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an epicurean experience - s u m m e r 2018 -

WOW FACTOR CULINARY PHOTO GALLERY

Savory Summer

E A G L E C O U N T Y ' S B E S T R E S TA U R A N T S


12TH ANNUAL

FEEDING THE SENSES | AUGUST 9-12 Celebrate the pleasures of the palate at the 12th annual Beaver Creek Wine & Spirits Festival. Combining top culinary talent, exclusive wines and outdoor venues, it’s the perfect blend of summertime in the mountains.

buy your tickets at beavercreek.com/wine


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EDITOR’S LETTER

VAIL DAILY PUBLISHER Mark Wurzer | mwurzer@vaildaily.com

EDITOR Wren Bova | wren@vaildaily.com

ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Carly Arnold Creative | hello@carlyarnold.com

PHOTO EDITOR Dominique Taylor | taylordmedia@icloud.com

AD DIRECTOR Patrick Connolly | pconnolly@vaildaily.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS Kristin Anderson, Charles Townsend Bessent, Will Brendza, Katie Coakley, Christopher Dillmann, Kim Fuller, Heather Hower, Traci J. Macnamara, Scott Miller, Justin Q. McCarty, Karen Mitchell, Elan Photographie Studio, Kimberly Nicoletti, Melanie Smith, Melanie Wong

ADVERTISING DESIGN TEAM MANAGER Afton Pospíšilová | apospisilova@cmnm.org

ADVERTISING DESIGN TEAM Rebecca Fitzpatrick, Jordan Lugibihl, Madelyn LyBarger, Malisa Samsel

ADVERTISING SALES COORDINATOR Chelsea Rosenthal | crosenthal@vaildaily.com

ACCOUNT MANAGERS Sandie Aveil | saveil@vaildaily.com Amanda Blevins | ablevins@vaildaily.com Carole Bukovich | cbukovich@vaildaily.com Graham Danzoll | gdanzoll@vaildaily.com Zach DuFresne | zdufresne@vaildaily.com Tyler English | tenglish@vaildaily.com Meghan Scallen | mscallen@vaildaily.com Lauren Schneider | lschneider@vaildaily.com Jennifer Wuebbolt | jwuebbolt@vaildaily.com

Follow the Food A month ago, I found my 4-year-old daughter looking through "Asian Dumplings," a cookbook by Andrea Nguyen, intently studying the photos. When she finished, she called me over and showed me everything she wanted to make. She was selective: char siu pork baozi, shrimp har gow, xiao long bao. Imagine how my heart swelled. Loving food is in my genes, so putting together EAT each season is both a joy and a torment. For a solid month I look at larger-than-life delicacies on my computer monitor, read about our local chefs’ newest creations, and try to endure my cravings. It’s a job I’m very lucky to be able to do. Our mission at EAT is to capture the essence of a restaurant much like an illustrator does with a caricature. The restaurant owners ask us to come in and we do. We taste things, talk to the chef and then try to capture it in writing and photography. We do this every season, so that the information in these pages is as current as possible, reflecting today’s menus and inspirations. So read on and see what Eagle County’s considerable culinary talent is fired up about right now. Fresh fruits and veggies are abundant, befitting the summer season, and playfulness seems to be the en-vogue approach. From whole-animal butchery to growing greens on-site, nobody is taking shortcuts. Happy EATing, Wren Bova EDITOR

CIRCULATION MANAGER David Hakes | dhakes@vaildaily.com

SWIFT COMMUNICATIONS PRESIDENT Bob Brown | rbrown@swiftcom.com

COLORADO MOUNTAIN NEWS MEDIA GM Jim Morgan | jmorgan@cmnm.org

CMNM EAST ASSOCIATE GM Meg Boyer | mboyer@summitdaily.com

SWIFT MAGAZINE DIRECTOR Susan Ludlow | sludlow@swiftcom.com

COLORADO MOUNTAIN NEWS MEDIA PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Bill Walker | bwalker@cmnm.org The Vail Daily is a wholly owned subsidiary of COLORADO MOUNTAIN NEWS MEDIA 200 Lindbergh Drive | P.O. Box 1500 Gypsum, Colorado 81637 p. 970.328.6333 | f. 970.328.6409 Copyright ©2018 Colorado Mountain News Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited.

PICTURE PERFECT The Summer Crudo at The Rose in Edwards features fresh hamachi and chili oil. Photo by Dominique Taylor

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PHOTO EDITOR’S LETTER

Summer play Summer in the mountains is all about playtime in the great outdoors. The long sunny days, warm clear nights and infinite outdoor activities often mean adults, as well as kids, are being dragged away from their outdoor playtime to come and eat.  As the photo staff of EAT magazine, it’s our job to create food images that capture the local cuisine, promising a meal as fun and adventurous as hiking a fourteener or rafting class V rapids.  For this we need to get playful too. So as we dive into creating the summer issue, playing with food becomes our mission.  The beauty of working on this season’s issue is that you are not confined to the indoor setting. Flowers are bright and gardens in bloom as Vail’s best restaurants dish up their summer creations including colorful salads, chilled soups and cooling cocktails on patios with breathtaking views. Whether we are staging the dishes outside or incorporating aspects of the outdoors in our indoor food photography, playing with the seasonal aspect of summer cuisine gives us a fresh approach to the food photography “studio.” And let’s be honest, who doesn’t want to play with their food? May a delicious cocktail and tasty plate of food may be the start of your next summer adventure. Cheers, Dominique Taylor PHOTO EDITOR

ON THE COVER: P HO T O B Y D OMINIQ UE TAY L OR The Hawaiian sunfish ceviche at Leonora in The Sebastian Vail is a colorful homage to summer’s bright flavors. Sous Chef Leo Tazza adds sweet potato, aji amarillo, leche de tigre and red onions to the pristine fish. Read about Leonora and Executive Chef Tyson Peterson on page 35.


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13 THE EAT COMPENDIUM Snapshot views of the county's best restaurants. BY EAT STAFF

62 PHOTO GALLERY Gorgeous food shots printed large. BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR, JUSTIN Q. MCCARTY, KRISTIN ANDERSON & CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

69 HOW SWEET IT IS Desserts that didn’t make the page. BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR & JUSTIN Q. MCCARTY,

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A JOYFUL TABLE

TIDBITS

Hygge-style your summer dining scene.

An illustrated guide to dumplings.

BY TRACI J. MACNAMARA

BY CARLY ARNOLD


VAIL

A Neolithic African Arrowhead and Ancient Cowry Shell set in 14 Karat Rose Gold.

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VAIL VILLAGE 970.476.4760


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EAT HERE NOW AT LARGE

MINTURN

13 Red Maple Catering

34 Turntable Restaurant

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14 Maya Modern Mexican Kitchen and Tequilaría 15 The Lookout 16 Green Elephant Juicery 17 Sauce on the Creek 18 Fiesta Jalisco 19 Vin48

35 Leonora 36 Almresi 37 La Tour 38 Fall Line Kitchen & Cocktails 39 White Bison 40 Ludwig’s Breakfast at The Sonnenalp 41 Game Creek Restaurant 42 Pepi’s Bar and Restaurant 43 Gessner at Hotel Talisa 44 The 10th 45 Bistro Fourteen 46 Grill on the Gore 47 Westside Cafe 48 Flame at Four Seasons 49 The Remedy Bar at Four Seasons 50 Matsuhisa Vail 51 Terra Bistro 52 Bōl 53 The Fitz Bar & Restaurant 54 Tavern on the Square 55 Ale House Kitchen & Tap 56 Pivot62 in the DoubleTree by Hilton 57 Elway’s Vail 58 Los Amigos 59 Russell’s 60 Yama Sushi

BEAVER CREEK 20 Mirabelle 21 Revolution 22 Toscanini Ristorante 23 WYLD 24 The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch 26 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill 27 Splendido at the Chateau 28 Colorado Tasting Room 29 Dusty Boot Roadhouse

EDWARDS 16 Green Elephant Juicery 30 Vista at Arrowhead 31 Gore Range Brewery 32 Marko’s Pizza 33 The Rose


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CONTRIBUTORS

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KATIE COAKLEY

DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: The fact that you can still be relaxing in the sunshine on a patio at 7 p.m., enjoying a cocktail after a full day of activities. You will never eat: Never say never. I'll try anything once! Perfect hangover breakfast: Waffle House. But since we don't have one, the Christmas Boo from the Turntable in Minturn. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: Zhoug sauce, a cilantrobased condiment that originated in Yemen. A bit like a cross between chimichurri and pesto, it's spicy and fragrant and good on everything. Country you'd like to eat your way through: Korea. Go-to camping food: I love taking a big ol' meat and cheese platter camping. Yes, this is car camping, but there's nothing like busting out a variety of charcuterie, bites and nibbles around the (responsibly maintained) campfire.  Favorite food-related blog: I've fallen in love with Michelle Tam's Nom Nom Paleo. No, I'm not really paleo, but the recipes are fast, easy and incredibly flavorful. 

Photo editor Best part of summer's culinary scene: Camp cooking. Street food you wish Vail had: Dumplings and steamed buns. You will never eat: Peanut butter or anything remotely like it. Perfect hangover breakfast: Bacon, tomato and avocado on a crusty baguette. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: Best way to cook eggplant — twice!  Country you'd like to eat your way through: How about the entire Mediterranean! Go-to camping food: Bacon and sweet potatoes. Favorite culinary show at the moment: Well it was “No Reservations” with Anthony Bourdain, so sad. 

