high-backed chairs, glowing chandeliers, and — of course — the food itself. Since its beginnings more than two decades ago, Grouse Mountain Grill has understandably risen as one of Beaver Creek’s shining culinary stars, and the drive to The Pines Lodge sets up the set-apart, special feel of this place that’s really only minutes away from the bustle of Beaver Creek Village. Once nestled inside the warm dining room, take off your coat and get ready to linger because this dining experience is one you’ll want to draw out as long as

Starters: $7-$19 Entrées: $35-$47 •••

AMBIANCE

Sophisticated setting for an exquisite meal with family and friends •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Grilled Rocky Mountain elk loin •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, kids’ menu available

possible. Begin the slow unfolding with a signature cocktail such as the Kentucky Lullaby — for bourbon lovers — or the Smoke Jumper, a tequilabased cocktail with a smoky mezcal flavor that makes it prime for pairing with the tuna crudo, a beauty of an appetizer that’s drizzled with a similarly smoky-flavored charred jalapeño vinaigrette. Crunchy radishes and cucumbers complement the smoothness of the fish, making this zesty small plate an exciting flavor opener.

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LOCAL FLAVOR Now that you’re ready for the full-flavor experience of Chef David Gutowski’s kitchen, go for a taste of the smoked ricotta ravioli, which — like all of the pastas here — is made in house daily with fresh, local eggs and stuffed with golden raisins, Swiss chard and braised goat sourced from Salida, Colorado. A commitment to perfect pasta also shows up in the gnocchi that accompanies one of Grouse Mountain’s standout entrées, the grilled Rocky Mountain elk loin. Pillowy gnocchi, pumpkin seed pesto, local squash, and huckleberry vinaigrette make this flavorful dish a hearty and satisfying winter meal. The dinner menu includes abundant options ranging from trout and tenderloin to the famed roasted sausage stuffed rabbit loin, providing

enough variety for all kinds of tastes. “We take pride in the service we extend to our guests,” says dining room manager Lou Wilson, highlighting just another one of the little things that stand out at Grouse Mountain Grill in a big way. “We want to create a sophisticated dining atmosphere in a setting that’s friendly and accommodating.” Mission accomplished. With this all-star team’s above-and-beyond commitment to service, a dinner at Grouse Mountain Grill turns into a special experience that’s in no way stuffy. The personal rapport adds an encore of benefits to an already-charmed evening: trusted recommendations. Ask the sommelier for personalized wine pairings, and even if you’re feeling shy, ask for a dessert recommendation. Take their word for it — or mine: Pastry Chef Jessica Anderson has a knack for sweet endings. Her apple walnut baklava layers on the love, and the double chocolate bread pudding’s liquid cheesecake center won’t be soon forgotten. • Yellowfin tuna crudo, cucumber, charred jalapeño vinaigrette, sesame cracker, avocado. left Grilled Rocky Mountain elk loin, pumpkin seed pesto, gnocchi, local squash, huckleberry vinaigrette. above


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SPLENDIDO AT THE CHATEAU 17 CHATEAU LANE | BEAVER CREEK | 970.845.8808 | SPLENDIDORESTAURANT.COM

PRICE

Appetizers: $14-$22; Entrées: $38-$62 •••

AMBIANCE by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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plendido at the Chateau doesn’t skip a beat. Between the rhythms of piano keys stroked live in the lounge and the seamless melodies of service dancing through the dining room, chef-owner Ackerman, dining room manager Brian Rhodes and the rest of the staff make

every evening a forever memory. For me, Splendido is the song I like to play over and over again — the one that never gets old. It’s the gem of a milestone birthday, the heart of an anniversary and the excitement of an impulsive date night. Just ask your glass of Champagne Henriot and the beautiful Britten artwork on the wall; from his golden bubbles to her gold leaf paint, sweet nothings are not only whispered into each moment, but projected into every course.

The restaurant has been freshly redesigned by Dallas Lyon of Lyon Design Group Edwards. A delicious scene to witness, it’s even more so with that first bite. Try the peekytoe crab appetizer to begin, served with the bright flavors of apple and pomegranate surrounded by the crunch of walnut pieces. The lump crab is succulent and especially distinct in its ocean richness over a celery root puree. A glass of Roots pinot noir from Oregon pairs just right with the pear and beet tart. Delicate in presentation and robust in flavor, this savory salad is bold with midnight blue cheese yet bright with candied pecan. For his entrée renditions, Ackerman is focusing on highlighting the ingredients for what they are, without too much alteration. Since taking over the restaurant in the spring of 2016, he’s lightened up the menu with less butter, while still maintaining plenty of flavor. “We are trying to elevate the food, and really give people what I believe they want to eat,” says Ackerman. “What we put on the plate is what we would want to eat and what we think is creative.” The Chilean sea bass stands up effortlessly to a glass of Alexander Valley cab franc. The dish is deeply savory with Brussels sprouts, wild rice, black garlic, chive and amaranth, yet balanced with a lively miso glaze on the fish.

Elegant mountain chateau  •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Dakota 21-day dry-aged buffalo rib-eye

The crescendo seems to build throughout the meal, and fully belts out perfection with the Dakota 21-day dry-aged buffalo rib-eye. This completely tender cut is served over a bed of spaetzel and lambic beer cabbage for a hearty Tyrolean flare. Each smooth, velvet-like bite should be taken with sips of cabernet sauvignon to lead you right back to your next forkful. The show doesn’t end until Sebastian Schmitt sings. The French pastry chef is crafting desserts where you must “crack open the moon,” or “climb up the mountain” – unique and fun presentations that please all the way from plate to palate. • Ontario Veal Oscar, king crab, bearnaise, olive oil crushed potato. top right The Mountain dessert with chocolate, caramel and pecan. left Yellowfin tuna, fresno chili, tomato, garlic, castelvetrano olive, caper, basil. cover White chocolate moon with tropical flavors. top left

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BACHELORS LOUNGE AT THE RITZ-CARLTON, BACHELOR GULCH 0130 DAYBREAK RIDGE | 970.343.1087 | RITZCARLTON.COM/BACHELORGULCH

by KIM FULLER photos courtesy THE RITZ-CARLTON, BACHELOR GULCH

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hampagne and cigars aren’t just for celebrations, but they do always make an evening seem all the more special. Bachelors Lounge is the place to raise a glass for an occasion, or simply “cheers” because you’re enjoying a slice of paradise. The contemporary scene of the

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lounge feels urban and lively, but the accents of the area and all the lovely amenities create the comforts of home. This adults-only indoor bar flows seamlessly into a heated outdoor terrace, and it’s a guest go-to for pre-dinner drinks or late-night entertainment. Stay inside to play pool, watch your team in action or relax in one of the rich leather chairs under a glow of soft lighting, or head outside

to cozy up beside the glass-framed fire pits and under overhead heaters. Out on the stone-lined terrace, guests can really enjoy the crisp mountain air without catching a chill. Before the sun goes down, look out to see a hillside of snow-covered trees. Once it’s dark, head out for a nightcap and a glimpse of the stars. Thumb through the cocktail menu and spirits list to choose your winter warmer for the evening — perhaps a pour from the extensive Scottish single-malt and local bourbon options, or a choice from a variety of cognac or perhaps the list of high-end tequilas. Domestic and imported beers include local selections and international favorites. The resort’s sommelier has created an impressive list of red, white and sparkling wine from the best growing regions in the world. Light bites are available and ideal for snacking and sharing. Enjoy artisan meat and cheese plates, spicy olives and beef sliders, among other options. As a full cigar bar, Bachelors Lounge has every kind you can imagine, with a price scale that ranges from $17 to $2,000. Outdoors, guests can smoke the cigars, as well as a variety of flavored hookah. A unique

PRICE

Starters: $11-$18 •••

AMBIANCE

Indoor-outdoor adult lounge •••

SIGNATURE DRINKS

Vaportinis •••

SIGNATURE CIGAR

Solomon’s Private Stash Dual Wrap

exclusive are the vaportinis, offering a zero-calorie “dessert” with flavors like French cheesecake, apple crumb and chocolate cake. • Cocktails work for both pre-dinner and late-night options. top right The lounge is clean, contemporary and comfortable. left Heaters make the outdoor area cozy. top left


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•••

AMBIANCE

Alpine, refined •••

SIGNATURE DISH

16-ounce elk rack with a side of charred Brussels sprouts

WYLD

0130 DAYBREAK RIDGE | 970.343.1555 RITZCARLTON.COM/BACHELORGULCH

by KIM FULLER photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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et ready to go WYLD. The RitzCarlton, Bachelor Gulch has unleashed a fresh and inspired restaurant concept this season in a beautifully renovated space. Locally sourced alpine dining is a perfect culinary muse for Executive Chef Benjamin Christopher and his staff, as they feature artisanal ingredients and products from across Colorado. The renovation opened up the space significantly. A wall of windows framing the ski slopes is no longer hidden by thick shutters and now

let the outside shine in. Stunning graphic prints by Colorado landscape photographer John Fielder invigorate the intimate yet lively dining room, and that energy flows right through the impressively redone horseshoe bar and into the great room. As the property’s prized living room, this fireside lounge now offers the WYLD bar menu, so guests can stay comfy on overstuffed sofas or sit at one of the new walnut community tables for an après ski cocktail or a casual bite to eat in the evening. Try the Big Fat Toasted Grilled Cheese, made with three decadent cheeses and served with a creamy bowl of all-star tomato soup.

Before your meal in the WYLD dining room, take a moment to enjoy the couches and fireplace that catch a clear view of magic in motion coming out of the open kitchen. The restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner, so you may find yourself relaxing here more often than not on any day that you’re lucky enough to be at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch. For dinner, don’t hold back. Foie gras with roasted pears and frisee is silky and rich alongside a crisp glass of Riesling, and the salt-roasted spiral beet salad is a unique rendition that showcases the hearty minerality of the beets, brought to life even more beautifully with every sip of Chablis. Many of the must-try dishes are in the “alpine classics” section of the menu, featuring a heritage of soul-hugging food born in the rugged mountains of Europe. The bison schnitzel is a Colorado nod to the Austrian specialty

— the crispy fried crust on the buffalo meat plays nicely with the slightly sweet taste of a gruner veltliner. WYLD brings in some surf with its turf, too. The seared Atlantic salmon with beluga lentils and smoked ham is a lighter dish that brings to life a lot of full flavor. But what really feels like home is a glass of red and the 16-ounce elk rack — a dish that proudly showcases Colorado’s best wild game. Try it with a fully loaded WYLD stuffed potato or a side of charred Brussels. To finish, make a wild move you won’t regret with a glass of sauterne and an order of the sticky toffee monkey bread, served warm and topped with bourbon orange ice cream. • WYLD opened after an extensive remodel. The 16-ounce elk rack. left The Lava Lift cocktail: blood orange, añejo tequila, Grand Marnier and jalapeño. top

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Starters and sides: $10-$36; Mains: $30-$85

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PRICE

Starters: $12-$20; Mains: $18-$28 •••

AMBIANCE

Mountain bar and grill •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Duroc pork shank with three-cheese polenta and Swiss chard •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

BUFFALOS AT THE RITZ-CARLTON, BACHELOR GULCH 0130 DAYBREAK RIDGE | 970.748.6200 | RITZCARLTON.COM/BACHELORGULCH

by KIM FULLER photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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he all-star lineup of beer and bourbon at Buffalos in The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch is reason enough to belly up at the long stone bar or relax into a seat at a wood dining table, and just wait until you try the food. The restaurant has refined pub fare in a rustic setting, making for a comfortable destination, that hosts everything from game-day festivities to fun evenings with the whole family. Lunch and dinner specialties firing out of the open kitchen are great for sharing, like the cast iron nachos with a pile of delicious ingredients including jalapeño cheddar cheese, achiote chicken and pico de gallo over corn tortillas. Start with a flight of beer to taste three of Buffalos 12 rotating drafts. The taster comes with house-made wild game jerky to get your mouth watering before every sip. This season, the bar has worked with Tivoli Brewing Company out of Denver to make a proprietary brew, chosen from a student brewmaster competition. “We went down and talked to students about what style we wanted,” explains Ritz-Carlton,Bachelor Gulch executive chef Benjamin Christopher. “We did a blind tasting and picked a winner.” The special beer, called Buck Buck Moose, is a Vienna lager that’s got a bit of body and richness with a lot of flavor and a satisfying finish. And

bourbon lovers can try the Bachelor Bourbon from Breckenridge Distillery, an exclusive spirit featured only at the Bachelor Gulch property. While adults are noshing on bacon mac and cheese bites, chicken wings and buffalo short rib sliders, kids can create their own flavor smorgasbord. “We set up a kids’ buffet, so families that come in can eat and everyone can have fun,” says Christopher. “Parents can relax, and kids are engaged, too.” Family-style shared plate passing works well here, but there are also some upscale comfort food specialties that you might want all to yourself. The Duroc pork shank is as big in flavor as it is on your plate. It’s served on three-cheese polenta with Swiss chard and a cider reduction. On the lighter side, try the winter chard salmon salad with pine nuts, radishes, pickled shallots and a smoked tomato vinaigrette. Drink your dessert with the houseinfused banana Jameson cocktail, named after the lady outlaw Belle Star. This smooth and creamy night cap is complete with a homemade cream and smoky Talisker scotch — a character that’s just like the s’mores you can roast outside by the fire for another round of sweetness. • Crunchy chicharrones. Flight of beer with house-made wild game jerkey. right The Duroc pork shank with threecheese polenta and Swiss chard. top left

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by KIM FULLER photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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f the walls in Anderson’s Cabin could talk, everyone inside would hear whispers of an area steeped in history. The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch hosts some of the most intimate and exclusive experiences in this historic venue — a cozy retreat in the woods that was originally the home of John Anderson, one of the seven bachelors that first settled in the area. The special space shows how The Ritz Carlton does rustic, as guests are able to reserve Anderson’s for private après ski afternoons and dinners featuring the classic mountain cuisine of raclette or fondue. The cabin holds up to 14 guests in the winter, and is located up the road from the resort and just across from the ski slopes. The après-ski experience available from 3:30 to 5 p.m. invites guests off the mountain to sip a cocktail by the outdoor fire or inside by delicious fixings of Colorado cheese and charcuterie with assorted breads and crackers, and a gourmet chili bar. Winter evenings welcome a long and beautiful glow on the cabin as groups arrive for dinner and walk toward its softly lit windows. Sit around the large wood table between a roasting wood stove, candlelight and original relics that seem to recall the old days of the area. Fondue and raclette here mean an endless amount of bread and cheese, presented alongside a winter greens salad including dried cranberry, candied pecans, blue cheese and toasted honey vinaigrette. Dip Colorado meat sausages and red-skin potatoes into a crock of hot fondue, or for the raclette grill your own elk loin, bison tenderloin, salmon filet and more with sauces like chimichurri, huckleberry chutney and herb aioli to accompany. Each experience includes an open bar, and for the finale, hot drinks can complement each taste from the spread of miniature desserts that sweeten the evening even more. Just save a little room for the outdoor fire pit party. “Most families end the evenings bundling up and roasting marshmallows by the fire, under the chairlift and under the stars," says Amy Moser, director of sales and marketing, “so it’s pretty magical.” Après Experience is $95 per

PRICE

See last paragraph of story •••

AMBIANCE

Intimate mountain cabin •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Bottomless raclette, salad and wine, followed by gourmet dessert •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

guest (exclusive of tax, gratuity and a taxable service charge) and is available to reserve from 3:30-5 p.m. daily. A $1,000 minimum food spend is required. The Fondue Dinner Experience starts at $150 per guest (exclusive of tax, gratuity and a taxable service charge) and is

available to reserve from 7-10 p.m. daily. A $1,500 minimum food spend is required. The Raclette Dinner experience starts at $195 per guest (exclusive of tax, gratuity and a taxable service charge) and is available to reserve from 7-10 p.m. daily. A $1,950 minimum food spend is required. •

top Raclette and fondue are lots of fun for families and friends. above Anderson's Cabin is a cozy retreat.