MELANIE WONG Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Patio dining on any of the valley's lovely patios. Street food you wish Vail had: Vietnamese Banh Mi. You will never eat: I really don't think there's anything I wouldn't try, but I guess I try to avoid foie gras, and I'd likely say no to cockroaches.

Perfect hangover breakfast: Ramen. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: Sous vide-infused cocktails are blowing my mind! Country you'd like to eat your way through: Japan. Go-to camping food: Either Cajun shrimp and veggies steamed in foil, or Velveeta mac and cheese with Spam. Not for those on a low-sodium diet. Favorite food-related show: My longtime favorite has been “Parts Unknown,” now bittersweet with Anthony Bourdain's passing.

KRISTIN ANDERSON Photographer Best part of summer's culinary scene: S'mores! Street food you wish Vail had: The most amazing hamburger/taco/salad burrito thing I had at a food cart in Miami. You will never eat: Pig, chicken or any animal's feet. Perfect hangover breakfast: I try to avoid being hungover. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: Roasting a whole bulb of garlic in the oven, then popping out all the cooked cloves, so satisfying! Country you'd like to eat your way through: Croatia. Go-to camping food: Cheese and salami. Favorite culinary info at the moment: Keto recipies.

KIM FULLER Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Sunday Vail Farmers’ Market goodies in my kitchen.  Street food you wish Vail had: Indian.  You will never eat:  Iceberg lettuce. You couldn’t at least use Romaine?  Perfect hangover breakfast: Huevos Rancheros plus a Bloody Mary with a Sidecar, of course.  Latest culinaryrelated discovery: Grilling on our deck, because we finally have a grill, and a deck. It’s amazing! Country you'd like to eat your way through: Italy, over and over and over ... Go-to hiking food: Homemade Trail Mix — sweet and salty! 

CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT Photographer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Riding bikes to dinner. Street food you wish Vail had: Doner Kababs! You will never eat: Raw ghost peppers— they are reserved for masochists. Perfect hangover breakfast: The original Boo Burrito at

the Turntable in Minturn. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: That I don't have to put cayenne on everything for it to taste good. Country you'd like to eat your way through: Lebanon. Go-to camping food: Jambalaya — so easy, so good, and nobody has to know you pulled it out of a box if you add fresh veggies. Favorite culinary show at the moment: Anthony Bourdain reruns.

MELANIE SMITH Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Picking wild berries on hikes and peaches at the farmers markets. Street food you wish Vail had: A waffle truck. You will never eat: Bleu cheese or pickled beets. Perfect hangover breakfast: Huevos rancheros, eggs over-easy, with Christmas sauce at The Northside. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: Topping salads with poached eggs and bacon. Country you'd like to eat your way through: Turkey.  Go-to camping food: Starbucks Via coffee packets. Favorite cookbook or cooking blog at the moment: Anything by Deborah Madison, and pinchofyum.com.


925 Fairway Drive This exceptional home sits on one of Vail Golf Course’s most magnificent sites and is just steps to Ford Ampitheatre, Golden Peak ski lift and Vail Village. Designed by Hans Berglund this LEED certified smart home offers a harmonious mix of old-world and modern influences. Built with views in mind the floor to ceiling HOPE’s steel windows offer panoramic views of the Vail Golf Course and mountains. Custom details include William Ohs Kitchen, dramatic open steel and wood staircase, seven limestone fireplaces, exceptional family room and over 2,000 square feet of heated patios with fireplaces.

285 Bridge Street Vail, Colorado 81657 970/476.1987 www.ronbyrne.com


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WILL BRENDZA

SCOTT MILLER

Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Heirloom tomatoes are everywhere. Street food you wish Vail had: Last time I checked, there's a gaping niche for any street food in Vail. But a fresh ceviche stand would make a killing in the summer. You will never eat: I don't like to speak in absolutes, but I will never in my life trust any "edible" creation with glitter on it.  Perfect hangover breakfast: A greasy spoon diner four-egg breakfast with bacon, hash browns, buttered Texas toast, a side of biscuits and gravy, a pot of coffee and three to four preferably sizable bloody Marys.  Latest culinaryrelated discovery: My Hawaiian roommate has been introducing me to the wide and wonderful world of poke. And I'm in love.  Country you'd like to eat your way through: If I could eat my way into France, I'd probably never eat my way out again.  Go-to camping food: Tinfoil pouch, loaded with mushrooms, whole cloves of garlic, red onion and a slab of salmon. Heat over glowing campfire coals. Enjoy with beer.  Favorite cookbook, cooking blog or culinary show at the moment: The shows, books, articles and adventures of Anthony Bourdain have always been a big inspiration to me. I'm really gonna miss that guy. 

Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Farm-fresh produce. Street food you wish Vail had: I’m in Gypsum. We really need a taco truck! You will never eat: Olives. Perfect hangover breakfast: Huevos rancheros — with home fries and beans, thanks. Country you'd like to eat your way through: This one! We have great chefs from all cultures right here. Go-to camping food: Pretty much anything in a Dutch oven. Favorite food-related show: “Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives” shows you so much of our country and the creativity of its chefs.

TRACI MACNAMARA Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Outdoor picnics. Street food you wish Vail had : Gourmet popsicle pop-up. You will never eat: Anything still wiggling on the plate. Perfect hangover breakfast: Corned beef hash and poached eggs.

Latest culinaryrelated discovery: The hygge dinner concept. Country you'd like to eat your way through: Japan. Go-to camping or hiking food: Starbucks Via is a backpacking and backcountry must. Favorite culinary show at the moment: NPR’s "The Salt".

Go-to camping food: Smoked oysters. Favorite culinary publication at the moment: EAT magazine.

CHRISTOPHER DILLMANN Photographer Go-to camping food: Breakfast burritos and steak. You will never eat: Olives. Perfect hangover breakfast: Screwdriver. Country you'd like to eat your way through: Japan. Favorite culinary show at the moment: “Kitchen Nightmares.”

HEATHER HOWER Writer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Picnics! Whether it's a fancy farm-to-table idea or a homemade caprese salad, bottle of bubbly and yummy bread. You will never eat: Corned beef and cabbage, liver, gizzards. Perfect hangover breakfast: Mimosas, coffee, ice water and eggs Benedict with avocado, salmon and tomato; decadent and sloppy. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: I fell in love with the mandolin this winter. Sliced, diced everything from potatoes to brussels sprouts.  Country you'd like to eat your way through: France. I've done it before and am up for round two. Nepal. Vietnam. Greece — I'd be happy to give any a try.  Go-to camping food: Shredded chicken tacos or lentil spicy sloppy Joes.  Favorite food-related site: Food52.com. Cakewrecks is pure joy. 

JUSTIN Q. McCARTY Photographer Best part of summer's culinary scene: Eating barefoot with the feet grounded. Street food you wish Vail had: Fresh Ono tacos. You will never eat: Anything and then complain. Perfect hangover breakfast: Chicken fried steak and eggs with a Tequila Sunrise. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: Wedding cake tastes the best when the toppers on it are of yourself and your bride. Country you'd like to eat your way through: Alaska.

WREN BOVA Editor Best part of summer's culinary scene: It’s so easy. Street food you wish Vail had: Trinidad roti. Perfect hangover breakfast: Something spicy. Latest culinaryrelated discovery: High-heat cooking cuts of meat I’d usually do low and slow. Country you'd like to eat your way through: Thailand or Vietnam. Go-to camping food: Fondue from a pouch. Favorite culinary publication at the moment: Milk Street magazine, by Christopher Kimball and “Six Seasons,” by Joshua McFadden.


1468 Vail Valley Drive Designed by Kyle Webb, this magnificent single-family custom home is ideally situated in Vail’s Golf Course neighborhood. Backing up to Forest Service land, enjoy Gore Range views and two private water features from the expansive heated outdoor patios with fire pit. Over 7,000 square feet, this eight bedroom home exudes luxury. Vaulted ceilings with imported mined beams, oak wood floors and chef ’s kitchen are just a few of the unique details in this exquisite home. Convenient access to Ford Amphitheater and Golden Peak.

Cristina Byrne

cristina@ronbyrne.com 970.331.1313

285 Bridge Street Vail, Colorado 81657 970/476.1987 www.ronbyrne.com


IIt’s not your listing we want,

it’s the sale of your property...

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1000 Spraddle Creek Road Sold for $18,500,000

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51 Chateau Lane, #11 Sold for $13,400,000

332 Mill Creek Circle Sold for $14,600,000

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221 Beaver Dam Road Sold for $13,500,000

493 Beaver Dam Road Sold for $8,650,000

285 Bridge Street Vail, Colorado 81657 970/476.1987 www.ronbyrne.com


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by KIM FULLER photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY PRICE

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our home may be the best place to host an elegant and delicious dinner — especially when you get to sit back and enjoy. Chef Jason Harrison's Red Maple Catering serves groups that are small and intimate or large and celebratory, from houses in Vail, Beaver Creek, Avon or Edwards, to wedding venues or corporate events set in an open-air meadow or a rustic mountain lodge. “I was thinking about starting a restaurant,” he explains, “and now I get to have a restaurant all over the place.” Harrison says catering weddings and events is an offering of the business that is really expanding, and it’s no wonder why — Vail's discerning palates and educated clientele are definitely in alignment with the talented chef. “Our clients are coming to a place where, within 150 miles, we have some of the best game, beef, pork and poultry in the country, as well as artisan cheese makers and amazing heirloom organic produce growers,” says Harrison. “We even use Colorado-bred Wagyu beef raised just minutes away, and our clients are raving about this and the other spectacular ingredients they are able to enjoy here in the Rocky Mountain region.” Harrison has recently started getting fresh bread from Hovey & Harrison in Edwards, highlighting the amazing talents of baker Molly Harrison, and has been sourcing greens from

Varies per event. •••

AMBIANCE

To be determined by the host •••

SIGNATURE DISH

What would you like? •••

CONTACT & INFO

redmaplecatering.com

Buttercrunch Farm in Eagle, as well as Mountain Microgreens at the base of Beaver Creek. While he’s great at catering large gatherings, Harrison can also create a beautifully coursed dinner for smaller parties, even just four people, so the Red Maple experience is really made to order every time. “Our job is to bring a restaurant to people’s homes instead of having them go out,” he says. “We get to bring the true Colorado dining experience to them, but they don’t have to sit in a dining room, they can be sitting on their deck at the house, so it’s a far more relaxed environment for them, and they can have a lot more fun.” Red Maple can also prepare meals or menu items for drop-off

or delivery to a client’s door. His signature selections include Colorado Striped Bass with Sweet Corn and Lemongrass Pudding, Great Plains Bison and Ricotta Meatballs with Basil Pomodoro, Rosen Farms Lamb Ramen, Boulder-Farmed Berkshire Pork Porchetta with Truffled Carolina BBQ Sauce, and High Altitude Lasagna with Venison, Bison, Heritage Breed Pork and Three Colorado Cheeses. ”Cooking to me is the greatest creative outlet there is," he says. "It is both how I can express my creative side, and show my passion for ingredients at the same time.” •

Citrus-Compressed Watermelon Carpaccio with pickled golden beets and cucumbers, sugar snap peas, purple quinoa and Esplette pepper. top 7X Farms Wagyu Beef Ribeye with grilled Red Maple Garden heirloom potatoes and carrots, summer pea and lemon gremolata and black pepper relish. left Charred Palisade Stone Fruit Salad with peaches and cherries, Boulder buffalo burrata, Buttercrunch Farms arugula and cucumber-basil vinaigrette. above

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RED MAPLE CATERING

LOCATED WHEREVER YOU’D LIKE 970.401.1769 | REDMAPLECATERING.COM

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PRICE

Starters and small plates: $10-$17 Entrées: $14-$38 •••

AMBIANCE

Hip, modern Mexican kitchen •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Blue Crab and Shrimp Enchiladas

MAYA MODERN MEXICAN KITCHEN & TEQUILARÍA 126 RIVERFRONT LANE, WESTIN RIVERFRONT RESORT & SPA | AVON | 970.790.5500 | RICHARDSANDOVAL.COM/MAYABC by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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he Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa’s signature restaurant, Maya, is known for its Friday Afternoon Club (FAC) festivities that take place throughout the summer. But with a massive wraparound outdoor terrace and chill-zapping fire pits, Maya is a place to go on any day for modern Mexican cuisine and creative tequila cocktails to be enjoyed in a sleek dining environment — and under the care of a team that’s committed to down-home hospitality. Whether you choose to dine outdoors or in one of Maya’s cozy, high-backed booths, you’ll catch views of golden light bathing Avon’s cliffs. Such beauty invites lingering over a drink before dinner, and with more than 100 agave-based spirits and house-infused tequilas in addition to a wide selection of beer and wine, you’ll have plenty of options. For a refresher, try the Pepino, a green-hued tequila cocktail that mingles together serrano-infused tequila and cool cucumber in a glass that’s encrusted with a flavorful citrus-tajin rim. Full of fresh and energizing flavors for the summer, Maya’s menu proves that Mexican food doesn’t have to leave you feeling heavy. Small plates such as the tableside guacamole that’s made

to order as you watch can include a recommended addition of tuna tartare. For those who want a light starter that’s packed with crunch, choose the mixed greens tossed with jicama strips, thinly sliced carrots, radishes, cucumbers and a chipotle vinaigrette. And be on the lookout for specials such as the grilled corn skewers doused with chipotle aioli, dotted with cotija cheese and garnished with lime. The Blue Crab and Shrimp Enchiladas are standout among entrée options and are said to be the favorite of celebrity chef Richard Sandoval, whose inspiration is behind Maya’s cuisine. Creamy, yet still capturing the lightness of summer, these salsa verde-smothered enchiladas are stuffed with spinach, cheese, blue crab and shrimp. For a different — yet equally pleasing — approach, try the succulent braised short ribs served with cauliflower puree, roasted carrots, and a caper poblana salsa verde. “Our goal is to welcome Maya guests as if they’re in our own home,” says Maya’s Tijuana-born Executive Chef Angel Munoz with the sincerity and dynamism that no doubt fueled his rise from line cook to executive chef. While this friendly and welcoming vibe is a priority every night of the week, it’s especially prevalent on Fridays from 5 until 10 p.m. for FAC, which runs from

June 22 through September 7 and features live music, drink specials and tacos galore. “We love FAC because it brings in all kinds of people — friends, family, young people — and people who just love tacos and a good time,” adds Maya Sous Chef Veronica Morales. There’s nothing sweeter than Maya’s friendly vibe, but if you want to try and top it, go for the Citrus Tres Leches Cake that comes plated with fresh fruit and is topped with blood orange

Grand Marnier sauce and a just-sweetenough white chocolate mousse. • Shredded chicken enchiladas, guacamole topped with tuna tartare and grilled mahi mahi tacos, with a selection of craft cocktails, including the Pepino with serrano and cucumber, the Sandia Tajin with watermelon and the Traditional Margarita. below Citrus Tres Leches, a rich, creamy cake with blood orange sauce, strawberries, oranges and white chocolate mousse. above


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THE LOOKOUT

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126 RIVERFRONT LANE, WESTIN RIVERFRONT RESORT & SPA AVON | 970.790.5500

AVON

by MELANIE WONG photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ho says bar food can’t be decadent? When the Westin Riverfront Resort renovated its lobby bar last summer, the menu and ambience got a reboot as well. The changes effectively transformed the bar from a hidden counter into a casual hangout spot. The Lookout is much larger than its predecessor, boasting 360-degree seating around the bar and offering stunning views of Beaver Creek Mountain from its patio. The lobby’s cozy fireplaces and generous seating invite diners to linger and people watch, while large-screen TVs offer a spot to grab a beer or snack while catching a game. “It’s not just a hotel lobby bar, and it’s not just a place for hotel guests — we want to draw in locals, too,” says Danielle Sadowsky, the resort’s food and beverage manager. “We’ll be offering live music on the patio through the summer, and the new layout really encourages people to hobnob in the lobby.” FAST, GOOD & SAUCY But ambiance is nothing without food to match, and that’s where Westin Riverfront Executive Chef Angel Munoz and his kitchen came in. They created a simple menu filled with well-executed, unique bar food made to share.

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“The menu was created with several thoughts in mind. We wanted to offer foods that are fast, good and saucy — finger food that can be enjoyed with a beer,” Munoz says. “At the same time, I want what we serve at The Lookout to represent the best of what our hotel and kitchen can be.”

The Lookout certainly seems to have bridged that gap, with dishes such as the spicy-and-smoky chicken wings, or the addictive fried pretzel bites, which hit the spot dunked in a made-fromscratch cheese sauce. We suggest starting your meal with one of the bar’s excellent cocktails. The Cool as a Cucumber is refreshing and just-sweet-enough on a hot summer day, and margarita fans should try the Mora Picante, a tequila-based drink infused with berries and a touch of heat. Both pair well with the stunning charcuterie and cheese plate, an impressive array of candied nuts, cheeses, Italian cured meats, and homemade jam and mustard. The Lookout’s entrées manage to impress with a repertoire of seemingly basic items, all elevated by stand-out sauces and inspiration from Munoz’s upbringing in Tijuana, Mexico. Take the grilled steak sandwich, a generous portion of perfectly cooked flatiron steak that could wow on its own. However, combined with a pimento cheese sauce and delicate caramelized onions, this is one of the most decadent sandwiches you’ll ever taste. Don’t miss the flatbreads, which pack a big punch for a relatively small meal, and are for sharing. We loved the roasted mushroom flatbread, rich with

PRICE

$8.50-$16.50 •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy, elegant bar setting with mountain views •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Cheese and charcuterie, sausage flatbread

truffle, ricotta and arugula, for its umami flavors. There’s something on this menu for everyone whether you’re seeking a pre-dinner drink or a quick meal with friends. The Lookout is worth the trip, whether you’re on vacation or not. • Sausage & Peppers Flatbread with marinara, cheese blend and chile flakes, and smoked chicken wings with Frank's Red Hot and ranch dressing. left Baby back ribs with a ponzu barbecue sauce, scallions, cashews and a Mora Picante cocktail with the Westin's own Select Herradurra Double Barrel Reposado Tequila, Cointreau, lime juice and blackberry-serrano puree. above