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ANDERSON'S CABIN

0130 DAYBREAK RIDGE | 970.748.6200 RITZCARLTON.COM/BACHELORGULCH

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DANIEL’S BAR & GRILL

AT THE RITZ-CARLTON, BACHELOR GULCH by KIM FULLER photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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utside is the place to be in Colorado, and in the winter season it’s ideal to be on or alongside a ski slope as much as possible. Just steps from the Bachelor Gulch Express, Daniel’s Bar & Grill is the quintessential Colorado BBQ experience. The outdoor dining venue has been refined through the years by the talented team at The Ritz-Carlton Bachelor Gulch, and while the food and drinks are all really fine, everything is really fun, too. Check out the bottoms-up method of pouring beer at Daniel’s. The beer flows through the bottom of the cup, which is then sealed by a collectible magnet. Collect four magnets and you get a beer free — great incentive for enjoying several rounds of craft drafts. All the bottoms-up brews are local, Colorado favorites like Denver Beer Company and Pug Ryan’s. Après is spent here at a picnic table or in an Adirondack chair, complete with a meal that’s easy to order and pick up. Enjoy an innovative “bar food” menu of specialty salads and dishes like jalapeño elk bratwurst, nachos, pulled pork and brisket. New this season, Daniel’s Bar & Grill chef Austin Wolf is bringing in delectable house-made sauces and rubs for all the proteins on deck. Choose the tangy sauce for a taste of South Carolina with mustard, apple cider vinegar and black pepper, or try the Greek seasoning rub of rosemary, dill, thyme, basil, cinnamon and nutmeg that smothers on and tastes just right with the spilt chicken. The family-friendly menu offers kids’ items like burgers, steak fries and more, so everyone can really settle in and soak in each mountainside moment. Daniel’s offers its full bar menu to go, but opt to stay outside and enjoy the sunshine whenever possible. Once you have food and drink in hand, relax and enjoy the daily apres ski live entertainment. The mountains are a great place to make memories, and Daniel’s delivers so many smiles that stem from delicious drinks, good food and lots of fun. •

PRICE

Bar menu: $10 - $20 •••

AMBIANCE

Open-air slopeside grill •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Smoked BBQ •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

All manner of proteins are smoked slope-side daily. right Split chicken, jalapeño elk bratwurst and a brisket sandwich. above

0130 DAYBREAK RIDGE | 970.748.6200 RITZCARLTON.COM/BACHELORGULCH


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SADDLERIDGE 970.754.5456 | BASE OF BEAVER CREEK’S EASTERN SLOPE (NO ONSITE PARKING; SCHEDULE A COMPLIMENTARY VILLAGE TRANSPORTATION SHUTTLE SERVICE BY CALLING | 970.949.1938 SADDLERIDGEBEAVERCREEK.COM

by KIMBERLY NICOLETTI photos by RIC STOVALL / VAIL RESORTS & CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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t Beaver Creek’s SaddleRidge, fine dining meets the Old West in a very big way. Cast iron chandeliers constructed from train wheels illuminate the rich wood arches and massive stone fireplace, setting the scene for a true Rocky Mountain experience. Situated on Beaver Creek’s eastern slope, SaddleRidge provides mountain casual dining with an opulent, traditional Western atmosphere, combined with a fine dining steakhouse experience. Last year, the restaurant started serving lunch — a boon for those in search of ski-in/ski-out fine dining. Unlike most of the on-mountain options, it’s open to the public, though reservations are required. “Guests can ski right up, or we will meet them at the top of the ski-way and escort them down,” says Jeff Baker, long-time general manager. “After

PRICE

Lunch: $10-$25 Dinner starters and small plates: $9-$15 Dinner mains: $32-$52 •••

AMBIANCE

Old West fine dining •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Elk strip loin, 16-ounce bison “Cowboy” steak •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, with an $18, threecourse meal, including fresh fruit cocktail; chicken, grilled cheese, trout or beef; and a chocolate chip cookie topped with ice cream. Reservations required.

lunch, we then give our guests a ‘ride’ to the top of Haymeadow.” The ride comes courtesy of The Sherpa — a trailer that seats nine, pulled by a snowmobile. The restaurant is also accessible via shuttle van — it’s complimentary — and by snowshoe. “It’s a great spot for mixed groups, where not everyone is skiing on the mountain,” Baker says. They will even let the non-skiers ride on The Sherpa if they want a little snow time before returning to the village. Kids and adults alike will love checking out the mounted game heads, General Custer’s historical hat and canteen and one of the original George Washington portraits used on the dollar bill. “This is an Old West dining experience that you cannot find anywhere else,” says Baker. “You’ll be dining amid the biggest private collection of U.S. Western artifacts, outside of a museum in the United States.” Dinner enchants the senses with the snowy backdrop of the mountain, the warm, grand mountain chalet feel of the restaurant and, of course, the best quality, flavorful Colorado cuisine, from wild game — including rabbit and venison — to traditional steakhouse dishes. “The idea is to update the

classics and give the menu a contemporary, fine-dining feel while being very family friendly,” says executive chef Adam Roth. “We have an emphasis on locallysourced meats, cheeses and produce when possible, as well as wild game options,” Baker says. All of the grilled delights are paired with inventive sauces, from roasted jalapeño butter to anchochile rub and whiskey glaze. And though it might be hard to decide which route to go, Baker predicts the 16-ounce bison “Cowboy” steak will be the season’s favorite. Though SaddleRidge places an emphasis on American wines, within the 380 varieties from which to choose, plenty originate from all over the world. And, for that special Colorado feel, SaddleRidge offers plenty of local microbrews, as well as a specialty drink list not to be missed. In addition to dining in the main restaurant, private parties can be hosted downstairs in the library. • The SaddleRidge dining room is replete with a large collection of authentic Western artifacts. left The elk carpaccio is delicately seared and served with spicy arugula and an Asianinspired vinaigrette. above


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PRICE

Starters: $8-$15 Entrées: $22-$33 •••

AMBIANCE

Contemporary with stunning views •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Pan-roasted Colorado half chicken; artisan pizzas •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Absolutely

BLACK DIAMOND BISTRO by JENNIFER GEISMAN photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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f you’re looking for ski-town ambiance, Black Diamond Bistro in Beaver Creek is one of the Vail Valley’s best-kept secrets. Tucked away in The Charter at Beaver Creek, Black Diamond Bistro is a ski in/ ski out gem with access to and from Beaver Creek Village. If you’re lucky, you’ll be served by Chris Morin, who will not only give you the insider’s scoop on each of the menu’s items, but will also delight you with interesting facts about Beaver Creek and the Vail Valley. Serving contemporized alpine cuisine, Black Diamond Bistro has sweeping views of Beaver Creek, so you’ll want to grab a window seat. Chef Dan Kent, who came to Black Diamond Bistro via Sweet Basil and Larkspur Restaurant, makes everything from scratch, using solid French techniques, but with a contemporary, comfort-food flair. Chef Kent creates an atmosphere that is unpretentious and perfect for families with a range of casual foods, such as pizza, to more sophisticated offerings. “I designed the menu to meet all of our guests’ needs. You can eat here three

nights in a row and have something different each time,” says Chef Kent. Begin with one of the Bistro’s exquisite starters such as the beer-steamed mussels, which includes\ chorizo, giving the broth and mussels a smoky depth, and grilled bread perfect for soaking up the deliciousness. Moist and savory, the Maryland crab cakes, served on a BLT salad, are a far cry from your grandmother’s renditions. The flavors will whet your palate with every bite. The Bistro’s signature pan-roasted Colorado half chicken never strays from Chef Kent’s philosophy of creating consistently good, hearty food that guests know will be served every time they visit. The petite tenderloin with braised short rib is mouthwatering and tender beyond your wildest carnivorous dreams and is complemented with bacon-blue cheese grits and seasonal vegetables. Both dishes will have you pining for just one more bite. Join the Bistro for daily après from 3-6 p.m. The attitude-free bar serves the restaurant’s signature artisan pizzas and drinks. New York or Chicago may be the hot spots for the classic slice, but they don’t hold a candle to the Bistro’s pizzas, made by chef de cuisine Tim Dixon. A pizza maker originally from the Front

THE CHARTER AT BEAVER CREEK | 120 OFFERSON RD 970.845.3198 | BDBISTRO.COM

Range, Dixon makes eating pizza an addiction. Of course, you can order a traditional Margherita (delicious!), but The Omnivore (seriously, has everything) or The Carnivore (pepperoni, sausage, capicola and salami) truly bring forth a mixture of flavors that captivate your senses. Dixon is also the Bistro’s pastry chef. A must-try, the Lemon Curd with blueberry granita and shortbread cookies is the perfect palate

cleaner and end to your evening. The Black Diamond Bistro offers complimentary valet parking. Arrive just in time for a breakfast sandwich at The Terrace (also managed by Chef Kent), do a couple of runs and return for après • Grilled Verlasso salmon with truffled marble potatoes, haricots verts, and sauce gribiched. below Chocolate meringue with mocha ice cream. above


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by KRISTA DRISCOLL photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

PRICE

All-day happy hour food is $4-$8 and drinks are $3-$6, craft cocktails are $12-$14, and small plates are $13-$26 •••

AMBIANCE

Funky, modern metropolitan •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Happy hour New England lobster roll, toasted-pecan old fashioned craft cocktail or chicken and waffles small plate

by KRISTA DRISCOLL photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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he label in the center touts that this particular slab of 33 1/3rpm vinyl, now affixed with The Metropolitan’s menu of cocktails, all-day happy hour options and small plates, was originally an LP of Steely Dan’s greatest hits. But unlike most LPs, this record has no true “B” side, as both surfaces are crammed full of culinary hits. Part of a small block of restaurants dubbed the East End of Beaver Creek, “The Met” has adopted a new tagline that aptly describes its evolution — “small plates, big wines, craft cocktails” — along with a menu that dropped roughly half of the old items in favor of updated fare and a slew of new craft cocktails developed by bar manager Thayer Stevens. “It’s one of the bigger swings we’ve done,” says Ben McNair, regional operations manager for Roadhouse Hospitality Group, which owns The Met. Indeed, though a few staples remain, such as the happy hour favorite New England lobster roll, potatas bravas and deviled eggs, the menu has new selections across the board, from the toasted-pecan old fashioned

with house-infused pecan bourbon to the short rib pork bao bun with sweet and spicy sesame sauce. Flip the record to find the small plates menu, divided into geographic themes representing Europe, Asia and the Americas. The European-inspired mojito watermelon caprese starts with a compressed slice of watermelon topped with mint chiffonade, goat cheese and crushed pistachios accented with extra virgin olive oil, balsamic, lime, Maldon sea salt and cracked pepper. With the chicken and waffles, The Met has miniaturized a Southern favorite, with two-bite wedges of fresh-made waffle crowned with all-natural fried chicken, rosemary candied bacon, Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Honey-maple syrup and cinnamon honey butter. “We broke it down to make it easy to share and pass,” McNair says, noting that the communal theme stretches across the entire menu, with each of the small plates composed in a way that encourages sharing and enhances the social aspect of dining. Aesthetically, the Enomatic pay-asyou-go wine dispenser still holds court in the center of the room, but a few design touches — like the vinyl menus and taller lounge tables — have been added to

give the space a more accessible feel. The Met opens for service each day at 3 p.m., and the happy hour food and drink sections of the menu are available until the place closes at 10 p.m. The idea is to create an atmosphere that encourages patrons to linger, McNair said, punctuated

by live music on a handful of peak weekends throughout the winter. • top Thai octopus salad with lime-soy vinaigrette, avocado, pickled red onion, grapefruit and Napa cabbage. above The Enomatic wine dispenser is a pay-as-you-go self-service system.

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THE METROPOLITAN

210 OFFERSON ROAD | BEAVER CREEK PLAZA 970.748.3123 | THEMETBC.COM

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PRICE

Appetizers: $4-$24; Entrées: $22-$34; Sushi rolls start at $10 •••

AMBIANCE

Sushi bar and restaurant •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Spicy tuna sashimi salad •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Xxxxx

SATO SUSHI BAR & RESTAURANT 0105 EDWARDS VILLAGE BLVD. SUITE E 101, EDWARDS CENTER SATOSUSHIEDWARDS.COM | 970.926.7684

by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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bove the long sushi bar at Sato, uniquely-shaped lampshades each cast an individual glow, illuminating a row of guests holding chopsticks and grabbing bites among their ordered selection of rolls and sashimi. Another low-lit bar nearby houses Japanese libations. Bottles stand as a backdrop, lined up for a unique taste of culture or a specialty craft cocktail. Try fine Japanese whiskey like Nikka 17-year whisky and Nikka Coffee Grain whisky, or order craft Japanese beers and Ramune Japanese soda for the kids. “The Nikka whiskey sour cocktail with Yuzu and lemongrass simple syrup, and a Hot and Spicy mocha with Patron Cafe, cayenne, chocolate, and espresso are sure to warm up your winter nights,” says Dominique Taylor, bar manager. Sato also has an extensive list of sake to sip. It’s the ideal drink alongside

clean cuts of fresh raw fish. The new Eagle Roll, created by sushi chef Peter Ma, is wrapped in sesamecrusted salmon and filled with seared tuna and tempura asparagus, drizzled with a unique sweet and spicy sauce. Executive chef Atsushi Minami says he and his staff strive to make the dining experience memorable, and meals there certainly seem to stay on my mind for a while. Here’s a “must order” from the menu: the spicy tuna sashimi salad, to share or on your own. It’s a mound of tuna sashimi mixed in with macadamia nuts over a base of scallion oil and chili oil, and topped with the most beautiful, flowerlike avocado crown and served with crispy wonton chips. The dish is visually striking, and succeeds as a delicious play on a tartare. Don’t fill up so much on sushi that you miss out on an entrée. The pine nut-crusted salmon filet falls right off with the light press of a fork, and the Italian flavors all meld beautifully with the side of purple cauliflower

puree and drizzled scallion oil. Minami has also created a new duck confit entrée this season, served with a forbidden rice risotto. He’s taken a very classic dish and infused it with distinctly Asian flavors in the rice and through seasonings in the curing process of the duck. Complete your evening with a Sato favorite — the white chocolate bread

pudding. It’s served with a warm, white chocolate sauce that melts its way into your mouth and into a blissful finish. • top The Eagle Roll with sesame crusted tuna, tempura asparagus, avocado, black tobiko, yamagobo and a spicy Poke dressing. above Duck confit and forbidden rice truffle risotto, , with ginger-thyme demi-glace, cherry syrup, chive oil.