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GREEN ELEPHANT JUICERY THE JUICERY & CAFÉ: 150 EAST BEAVER CREEK BLVD. | AVON | 970.470.4042 SMOOTHIE, ACAI BAR & GRAB-N-GO: THE VILLAGE MARKET | 34295 HIGHWAY 6 | EDWARDS | 970.926.1113 VAIL LIONSHEAD: 616 W. LIONSHEAD CIRCLE, CONCERT HALL PLAZA | VAIL | 970.470.4206 | GREENELEPHANTJUICERY.COM by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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hether you’re looking for a daily pick-me-up or something special to pack in your picnic basket this summer, Green Elephant Juicery is the place to go for fresh salads, acai bowls, breakfast options, wraps, snacks, cold-pressed juices and naturally sweet treats. With a café location in Avon, a grab-n-go in Vail’s Lionshead area, and a new location within The Village Market in Edwards, Green Elephant Juicery makes it easy to eat healthy and organic wherever your summer adventures take you. Gather up a cozy blanket and a basket, and then Green Elephant Juicery can supply everything else you’ll need for the ultimate nutrientand flavor-packed meal to be enjoyed outdoors. Begin by picking the Hearts of Palm Ceviche and pairing it with the Vegetable Flax Crackers for a starter full of fresh flavors and an exciting crunch. With hearts of palm in place of fish, this ceviche is a striking take on the traditional, and the addition of tomato, red bell pepper,

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PRICE

Juices and smoothies start at $10; grab-n-go food and snacks start at $5 •••

AMBIANCE

Bright and cozy café in Avon; healthy vibe at all locations •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Exciting, wholesome takeaways and cold-pressed juices, such as the refreshing GLOW-E

red onion, jalapeño, lime juice and cilantro bring zest and texture into play. Choose the Edamame Hummus with Crudite or a side of Quinoa Pesto Salad to complete the spread. Next, pick from among Green Elephant Juicery’s wraps, sandwiches, bowls or color-bursting salads. Wraps are easily transportable, and favorites include the Black Bean Burger &

Guacamole Wrap as well as the Almond Burger & Hummus Wrap. For summertime sipping, there’s nothing like cold-pressed lemonade, and Green Elephant Juicery features four flavor combinations, including the Rosewater Lemonade and the Cyan Lemonade, which gets its beautiful turquoise hue from the blue-green goodness of spirulina. Complete the meal with a few plant-based sweet treats for sharing, such as the Crazy Choco Nutty Cups or the Peanut Butter Cookie Dough Bites, both made with organic ingredients and sweetened with maple syrup. THE COLD-PRESSED PROCESS You don’t have to be adventure-bound to get the benefits of Green Elephant Juicery’s cold-pressed juices. These can be enjoyed on a daily basis. Within the cold-pressed juice market, Green Elephant Juicery distinguishes itself by being entirely organic while also providing the Vail community with a way to make a healthy, local and sustainable choice. The cold-pressed

process at Green Elephant Juicery takes raw, organic fruits and vegetables and presses them at a pressure of up to 1,800 pounds to extract the highest nutrient and enzyme counts possible, for a whole lot of health in every sip. “When it’s summer, I like to eat food that makes me want to be outside,” says Osha Groetz, Green Elephant Juicery Partner and Chief Operating Officer. “We feel more rooted when eating light, gorgeous fruits and vegetables, and these complement our activities when it’s warm and lively outside.” Green Elephant Juicery’s services include subscriptions and delivery, which make it even easier to experience the energizing benefits of its healthy, organic food and cold-pressed juices this summer, whether you’re out on the trail — or daydreaming of being there. • Smoothies, left to right: Funky Monkey, Blue Elephant and Mountain Of Youth. left Hearts of Palm Ceviche with tomato, red bell pepper, red onion and jalapeño. page 65 Thai Peanut Soba Noodles. above


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SAUCE ON THE CREEK by KATIE COAKLEY photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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hen you’re looking for a friendly, welcoming atmosphere that embraces guests like family while feeding them well, there’s nothing quite like Sauce on the Creek. A relative newcomer to the Avon dining scene (it opened in March), Sauce has quickly become a go-to place for contemporary Italian cuisine served with a smile. Located in the Traer Creek Plaza in east Avon, Sauce on the Creek is a bright, cheery space that is both classic and modern, while the expansive patio is alluring for games of bocce or simply enjoying a glass of wine with friends.

The bar beckons for those who wish to peruse the extensive selection of whiskeys and bourbons, and the bartenders are happy to scale the library ladder for the right bottle. Tim Applegate is one of Sauce on the Creek’s owners and is the managing partner. A sommelier, he says that he’s “a wine guy who moved to Colorado and fell in love with bourbon.” The excellent selection of spirits, more than 120 wines on the wine list and eight varietals in the temperature-controlled cuvenee, are thanks in part to Applegate. “We’re happy that we have 100 different bottles of bourbon, and that list will continue to grow year after year,” Applegate says. “Everybody’s really into the Kentucky bourbon, but we also have

TRAER CREEK | 101 FAWCETT ROAD | AVON 970.949.3291 | SAUCEONTHECREEK.COM

Virginia whiskeys that are just as good and we have some from Vermont that are just incredible.” Sauce on the Creek even has a bottle of the elusive Pappy Van Winkle. Ordering a flight will allow you to sample several different years and age statements and make your own comparison. But it’s the conviviality of the place that has made it so popular with locals. Already, sports teams have enjoyed post-game celebrations here and the large tables are great for various groups. “One of the most important things for us is that we’re a family-friendly restaurant,” Applegate says. “Come in and there might be a couple having a romantic first date and at another table there’s a family of six, with the kids outside playing bocce and the parents enjoying their dinner, too. We love having that blend.” The menu encourages guests to share, offering up generous portions in either “single” or “family” sizes for most options. Different dietary restrictions are also taken into account: Many dishes are available gluten-free, including zucchini ribbons instead of pasta. There’s something for everyone at Sauce on the Creek. Start with the sautéed mussels, a heaping portion of New Zealand green-lipped mussels served with basil pesto cream and parmesan — the crostini allows you to sop up every last bit of the delicious broth. Classic Italian antipasti options like bruschetta and calamari fritti are available along with more contemporary options like crispy Brussels sprouts and spicy fried ravioli. But be sure to save room for the main course. “One of my favorites is the rigatoni, and all of our pizzas are great,” says

PRICE

Antipasti, soup and salads: $5-$20 (family size); Entrées: $11-$32 for single, $19-$37 for family size •••

AMBIANCE

Warm and welcoming •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Linguini alla Pescatore

Chef de Cuisine Michael Irwin. “All of our sauces are made to order. We make the tomato sauce fresh daily and our dough is made in-house daily, too. We even cut our own filets.” Pasta dishes range from light and fresh spaghetti Margherita, which can be topped with chicken, shrimp or scallops, to the spicy linguine fra diavolo to the ravioli of the day. Options abound — but the secret sauce here is the welcoming vibe and the sense that no matter if you’re just stopping in for a drink or have brought three generations to dine, you’ll be welcomed as family. • Pizza Margherita. New Zealand green-lipped mussels in a basil pesto cream sauce. left The patio has comfortable seating for diners and drinkers alike, as well as a bocce court. page 68 The well-stocked bar. top left

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FIESTA JALISCO by KATIE COAKLEY photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ou know something’s special when it gets its own weekly, alliterative holiday. Yes, tacos are perfect little pockets of goodness, but you don’t have to wait until Tuesday to enjoy. At Fiesta Jalisco in Avon, you can indulge in tacos al carbon carne asada any day of the week, but why stop there? For more than 16 years, Fiesta Jalisco has been satisfying the valley’s craving for Mexican food via the Guadalajara region, one burrito, enchilada or plate of camarones chipotle at a time. The portions are generous — one plate is usually enough to satisfy two people — but a desire to try more than one item on the menu might convince you to get your own and power through. However, everyone knows that a great meal starts with a great drink and Fiesta Jalisco’s margaritas will slake your thirst and pique your appetite. For the summer, ask for Manager Mariana Gonzalez’s special margarita. It’s not on the menu, but this thirst-quenching concoction is perfect for a sunny

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240 CHAPEL PLACE #129 | AVON | 970.845.8088 | FIESTAJALISCO.NET

day: Ask for a margarita natural with cucumber and jalapeño. “I like the combination of the tequila and the lime juice and you have the flavor of the cucumber and a little bit of jalapeño,” Gonzalez says. “It’s kind of refreshing and gives you a little kick at the same time.” Then comes the arduous task of choosing what to eat. Gonzalez recommends the camarones chipotle “because we have really good seafood… and I love the chipotle sauce.” You can also order pollo chipotle if you’re not a fan of shrimp. There are burritos stuffed with chicken, beef, seafood or veggies; the fajitas can feed a small family. The carne asada is also a frequently recommended dish — the charbroiled beef is perfectly cooked — and you can enjoy it in a quesadilla, tacos or even con huevos. Yes — with eggs. Perhaps the best-kept secret at Fiesta Jalisco is the fact that they start serving breakfast at 10:30 a.m. and continue until 3 p.m. The menu is smaller than the lunch or dinner offerings but is full of tempting options. The chorizo is homemade and served with eggs and potatoes or in a burrito. Or, try huevos con machaca, a blend of shredded beef and pork.