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1265 BERRY CREEK ROAD | EDWARDS 970.477.5353 | SONNENALPCLUB.COM

by KIRSTEN DOBROTH photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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hef Kelly Liken’s new venture, Harvest, opened this past summer with the same buzz around it that kept her former spot, Restaurant Kelly Liken in Vail Village, atop the lists of foodies near and far for over a decade. Visitors to her new eatery in the Sonnenalp Club in Edwards probably noticed two things: first and foremost the food, and secondly that deck! But summer memories of that deck are quickly replaced by winter’s fireplace — a central feature in the expansive dining area that’s surrounded by big, picture glass windows, and capped with a cabininspired ceiling. A large bar area serving craft cocktails, a hefty list of Colorado draft beers, and a wine for every palate complements the seating area, and serves as a focal point to belly up for a snack, or sip on a pint during the restaurant’s live music every Wednesday night. And seasonal tastes stay in the spotlight on a winter menu that offers an assortment of starters, small plates and mains where locally sourced ingredients continue to shine via Liken’s signature style. If you’re thinking small, the roasted wild mushrooms with grilled ciabatta, house-made ricotta, fresh arugula, and topped with a fried egg and sambal vinaigrette, is a savory, soul-warming choice that might make the case for another plate to share. If so, go for the grilled octopus, which dishes

out a fantastic lightly charred flavor that’s accompanied by a citrus and paprika marinade, fingerling potatoes, capers, fresh fennel and arugula. When it comes to mains, few things are as satisfying as the seared salmon filet, which sounds like a lighter choice on its own, but, when paired with a white bean and roasted tomato ragout, Knapp Ranch Swiss chard, crisp pancetta, sherry vinaigrette

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and olive relish, offers a hearty taste for even the coldest of winter evenings. However, if you’re looking for something that will really melt the chill from your bones — along with your taste buds — opt for the lamb ragout; melt-in-your-mouth Colorado lamb is paired with light, house-made pasta, and topped with fresh ricotta and herbs for a seasonal spin on a local favorite. Foodies following Liken from her last spot will be pleased to see her signature sticky bun sundae as a sweet tooth staple on the dessert list. If your favorite dessert typically comes from a shaker, order a chocolate martini to sip by the fire. Don’t forget to stop by for lunch, or newly added Sunday brunch, along with a daily Happy Hour that sees extended hours every Sunday. Or, swing by The Pantry, Harvest’s on-site grab-andgo location that provides more café-inspired bites ranging from fresh salads and sandwiches to sweet and savory toast selections, and features an all-day coffee bar along with a fresh juice

PRICE

Starters $7.50-$18, Mains $14-$30 •••

AMBIANCE

Spacious, with a rustic cabin meets fine dining coziness •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Lamb ragout •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Of course!

and smoothie menu. The Pantry opens each day from 7 a.m to 5 p.m., with lighter lunch offerings served at 11 a.m. from the grab-and-go spot. • Seared salmon with white beantomato ragout. left A trio of smoothies, great for breakfast and lunch. page 9 Granola and Greek yogurt parfait from Harvest's Pantry. above

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Apps and Salads $11-$15 Pizzas, pastas and entreés $16-$35  •••

AMBIANCE

Warm winter welcome •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Burrata (semi-soft fresh white Italian cheese), Fruitwood-fired pizzas and pasta fatta in casa  (fresh pasta made in-house daily)  •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Warm, fun welcome given to kids of all ages

ZINO RISTORANTE by SUZANNE HOFFMAN photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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t family owned and operated Zino Ristorante in Edwards, the food is Italian inspired, but the dynamism and warmth are pure Italian. Given its Mediterranean influences, the menu is never boring and always delicious. Biannual menu changes pay homage to the seasons’ freshest ingredients. Mainstays include the always-popular house-made burrata, but executive chef and partner Nick Haley’s creative streak his grandmother and mom inspired comes alive as seasonal menus take shape. For his carpaccio this winter, Haley pounds a piece of raw prime New York beef into a square sheet and tops it with festive curls of frozen, shaved foie gras, smoked fleur de sel and droplets of aged balsamic reduction. Grilled flatbread straight out of the pizza oven accompanies the dish for a special treat. This season’s Polipo (octopus) offering is a grilled Spanish octopus salad. Tender olive oil-poached fingerling potatoes, scallions and salsa verde of watercress, chives, anchovies, parsley and capers, combine to make this a tasty starter or even a light main dish. Pizzas are the menu rock stars at Zino. Like everything house made in the restaurant, pizza dough production is serious business. High-altitude

baking and changing humidity levels challenge the chefs; however, pizzas emerge from the fruitwood-burning oven with bubbly crusts that possess a slight sourdough flavor thanks to the minimum 24-hour fermentation of the dough Haley requires. This winter, two additions join popular mainstays. Haley’s Calzone stuffed with house-made Italian sausage, Piemontese Robiola cheese, caramelized onions, and marinara is akin to a gift-wrapped present. A new choice for meat lovers is the Porchetta pizza. Thin slices of imported Tuscan porchetta (moist boneless pork roast), Italian speck, Fontina, and charred scallions top this tasty pizza. Pasta handmade daily vies with pizza for menu rock star status. Rabbit returns this winter as a sugo (sauce) over porcini-filled ravioli topped with a luscious rabbit sauce. Most Zino loyalists will fight to insure that Haley keeps the pappardelle with veal meatballs, ricotta and marinara on the menu. The approximately 22,000 meatballs served in the first 11 months of 2016 bear witness to the dish’s popularity. Haley’s main dishes — secondi piatti — include servings of popular creations such as Colorado chicken baked in the pizza oven, tagliata — a 12-ounce Prime New York Strip — and pork chop Milanese. Of course, vegetarians can always find plenty of choices on the menu.

27 MAIN STREET | RIVERWALK, EDWARDS 970.926.0777 | ZINORISTORANTE.COM

The well-trained members of the service staff are knowledgeable liaisons between diners and the kitchen that can help modify dishes to address dietary restrictions. Whether for drinks in the vibrant upstairs bar or vinous libations to pair with Haley’s menu, Naples-born partner Giuseppe Bosco’s wellcurated, reasonably priced wine list has something for all palates and budgets. Most of the wines are Italian — primarily Tuscan and Piemontese — but guests can also find excellent

choices from American wineries. Bosco’s infectious energy in the front of the house and the inventive cuisine of well-traveled, Piemontesetrained Chef Haley combine to make Zino a local’s favorite that Vail Valley guests can enjoy year-round. • Polipo: grilled spanish octopus, olive oil poached potatoes, watercress, scallions, salsa verde. left Carpaccio: Prime New York steak, foie gras, smoked sea salt, chives, aged balsamic, grilled flat bread. page 12 Chef Nick Haley makes pizza. above


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by STEPHEN LLOYD WOOD photo by ANDY GUY

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f you’re like many visitors to Colorado, thoughts of dining on wild game may conjure up memories of those gamey steaks Uncle Bud brought home from his hunting trips. Truth is, game meat is one of fine dining’s finer, and healthier, pleasures — and there’s no better place in the state to introduce yourself to it than The Gashouse Restaurant & Bar in Edwards, a longtime locals’ favorite. Indeed, discriminating diners with a flair for the wild owe it to themselves to branch out from the state’s more widely known dishes of local lamb and trout and try some of the wide range of other meats from animals native not only to Colorado but to the Rocky Mountains, in general, says Andy Guy, co-owner and manager. “When people come to the mountains, they often want to try some of the other wild critters that traditionally run around here,” says Guy, who in his eight years at The Gashouse has slowly changed the menu from mainly beef steaks and seafood to one chock full of wild game dishes, too. “That’s elk; that’s venison; that’s buffalo, or bison; that’s bear, antelope, caribou, wild boar, rabbit, duck, quail,” he says. “And because game, especially elk and venison, is far lower in saturated fat and cholesterol than beef, it’s better for you, too.” For starters, try the buffalo carpaccio appetizer: loin meat from a Colorado bison that is lightly smoked, then sliced paper thin and served with crunchy crostini, capers and a drizzle of virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Or, there’s the Game Sausage Sampler, with samples of mixed sausages made from wild boar, smoked buffalo and “jackalope.” “We always warn people about the ‘jackalope,’” Guy says, laughing, of the a hot-and-spicy but savory mixture of jack rabbit, antelope and habanero peppers. Looking for an impressive platter to enjoy with friends? Go for the Gashouse’s Ultra Game Grill, with grilled quail, buffalo tenderloin, a bone-in venison chop and a game sausage of your choice. The Gashouse offers a whole slew of other, more pedestrian options,

PRICE

Apps $4.95-$49.95 Entreés $14.95-$48.95 Dessert $4.75-$7.95 •••

AMBIANCE

Rustic mountain cabin with laid-back energy •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Ultra Game Grill

as well, including soups and salads, pastas and burgers, and classic appetizers like the “buffalo”- and Thai-spiced chicken wings and their infamous Super Nachos. Guy suggests starting out with one of four kinds of oysters, served by the half-dozen, with the Barcat variety from the Chesapeake Bay being his personal favorite. Indeed, seafood at The Gashouse is a local legend. The beloved Maryland Lump Crab Cakes is a real winner, as is the Seafood Combo offering lobster tail, crab cake and Cajun shrimp. And make sure to check the hand-written board on the wall for fresh fish specials, different every night. All entreés, meanwhile, are served with mixed veggies and the choice of wild rice pilaf, fries or baked potato unless you up the ante with “twice-baked” potato, parmesan truffle fries, onion rings or a side of pasta Alfredo. And save room for dessert. The lineup includes Kentucky pie, a huge, hot chocolate-chip cookie topped with chocolate syrup and crushed pecans, best enjoyed a la mode; fresh-baked apple pie; salted caramel brûlée cheesecake; and the go-to mud pie, a delectable ice cream sandwich with fudge in the middle and an Oreo cookie crust. In the end, it’s the atmosphere of The Gashouse, originally a gas station in the 1940s and ‘50s that sat dormant

for twenty years of so before coowner Connie Irons opened it again as a restaurant in 1983, that first-time visitors remember most. The hunting trophies and other historic items on the walls — and the hundreds of Vail ski passes donated by loyal locals over the years, laminated to the main bar and tables throughout the restaurant — contribute to an unforgettable experience. Even Uncle Bud would agree. • The Gashouse is known for its extensive selection of wild game and fresh seafood.

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34185 U.S. HWY 6 | EDWARDS 970.926.3613 | GASHOUSE-RESTAURANT.COM

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ou know when you have a hankering for eggs and bacon or eggs benedict at 2 in the afternoon and nothing else will do? Head over to Cafe 163, a nook of a restaurant located in Edwards that has been serving “the most important meal of the day” all day, every day for six years. The restaurant has a loyal following of regulars — and the staff knows them and their orders, welcoming them with a hearty hello and quickly getting them settled. In a valley known for its transient workforce, Cafe 163 has had a chef who cooks with love for five years and managers who have been there almost as long, creating a place where locals are just as welcomed as out-of-town guests. The vibe has an upscale diner feel, with homemade muffins, pancakes and pastries… minus the pretention and high prices. The menu is mighty. Everyone has a favorite and knows just what they want as soon as they settle in to a booth or table. It might be the challah bread French toast in a cornflake

105 EDWARDS VILLAGE BLVD. #D101 | EDWARDS | 970.926.1163 | CAFE163.COM

crust — equal parts crunch and meltin-your-mouth deliciousness or the breakfast burrito, sometimes with bacon, sometimes not, with veggie green chili; or, when trying to achieve a healthier option, the BYO (build your own) omelet with spinach, goat cheese and mushrooms; perhaps the ham, spinach and tomato eggs benedict, with a dollop of hollandaise sauce and a side of the cafe’s signature thinly sliced, perfectly fried potatoes. Let’s wax eloquent about the potatoes for a minute because they are totally different than the pile of hash browns or chunky home fries often served alongside breakfast. They are round masterpieces, crisp outside, creamy inside. Lunch is no less of a culinary splendor with tough choices like the ultimate in all diner orders, the classic Reuben, as well as the 163 Gyro — shaved lamb, cabbage, tomato, onion and feta with tzatziki on a toasted pita. The gyro’s meat is salty, spicy and cooked lovingly to perfection, topped with the tzatziki sauce for a cool refreshing finish. Oh my! This being the Vail Valley, though, there has to be healthy options and Cafe 163 doesn’t disappoint with the Curry Bowl with curried sauteed

spinach, carrots and potatoes, served with a warm pita with the option of chicken or shrimp.  The slew of salads (Cobb, spinach, Greek or roasted pear to name a few) tempt and tease the palate — they arrive in a porcelain deep bowl, packed with goodness and homemade dressings. The understated owner strives to make Cafe 163 the kind of place where you want to linger over homemade goodness, where the staff knows your name and where you’re promised a meal that satisfies and leaves you with a smile. It happens, he says, thanks to Chef Rory, general manager Rocio and assistant manage Kate, as well as the seasoned staff who want to provide exceptional service. “Everything here has equal love in it. We use the best quality ingredients and make everything from scratch,” he says. Arrive hungry and be ready to be wowed, to leave sated, full and happy… feeling like you just found your new favorite breakfast and lunch spot, because you probably did. Settle a goal to determinedly work your way through the lengthy menu. It’s a challenge but one worth tackling before hitting the powder or after a night of revelry. •

PRICE

Breakfast: $6-$11.50 Salads: $9-$14 Lunch: $4-$15 •••

AMBIANCE

A state-of-the-art café with classic breakfast, brunch and lunch •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Classic Eggs Benedict •••

KID FRIENDLY?

You bet! Lots of kidfriendly menu items, including pancakes

Blueberry granola pancakes with house-made berry compote. top right Eggs Benedict with ham, spinach and tomato, served with crispy cafe potatoes. top left


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97 MAIN STREET E101 | RIVERWALK | EDWARDS 970.926.7001 | JUNIPERRESTAURANT.COM

by JOHN O’NEILL photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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ou can go to Juniper Restaurant in Riverwalk in Edwards to enjoy big flavors and substantial portions of signature and new dishes with or without making a big to-do about it. Here’s what we mean: folks in jeans and fleece vests can order a classic Manhattan up or on the rocks and feel just as comfortable as another party adorned in furs, drinking blueberry acai martinis. The restaurant seems to stand apart from the scene its new world contemporary cuisine could command, filling a sort of upscale-yetcasual dining niche. Juniper opened in 2002 and immediately garnered its loyal multifarious following for its selection of starters — everything from braised short rib with whipped mashed potatoes, smoked onion jam, bleu cheese and baby arugula to a yellowfin tune poke cucumber roll with guacamole, lotus root chips and pickled Fresno chilies — and an eclectic menu of protein or pasta mains. “The menu is good across the board,” says Scott Ofsanko, executive chef. “That is what it’s all about. It is hard to steer someone one direction or another. We have pizzas, pastas, steaks and some Asian dishes on there, too.” Some listings, such as the veal scaloppini — with angel hair caprese, asparagus, lemon beurre fondue and veal reduction — have been at

the top of the menu since the day the restaurant opened. It is the only dish on the menu that Ofsanko, who has been at the restaurant for seven years, didn’t come up with himself. “I change the menu around opportunities to be seasonal and local, but consistency is something people have always loved about us,” Ofsanko says. “We keep it

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recognizable to the people who come in all the time and know what they want, but we change things up to fit the season or to keep the food fresh and local whenever possible.” Among the new entrées for the winter are a 32-ounce porterhouse, cooked for two with truffle potato gratin, grilled asparagus, béarnaise and onion rings; a braised pork shank with pimento cheese polenta, sautéed kale and pickled vegetables; and Colorado buffalo loin with ricotta gnocchi, haricot vert-mushroom sauté and porcini beurre. The bar follows suit in this way of being all things to all people for its mix of beverages. Your Old Fashioneds, Manhattans, Sazerac and other cocktails are on the very same menu as experimental mixology that twists a myriad of syrups, berries, fruits, spices, peels and creams to whiskeys, vodkas, tequilas and gins sourced from all over the world. There is also a lengthy list of cognacs and scotches, and, of course, beer and wine. Whether you come rocking in with your shoes polished and hair done, looking for a round of ribeye steaks and flavored alcohols, or slip in for an appetizer and a glass of wine with friends at the

PRICE

Starters: $12-$20; Mains: $36-$46 •••

AMBIANCE

Refined and inviting as a riverside mountain bistro •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Veal Scaloppini with angel hair caprese •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Yes

bar, Juniper will embrace both scenaria with a wonderful experience of eating and drinking. • Organic Atlantic salmon with beluga lentils, prosciutto wrapped asparagus and sun-dried tomato pesto. left Yellowfin Tuna Poké "Cucumber Roll" with guacamole, lotus root chips and pickled fresno chilies. above

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VISTA AT ARROWHEAD

676 SAWATCH DRIVE | ARROWHEAD | EDWARDS 970.926.2111 | VISTA-ARROWHEAD.COM

by KRISTA DRISCOLL photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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icky Poage completes a melody on the piano with an elegant flourish, and Vista at Arrowhead patrons respond with applause and requests for favorite songs. The longtime valley piano man graciously obliges, and a new tune emerges from his keystrokes to provide a soundtrack to the soft candlelight and snowy windows of the restaurant. Choruses of food emerge from executive chef David Collins’ kitchen to harmonize with the delicate strains of music, as Vista celebrates the opening night of the winter season. It’s the first full winter of ownership for Collins and his partner, Daryl DeYoung, who purchased the restaurant in January 2016. The pair has made sweeping changes to the menu, beginning in the summer when they did away with the Tuscan theme established by the previous proprietors. “The new direction of Vista is to incorporate local and seasonal products,” DeYoung says. And it’s evident from the start, with local craft beers and Colorado spirits, as well as first courses such as the tender braised Harris Ranch short rib with root vegetable puree studded with artisan blue cheese or the Borden Farms Colorado tomato soup. Vista has introduced another new concept with its customer-composed entrees. Choose a protein, such as sautéed Colorado striped bass or marinated

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duck breast, and add a sauce, vegetable and starch to create a custom dish. “The option to make your own entrée allows customers to order what they would like, as opposed to switching out a side or sauce for something they don’t want from a chef-composed dish,” DeYoung says. “This option also allows people with certain dietary restrictions to create a dish they can eat and enjoy.”

DeYoung says the restaurant gets many returning customers, and the menu allows them to try different items. Those who are hesitant about pairing complimentary elements can defer to the more traditional chefcomposed section of the menu. Here, Collins has created a handful of arrangements, from the pan-seared Hokkaido scallops with wild mushroom risotto and winter greens to the vegetarian chickpea- and quinoa-stuffed eggplant. Wasabi mashed potatoes and a soy-ginger butter sauce add complexity to the seared rare yellow fin tuna, or the potatoes can be chosen from the deconstructed side of the menu to add punch to a steak or lamb shank. Each can be paired with a glass or bottle of wine from Vista’s extensive collection of 100-plus labels, or with a craft cocktail, such as the blood orange-tini, built with housemade blood orangecello, or The Litigator — Colorado Woody Creek Rye with griotte cherry, black pepper simple syrup and an orange twist. The finale is a classic dessert, be it a French apple tart or the playful butterscotch milkshake with vanilla doughnuts. Vista at Arrowhead opens at 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, with Poage on the piano starting at 6 p.m. nightly. •

PRICE

Starters are $9-$15, chef-composed entrées are $23-$41, and customer composed proteins are $21$41, plus $5 each for sides •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy and traditional •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Pan-seared Hokkaido scallops or tamarindmarinated Rohan duck breast •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Yes, children’s menu available

Harris ranch short rib over root vegetable purée topped with artisan blue cheese. left Prince Edward Island mussels with oregano-roasted tomatoes and house-made sausage in a white wine sauce. above


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by HEATHER HOWER photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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feel like a local,” proclaimed my usually reserved husband when we sat down in a deep booth at the windows at the Gore Range Brewery on a chilly fall night. Indeed, Edwards’ Gore Range Brewery, with it convivial atmosphere, mug club, packed bar, busy dining room and roaring kitchen fire, makes everyone feel welcome. The Gore Range Brewery, also known as GRB, was the first brewery in Eagle County — it opened in 1997, basically pioneer days here in the valley. New owner, Chef Pascal Coudouy, took over in 2011, keeping the vibe but updating the menu, which, by the way, has not only standard pub fare like fish and chips, burgers, a gorgeous Reuben and baby back ribs; but has surprising — and tasty — additions like mussels steamed in red ale, prosciutto-and-pear pizza, seasonal salads and grilled lamb chops. Think of it as high-brow options in a totally low-key environment. All this yumminess comes courtesy of Chef Coudouy, whose resume is a feast in gastronomy straight from France. He kicked off his culinary prowess in the South of France before he migrated to midtown Manhattan’s Le Perigord Restaurant; prior, he was the youngest chef at a Michelin two-star restaurant where he trained under Hotel du France renowned chef Andre Daguin. And add good

PRICE

Apps: $5.75-$16.25; Sandwiches: $11.50$13.50; Pizzas: $13.50-$14.75; Entrées: $15.75-$28 •••

AMBIANCE

Locals brewpub & sports bar with fine, beer-centric cuisine •••

SIGNATURE DISHES

Le Grand Gore Range Nachos; the BBQ Spice-Rubbed Brisket Dip •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Kids menu items $6-$12.50

student to his bio: He was one of the top culinary school graduates in France — all of which should be an indication of his abilities and the “yum factor” he brings to the menu at GRB. You’ve come to the brewery for its beer but will stay for its food and atmosphere, right? So let’s talk beers, brews, ales and lagers. There are eight

brews on tap, all of them made right on-site. The list of brews is tempting even for a non-beer drinker: Great Sex Honey Lager, Intimate IPA, Pascal’s Porter, Raspberry Kolsch, Bodacious Brown, Fonce Rouge Red Ale, Beaver Logger and Powder Day Pale Ale. The best way to find your favorite ale is to order the Brewery Sampler, four 1 ½- ounce samples to whet your whistle. With descriptions like “light floral and citrus” or “a moderate body” and “a French-inspired mediumbodied beer” you may think you’ve stumbled into a winery. Nope, just a brew house with passionate brewers, lovers of hops and fans of flavor. GRB also features a host of guest

taps so the sampling pairings can truly be endless. Included in the Brewery’s guest taps are gluten free options, hard apple cider, non-alcoholic options and even those from another wellknown Colorado brewery: Coors. Finding the right option for your palate can be a long, winding, delightful sipping stroll down a very tasty road. It’s a lofty goal, but you’re up for the challenge, right? • Reuben sandwich with housemade corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese and 1000 island on a marble rye bun. left Prosciutto and pear wood-oven pizza with mascarpone, roasted tomatoes, poached pears, prosciutto and baby arugula. above

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GORE RANGE BREWERY

0105 EDWARDS VILLAGE BLVD | EDWARDS 970.926.BREW (2739) | GORERANGEBREWERY.COM

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PRICE

Starters: $7-$18; Mains: $12-$25 •••

AMBIANCE

Upscale dining for people with downhome style •••

SIGNATURE DISHES

The Ramen bowl; avocado fries; The Rose salad

THE ROSE by JOHN O’NEILL photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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here is a special sort of charisma exuding from The Rose restaurant in Edwards, just the type to have you sitting and chatting long after your meal with chef and owner Bryan Redniss over a bottle of mezcal you can only get in Puerto Vallarta. This little-known boîte and gem of Riverwalk has seven tables set for two, eight seats at the bar, a couch near the only window and that’s all. Its sole marker to foot traffic is an easily-missed gray awning with “The Rose” written in Redniss’ handwriting. Inside, the artwork and décor was all hand crafted by Redniss and his wife, Jessica. Amidst a valley full of restaurants committed to acclaim and popularity, the quiet confidence and industrious nature of The Rose is downright charming. “This is kind of like going to home to New York for me,” Redniss says. “Like you are walking down some alley and there is a little hole-inthe wall restaurant where you get served this and that, and it’s the best meal you’ve ever had.” It is this exact force of creating

97 MAIN STREET | RIVERWALK EDWARDS | 970.855.0141 | THEROSEEDWARDS.COM

simple and delicious dishes with alluring presentation that has earned the restaurant an eclectic band of loyalists, each of whom knows full well that the steady heartbeat of The Rose lies back in the kitchen. The beet salad perfectly balances the intense spiciness and vibrant flavor of arugula with the sweetness of beets and the crunch of flashfried shallot. The pork belly is rich and tender yet still decadent in a way that you can realize the light flavor of the dish’s pickled ginger crumble and locally-sourced microgreens. Even the heavier dishes, such as the chicken waffle, have graduated from their stomach-pummeling origin — over a golden milk and field pumpkin waffle, the crispy skin and moist meat of the chicken is enhanced by sage honey butter, hot sauce and pickled apple slaw. New to the menu for the winter is the braised beef short rib, which adds another protein to the crowdfavorite duck entrée. Both of these achieve huge flavor and substantial portions for the winter season. Rarely will you find desserts as well done as those created by pastry chef Olivier Campe for The Rose. With incredible diligence and perhaps a little magic, Campe will

raise cheesecake, goat cheese and honey, carrot, chocolate and lemon macaroons at 8,000 feet, or turn around a pistachio berry cake with an almond-flour base and raspberry filling. The drink menu is crafted by Mark Summers and draws its own loud applause from diners and the bar

crowd alike with drinks such as “How The West Was Fun,” which puts rye whiskey with Cardamaro, lemon, honey and Averna. Or, the recently added Mexican Mistress with Reposado tequila, mezcal, pomegranate and lime. Go there for the food, which is as local as the crowd. Go there for drinks that are as creative as the art hanging on the walls. Go there for the atmosphere that ties it all together. Go there. Go there. Go there. • Cheese and charcuterie board with chef's choice of meats, cheese and accoutrement; Hibiscus Hustle cocktail with Bols Genever, Cappelletti, lemon and Lost Identity tonic. left Yellowfin tuna crudo, grapefruit juice, scallion oil, hot chili oil, puffed rice, popcorn shoots, green onion miso puree and sweet potato curls. above


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175 MAIN ST. #107 | EDWARDS, CO 81632 970.855.0335 | DELITEANDBOWL.COM

by JENNIFER GEISMAN photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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n any given winter night, you will find Delite & Bowl filled with locals and tourists eager to taste the restaurant’s flavorful dishes. Dedicated to offering fresh and organic options for every palate, Delite & Bowl in Edwards Riverwalk prides itself on supporting clean eating using natural, non-antibiotic, non-GMO and organic ingredients in all of its authentic Asian foods. In addition, the restaurant offers glutenfree and vegetarian options. Owner Xin Barron said she created the made-to-order menu using cooking techniques from her childhood and continues to honor the tradition of making broth from boiling bones and bone marrow for more than 16 hours. Delite & Bowl is known for their soups, which combine delicious Chinese noodles with organic ingredients including hand-wrapped pork wontons, Colorado-farmed beef, tender pieces of organic chicken, fresh salmon and shrimp, farm fresh vegetables and topped off with an array of traditional Chinese spices for a savory, old world taste. If you want to try something new

PRICE

Starters: $5 - $9.95; Mains: $12.95 - $22.95 •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy place to dine with friends for traditional and upscale Asian fusion •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Spicy red curry with grass-fed beef, lychee, tomatoes, Thai basil, and serrano peppers •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Smaller portions of fresh food that healthy kids love

this winter, don’t miss Delite & Bowl’s signature curry dish. Some may shy away from the unique flavors in curry, but this dish isn’t overpowering and gives your taste buds the essence of its spice fusion - cumin, coriander,

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DELITE & BOWL NOODLE HOUSE

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turmeric, pepper, mustard, ginger, clove and cardamom. The chicken, seafood and vegetable curry dishes use a combination of textures of bamboo shoots, onions, butternut squash, snap peas and edamame to round out the distinctive flavoring. To really warm your soul on a chilly night, the Spicy Red Curry Beef has that extra kick. The Spicy Red Curry Beef is a collaboration of serrano peppers and red curry for a sweet and spicy flavor, playing tricks on your palate. Delite & Bowl’s Szechwan roots is evident in the Red Chili Oil Wontons. Mirroring the bold, pungent and spiciness from the Szechwan province, the provocative chili oil and fiery flavors result in the signature numbing of your tongue. However,

your face won’t turn red and smoke will not come out of your ears, as Delite & Bowl’s Red Chili Oil Wontons give your taste buds the soul of the Szechwan tradition without stunning your gastronomic experience. End your meal at Delite & Bowl with one of their many Boba Teas. Served warm or cold, the Taiwanese tea-based drinks are made with milk, concentrated flavors and chewy, tapioca balls. The tapioca balls may seem strange at first, but when you order one of these teas, you will be sipping dessert and taking the perfume of its flavor with you. Coming for lunch? Delite & Bowl’s Lunch Combo allows you to choose an entrée, a side and a drink (both tea and alcohol) for $12.95. • Seafood curry with fresh Alaskan salmon and shrimp, fresh vegetables and bamboo shoots in a yellow curry sauce. left Short rib steamed bun with braised boneless ribs in a steamed bao bun with a pickled salad, Asian herbs and hot mustard. above

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PRICE

Starters are $5-$18, mains are $18-$65 •••

AMBIANCE

Modern bowling alley with upscale cuisine •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Hot cauliflower, Boulder natural crispy half chicken, Eaton Ranch steaks •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

BOL

141 EAST MEADOW DR #113 | SOLARIS | VAIL 970.476.5300 | BOLVAIL.COM

by KRISTA DRISCOLL photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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like the vibe of this place; it’s very nightclubby,” says Bol executive chef Paula Turner with a sweeping glance at the modern lighting that snakes across the ceiling and the stark, white chairs and tabletops of the Vail Village restaurant. The occasional clatter of pins emanates from the handful of bowling lanes on the other side of a row of sheer curtains as Turner explains that she’s brand new to the restaurant, having started on Nov. 1. Her resume comprises everything from informal settings to fine dining, but she’s quite comfortable in her new digs here at Bol. “I liked the idea of being in a hip, fun vibe, but still being able to do very upscale food. I’ve been in a lot of styles of restaurants,” she says, ticking off a list of valley dining spots that ends with recent stints at Castle Peak Grille and Larkspur. “This is a combination of the two: It’s elevated, casual dining.” A month into her new gig, Turner has already overhauled the entire menu, leaving only a scattered handful of pre-tenure items. The single bill of fare is available all day and begins with shareables, including a traditional hot

wing-inspired dish with cauliflower coated in blue cheese, tempura fried and drizzled with a buffalo-style hot sauce. The cruciferous veggie makes a few more appearances on the menu, highlighted by the curried cauliflower with roasted chickpeas, shishito peppers and raisin gastrique tossed in shallot vinaigrette. Turner says it took her years to dial in the precise flavor and texture of the accompanying hummus-style chickpea croutons that melt on the tongue. “It definitely has a bowling alley food spin on it,” Turner says of the new menu, “but everything is taken up to more of a fine-dining presentation. I’d call it thoughtful, detail-driven bar food.” The beef served at Bol — from the Bol burger to the beef Carpaccio in a port reduction to the New York strip and bone-in tomahawk steaks — comes via exclusive contract with Eaton Ranch in Edwards. The cows are born at the small ranch and raised on grass and spent grain from a local brewery. “We’re the only restaurant that they supply all the beef to,” Turner says. “We hand-pick our cows, and all of the beef comes from Eagle County.” Colorado-sourced ingredients also make an appearance in other dishes, such as the Boulder natural crispy half

chicken, served with celery root puree and pan-seared beets and Brussels sprouts roasted in duck fat, finished with chicken jus and gremolata. Turner’s favorites include the ham and cheese pizza with a 64-degree egg perched atop it and the country pate melt with cornichon, stone-ground mustard and swirled rye bread. “It’s pretty fantastic,” she says. •

top Ahi tuna tartare with pink grapefruit, avocado and a tamari-scallion vinaigrette. above Boulder natural crispy half chicken with celery root puree, duck-fatroasted root vegetables and gremolata.


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THE 10th

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TOP OF GONDOLA ONE | MID-VAIL | 970.754.1010 | THE10THVAIL.COM

VAIL

by KIRSTEN DOBROTH photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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ining at The 10th is an integral part of the Vail Mountain ski experience. Located at MidVail, The 10th not only provides incredible views of the Gore Range, but also complete comfort to gaze upon the majestic peaks. As guests enter The 10th, they’re encouraged to step out of their cold ski or snowboard boots and slip their feet into soft, plush slippers. Even visitors who don’t ski are welcome to get a taste of the experience by taking a scenic ride up Vail’s Gondola One and having lunch at The 10th; the cost of the day pass counts toward a meal credit. Named after the 10th Mountain Division, The 10th offers refined, on-mountain dining, paired with an award-winning wine selection. Chef Tim McCaw joined The 10th’s team last winter, adding his rustic, Colorado-centric touch to the menu. Last spring, he visited Italy specifically to research new recipes and make them his own. His exploration led him to take alpine cuisine to the next level, blending his Colorado “twists” with classic European alpine dishes. “While still rooted in alpine classics, the menu at The 10th will have a much more cosmopolitan comfort-foods feel this winter,” says general manager of fine dining Jen Rizza. “Modern, inspired alpine cuisine has been the crux of The 10th since opening, and we continue to offer a diverse array of items.” Those items range from a delightful bowl of signature truffle fries to Bangs Island mussels with

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chorizo, or a roasted beet salad with Colorado goat cheese mousse. Then there’s the European-style flatbreads, flavorful Porcini-crusted Colorado bass or a warm bowl of house-made pasta alla Bolognese. McCaw uses local ingredients whenever possible to present a comprehensive culinary selection that can please any palate or appetite, from a few shared small plates at a table or a larger lunch to fuel an afternoon of skiing or riding. Gluten-free options, including pizza, are also available.