Chilaquiles come in both red and green versions (you can order it with two eggs on top for a satisfying breakfast) and for those who might have indulged too much the previous night, the classic Menudo Jalisco will set you to rights. But no matter when you choose to visit, you’ll be greeted with a warm smile — and a basket of tortilla chips and bowl of salsa, the heat of which depends on who made it that morning. And when your meal arrives, you’ll realize just how happy you are that you arrived hungry because “just one… more… bite” will become your mantra. • Carne Asada y Camarones con Tocino: tender beef skirt steak charbroiled and served with four fried bacon-wrapped prawns, alongside a Pacifico and a house margarita. left Shrimp cocktail with fresh avocado. above

PRICE

Breakfast: $6.95-$16.95; Lunch: $9.50-$15.80; Dinner: $9.50-$21.95 •••

AMBIANCE

Like eating in Abuela’s cucina •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Carne Asada


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VIN48 AVON

48 E. BEAVER CREEK BLVD. AVON | 970.748.WINE VIN48.COM

by MELANIE WONG photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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t’s difficult to miss Vin48, thanks to its iconic boat-shaped building just off one of Avon’s main roundabouts. And diners will never be bored with a meal here, thanks to the intensely seasonal, constantly changing menu that focuses on the freshest ingredients from the farm, ranch and sea. In fact, it can be difficult to revisit a favorite dish at Vin48, as many of the menu mainstays are constantly getting redressed and updated. For example, you’ll always find chicken drumettes on the menu, but the latest rendition has a Southeast Asian twist, complete with kiwi and cilantro topping. They may look dainty on the dish, but these smoked treats will have you licking chipotle sriracha sauce off your fingers after one bite. Chef Mac Hyde is proud of the restaurant’s use of High Country ingredients, carefully purveyed from around Eagle County and the Western Slope. Pork comes in the form of a whole pig from a farm in Meeker, for example. Bones might be used for flavorful broth and a shoulder used for the pork special of the day, while other parts go into the house-made chorizo. Fresh veggies and herbs are delivered daily to the restaurant’s doorstep by local farmers. While seafood isn’t a Colorado commodity, Vin48 boasts some of the freshest fish around, thanks to daily orders shipped from the West Coast.

PRICE

$8-$38 •••

AMBIANCE

Modern mountain setting serving seasonal, Colorado cuisine •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Classic steamed mussels with house-made chorizo and oven-dried tomatoes

“I order our seafood every morning and it comes fresh the next day,” says Hyde. “From sea to table in 24 hours is impressive, considering we’re in the middle of the Rockies.” Sample the catch with the cobia, clam and mussel cioppino, a classic take on Italian fish stew. Cobia, a mild, flaky fish, holds up well in this rich tomato-clam

broth, pairing perfectly with a fiery sauce and house made pasta. On a sunny day, enjoy the spicy watermelon gazpacho, served with a generous hunk of sweet crab, on the restaurant’s casual, relaxed patio. Light and brimming with favor, this is an ideal summer dish. Feeling adventurous? Try the unique duck liver mousse, a dish that balances the richness of offal with the tartness of fruit, packaged inside a flakey pastry shell. The fun of dining here is that you never know what the chefs are going to come up with next, an element of surprise that keeps Vin48’s many fans coming back again and again. The wine list, too, is both deep and friendly. Wine Director and Co-owner Greg Eynon has amassed a terrific collection that includes more than 40 wines by the glass, thanks to the enomatic wine system.

“Part of our success is that we have focused on locals, with daily happy hours and off-season specials,” says Executive Chef and Co-owner Charles Hayes. “We are as good as any restaurant in town, our prices are reasonable, and we always have something new on the menu.” This summer, look for an expanded list of rotating specials that will allow diners to taste the latest creations from Vin’s kitchen. • Beef tenderloin tartare with cured egg yolk, roasted chili, black lime aioli, pickled mustard seeds and wonton. above Smoked chicken drumettes with chipotle sriracha, kiwi salsa, cilantro and a warm peanut vinaigrette. left Spicy watermelon gazpacho, sweet deep sea red crab, pickled vegetable salad, lemon aioli and cilantro oil. top

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MIRABELLE 55 VILLAGE ROAD | BEAVER CREEK 970.949.7728 | MIRABELLE1.COM

by SCOTT MILLER photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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f you want to celebrate — a wedding, an anniversary, a birthday or even a day well-lived in the Vail Valley — Daniel and Nathalie Joly will be happy to help. The Jolys own Mirabelle, a charming restaurant nestled at the base of Beaver Creek. The restaurant — where the Jolys both work and live — is a ranch house more than a century old. In the tradition of country inns, Daniel and Nathalie live upstairs. If the couple is gone, the restaurant doesn’t open. That way, Joly says, guests know just who is hosting their evening out. After years of renting, the Jolys bought the restaurant and surrounding property in 2016. There’s a small greenhouse toward the back of the property, and the place is much like it was in the early 1900s — except with a modern kitchen and comfortable dining room and bar on the main floor. When the restaurant is open — which is most of the time, of course — Daniel is in the kitchen, working culinary magic. Belgian by birth and classically trained in French cuisine, Joly melds those classical techniques with a modern flair to create dishes unique in the Vail Valley’s dining scene. We visited on a warm summer night and the doors to the patio were open, allowing both a view and the evening breeze to waft through the inviting dining room. Though the à la carte menu is studded with gems, the prix fixe menu is a delightful option. For our visit,

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PRICE

Prix fixe four-course dinner, changes nightly: $75 per person; Appetizers: $10-$19; Entrées: $21-$45 •••

AMBIANCE

Belgian American in a historic setting •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Any dish with seared foie gras, classic chocolate soufflé for dessert

Joly prepared a pair of appetizers — a ravioli of rabbit stew with garlic foam and grown-on-site spring herbs, both adding a counterpoint to the mild rabbit, and the seared foie gras, served with

sweetly caramelized Anjou pears and a baby green sauterne vanilla reduction. The wine list is extensive, and we submitted ourselves to the expertise of our server, Bruce MacPherson. Well versed in the restaurant’s cuisine as well as the wine list, he was spot on with each course he paired for us. MacPherson has worked at Mirabelle for more than 20 years, and it’s apparent in the depth of his knowledge. As we dined on our entrées, a filet of arctic char and elk tenderloin, Nathalie wandered the dining room, greeting old customers like old friends because, well, they are.

On our visit, Joly was busy in the kitchen most of the evening, but he loves to socialize with guests, too. And though all of his guests are treated like VIPs, you never know who you might be seated next to at Mirabelle. While we were there, a small party was enjoying a 25th-anniversary dinner, having flown in especially for the meal before heading to the French Riviera. There was also a larger party on the deck. Everyone, at every table, was enjoying the evening. And, with an experience like this, who wouldn’t have a lovely evening out? • top Elk medallion with asparagus and gnocchi. above Steelhead trout with Thai coconut milk red curry and salsa with lemon confit, ginger and tarragon. left Pistachio, strawberry and garden mint.


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AMBIANCE

Lively yet chic, great for families, dates or friends •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Spanish Octopus with chorizo tortellini, peach soffrito, tomato water, pea and radish

REVOLUTION by KIM FULLER photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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estaurants always strive to stay relevant and fresh, and sometimes a significant change can create the best new momentum. Revolution has a new Executive Chef, Remington Fleming, and the Beaver Creek restaurant is definitely embracing a wave of inspired ideas and emerging into a new and exciting era. The restaurant is still owned by wellloved local restaurateur, Riley Romanin, who is now also balancing the ownership and maintenance of a farm he recently

26 AVONDALE LANE | INSIDE THE BEAVER CREEK LODGE | BEAVER CREEK 970.845.1730 | REVOLUTIONDINING.COM

acquired. Guests of his restaurants can now look forward to eating produce straight from this endeavor, and while Romanin sows the seeds of this new project, Fleming and Chef De Cuisine Noah Webb have come in to really bring Revolution’s summer menu alive. Try the Cheese & Charcuterie board and the talents of the kitchen will come through immediately. House-made pork rillette, chicken liver pate and pork country pate are savory and delectable against wedges of Colorado cheeses. Bar Manager Danny McGuckin has crafted a great list of creative cocktails for the summer, including the Poached Pear Sour with A.D. Laws Farmhouse Bourbon, poached peach syrup and fresh lemon juice. Revolution’s new menu has both approachable and adventurous options, and each week he puts together a tasting menu for those who want to try what art the chefs are plating week to week. Fleming says many of the dishes have been in his mind for years, and he finally gets to make them real. Guests can still order full platters of meat to share, but Fleming will be bringing back more composed entrées that showcase layers of color and flavor. Spanish Octopus is poached and served with chorizo tortellini, peach

soffritto, tomato water, shaved radishes and pea flowers. A Rioja rosé is refreshing on its own and grounding for the seafood dish — a perfect Spanish pairing. Fleming’s Skuna Bay Salmon is finished with a light sear and surrounded by carrot done six different ways, showcasing his range of talent from the dazzle of a puree to the spark of flavor in a carrot-top salsa verde. A plate of 7X New York Strip cannot be topped, as the Waygu beef just speaks brilliance atop a charred onion soubise and with each bite of spring onion tempura, pickled cippolini, arugula, a touch of black garlic and a drizzle of herb oil. For dessert, a 1999 Sauterne is nice on its own, but your palate may want the strip of lemon curd that is nestled between blueberry compote and housebaked granola. Great chefs know how to lead guests through unforgettable culinary journeys. With Fleming initiating this pivot point for the restaurant, Revolution will definitely gain quite the following this summer and in seasons to come. • top

Skuna Bay Salmon with a carrot sextet.

left Poached Peach Sour: A.D Laws 4 Grain

Bourbon, poached peach syrup, lemon juice, egg whites, Carpano Antica, lemon zest, peach bitters.

Spanish Octopus with chorizo tortellini, peach soffrito, tomato water, pea and radish.