McCaw debuted one of his signature dishes, the Spatzle with Colorado pork bratwurst, last winter but refined it last summer, transforming it into a true classic. Balanced with sautéed brussel sprouts and wild mushrooms with a country-style mustard vinaigrette, the traditionally Bavarian dish is perfect for a cold winter day. And, die-hard fans of The 10th will be happy to hear that the renowned pot pie, made with roasted heirloom chicken and pheasant with sage vermouth sauce baked in a housemade puff pastry, continues to be a staple on this winter’s menu. The full bar and the open, communalseating lounge area, transcends traditional mountain architecture with its wine display wall and large fireplace. It matches the caliber of the cuisine with a Wine Spectator honored list, earning The 10th the Best of Award of Excellence for two years. Under the guidance of Nicole Jeffrey, beverage manager, the team’s passion for concocting craft cocktails results in drinks with just the right amount of flair, balanced against tradition with their artisan ingredients. The cocktail crafters use local liquors and house-made ingredients whenever possible. Beer lovers enjoy myriad Colorado beers on tap, as well as other US and import selections.

PRICE

Starters: $14-$34 Mains: $26-$34 •••

AMBIANCE

Ski-in, ski-out fine dining •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Heirloom chicken and roasted pheasant pot pie •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Yes, kids dine on a 3-course kids' menu

“And lastly, the energy of the restaurant, bustling with ski aficionados and smiles from ear to ear, is palpable from the moment you enter the building,” Rizza says. • Spatzle: Tender Belly pork sausage, mushrooms, Brussels sprouts and a whole grain mustard vinaigrette. left Chocolate Cake Roll with Earl Grey diplomat crème, lavender shortbread, blackberry coulis. above

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ALMRESI RESTAURANT

by JOHN O’NEILL photos courtesy ALMRESI RESTAURANT

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t’s as though Vail’s new Almresi restaurant was plucked from the Black Forest in Germany and set down gently in Seibert circle atop of Bridge Street at what is precisely and popularly known as “the old Tap Room location.” Here is the level of authenticity they offer: When a waiter in lederhosen or a waitress in dirndl brings out a dish such as Austria’s famous Hut Essen — a hot iron hat a-sizzle with

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meat — you’ll have to commit to memory the fact you’re still in the Rocky Mountains and not seated hilltop somewhere in the European Alps. The Thoma family, who own and operate the restaurant together, is from the Black Forest and has spent months building the space out with such incredible attention to detail. "We want to bring something cozy and traditional to Vail," says Alyssa Thoma. “The most important thing is that when the door opens, you are somewhere else. For a few hours you can maybe sit on a Swiss

333 BRIDGE ST. | 970.470.4174 | ALMRESI-VAIL.COM

Mountain or in the Alps in Austria.” The Thomas were very particular in their design: All of the wood was brought from Germany, all the furniture was made in Germany, a large beam stretching across the bar was sourced from an old farm in Austria, cuckoo clocks from the Black Forest hang across from the bar, and other relics from Europe are both on display and refashioned into new uses. Chefs Alexander Gabler and Daniel Schleehauf will further the experience with dishes along the lines of Holzfällersteak with onion rings and bacon champignons, schweizer rösti and Älpler macaroni to go with their specialties such as the Hutessen and a schlitten fondue chinoise, or type of meat fondue. Even the youngest of the Thomas, who are still in Germany, are busy baking welcome cookies that will be sent over to greet patrons at Almresi in Vail. "These are the kind of ski huts you would find somewhere in the Alps," Diana Thoma says. "We want to be very, very traditional. We want people to feel welcomed, and to see how much love we put into everything." This is the case with their Glühwein, a hot spicy wine drank around the holidays or for après in the Alps since the 1800s. The Thomas have had it sent over from the holiday markets in Germany

PRICE

$16-$40 •••

AMBIANCE

Authentic, rustic, cozy, alpine style •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Austrian traditional Hut Essen, "eat your hat" •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

to serve and make cocktails with. “In every single detail we have these traditional things,” says Joshua Thoma. “It is very rustic like it is in the Alps. It is an experience that people coming to Vail will have to have.” "We feel so blessed that we are able to be a part of Vail," Alysssa adds. "We want people to come in and feel good." • Venison chops. Dining room "Kuhstahl.." Alpine mountain breaksfast buffet.

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PRICE

•••

AMBIANCE

Family-friendly dining with majestic views of surrounding peaks •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Colorado lamb Reuben with house-cured and smoked Colorado lamb, braised red cabbage and dill havarti cheese and hand-cut fries •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Three-course children's menu for $10

BISTRO FOURTEEN by KIMBERLY NICOLETTI photos by LINDA GUERRETTE

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hether you ski, snowboard, snowshoe or take the gondola... you won’t be disappointed with the creative menu offerings at Bistro Fourteen, a gem not-so-hidden away on top of Vail Mountain at Eagle’s Nest. The expansive deck beckons but the inside is just as appealing with large windows overlooking the restaurant’s namesake: the 14,000-foot Mount of the Holy Cross. Chef Matthew Good, who looks much younger than his years, has revamped the menu, leaving only the Bistro Burger untouched. He has years of restaurant experience around the valley and with Richard Sandoval restaurants in Denver; his dad was a chef for 30 years so cooking just might run in the family. Last winter he worked at Mid-Vail, bringing his fresh approach to Bistro Fourteen this spring. He’s quick to give credit to his sous chef, Alec Cheng. “It’s nice to be here and get credit for my menu. They let me have full control — I’m trying to go for the ‘Colorado Proud’ menu,” Chef Good says, before describing each creation in mouthwatering detail. As if it’s not special enough to

EAGLES NEST VIA EAGLE BAHN GONDOLA | VAIL MOUNTAIN 970.754.4530 | VAIL.COM

break bread at 11,000-feet above sea level, you’re surrounded by snowcapped peaks, feeling the sun shimmer under the bright blue sky as you’re tempted with creative and unique flavors. Chef Good takes a caring and imaginative approach in his dishes. The creamy smoked trout dip, inspired from a previous job, replaced the previously popular crab dip. Served with homemade thick-cut potato chips, the dip comes with red onion marmalade and toasted almonds. It’s a salty, creamy lovely way to start off the meal. On the rooftop, Chef Good has a small herb garden and there are chives growing out front. The salads are made with Colorado greens — the Bistro Summer Salad’s spinach and arugula is tossed with a slightly tart, not-at-all-sweet blueberry champagne vinaigrette, touches of goat cheese, crunchy sunflower seeds and pickled red onions that burst with flavor. Chef Good talks excitedly about pickling, growing his own tomatoes at home and Bistro Fourteen creations that started in his own kitchen, such as the Colorado Lamb Reuben. It’s a total twist on the classic Reuben but it comes together perfectly. Starting with house-cured, brined and smoked lamb, it’s layered with braised red cabbage (made from an orange-juice

and red-wine reduction — he makes everything sound so simple) with a dill Havarti cheese and horseradish mustard, served on locally made pumpernickel bread. There’s crunch, a bit of spice and the smoky lamb tying it all together. Who doesn’t love a spicy, smoky sandwich? A little something is usually enough to end a meal with — and that’s just what pastry chef Ann Armstrong offers in her ‘petite sweets’ menu. Rumor has it she

has a chemistry degree in addition to her pastry prowess. Many of the ingredients are local — Palisade peaches and apricots — and all desserts come with a dollop of house-made ice cream or sorbet. It’s a happy ending, indeed. • top Colorado lamb Reuben with house-cured and smoked lamb. above Donut float with house-made Palisade plum soda, and sweet almond-glazed donut.

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Starters: $12-$17 Mains: $17-$26

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PRICE

Sunday brunch: $9-$17 Appetizers: $13-$15 Entrées: $32-$49 •••

AMBIANCE

A convivial setting for classic and contemporary French cuisine •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Dover sole à la meunière •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, kids’ menu available

LA TOUR by ASHLEE BRATTON photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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elcome to an evening at La Tour. Known for its creative and contemporary adaptations of classic French fare infused by whatever is inspiring chef-owner Paul Ferzacca and his team, La Tour puts the “zing” in amazing. This cozy eatery with seasonal cuisine beckons those searching for a delightful dining experience any time of the year. Just look for the cheery yellow awning. Snuggle up next to the floor-toceiling stone fireplace with one of La Tour’s master cocktail creations and enjoy the contemporary atmosphere peppered with works from both worldclass artists and local collaborators. This season’s liquid invention, aptly named “Root Down” and created by bartender Jeff L., fuses beet syrup with Sipsmith gin and a cherry reduction. With some bartender tricks, this libation blossoms into a martini glass masterpiece with a color and taste that is unmatched in vibrancy or zest. La Tour mastermind Ferzacca has commanded this ship for over 18 years and is soulfully committed to providing its guests with the absolute best in everything. He and his team

122 E. MEADOW DRIVE | VAIL | 970.476.4403 | LATOUR-VAIL.COM

prepare handcrafted cuisine from fresh, seasonal, organic and sustainable ingredients. But one thing you can’t understand — unless you’re sitting in the dining room, experiencing the cuisine — is Ferzacca’s playful side. It is the raised eyebrow quirk after a flawless setup. “Did he just…” Yes, he did. Take one of this season’s signature entrées, Veta de Palma Loup de Mer. Yes, the imported poisson is flown in fresh from Spain daily. And the butter beans and fennel add a classic foil to the fish. But the blood orange and phyto sauce ensure all the senses get involved, with a touch of adrenaline as you chase those flavors across the plate. As for the Sizzling Octopus A La Plancha, a concoction of cumin almonds, charred scallion, water chestnuts, kale and a Chile Caribe aioli that is perfect whether it’s a lunch, après or dinner selection. One of La Tour’s hidden weapons? Its excellent staff, including Master Sommelier Roland Micu. Micu is not afraid of any question you might have and is up for friendly banter and pairing challenges. “I’m a big texture guy. Texture first, then flavor,” he says. Complementing the cuisine, La Tour’s wine list boasts over 650 selections. Do not be afraid to let Micu pair a master treat whether it’s an après choice or a

delicate dessert. He knows exactly what goes with the grilled pineapple tarte tatin emblazoned with coconut ice cream, lychee and sliced macadamia nuts. Just as Chef Ferzacca crafts his menu and culinary team with precision and style, nothing about La Tour is commonplace — yet it’s a place that can be enjoyed in Vail any day of the week, any time of year. •

top Sizzling octopus a la plancha, cumin almonds, charred scallion, water chestnuts, kale, chile caribe aioli. above Herbes de Provence Colorado lamb rack chop, green chickpeas, beets, preserved lemon, Fruition Farms harissa skyr.


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THE FITZ BAR & RESTAURANT

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MANOR VAIL LODGE 595 EAST VAIL VALLEY DRIVE | VAIL 970.476.5000 | MANORVAIL.COM

VAIL

by JOHN O’NEILL photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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he Fitz, recently revamped to occupy all of the restaurant space at Manor Vail Lodge, delivers tasty, casual affordable cuisine to all who enter. Nestled a bit off the beaten heated cobblestone track of Vail Village, it seems awfully unfair to skip out on a hot meal or hand-crafted cocktail at this modernized restaurant, in close proximity to Golden Peak, simply because its more than a stone’s throw from the Covered Bridge. Here, are several reasons why: • The pork belly starter is brined with a dry rub of brown sugar and salt,

braised for six hours, then given a hard sear, honey glaze and harrisa sauce. • They offer free parking on property after 3 p.m. • The “Boulder Chicken” includes, well, chicken from Boulder that is all natural, sous-vide and cooked at a low temperature in all its own juices. It’s then seared to lock in moisture under a crispy skin. • The après crowd is loyal and local. • The donut dessert made by in-house pastry chef Kate Hughes, served with homemade chai ice cream. “It’s a modern take on simple ingredients,” says Kenneth Butler, executive chef, of the menu, created and altered in many parts by chef de cuisine Gage Smit.

“You don’t sit down to a list of ingredients you can’t recognize. You can read and know what you’re getting and then be surprised by the taste and presentation.” Take the mushroom risotto — a vegetarian dish that mixes trumpet, shiitake, crimini and beech mushroom varieties with risotto, aged sheep gouda, leeks and arugula — as an example. Not one of the ingredients can be misunderstood, yet the taste is extraordinary. Though a few mains and après favorites such as the Brussels sprouts and their flatbread remain, the menu is constantly revitalized with a keen eye for fresh ingredients and local collaboration: the microgreens come from a greenhouse in Denver, chicken is from Boulder, the steaks and root vegetables come from Colorado. “I just try and use fresh products and high-end ingredients,” Smit says. “Knowing our chicken isn’t coming from some corner of the United States where who knows what went into it is important. Keeping it fresh, local and simple is quality and quality food is good food.” This sort of drummed-down, toned-up, localized take to eating is what replaced Lord Gore, the previous restaurant in Manor Vail Lodge. “The property was build in 1960s as an owners club,” Bob McCleary, the general manager of Manor Vail Lodge, says. “It was ornate with these big legacy chandeliers. It was formal and European.”

PRICE

Apps: $8-$18 Salads: $13-$15 Mains: $16-$28 •••

AMBIANCE

Modern, lively space •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Boulder Chicken; The Fitz Burger •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

An extensive, Coloradosourced kids menu

Now the restaurant is laid out with a large chalkboard done up by local artist Amy Dose. Large fireplaces set off the main dining room and bar area, and between the two is an exposed gray brick backdrop. The vivacious modern atmosphere in both taste and ambiance feels authentic to a ski experience in the mountains of Vail. • The Fitz is a lively room. The Boulder chicken with butternut squash purée, farro and rainbow kale. left Braised short rib with house-made sriracha. page 13 8200 Ft. cocktail. top left

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PEPI’S BAR AND RESTAURANT

by JOHN LACONTE photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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t's not often you can say "check out what's new at Pepi's." The dedication to the classic nature of the place is what has contributed to its success over the last several decades. "If I tried to remove some of the items off the menu, I wouldn't just lose my job, I'd lose my head,” says

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executive chef Helmut Kaschitz. The dedication can be seen not only in the commitment to the classic menu items guests have come to expect – like wienerschnitzel, escargot and the steak tartare — but in the constant attentiveness from the restaurant and hotel's longtime owners, Austrian immigrants Pepi and Sheika Gramshammer. The couple lives on the property, works there all day, and eats most of their meals there. So when it was suggested that

they remodel their bar and condense the menu a bit, it was a suggestion that was not welcome at first. "Finally we were able to meet in the middle," Kaschitz says. The result is a bigger bar with large windows looking out to Bridge Street, new floors, a new ceiling, the bar itself is new and so are the bathrooms. And the menu is a little easier to take in at first glance. "I think the changes will really liven up the atmosphere in here," Kaschitz says. The bar menu will be condensed to a few tavern fare items along with some Austrian classics like the pretzel with mustard and cheese sauce. From the restaurant menu, there's a few new items to try. Kaschitz and his trusty sous chef, Richard Frazier, tried a few items last summer which were a success and will make the winter menu. Look for pork shanks and beef stroganoff among them. "They went through the roof this summer so we have to bring them back," Kaschitz says. Also look for a few new salads, including a beet salad, a tomato mozzarella salad a Ceasar salad. "We were busy last winter, but this winter I think it's going to be even more," Kaschitz says. •

231 EAST GORE CREEK 970.476.5626 | PEPIS.COM

PRICE

Apps $12-$17, lunch $12-$18 and dinner $20-$38 •••

AMBIANCE

Traditional Austrian •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Wienerschnitzel •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

Roasted red and gold beets with arugula, almonds, blue cheese and balsamic vinaigrette. top right The Bee's Knees: Barr Hill gin, honey, lemon juice and burning rosemary. left Pan-fried veal cutlet, new potatoes and vegetables. top left


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PRICE

•••

AMBIANCE

Mountain contemporary and edgy •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Alaskan Black Cod •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, skewers and noodle soups are popular, although many kids enjoy sushi as much as the adults

MATSUHISA VAIL 141 EAST MEADOW DRIVE | SOLARIS | VAIL 970.476.6628 | MASTUHISAVAIL.COM

story and photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ining at Matsuhisa is like going on a Japanese culinary safari around the world in your best designer shoes — and feeling nothing but comfortable all day long. Matsuhisa is more than just a sushi joint. Located on the second story of Solaris in Vail, this internationallyrenowned restaurant dishes up nightly appetizing adventures in sophisticated style, served with mountain-friendly hospitality. The adventure begins the moment a chorus of “Irasshaimase” rings out from staff members, meaning roughly “welcome” as you are led through the contemporary red and wooden dining room to your table. Ceiling-to-floor windows provide picture-perfect views of Vail Mountain while a cool crowd at the long designer bar keeps the ambience of the restaurant lively. Once seated you will likely be attended to by a friendly and incredibly knowledgeable server who will walk you through the

extensive menu, giving you plenty of suggestions along the way. Start your Matsuhisa dining experience off with an amazing craft cocktail. A must try and staple on the menu is The Gardener, which combines Hendrick’s gin with cilantro, serranos, ginger, lime juice and simple syrup in a well balanced, herbaceous beverage that finishes with a bit of spice that will keep you coming back for more. With your palate now kicked into action, it’s time to dive into the dining journey where Japanese style meets Peruvian flavor. “Our philosophy is to keep it simple with clean but complex flavors, utilizing the best ingredients from around the world. The unique part is we focus on this Japanese philosophy in a not traditional manor,” says Brian Busker, executive chef. The ever-changing sashimi quartet is the perfect introduction to this philosophy.  The dish takes four different fish served in four different styles of sashimi using unique ingredient combinations to create a surprise in every mouthful as you tour through different flavor and

textural profiles. The Isaki tiradito, wild grunt fish served with Peruvian rocoto chili paste, soy sea salt, yuzu and micro cilantro, starts in the mouth as a citrus flavor before moving into salty with a hint of spice and finishing with the butteriness of the fish itself, all in one bite.  Pair this with one of the Nobu-specific cold sakes served in a real bamboo carafe. While Matsuhisa is well known for its sushi menu, their kitchen menu items are not to be ignored. Signature dishes like the tempura king crab with “amazu” sweet ponzu, or the miso-marinated black cod, which is marinated for three days and literally melts in your mouth, and which the servers affectionately refer to as “fish candy,” are consistent crowd

pleasers. New items like the 30-ounce bone-in Wagyu rib-eye with truffle tosazu butter or warm mushroom salad are sure to excite both regulars and newcomers to the restaurant. This season, along with the two Omakase (tasting menus) which are always available, the restaurant also has plans to hold culinary events in February hosted by owner and celebrity chef Nobu Matsuhisa.  Until then, Chef Busker invites you to come in and, “Let us cook for you from our hearts.” • top Sashimi Quartet with live scallop tiradito, king salmon New Style, Golden Rye snapper with dry miso and uni with toro jalapeño. above Mushroom salad with yuzu dressing. page 10 Spicy tuna with crispy rice.

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PRICE

Starters: $11-$18 Entrées: $29-$44 •••

AMBIANCE

Upscale urban contemporary •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Crispy duck leg confit •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, children’s menu available

TERRA BISTRO by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos by CHRISTOPHER DILLMANN

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erra Bistro has been crafting culinary adventure for 23 years, and with an exciting winter menu, this favorite among Vail’s worldclass restaurant scene continues to showcase the seasonally inspired menu and regionally sourced ingredients for which it is known and loved. Located within the Vail Mountain Lodge, Terra Bistro radiates a warm and classy feel, but it’s also casual enough to capture the essence of Vail's mountaintown vibe. Come by after a day on the slopes to experience the extensive wine list and Colorado-inspired house cocktails that make Terra Bistro’s bar a happening place to top off your day with appetizers that go beyond typical bar fare. But plan to stick around because what’s coming out of Shawn Miller’s kitchen for dinner this winter is for those who want a unique Vail dining experience. “I recently traveled to Asia and was inspired by the flavors and culture,” says Chef Miller. “We’re incorporating some of that influence into our winter menu, and we’re excited about the lighter dishes we’re offering.” Find this influence, for starters, in Terra Bistro’s flavor-powerful small plates and in the standout kampachi

352 E. MEADOW DRIVE | VAIL MOUNTAIN LODGE | VAIL 970.476.6836 | TERRABISTROVAIL.COM

crudo, which melds herbal, spicy and tangy flavors with its ginger-sake reduction, cilantro, basil, Thai chilies, tamari and yuzu gelée. Other interesting small plates, including the porcini-crusted scallops with dashi and the warm mushroom salad, beautifully capture Chef Miller’s most recent inspiration. You’ll also find a lot of joy in Terra Bistro’s Colorado-proud beverage selections. Embrace the emphasis on Colorado spirits, and go for the Woody Creek Basil Gimlet, featuring Colorado vodka, torn basil, lime juice and a hint of agave nectar, or choose from a selection of Colorado craft beers. And with a sommelier in house, you’ve got an expert guide to assist with wine pairings for the main course. The buttery, light flavor of the Rocky Mountain trout pairs nicely with a glass of the Ferry Lacombe rosé. This new take inspired by the classic Trout Amandine offers perfectly seasoned grilled trout rounded out with creamy white polenta, roasted cauliflower, grilled Belgian endive, apple, red onion, brown butter and almonds. Among Terra Bistro’s main courses, the parsnip and goat cheese ravioli with rabbit confit is both ambitious and unique, with a creamy flavor burst in the ravioli center that’s mirrored in the juicy pop of fresh pomegranate seeds. Dessert devotees will be happy

to hear that Terra Bistro’s beloved Bittersweet Chocolate Molten is still the house specialty. This luscious cake with an ooey-gooey center is accompanied by vanilla gelato and drizzled with raspberry coulis. Pair it with the Colorado Copper Muse amaretto for a sensational finale that conjures the best of Coloradocrafted cuisine, from beginning to end. •

top Porcini crusted scallops with dashi, king trumpet mushrooms, sesame oil and green onions. above Kampachi crudo with a gingersake reduction, cilantro, Thai chili, tamari and yuzu gelee.


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FLAME

AT THE FOUR SEASONS ONE VAIL ROAD | VAIL 970.477.8650 FOURSEASONS.COM/VAIL/ DINING/RESTAURANTS/FLAME/

by TRACI MACNAMARA photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ir Loin tells you everything you need to know. When you reach the bottom of the grand staircase inside Four Seasons Resort Vail and approach the entrance to Flame, a regal-looking cow is there to greet you. This lifesized sculpture sports a name tag — Sir Loin — and serves as an apt introduction to a place that reveres one thing above all others: beef. In this way, Sir Loin foreshadows the family-friendly fun and exquisite meat-centric menu you’ll enjoy once seated at your table inside Flame’s generously sized dining room that’s as appropriate for a group gathering as it is for a first date. If you doubt the importance of the almighty cow, know that when executive chef Marcus Stewart isn’t doing one of the many things that need doing when running the kitchen of a five-star hotel, the chef might be found jetting over to Hotchkiss with a group of guests to tour the 7X Ranch. It’s where Chef Stewart buys all of the American Wagyu served at Flame, and is part of the restaurant’s Farm to Flame program that begins in a helicopter and ends with dinner at the chef’s table. But for those who don’t want to cross the county line on a culinary adventure, simply get a table at Flame. Sip on an elixir from the bourbononly special cocktail list while getting a sense of the menu’s offerings from Colorado suppliers and ranches. “Our claim to fame is our variety of over-the-top quality meats you won’t find elsewhere. Elk, bison, pork, lamb and beef are all staples at Flame,” says Chef Stewart. “They’re what we do best.” For starters, choose from Flame’s more interactive appetizer options with finger pickings served on a big

PRICE

Apps: $14-18; Entrées: $35-$58 •••

AMBIANCE

Modern mountain steakhouse •••

SIGNATURE DISH

7X Wagyu NY strip steak •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, with a playful kids’ menu

butcher block. The whole table can get involved in this experience while trying a sampling of must-haves including the mini elk corn dogs served with housesmoked tomato ketchup and grainy mustard aioli for dipping, guajillo pepperjelly-glazed pork belly with smoked goat cheese grits, and beef tenderloin tartare with quail eggs and lavash. Next, get ready for the true spectacle, mains from the pasture, including the dry-aged lamb chops and the Wagyu bone-in rib-eye from Colorado’s 7X Ranch that packs amazing flavor and texture into every bite. The description “melt in your

mouth” was created for this steak. When ordering, choose from several house-created rubs that add more flavor explosion to your favorite piece of meat, and then enjoy dipping your selection in six different accompanying sauces that add even more flavor and fun, too, with names such as “Charleston Truffle” and “Black Pepper Love.” Plus, the sides — listed as “carboholics” on the menu — more than complete the meal. Of these, the decadent smoked Gouda and dill mac and cheese stands out as one you’ll want to return for as a standalone, though the Maine lobster mashed potatoes are hard to resist.

Don’t be afraid go over the top with dessert here: Outrageous is something that Flame does best. Even if you simply try one final bite, you’ll want to devote it either to the crèmeanglaise-filled chocolate soufflé that arrives in a mini Staub — or to a trio of maple-glazed doughnuts topped with candied bacon. At least if you can’t eat all of the doughnuts for dessert, they’re a to-go that will pair perfectly with tomorrow morning’s coffee. • Braised Greeley lamb "Volcano" shank. Rocky Mountain elk corn dog with house-made sauces. top

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TAVERN ON THE SQUARE

675 LIONSHEAD PLACE | LIONSHEAD 970.754.7704 | ARRABELLE.ROCKRESORTS.COM

by BETH POTTER photos courtesy VAIL RESORTS

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hen you’re having the perfect ski vacation, snowflakes fall lightly at midday, as you try to decide whether to sit outside on the Tavern on the Square’s patio, or inside, in a cozy corner. It’s just steps from the Eagle Bahn gondola, meaning you can take in the action from your window seat, or hail your friends to join you for a relaxed meal. This place is a gastropub in the true European tradition, where you may want to snuggle with your honey at the bar, or walk around in your ski boots. But when it comes to the food at the Tavern, look for clean flavors in the best new American tavern cuisine style. That means fresh tastes made with locally-sourced ingredients and easily recognizable bar food. “It’s the foodie’s answer to comfort food,” says Paul Wade, executive chef. “Understated elegance. Honest and approachable.” There’s the updated Croque Madame “Cubano” sandwich with ham, roast pork, pickles and Swiss cheese, and a duck egg on top, smothered in béchamel sauce. The corresponding

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PRICE

Starters: $7-$14 Mains: $22-$45 •••

AMBIANCE

European gastropub •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Steak frites •••

DOG-FRIENDLY?

Yes — there's a canine menu available on the terrace

Muffaletta is the traditional Italian ham and cheese, made with Parma ham, salami and soppressata.  Another stellar sandwich is the aptly named knife and fork Brisket BLT made with smoked brisket, pork belly, fried green tomatoes, arugula and lemon aioli. All meats are cured in house. You could go lighter with the vegan Radiatore, which blends the flavors of quinoa pasta spirals with tomatoes, arugula and herb crumbs. But it’s

vacation, right? Check out the trendy poutine cheese fries elsewhere on the menu. You’ll be able to ski them off in no time. There’s the simple: sea salt and parmesan; the complex: a short rib and mushroom sauce delivered with fontina cheese; and the decadent: shrimp fries with bacon and jalapeño, covered in a velvety cheese sauce. At lunch or dinner, market steak and potatoes for the traditionalist serves as a counterpoint to a Colorado striped bass and a bouillabaisse rich with shrimp, scallops, mussels and clams. The sweets menu goes playful. Kids and adults alike will love the donuts — warm Munchkin-style morsels served with chocolate, fig and chestnut jam and custard sauce. The S’mores Crack Jar will delight anyone who loves chocolate

pudding, topped by graham cracker dust and hand-crafted marshmallows. At Tavern on the Square, there’s also a special menu for Fido (we’re told that the doggies always lick their plates clean), a kids’ menu, a vegan menu, and a spa menu (the restaurant connects directly with the Arrabelle on the west wall). “We’re pleased to offer a diverse and family-friendly selection,” Wade says. It might be the signature cocktails that keep regulars coming back year after year, however. The Vail Mule comes in its own engraved copper mug that you get to keep. Refills are $10, anytime, any day. With such eclectic choices, we say, “Comfort foodies, unite!” • Knife and Fork BLT. Steak frites.

above left


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•••

AMBIANCE

Fun, family-style pizzeria, with restaurants in Lionshead and Beaver Creek villages •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Hand-tossed, New York style pizza •••

KID FRIENDLY?

You bet!

BLUE MOOSE PIZZA by EMILY JAISSLE photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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short stroll from the Lionshead gondola puts you at Blue Moose Pizza, a locallyowned, community-oriented pizza restaurant overlooking the popular ice skating rink. The focus on Colorado-born beers and spirits is no reason to discount this New York-style pizza joint. Made from scratch, hand tossed, thin crust and a secret “Blue Moose twist” bring the flavor of New York directly to the cobblestone streets of Vail. Pizzeria favorites like the Big Moose combine pepperoni, sausage, Canadian bacon, black olives, mushrooms, onions, green peppers, marinara and mozzarella for an “everything style” pie are crowd pleasers. Others like the Autumn Pizza excite taste buds with aromatic truffle oil, dainty crimini mushrooms, parsley, garlic and creamy goat cheese. Delicious pizza combinations are offered and, behind the counter, 25 toppings and seven different cheeses are available.

This plethora of options and a bit of creativity make it possible to stay traditional or invent the pie of your wildest dreams to share with friends. If you are a dreamer of pizza possibilities, Blue Moose will be hosting an opportunity to win a spot of the menu in 2017. After receiving an email from a curious customer asking, “why there was no pie with cream cheese,” the team created a contest to have the winner’s pizza placed on the menu. On Vail’s Closing Day a final contest will determine the best pizza to be featured on the menu year-round. “Community involvement is a cornerstone to the business,” says Sarah Franke, a member of the business development team for over a decade. The company donates $1 of each Vintage Pizza to Eagle Valley Senior Life as one of their multiple other givebacks to the surrounding community. Options like soups, salads, hot sandwiches, calzones, appetizers and a kid section titled “Little Moose” are available if pizza isn’t calling your name. Kids are always welcome at both the Lionshead and Beaver Creek

675 LIONSHEAD PLACE | LIONSHEAD | 970.476.8666 76 AVONDALE LANE | BEAVER CREEK PLAZA | 970.845.8666 BLUEMOOSEPIZZA.COM

locations, and are even invited to draw on the tablecloths. Stopping by during a busy time? Ask about the “text to waitlist” option that allows you to be alerted via text when your table is set. Instead of waiting inside you can enjoy the charming surroundings. Blue Moose is a place to easily grab a local brew and a fresh slice, enjoy table service with a group of friends, or pick up a pie to bring home to the family. They also offer daily lunch and après specials all season. Lastly, do not forget the delicious warm and gooey chocolatechip cookies baked to order: You will not regret this indulgence any time of day! • The popular Vintage pizza with sliced meatballs, roasted red peppers, fresh basil, marinara, parmesan and mozzarella. right Bruce the Moose enjoys a slice of Cowboy pizza with a Tent Pole Vanilla porter. above

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PRICE

Apps: $4.95-$11.95 Pizzas: $13.95-$25.95 Slices: $3.25-$4.50 Entrées: $11.95

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PRICE

Sushi $7-$24, Mains $24-$52 •••

AMBIANCE

Small, hip, and modern •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Summer in Vail Roll, Alaskan King Crab Claw

YAMA SUSHI by KIRSTEN DOBROTH photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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n a culinary landscape consisting of rich, alpine-inspired bites, Yama’s spot on Gore Creek Drive makes the case for a cozy evening spent with tastes from the Far East as opposed to the Wild West. Black and red accent lighting, modern décor, and a chic staff keep the place humming with an understated hipness that bumps along to the sounds of electronic jazz for dinner service each evening. And whatever the hole-in-thewall eatery lacks in square footage, it makes up for with an innovative menu that balances some of the celebrated sushi spot’s signature plates with a rotating cast of new favorites, and a welcoming exclusivity that keeps reservations booked, and a seat at the bar a coveted spot. Efrain Canales is the new head sushi chef, although he takes the helm after being behind the sushi bar since Yama’s inception, and with nearly 12 years of experience. Fresh fish comes Canales’ way from around the world, with a range of varieties flown in every other day. Along with his own creations, his winter menu sees a return of some old favorites, like the Summer in Vail

168 EAST GORE CREEK DRIVE | VAIL | 970.476.7332 | YAMASUSHIVAIL.COM

Roll, which features snow crab, tuna, yellowtail, salmon, masago, cilantro and avocado wrapped in cucumber and topped with ponzu sauce — an intriguing, rice-less favorite. Other menu favorites making an appearance on this season’s menu include the Kumamoto oysters, and other specialty rolls like the Shiso Tuna: thinly sliced yellowfin is wrapped around shiso leaf, julienned cucumber, fresh grated wasabi root, and topped with a citrus garlic soy and scallion infused olive oil for a refreshingly potent flavor. Chef Dimitri Sourvorin’s approaches the hot menu with the same take on fresh ingredients and innovative, Asian-inspired tastes as well, with an assortment of individual-sized and family-style plates for the table to choose from. If you’re looking to feed a group, start with an order of the Alaskan King Crab Claw, a menu favorite that’s served with a tempura shishito, micro wasabi greens, and topped with a truffle ponzu for a savory finish. If it all looks too good to choose, leave fate to chance and opt for Omakase — chef’s choice — for a tasting experience that should leave you with a full table and a content belly. Wash it down with one of Yama’s specialty cocktails — the Ronin Moguls is a light, sake-infused choice that will keep you sipping — or share a flask of sake

from the list, which features an extensive assortment of hot and cold sakes — the Living Jewel is a chilled house favorite. The drink list doesn’t skimp on wine or beer either, with an extensive list of whites and reds by the glass and bottle, and an assortment of specialty Japanese beers, too. And if your sweet tooth is calling at meal’s end, cap the experience with an order of mochi for the table. •

top Spanish mackerel two ways, sashimi and nigiri topped with fresh ginger, scallion and amazu (sweet soy) and a Shochu Sour with togarashi infused shochu, egg whites, yuzu lime juice and simple syrup. above Alaskan King Crab claw grilled and served with tempura shishito and micro wasabi greens, drizzled with truffle ponzu.