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Appetizers: $5-$28; Entrées: $18-$29; Family-style specialty platters: $60-$150

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TOSCANINI RISTORANTE by WILL BRENDZA photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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s there a more authentic Italian gem in this valley than Toscanini, the buzzing ristorante nestled against Beaver Creek’s ice rink? It is an experience that goes beyond the cobbled patio and expert staff. Beyond the award-winning Italian wine list. And beyond even the mind-bendingly delicious Italian cuisine that Executive Chef John Zavoral is constantly turning out of the kitchen. It’s the character that’s borne upon all of that, which transports its diners into the heart of Tuscany — if only for an evening. Throughout the summer Toscanini’s patio is alive with energy. Conversations babble like creeks, bubbling into laughter and flowing like wine throughout the tables outside and into the restaurant. The kitchen within thrums with activity in full view of the dining area. Bursts of open flame from the wood-fire oven punctuate the symphony of contented diners, enjoying meals that they’ll be hard pressed to forget. “I’ve always been fascinated by Italian cuisine,” says Chef Zavoral. That fascination borders on obsession and it’s evident throughout Zavoral’s menu. Even at only two pages long, choosing what to order is a difficult task — everything sounds and looks as remarkable as it tastes.

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MENU HIGHLIGHTS The signature gazpacho is delightfully refreshing. The light heirloom tomato soup is served cold, poured right in front of you at the table, around an ingot of diced avocado and cucumber, drizzled with basil oil and topped off with fresh micro greens. Perfectly crunchy, perfectly savory, it’s a light zuppe, bound to pique your appetite. Or try the carpaccio. Seared beef sirloin strip, sliced thin and sprinkled with shaved manchego, is served with house-made aioli and green harissa, a spicy puree of herbs, jalapeños and spices. It is quite unlike anything you’ll taste on this side of the Atlantic — a concert of savory, tender meat, bright, explosive micro greens and crispy potato swirls that contribute a welcome crunch to each and every bite. When it comes to a main course, the choices range from pizza to insalate, pasta and secondi. Toscanini’s dishes rotate seasonally and are crafted using

PRICE

Antipasti e zuppe: $12-$22; Pizza: $12-$16; Insalate: $11-$15; Pasta: $23-$31; Secondi: $32-$42 •••

AMBIANCE

Lively and informal, authentic Italian restaurant with an award-winning Italian wine list •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Vitello (Veal Scaloppini)

only the freshest, most local ingredients and much of the pasta is made in house. The Trota is a delicious dish that feels right at home in the Rockies, as trout is sautéed and served over sun-driedtomato gnocchi, roasted tomatoes and drizzled with a buttery lemon dill sauce. And the house bucatini is on another level of hearty satisfaction. Roasted hunks of pork belly, mixed in with peas, pecorino, bucatini noodles and traditional carbonara sauce, make every bite a dramatic experience. Of course, if you dine at Toscanini, it would be irresponsible not to take advantage of the extensive, 100-percent-Italian wine list. The fourteen-page catalogue is divided into categories that would impress any sommelier; with descriptions like “aromatic, dry and structured” and “soft, silky and high pleasure” it’s no difficulty to navigate; and likely why they've earned the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence for 18 years in a row. Toscanini serves a far deeper purpose in Beaver Creek than simply offering a nice place to enjoy a bowl of pasta. It acts as a genuine portal into the rich flavor of another culture — an open window into the world of fine Italian cuisine. • Tagliatelle with lamb, beef and pork Bolognese, plum tomatoes, parmesan cheese and crispy sage. right The Trota, made with Idaho red trout, sun-dried-tomato gnocchi, grilled squash and a lemon-dill butter sauce. page 61 Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho. above

60 AVONDALE LANE | BEAVER CREEK PLAZA BEAVER CREEK | 970.754.5590 TOSCANINIBEAVERCREEK.COM


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AMBIANCE

Upscale and organic, bringing elements of the outdoors in •••

SIGNATURE DISHES

Baby Beet Salad with goat cheese, hazelnuts and dried cherry vinaigrette; Steel Cut Oats with roasted corn, cotija and purple chipotle; Tuna with porcini puree, cipollini onions and pinot noir sauce

WYLD

0130 DAYBREAK RIDGE | 970.343.1555 RITZCARLTON.COM/BACHELORGULCH

by KATIE COAKLEY photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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ntering the gates of Beaver Creek imparts a tangible sense of arrival, knowing that what awaits at the top of the mountain will be special. Traveling to Bachelor Gulch intensifies that feeling and arriving at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch — there’s no doubt that an unforgettable experience is at hand. The hotel’s signature restaurant, WYLD, epitomizes the idea of bringing locally-sourced, Colorado cuisine to “the edge of wild,” an idea that describes the resort’s location. However, it’s the creativity and passion of new Executive Chef Jasper Schneider that truly sets this experience apart. Chef Schneider, who most recently oversaw culinary operations in Anguilla, B.W.I., of 13 dining outlets within CuisinArt Golf Resort & Spa and The Reef by CuisinArt, took the helm of WYLD at the beginning of June, bringing creative flavors and unexpected pairings to the menu. The menu is divided into several sections to peruse, from “table snacks” and “today’s farm” to “sea & land,” “grains & things” and a section of butcher’s cuts from local farms. Be sure to carefully consider each dish as even classic options have a unique twist.

Beets are a favorite seasonal veggie and a fresh salad is like an earthy, savory taste of summer. In Chef Schneider’s version, the beets are paired with fresh goat cheese and dusted with hazelnuts and ginger, all atop a dried cherry vinaigrette. The understated richness of the vinaigrette pairs perfectly with the beets; the ginger is an unexpected bit of heat that keeps you reaching for another bite. It’s this play between sweet and spicy, heat and coolness that seems to appeal to Schneider. The roasted heirloom carrots, which arrive in what seems to be a Pollack-inspired presentation, are roasted with lime and chilis: They retain their inherent sweetness yet are tempered by a fresh raita and are studded with fresh Fresno peppers. And don’t let the idea of oatmeal at dinner throw you off: the steel cut oats, studded with roasted corn and cotija cheese, is savory with a lingering, low grade heat thanks to the undercurrent of purple chipotle. It’s a surprising combination that leads to an unabashedly scraped plate. “When I was honeymooning in Mexico, the chef decided to shave sugar over a piece a fish and they served it with a habanero sauce and it always stuck in my head, the spice and sweet,” Chef Schneider says. “So for this I went back to savory and sweet. You

look at the balance (of the dish) and when people taste the food you want them to say, ‘I didn’t expect that.’” Though WYLD’s menu will continue to highlight Colorado proteins like bison and elk, Chef Schneider is also bringing more seafood to the menu, like a fluke ceviche and a salmon crudo, favorites from his tenure in the islands. Desserts are also seasonal and more fruit-driven — think selections of petit fours and bonbons or a fresh strawberry soup. “I’m excited,” says Chef Schneider. “We have big expectations, but we’re starting off right. You eat with your

eyes, so you make a beautiful plate, but we’re letting the food speak for itself, more than anything else.” So the next time you’re deciding between the myriad of dining options in the valley, take a second to be still and just listen. That symphony you hear, floating on the breeze from the edge of the wild? Succumb to the siren song of WYLD — it’s an experience you won’t want to miss. • Strawberry Soup. Baby Beet Salad with hazelnuts, goat cheese and a dried cherry vinaigrette.

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Appetizers: $14-$28; Entrées: $28-$85

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THE RITZ-CARLTON, BACHELOR GULCH 0130 DAYBREAK RIDGE | 970.748.6200 | RITZCARLTON.COM/BACHELORGULCH

by KATIE COAKLEY photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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he Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch is a treasure trove of dining experiences. In addition to the fine dining experience at WYLD, guests can also choose between a “seat with a view” at Daniel’s, burgers and more at Buffalos or cigars and cocktails at Bachelor’s Lounge. No matter when you get the need to nosh, there’s a little something for every appetite. DANIEL’S BAR & GRILL To truly enjoy the feeling of being on “the edge of wild,” head to Daniel’s Bar & Grill. Located on the expansive patio with 180-degree views of the mountains, leisurely lunches here easily flow into après. Soak up the sun and choose from a light bite, like one of the specialty salads, or perhaps more substantial fare, like burgers or barbecue. Known for the option to mix-and-match sauces and rubs on grill favorites like pulled pork and brisket, lunch here is all about having it the way you like, whether that’s hot and tangy or sweet and smoky. Perfect for gathering up the family or meeting with friends, Daniel’s is the perfect destination for whiling away the afternoon.