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AT SONNENALP HOTEL

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20 VAIL ROAD | VAIL 970.479.5429 | LUDWIGSRESTAURANT.COM

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by KIMBERLY NICOLETTI photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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udwig’s immerses all of your senses in the Old World tradition of hospitality and fine dining. Walking through Sonnenalp Hotel heightens the wonder of European elegance, and once you wind your way into Ludwig’s, tucked into a quiet corner, any stress melts away, as impeccable, warm service greets you. Every season, executive chef Florian Schwarz hires some of the best chefs, some of which come from Europe, where culinary apprenticeships take three years. The dedicated staff works together to present spectacular cuisine with the precision of clockwork. Because Ludwig’s is a winteronly restaurant, Schwarz spends his summers experimenting with unique combinations; he deconstructs traditional alpine and other European staples, incorporates Colorado classics, then uses simple, fresh ingredients to generate new tastes and textures every winter. He describes his recipes as a mixture of “craziness, creativity and hard work.” Every dish satisfies multiple areas of the palate. For example, his signature sea bass, served with quinoa last year, is even more amazing this winter, with its delicate, yet flavorful, broth. Sophisticated diners, such as a group from New York City visitors enjoying another one of their many meals at Ludwig’s just before Christmas, spontaneously made comments to each

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another: “They don’t disappoint,” one man said. “He’s the best chef in Vail,” another commented. “Every bite is delicious,” a woman exclaimed as she relished Chef’s most tender venison, served in a light chocolate sauce. With all the savory starters, main courses and even desserts like carrot cake pieces artfully displayed with small dollops of vanilla ice cream and pumpkin

sauces, it’s hard to believe everything Ludwig’s serves is gluten free. While an unaware diner would never guess, guests, like one woman who literally cried with gratitude that she could order anything off the menu, don’t have to worry about gluten cross-contamination. “Everything is made in house, so I know all the ingredients are fresh and gluten free,” Schwarz says. The ornate wood and copper work within Ludwig’s complements each artfully displayed dish. In addition to a friendly, professional staff, Schwarz believes an intimate dining experience includes perfection in artful presentation; each dish appears distinct in its details, which entice the eyes, because, as Schwarz puts it, “The eyes are actually eating, too.” He strives to surprise guests with unexpected flavors and creative presentation. “They’re simple ingredients, but you can make so much out of it when you combine them differently,” he says. Meanwhile, Ludwig’s sommelier, Joel Cabrera, is building a wine selection focused on drier wines with less fruit that feel more

PRICE

Mains from $29-$49 •••

AMBIANCE

Modern gluten-free cuisine in a timeless Bavarian setting •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Colorado rack of lamb with roasted vegetables

graceful on the palate, he says. He looks for full-bodied wines without flavors that overpower the cuisine. Through every detail, Ludwig’s makes you feel like you’re a guest in an intimate home filled with hosts who are committed to the finest of Old World dining, while still providing modern, innovative spins on traditional cuisine. • Colorado lamb rack with gnocchi, root vegetables and haricots verts. left Crêpe Suzette with orange, Grand Marnier, caramel. above

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THE REMEDY BAR

ONE VAIL ROAD | FOUR SEASONS RESORT VAIL 970.477.8600 | FOURSEASONS.COM/VAIL/

by KIRSTEN DOBROTH photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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he Remedy Bar in Vail wants to remedy your week with elixirs, potions and concoctions — also known as alcohol. They also want to follow up with doctor’s orders, green therapies and sweet therapies — the culinary side of the restaurant and lounge. Their mission seems to be landing, as the establishment has become a beating heart of locals and visitors enjoying a convivial place to imbibe, nosh and enjoy one another’s company. From secluded lounge-style seating by the fire, to an alcove fitted with larger high tops, couches and televisions, to the expansive outdoor section that comes equipped with fire pits and sweeping views of Vail Mountain, an afternoon snack, evening meal or nightcap at The Remedy is tailor made for whoever is ready to indulge. The menu offers a medley of experiences for every type of visit, along with nightly specials that keep a steady stream of visitors — and a large following of locals — coming back for more. Whether it’s Colorado whiskey flights, game-day burgers or live jazz, there is always something special at The Remedy. Executive chef Marcus Stewart has created a fun, eclectic menu that reads like a choose-your-own-adventure book. His culinary enthusiasm is obvious in everything from the 10 Alarm Chili Bison Burger to The Cioppino Cure to Charlotte’s Revenge Pork Ribs. As anyone who has spent any time with the chef knows, he has a flair for naming things. Though the food

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is of utmost importance at The Remedy, the cornerstone of the establishment is Steven Teaver, beverage director. “Steven has a culinary background that he incorporates into the beverage program,” says Stewart. “He creates

his own infusions and shrubs for the cocktails, and we work together to complement each other’s menus.” Teaver’s menus are diverse and inventive. With international influences, diners can experience concoctions inspired by the Caribbean, South America, France and the U.S.’s own cocktail culture. Infused syrups and spirits, plus some sleight of hand, make it a bit of dinner — or at least drinking — theater that plays right alongside the mood of the rest of the lounge. But here is the kicker: While happy, well-dressed people chat amongst each other at the bar, a family sits in the dining area enjoying dinner and watching a football game on a 165” television. That’s the thing about this place, you can order the drink of your dreams and still get a great burger for the game. •

PRICE

Cocktails $14-$15, Starters $6-$20, Mains $16-$44 •••

AMBIANCE

Bright, spacious and inviting •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Tuna Huarache, Kalbi glazed beef ribs •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes

Hamachi Tiradito. Quinoa Salad with Seared Salmon.

above left


v a i l d a i l y

•••

AMBIANCE

Contemporary steakhouse destination with a classy après-ski scene •••

SIGNATURE DISH

New York strip; Colorado lamb fondue •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Yes, from small bites to scrumptious steaks and sides

ELWAY’S VAIL by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos courtesy ELWAY’S VAIL

I

f you’re looking to elevate your après-ski experience this winter, then look no further than Elway’s Vail, located just steps from Vail’s Gondola One within the Lodge at Vail. Yes — you probably already know Elway’s as a contemporary steakhouse named after that beloved Broncos quarterback. And you’re well aware that Elway’s is where to go when you’re looking to enjoy mouthwatering cuts of USDA prime steaks in a chic, contemporary dining room. The staff in both the front and back of the house are known for exacting standards and attention to detail — something guests will appreciate when they tuck into a delicious bite. But before you march straight to your dining room table at Elway’s this winter, be sure to come early for a stop by the bar, where you’ll discover that it provides a destination après experience to be remembered for its craft cocktails, Colorado beers,

174 EAST GORE CREEK DRIVE | LODGE AT VAIL | VAIL | 970.754.7818 | ELWAYS.COM/VAIL

enticing appetizers, and fun vibe. With a 7 for $7 bar menu available each day from 3-5 p.m., you’ll find plenty of upscale starters that would make the big #7, John Elway himself, proud. The concept is simple: seven appetizers for $7 each, served in the bar area — but the quality you’ll discover in the Elway’s bar menu makes it anything but blasé. A grilled artichoke dusted with herbs and spices is served with drawn butter and garlic aioli, and the creamy artichoke dip shows up in a mini Staub cast-iron crock that keeps it warm for dipping. The Rhode Island calamari mixes blue-cheesestuffed fried green olives, marinated baby corn, and tangy pepperoncinis with crispy calamari rings. And for something closer to home, you’ll find great local flavor with the Coloradosourced Wagyu beef sliders topped with a chipotle sauce and pickles inside of a house-made brioche bun. This time of year, the Colorado lamb chop is a can’t-miss item. Served with a green chile fondue, Chimayo tortilla chips and roasted sweet potatoes, it’s a lot of love for both sides of the border.

USDA prime beef takes center stage in the Elway’s dining room, and you’ll find it grilled to perfection whether your preference is a thick Porterhouse, a juicy rib-eye, or a melt-in-your-mouth fillet. Of course, if you’re having a good time at the Elway’s bar, you can certainly order an entrée from your

barstool, but the buzzing après vibe is certainly one you can carry with you from the bar to the dining room, all the way through dessert. • top USDA Prime New York strip with asparagus. above Moscow Mule in traditional cup.

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Starters: $7-$23.50; Mains: $18.50-$63

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BIG BEAR BISTRO

297 HANSON RANCH ROAD | VAIL | 970.445.1007 | BIGBEARBISTRO.COM

by ASHLEE BRATTON photos by CHRISTOPHER DILLMANN

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ant to know where the locals go? Just shimmy off Gondola One and head straight across the Vail Village plaza to Big Bear Bistro on Bridge Street and you can’t get more local than that. Everything about the little cafe with the street-side après patio seating has a local, homemade touch. From the artwork on the wall painted by Vail Mountain School’s art class to the sandwiches named after the owner’s daughters, there’s nothing but local love flowing from the floor to the décor. “I’ve been here so long I’ve watched these kids grow up,” says Vidette Gehl, the owner, laughing. “Whatever people walk in with I’ll feature — but I painted the one in the bathroom. That one’s mine.” This owner and artist also happened to create the Big Bear Bistro logo as well. Framed photos hang in the corner of various famous faces that have enjoyed noshing from the carefully crafted menu of breakfast, lunch and après options. This casual, low-key eatery is just the type of foodie joint anyone from the U.S. Ski Team-in-training to vacationing celebs-gone-incognito go to get a quick bite and then hit the hill. With such strong ties to the ski community, it’s not surprising that this little sandwich shop also provided over 1,000 sandwiches for volunteers at the World Cup in 2015. So what can one get from the chalkboard menu? Breakfast and lunch are served at the eatery all day. At breakfast, customizable breakfast burritos and sandwiches, crepes, omelets and French toast are

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popular items. Add a smoothie if you like. And don't forget the coffee. Or, if you're feeling lively, try the creative wine-based concoctions, such as the apple blossom hot spiced apple cider that is yet awaiting the perfect name. If you have a suggestion for the unnamed cocktail, it just might make it onto the menu. Wine and champagne are also available by the glass or the bottle, along with microbrews and select imports. If you’re jonesing for a sandwich, Big Bear Bistro is the perfect place. In

honor of Vidette’s daughters, there’s a sandwich on the menu to represent each one. Order The Mo, aptly named after vegetarian daughter, Monika, or prepare yourself for The Briggs — a roasted turkey, bacon, avocado and buttermilk ranch sandwich that will make you smile. Any sandwich can be ordered on fresh-baked organic ciabatta bread, whole wheat and gluten-free breads or several choices of artisan tortilla wraps. Order the Bistro’s infamous Masterpiece Sandwich with maple-glazed ham, capicola, salami, provolone, honeybalsamic-glazed arugula, banana peppers and cracked pepper aioli. Daily hot soups are excellent foils to the large selection of salads. Try an arugula salad with berries and goat cheese, or the Mona Lisa with mozzarella, house-made pesto, tomatoes and honey-balsamic dressing. The little shop has many options. Perched at the top of Bridge Street, Big Bear Bistro is the place to kick back and enjoy the local side of mountain life. • Croissant French toast is topped with whipped cream, fresh berries and maple syrup. left The Tree Hugger sandwich is one of Big Bear Bistro's most popular, and includes caramelized onions, sprouts, peppers and a maple cider vinaigrette. It is accompained by a Stella Artois beer. above

PRICE

Breakfasts: $8-$10 Big Sandwiches: $10.95 Salads: $7-$12 Après: $8-$15 Beers: $2-$4 Wines and champagne by the glass: $5+ •••

AMBIANCE

Delicatessen/coffee shop/ local's hangout •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Masterpiece Sandwich •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Oh yeah ...


v a i l d a i l y

•••

AMBIANCE

A warm and welcoming eatery transported from Italy to the heart of Vail •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Raviolo di Coda di Bue, Linguine Crostacei •••

KID-FRIENDLY?

Bring the whole family!

CAMPO DI FIORI by KIRSTEN DOBROTH photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

A

visit to Vail can hardly be called complete without a meal at Campo de Fiori, but then again, that isn’t news to the many families who make an evening at Campo a centerpiece of their trip. Chef Simone Reatti mingles with tables throughout the evening, many of whom know him from visits over the years, as perfectly portioned dishes of from Reatti’s home country grace the table with a taste for everyone, and plenty of smaller plates to share. It’s this kind intimate feeling that often gets lost in the type of square footage that Campo boasts, and one that, according to managing partner Mira Hozzova, creates a sense that every party’s spot at Campo is a special one. This attention to detail is apparent from the moment guests top the staircase to the main dining room, where they dust off the snow and chill from outside and find themselves within a Tuscan-inspired space, with big windows offering views above the heart of Vail Village. An open kitchen lets guests in on all the action — and each dish — created by Reatti and his team. And while guest experience is front and center, each dish is the main attraction that keeps people

100 EAST MEADOW DRIVE | 970.476.8994 | CAMPODEFIORI.NET/VAIL/

coming back for more. Ingredients are a central focus for Reatti, who spends time meeting with producers, and has traveled to Italy to source ingredients in order to craft a menu that changes with the season. “I won’t use ingredients that I wouldn’t eat, or that I wouldn’t feed my daughter,” he says. And it’s apparent from the first plate to the last. The Piato di Prosciutto is a favorite way to start a meal, as Paolo Tanaro prosciutto that’s been aged 18 months is sliced paper thin and paired with grilled focaccia. The Polpo alla Griglia is another can’t-miss starter — grilled Spanish octopus skewered and drizzled with red-pepper-infused olive oil for a bit of mild heat and charred taste. When moving to mains, pasta is the house special, and winter-inspired dishes offer a seasonal take on old favorites. Try the Raviolo di Coda di Bue, a homemade raviolo filled with braised oxtail and taleggio cheese, and topped with a butter sage sauce for a delicate take on a hearty staple. Paired with a glass of Italian red or white from the extensive wine and cocktail list, you might think that you’ve been transported to a ski trip in the Dolomites as opposed to the Rockies. Don’t forget to cap off an evening with a sweet ending, as the time and thought put into each starter and main

isn’t lost on the dessert list. The Mousse di Cioccolato Nero is a decadent crowd-pleaser that’s whipped texture is the perfect complement to a heavier meal, and is topped with fresh berries. And if you really can’t find room for dessert, don’t miss the house-made

Limoncello – a longstanding restaurant favorite that’s the perfect last warm up before heading back out into the cold. • Linguini seafood. Polpo alla Griglia: grilled spanish octopus, red pepper infused olive oil. above

below

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Starters $10-$20, Mains $21-$41

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VINTAGE 12 VAIL ROAD #100 | VAIL | 970.479.0175 | VINTAGE-VAIL.COM

by JOHN O’NEILL photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

T

he four-seat square tables at Vintage restaurant in Vail are set neatly with white linen, oil candles and all the necessary accoutrement. Overhead, soft French music injects an equable mood into the room, and diners enjoying spirited conversation drift effortlessly from cocktails and starters to wine-paired mains to palatesoftening desserts and evening coffee. Should you ever have had the good fortune to dine in France, you’d be impressed that Vintage is not some listless impersonation, but a true-toform experience of a French brasserie. “There is something very comforting and comfortable and nostalgic about a room like this,” Laurance Broderick, owner and general manager of Vintage, says. “All of the room, food and service is a compliment to the company people are keeping and the conversations they’re having. We want people to come in here and just connect.” For this winter’s season, executive chef Remington Fleming has doubled the size of the starters and sides, increased the entrée offerings and will

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PRICE

Starters: $10-$22 Mains: $25-$50 •••

AMBIANCE

Vintage French •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Steak frites •••

HOURS

Brunch:  8:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday to Monday Dinner: 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

offer rousing chalkboard features. “A lot of the techniques we use are French," Fleming says. “A lot of research goes into these classical French dishes with space on the menu to explore some new American style.” The steak frites, onion soup, tartare

and Lyonnaise salad are prepared as traditional French classics, whereas the tuna crudo or octopus starters are the chef’s creations along with the chalkboard features. The pâté, made with bourbon instead of brandy, and the frog legs fall somewhere in between as a modern twist on quintessential French cuisine. The wine list is set by sommelier

Johnny Thompson, who is influenced in some ways by his upbringing in the reinvented French culture of New Orleans: It is approachable with reasonable prices on the higher end bottles of recognizable labels, but there is also a novel selection that may require a bit of faith in the stewardship of Thompson. “I try to accommodate the high expectations of our diners by maintaining more food-accommodating wines,” Thompson says. “The American palate these days gravitates toward wines that are higher in alcohol content with fruit qualities, but those don’t pair as well with food as the Old World wines do. I definitely maintain a French influence and try to have wines with more acidic structures that are going to really complement the food you are salivating for and getting ready to eat.” Vintage embodies a culture that persists in France today, one where friends or family come together over a meal or a cocktail. The restaurant seems to diminish stress and center the attention of its diners on the taste of the food and quality of the conversation. Bon appétit. • 7 oz. maple-glazed duck breast, bourbon buttenut squash purée, pickled squash, savory granola, brasied rainbow chard, balsamic reduction paired with a glass of Solis, Malbec, Cahors wine. left Fried frog legs, red pepper d'espelette, bleu d'avergne, carrot and celery chips, honey-crème fraiche. above


v a i l d a i l y

GAME CREEK RESTAURANT

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GAME CREEK BOWL | VAIL MOUNTAIN ACCESSIBLE VIA SNOWCAT FROM EAGLES NEST 970.754.4275 | GAMECREEKVAIL.COM

by JOHN O’NEILL photos CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

et back in the thin pine-forest on the east side of Vail’s Game Creek Bowl, the wooden construct, overhanging eaves and smoking chimneys of Game Creek Restaurant are the first indications of a European chalet-style dining experience. The fact that getting there for dinner involves a gondola ride and snowcat shuttle under the bright stars of a black Colorado sky further sets the stage for an evening of mountainside indulgence. Then, a coup of local influence lands you back in the Rockies with Chef Steven Topple’s American menu with long-standing signature dishes such as gingerbread-crusted lamb paired with red-wine braised red cabbage, sweet potato gratin and a savory thyme sauce. Guests dine on a prix fixe menu, selecting either three or four courses from Chef Topple's creative American menu. Or, for a more elevated culinary adventure, the Chef's Gourmet Tasting Menu of five courses is available, and can be complemented with wine pairings designed by sommelier Josh Maclean. The “Colorado Proud” menu sources many ingredients with short travel time while simultaneously supporting local farmers. There are things like bass and shrimp not native to the area, but also trout and locally raised goat salamis, cheeses and signature Colorado game meats such as lamb and bison. “A Chef's palate and creativity never wane, and such is the case for Chef Topple who enjoys dining at renowned restaurants and is perpetually on the lookout for new trends, styles of cooking, or intriguing flavors,” says Jen Rizza, the general manager of fine dining. “He most recently dined at restaurants from Joel Robuchon, Pierre Gagnaire and Gordon Ramsey in Las Vegas, and snuck into Danny Meyer's The Modern while visiting New York for the James Beard House dinner.” The James Beard House, by the way, is an acclaimed “performance space” for visiting chefs in New York City’s Greenwich Village. Chef Topple visited in October for the fourth time, bringing with him Colorado ingredients to create dishes such as lamb tartar with quail egg and grilled venison with cherry gastrique. His event sold out. To pair with delectable Colorado cuisine is a sophisticated wine and cocktail program catering to a

.

PRICE

Prix Fixe Menu: $99 (3 courses) $109 (4 courses) $140 (5-course Chef's Menu) Reservations required •••

AMBIANCE

Old World, European chalet •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Trout Chowder; Rabbit with Chorizo, Colorado Lamb, Venison •••

KID FRIENDLY?

Yes

variety of price points, viticultural regions, and stylistic preferences. “As Thomas Jefferson said, 'Good wine is a necessity of life for me,' and so goes dining at Game Creek,” Rizza said. “Game Creek's wine program has earned the Wine Spectator Best of Award of Excellence for the past two years, with eyes set on a third accolade.” Game Creek offers a variety of options, everything from family-focused reservation times to late-season romantic sunset diners, all of which and everything in between make for one of Vail’s most remarkable dining opportunities. •

Venison with red onion jam, rutabaga, carrot and cassis. left Rabbit with purple potatoes, chorizo and tarragon. above

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s Somm TH E

OF VA I L

EDUCATED ‘WINOS’ IN VAIL’S RESTAURANT SCENE HELP DINERS ENJOY THE WINE EXPERIENCE By Traci J. Macnamara • Photos by Dominique Taylor Sean Razee


Jeremy Campbell

W

hen navigating the wide world of wine, even the most adventurous travelers will often find themselves needing the advice of an expert guide. In Vail, especially, where wine lists are chosen to complement extraordinary menus and also delight the tastes of international diners, choosing from among a multi-page wine menu can be exciting for some — and daunting for others. But making that drink decision becomes so much easier when there’s a sommelier in the dining room. A sommelier — roughly pronounced suh-mel-yay, with the accent on the yay — is most simply the person in a restaurant in charge of serving wine. Many of Vail’s sommeliers go way beyond this basic requirement in possessing an interesting blend of skills that makes them seem more like wine superheroes — or at least very passionate people who do well in a role that involves being equal parts coach, geek and magician. In helping diners choose perfect pairings, sommeliers field questions that can cover anything from taste to history and geography. Some sommeliers also act as beverage directors, which involves balancing budgets, ordering stock and receiving monster shipments. Sans doubt, sommeliers

are oenophiles — connoisseurs of wine — but they’re also normal people, too, with families, and career aspirations, and the desire to blow off work on a powder day.

TH E M ASTER

To an outsider, a career in wine might seem like some sort of an idyllic experience involving drink tastings and dining activities that resemble the shadow of real work. But as with all successful career paths, major dedication is required. And if a person plans to make it to the top, then extreme commitment is compulsory. For Sean Razee, one of Vail’s wine experts who has achieved the certification level of Master Sommelier, the process of reaching this pinnacle took more than five years, which is quick, considering that only around 230 people in the world have attained this level of certified expertise since 1969. Most who dare to pursue the Master Sommelier process fail multiple times along the way or find it ultimately impossible to achieve the next step. But Razee, who began his career bussing tables at Beano’s Cabin in 1996, discovered that learning more about wine satisfied his academic interests and his curiosity in topics related to language, culture, food and geography. Eventually, he met Jay

Fletcher, a Master Sommelier in Aspen, who inspired him to pursue a career in wine even though the career possibilities at that time still seemed dubious at best. “I lived with flashcards and notes,” says Razee of his years studying for exams. “My wife quizzed me while I drove the car, and I studied notecards while doing everything from going snowshoeing to pushing my newborn daughter around in a stroller while she slept.” All of this was necessary preparation for the three-part exam that covers wine theory, blind taste testing and service. While attaining higher levels of certification opens up additional opportunities in the wine industry for buying and selling wine and for directing beverage programs, Razee ultimately considers the pursuit of knowledge satisfactory in itself. “I love learning, and I'm still following my passion. Isn’t that what most people want out of their work, too?” he asks. Razee now works as a wine representative. “It takes a long time to gain experience and build up knowledge,” says Razee. “Staying current is a day-to-day process — and the learning is never-ending.” In this way, achieving a high-level title such as Master Sommelier was the end of Razee’s long examination process but still nearly the beginning of his inspired career.

TH E STU D ENT TE ACH ER

Root & Flower, Vail’s biggest little wine bar, doubles as a hip hangout for wine lovers and a hotbed for those who want to learn more. This tiny space tucked into one of Vail Village’s side streets is where Jeremy Campbell, coowner and wine director, is working to elevate the status of Vail as a wine center, with Root & Flower at the heart of that community. Campbell, a self-proclaimed history buff, has created a distinguished wine and cocktail list at Root & Flower while also teaching classes designed to foster appreciation of wine and its history. With a rotating schedule of sessions he’s developed on topics ranging from “The Art of Tasting” to “Drunken History,” Root & Flower is becoming a place where people can have fun while learning new things — and also simply enjoy good food and drink. Campbell worked as a sommelier at restaurant Kelly Liken before opening Root & Flower with partner Samantha Biszantz in 2015. He attained his Advanced Sommelier certification through the Court of Master Sommeliers in 2012 and is currently working toward becoming a Master Sommelier. In addition to being accomplished in his field already and ambitious when it comes to his future, humility is also a part of what he believes makes a good sommelier.


“A sommelier is just someone who can talk with people about wine,” says Campbell. “A piece of paper doesn’t necessarily make someone good at wine or serving it to others, but I like how the Master Sommelier certification process is pushing me to be the best I can at my chosen profession. That’s what I’m trying to do here.”

TH E N OT-SO -STU FFY WIN E GUY

The easiest part of Andreas Harl’s job as beverage director at Matsuhisa Vail, celebrity chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s destination dining location in Solaris, happens to be when he’s out on a packed dining room

floor, talking with people about wine. But he reckons he really only spends about 25 percent of the time there, with the other 75 percent devoted to behind-the-scenes grunt work that includes balancing budgets, tracking shipments, talking with distributors, evaluating inventory and organizing boxes. “Almost everything except cooking vinegar is within my realm here,” says Harl, who grew up in Austria and attributes his love of kitchen culture to his grandmother, a chef and the owner of a restaurant near Salzburg. He radiates a youthful exuberance, and even though Harl has worked at other Vail locations with awardwinning wine lists, including the Sonnenalp,

his past five years at Matsuhisa have taught him that working with a team of successful sommeliers requires social skills, wine smarts and a deep drive to improve. “Listening is half of what I do when I’m on the dining room floor,” Harl says. “I listen to people describe what they already like, and I work with them to decide whether they’re willing to try new things or if they want to stay in their comfort zone. Then it’s my job to deliver what gives them the experience they’re hoping for.” In order to make that happen, Harl has worked to expand Matsuhisa’s initial wine list of 75 selections to its current of more than 650. With an inventory of

more than 5,000 bottles in stock, that’s a lot of wine to know. At Matsuhisa, white wines outsell reds — primarily due to the food with which it’s paired — and overall, wine sales double those of spirits. Even though Matsuhisa is the place to go for sake in Vail, sake sales still rank lower than those of wine or spirits. “If I stop reading and learning about wine, I’m behind the ball,” Harl says. “This career choice doesn’t let me be lazy for too long. And at the same time, I don’t want to be that stuffy wine guy. This job isn’t pretentious for me. It’s just wine, right? I want to enjoy it and help other people enjoy it, too.”


TH E N E X T GEN ER ATI O N

Throughout the cold winter season, The 10th is the hottest restaurant on Vail mountain for a ski-in, ski-out lunch with an award-winning wine list. Nicole Jeffrey began working at The 10th as a bartender in 2013 and is stepping into a new role this season as the restaurant’s lead beverage specialist, which will involve being responsible for the restaurant’s beverage program while also working in the dining room as sommelier. In Vail, Jeffrey says she’s surrounded by a community of people in the wine industry who encourage her and also help push her to be her best. “Both men and women have been inspirations and mentors to me. Sill, I’m female and younger than most of my peers in an industry where these two things make me a minority. Knowing where I’m at motivates me to take my career seriously,” says Jeffrey, who is studying to pass her Certified Sommelier exam this year. Jeffrey likes learning all things about wine, but she’s most interested in the ways that climate change dynamics have heightened interest in wine production.

Andreas Harl

ing more n r a le t a th d e r e v Razee… disco ic intere s ts m e d a c a is h d ie f s about wine sa ti related to s ic p to in y it s io r and his cu aphy. r g o e g d n a d o o f , lang uage, culture Nicole Jeffrey

“People are putting more attention into sustainability and environmentally friendly practices now, and that’s important to me. Even though vineyards in France have been producing in sustainable ways for centuries, there’s growing focus on care for the earth.” Jeffrey also feels more at ease within a wine industry that seems to be lightening up. Being an expert doesn’t equate to being a member of the elusive elite, and she likes the freedom she has to have fun. “I like offering wine descriptions that make people smile,” she says. “I’m a person and not a robot, so when others see me as approachable, I think that everyone has a better experience.” If you’re looking to expand your knowledge of wine or push the boundaries of your tastes this winter, then take some time to get to know the sommelier at your favorite restaurant. With what’s in the glass to begin this beautiful relationship, it’s not difficult to do. You’ll likely discover stories like these from a few sommeliers whose influence shapes the Vail wine scene, one cork pop at a time.


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Food is tonic.

In South Africa, walkietalkies are stewed chicken feet (walk) and heads (talk).

– KOREAN CULINARY BELIEF

GREEKS CONSUME MORE OLIVE OIL PER CAPITA THAN ANY OTHER PEOPLE: 30 LITERS.

COUSINS:

Pasties Empenadas Calzones

GHANA PRODUCES

I N T I B E T, C H E E S E M A D E F R O M

21%

N A K ( T H E F E M A L E YA K ) I S PRODUCED IN FACTORIES FOUNDED

OF THE WORLD’S COCOA.

BY SWIS S MIS SIO N A RIES.

The Arab Saracens introduced dried pasta, rice and citrus fruit to Sicily in the 9th century.

“B’SAHA!” A TOAST TO YOUR HEALTH IN MOROCCO

In Shanxi, China, there are 300 types of noodles. SOURCE: FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE TO THE WORLD


COZ Y U P T O

BIG NAMES AT TH E

VPAC

LEANN R IMES

C O M P L E X I O NS

P E TER C E T E RA

CL I NT BLAC K

J O E L M c H AL E

BROADWAY CLASSICAL & OPERA COMEDY CONCERTS DANCE FAMILY

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LOCATED UNDER THE ICE RINK IN THE HEART OF BEAVER CREEK VILLAGE


Ski-in/Ski-out

On the Slopes in 60 Seconds or Less... 454

Beaver Dam Road

Located 50 yards off the slopes this authentic European Chalet offers six bedrooms, nine baths, family room, media room, office, skiroom and fabulous spa grotto with fireplace. This home was developed with materials imported from Europe and is just a short walk to the heart of the Village.

332

Mill Creek Circle

Coveted Mill Creek Circle address located just steps from Gondola One and the wonderful shops and restaurants of Vail Village. This five bedroom home has been completely remodeled and designer decorated. A unique opportunity to own one of Vail’s legacy estates.

493

Beaver Dam Road

Ski-in and out of this beautiful home located directly on Born Free ski run. Spacious living room with vaulted ceilings and wood burning fireplace. This five bedroom home has beautiful outdoor spaces with cascading waterfalls, and heated patio overlooking the Eagle Bahn Gondola and Chair 8 ski lift. 285 Bridge Street Vail, Colorado 81657 970/476.1987 www.ronbyrne.com


EAT // Winter 2017