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BUFFALOS Bringing the outside in, Buffalos is where you can belly up to the expansive stone bar, enjoy a hand-crafted cocktail or carefully selected microbrew and feel as if you’re enjoying the outdoors without the need for a campfire. Though beer never goes amiss — the selection includes some of Colorado’s favorite crafts — try a bourbon-based cocktail like the Ryed Wedding, made with local 10th Mountain Rye, to drive off the chill when the sun goes down. Described as a “gastropub on steroids,” by Executive Chef Jasper Schneider, Buffalos takes classic pub grub and turns the dial up to eleven. For example, classic flatbreads like Margherita are available, but why not try

a taste of Colorado with the Bachelor? Covered with ground bison, elk sausage and smoked mozzarella, accented with Calabrian chili and granny smith apple, it’s a savory snack of mountain flavors. Tacos are not just for Tuesdays, with meat, seafood and veggie options to satisfy south-of-the-border cravings. Add a side of crispy Brussels sprouts or lemon asparagus to make sure you’re getting your greens or order the quinoa and spaghetti squash salad for a protein-packed option. BACHELORS LOUNGE For those evenings that invite you to linger among friends, head to Bachelors Lounge. This adults-only space is a cozy enclave that offers both indoor

and outdoor seating. The indoor lounge features elegant, mountain-inspired décor while the open-air area offers sleek and comfy seating and several fire features with mountain views. Whether you choose to relax indoors or out, the well-curated wine list will allow for the perfect after-dinner drink or try one of the Lounge’s Vaportinis. This unique twist on the classic Martini allows participants to experience the martini in a new way by creating alcohol vapor that is then inhaled with a straw. It’s a one-of-a-kind experience that provides

a cocktail foil for the cigar. As Bachelors is the only cigar bar in the valley, be sure to visit the humidor: The collection is impressive and connoisseurs are sure to find the perfect puff. • Berry Dreams. A Tall Krizz "Hibiscus Lemonade" being poured. top Bison cheeseburger with fries and a beer flight from Buffalos. above The WYLD Flower in mid-preparation before the color changing reaction. left Amaretto Sour. opposite page left

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8100

MOUNTAINSIDE BAR & GRILL

50 WEST THOMAS PLACE | PARK HYATT BEAVER CREEK 970.827.6600 | HYATT.COM/GALLERY/BEAVE8100

by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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ith colorful flags from across the globe positioned along the drive to Beaver Creek, this beloved resort town can feel a world away. But no passport is needed to explore Beaver Creek’s dining scene, which is welcoming to locals and guests alike. Tucked within the Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa, 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill is the place this summer to experience a fun, family-friendly dining experience that centers around the wood-fire grill, this kitchen’s showpiece — and the impetus behind 8100’s not-to-miss Cooking with Fire & Summer BBQ Series. Begin an evening at 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill in the best possible light by sipping on a cocktail or Colorado craft beer while watching alpenglow make its way up the mountain. With wide windows, a slopeside location and an outdoor patio, 8100 is one of the few places where it’s possible to dine in such close proximity to the outdoors. Choose from 8100’s extensive cocktail, beer and wine menu that features several thirst-quenching options for summertime refreshment. For a balanced, fruity starter, try the Strawberry Park signature cocktail that mixes together Hennessy VS, coconut water, muddled strawberries, lime and agave nectar. Local history buffs know that lettuce is a part of Beaver Creek’s beginnings: The area’s climate lends itself to growing greens, and lettuce fields once

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covered portions of what are now ski slopes. Get a taste of this local flavor before your entrée with 8100’s Waldorf salad, a crunchy classic that includes juicy grapes, crisp apple, endive, and a generous heap of lettuce from the nearby Buttercrunch Farm, all tossed in a light, vinegary dressing. Such salads and small plates lead diners into 8100’s main attraction: meaty entrées that capture the rich, smoky flavors of a wood-fire grill.

Dry-aged, prime-grade steaks are the highlight, but the salmon, too, lets you get a sense of the grill’s smoky goodness mingling with this entrée’s smoked tomato pine nut relish, baby spinach and citrus-infused pea puree. “It’s important to us to connect with local purveyors and bring what’s sustainable and fresh to our guests,” says Chef Wade Eybel. “As with Buttercrunch Farm, we have established relationships with others nearby who align with our goals of being a part of the community and being an entity that supports the local economy.” 8100’s Cooking with Fire & Summer BBQ Series is another way for diners to connect with local purveyors while honing their open-fire cooking techniques. Mark your calendars for this series at 8100, which will run on Saturday evenings from June 30 through mid-August. No matter what brings you to 8100 this summer — the tantalizing smell of smoke from the wood fire grill, or the excitement of the Cooking with Fire & Summer BBQ Series — be sure to leave with a sweet taste on your tongue. A top summer dessert pick is the pear crisp that’s served in a mini cast-iron pot and topped with brown sugar bourbon ice cream. •

PRICE

Starters and shared plates: $10-$16; Entrées: $18-$36 •••

AMBIANCE

Mountain casual, familyfriendly and fun •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Dry-aged prime grade steaks served sizzling from 8100’s wood fire grill

Norwegian salmon with smoked tomato and pine nut relish, English pea puree and baby spinach. left Waldorf salad with Eagle County's Buttercrunch Farms lettuce, endive, apples, grapes, walnuts, celery and a champagne vinaigrette. above


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BEAVER CREEK

SPLENDIDO AT THE CHATEAU 17 CHATEAU LANE | BEAVER CREEK | 970.845.8808 | SPLENDIDORESTAURANT.COM

PRICE

Appetizers: $17-$24; Entrées: $39-$52; Six-course tasting menu: $75 •••

by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ust walking into the elegant Chateau Beaver Creek can seem to slow the swirling motion of a busy day and transition your evening into a smooth and delightful dance. Let gracious hosts lead you toward the melodies of live piano that drift through the spacious entryway and into Splendido’s bar and lounge. Like the feeling you get upon arrival at Splendido, some things about the restaurant are truly timeless. You can always enjoy a perfect dish of Dover sole and never be disappointed, or sit in awe while your fork cuts with barely an ounce of pressure into a beautiful cut of foie gras. The service is impeccable, and it’s likely that the wine you have with your meal will be a pairing that’s simply wonderful. As with the creation of all great art, it’s a constant flow of inspiration and innovation that feeds the artists. Every night while the Splendido pianist is serenading a dining room full of guests, Chef-Owner Brian Ackerman leads his team in a production drawn from classic and contemporary, the old and the new. A glass of Taittinger Prestige Rosé Brut will spark your taste buds for Ackerman’s most exciting new addition to Splendido’s evening offerings. A $75

six-course tasting menu is available for those looking to try unique expressions of culinary talent coming from the kitchen. The tasting menu changes every six or seven days, and Ackerman says it’s the portion of cooking that is letting he and his team “play.” “We’re trying new things back there and are having fun with some items that you wouldn’t usually taste,” Ackerman explains. Guests can order the Splendido classics they know and love, along with a variety of revamped appetizers and entrées, such as the Jidori chicken with lingonberries, pine nuts and mustard greens. But the tasting menu will consistently produce a new array of exciting flavors and textures that make for a real dining event. A Dungeness crab beignet hors d’oeuvre and a first course of kampachi really sing alongside a glass of Chablis, and Ackerman’s courses get progressively more entrée-like in style, while portioned appropriately for the course load. There will be dishes that draw attention and conversation, like a beet gazpacho that’s as earthy and spicy as it is bright and vibrant, or monkfish that’s crusted and seared to have a perfectly crispy shell over a tender and flavorful filet. Leave it to Pastry Chef Sebastien Schmitt to make the final courses just as fun as they are delectable. From a

panna cotta “sun” with frozen coconut foam to carrot cake with cream cheese, raisin and white chocolate, whatever Schmitt has up his French sleeve is worth saving room for. •

AMBIANCE

New American cuisine served in an elegant mountainside dining room with a piano lounge •••

SIGNATURE DISH Venison carpaccio with gribiche, potato and celery. top right Carrot cake, cream cheese, raisins and white chocolate. below Jidori chicken with lingonberries, pine nuts and mustard greens. top left

Jidori chicken with lingonberries, pine nuts and mustard greens


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COLORADO TASTING ROOM by KIMBERLY NICOLETTI photos by CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT

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eaver Creek’s new Colorado Tasting Room is the only restaurant in the area that serves all Colorado products. If it’s not grown in Colorado, it’s not on the menu. “A lot of people try to do locally sourced, but this restaurant is 100 percent Colorado locally sourced,” says Dillon Bolders, President of Operations. “All the food is sourced from Colorado or Colorado companies.” While some people might not think

of Colorado as a big food-producing state, Bolders and his staff actually had a difficult time narrowing down items to place on the menu. “We want to highlight Colorado in its fullest, (but) there are so many offerings it was hard to limit,” Bolders says. “Once you start diving down into it, it’s interesting how many Colorado foods there are.” Small farms have been partnering with restaurants for many years, and because of the recent demand for locally sourced ingredients, more farms are able to thrive; for example, Colorado Tasting Room obtains its greens from a farm that focuses only on micro greens. “Because they’re not mass-produced, they are able to have a solid product at the end of the day,” says Justin Adrian, President of Culinary Development for Roadhouse Hospitality Group, which launched Colorado Tasting Room. “We accent the flavors Colorado companies are producing.” When the group envisioned Beaver Creek’s new restaurant, they wanted it to act as a destination for visitors to experience what Colorado offers.

210 OFFERSON ROAD, SUITE 201C BEAVER CREEK | 970.748.3123

“We think of it as an activity — something to go to in the afternoon, to intertwine a dining experience (with other attractions),” Bolders says. As such, the cocktail menu features a plethora of Colorado liquors, including whiskeys, rums, gins, vodkas and tequilas, as well as a dozen wines that offer tasting pours so guests can sample as many as they want. In addition, the bar provides Colorado draft beers, bottles and cans. TASTING MENU The dining menu revolves around small plates and sandwiches, such as Red Bird lettuce wraps, chicken tinga tacos, corned beef sandwiches and more. And, though they’re termed “small,” Adrian assures guests the plates will fill them up. “It’s all about the tasting menu,” Bolders says. Appetizers range from a cheesy sweet corn dip with jalapeños and caramelized onions to smoked elk carpaccio and meat and cheese plates featuring elk and green chili sausages, goat cheese, gorgonzola and calabrese. “It’s very eclectic,” Adrian says, adding that he has a sweet tooth, so he tends to blend sweet and spicy or sweet and savory flavors. In addition to his homemade cheesecake, his affection for sweets comes out in his salads. His Compressed Watermelon fuses mixed greens, pistachios, red onion and goat cheese with dense watermelon slices generated by vacuuming the air out of the watermel-

PRICE

$10-$23 •••

AMBIANCE

Upscale, casual Colorado tasting experience •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Appetizer: Beet-pickled deviled eggs & the compressed watermelon salad Main: Papperadelle wild mushroom ravioli

on. In his Grilled Palisade Peach salad, the gorgonzola accents the peaches and includes orange-champagne vinaigrette made with local honey. Inside the Colorado Tasting Room, rich, dark wood, brick archways and steel panels reflect Colorado’s more rugged aesthetics, while the food and drinks reveal the fine tastes of local farmers and producers who are committed to quality. • Beet-pickled deviled eggs paired with a beer flight. top right Compressed watermelon salad. left Laws Stave-Smoked Old Fashioned with a smoked glass, Laws four-grain bourbon, Angostura bitters and simple syrup. top left


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DUSTY BOOT ROADHOUSE

210 OFFERSON ROAD | BEAVER CREEK PLAZA 970.748.1146 | DUSTYBOOTBEAVERCREEK.COM

by WILL BRENDZA photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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erched overlooking the ice rink of Village Plaza, the Dusty Boot hums with local life and excited diners. It’s become a landmark après destination in Beaver Creek over the years. Since 1997 the Boot’s been slinging its savory Western cuisine, offering a warm and friendly place for both locals and visitors to kick back after a long day on the slopes. This year marks their 20th anniversary, and to celebrate, the Boot has a fresh renovation, a revamped menu and a host of new happy hour deals to give back to its Beaver Creek community. Just inside the new glass doors, the Boot’s long bar is usually a-bustle with guests, drink in hand, marinating in the warm light that saturates the space. The newly redone dining area, just beyond the bar, is lined with leather booths, filled with families and couples enjoying the bright Western atmosphere. Happy hour at the Dusty Boot is from 3 to 5 p.m. — an ideal window of time for anyone coming down off the mountain to get $2 Coors beer, $5 well drinks, or $6 draft beers and house wines. There’s also snacks and apps on the happy hour menu, that, for only $8, come with your choice of beer or wine.

But don’t stress too hard about when you get there. Part of their 20th anniversary overhaul boldly declares ‘happy hour, every hour." “It’s an attitude from our staff to

our guests,” explains Manager Lonnie Leto. “Who are we to tell you when you should be happy?” So, no matter what time you walk through those front doors, there’s sure to be some kind of bargain waiting for you on the other side. Grab a $5 Bonfire beer all day, every day; or, ask about their daily food and drink specials. And when it comes to dollars per unit of fulfillment, hungry customers need not worry — the portion sizes at the Boot are notoriously satisfying. Even appetizers, like the Brussels sprouts, come piled high in a succulent mountain covered in fresh goat cheese. Or try a massive tray of mouthwatering chicken and steak nachos, a perfect accompaniment to one of their signature “Boot margaritas.” Pace yourself, though. Entrées like the “Jam Burger” are an experience worth being hungry for. Imagine a perfectly cooked Colorado hormonefree Angus beef burger, spread with a sweet bacon-onion-apple jam, and topped with a smoky-sweet offering of applewood-smoked bacon. It’s a wild twist of sweet and savory flavors that lingers on the mind even longer than it lingers on the palate. “The best burger in the valley,” says Leto proudly, as he set the Jam Burger on the table, “One of my favorite things on the menu.”

PRICE

Starters: $9-$19 Mains: $12-$39 •••

AMBIANCE

Laid back and convivial •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Homemade ranch potato chips, Boot Pasta, steak frites and short-rib enchiladas

Whether you’re a valley local or a visitor, a family or a couple out on a date, the Dusty Boot is one of the best bars in Beaver Creek to après and relax into the evening. But it’s also a dining experience that will stick with you long after you’ve left your cowhide booth. • Classic Boot Nachos with black beans, jalapeños, pico de gallo, sour cream and guacamole. left The Jam Burger with Colorado beef, bacon-onion-apple jam, applewood bacon, brie and arugula on a brioche bun. above

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VISTA AT ARROWHEAD

676 SAWATCH DRIVE | ARROWHEAD | EDWARDS 970.926.2111 | VISTA-ARROWHEAD.COM

by WILL BRENDZA photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON PRICE

Lunch – Starters: $2.50-$18; Pasta and Pizza: $12-14; Sandwiches: $11-$12.50 Dinner – Appetizers: $13-$21; Chef’s composed entrées: $23-$41

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uring the summer, there is never a bad time to visit Vista at Arrowhead. You’ll always find spectacular lunch and dinner options. You’ll always experience up-scale service and a casual atmosphere. And, of course, there will always be that breathtaking view. But there is, without question, a best time to visit Vista: every evening, right around 6 p.m. At that golden hour, the sun is making its final descent towards Wolcott canyon to the west, spilling amber light over those mountains and across the beautiful rolling greens of the golf course. Birds swoop from aspen trees, chirping as they glide over and around Vista’s flower-laden patio. There’s a reason this place is named for the view. Still, the vista beyond Vista isn’t even the main event. Promptly at 6 (or maybe 6:10 depending on how many familiar faces he sees) Micky Poage, a local piano legend, takes his seat at the gleaming Yamaha grand piano in the corner of the dining room. What ensues is nothing short of euphonic. “I started playing in the valley when I was 19,” Poage says, when he stopped by the table to say hello and ask for requests. He played in Vail for 35 years prior to moving to Arrowhead and, judging by how well loved he is among the diners at Vista, he has found his home. As the sunlit valley beyond fades into the darkness of nighttime, the world seems to disappear and the

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•••

AMBIANCE

One of the best decks in the valley with a customerfriendly menu and live entertainment nightly •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Seared rare tuna with wasabi mashed potatoes, sesame bok choy and soy ginger butter sauce

atmosphere within Vista only gets richer with Micky’s music, easing diners into a sense of comfort and kindling their appetites for the oncoming meal. MENU DELIGHTS And what a meal. To begin, the delicious jumbo shrimp and snow crab cocktail is outstandingly fresh, while the signature mussels are embellished with Italian sausage, giving them a robust flavor cheered on by cherry tomatoes, spinach, garlic and white wine. One must-try dish is the pan-seared Alaskan halibut, available only in the summer when they can get it fresh, never frozen. Served with sun-driedtomato risotto and a red pepper puree, it’s a perfect warm-weather dish. “We try to get local ingredients as much as possible,” says Daryl

DeYoung, the owner and operations manager of Vista. It’s something they’ve been doing more and more of, in both the kitchen and at the bar. In addition to all of the beef, many of the vegetables come from Colorado. When it comes to comfort food, though, there’s nothing quite like Vista’s short ribs. So tender, so perfectly braised you barely need to use the steak knife that comes with them. The restaurant's signature meat dish, the short ribs are terrific with the Yukon potato puree and any of the sauteed or grilled vegetable options. And, regardless of whether or not you’re full when you’re finished with dinner, the strawberry-rhubarb

shortcake is a don’t-miss treat. The sweet biscuit dissolves like a sugar cube on your tongue, so full of flavor you can almost hear it, like the notes of some far off, mellifluous tune… Or maybe that’s just Micky, tickling the keys of his grand piano. Either way, it’s a delight. And it’s hard to shake the happy haze that follows you out of Vista when you leave. • top Maryland crab cake, left, colossal snow crab and shrimp cocktail and beets and bibb lettuce with a glass of wine and the Litigator cocktail. above Strawberry and rhubarb shortcake with vanilla gelato. left Pan-seared Alaskan halibut.


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GORE RANGE BREWERY by WILL BRENDZA photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

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here are a lot of reasons why the Gore Range Brewery has been a local favorite for 21 years and counting: the classic pub fare and fulfilling entrées, a warm and cozy atmosphere, the lush tree-ringed patio, and, of course, the craft beer. It’s a timeless place, as near and dear to the valley as the mountain range it’s named for. Steeped with decades of good vibes the Gore Range Brewery always seems to be humming with happy people enjoying good food and crisp, craft beer. Classic rock pours over the diners, mingling with the boisterous

laughter and casual conversations so often swirling throughout the pub. A quick glance over the menu and you’re sure to recognize a spread of age old favorites: sandwiches like the Rueben served on marble rye, or the BBQ Spice Rubbed Brisket Dip, brewery burgers, a host of wood-fire oven baked pizzas, full and half racks of ribs and apps like their fried pickles all sing with freshness and familiarity. “I like to keep things simple,” says Pascal Coudouy, the owner, brewer and head chef of the Gore Range Brewery. Coudouy, who grew up in France and specialized in Parisian bourgeois cooking, took over the Gore Range Brewery in 2011. Since then, he’s worked hard to bring an even greater vibrancy to the

0105 EDWARDS VILLAGE BLVD | EDWARDS 970.926.BREW (2739) | GORERANGEBREWERY.COM

food and the beer — while at the same time maintaining that air of simplicity. “Just order to your own taste,” he says, describing his philosophy. It’s all about following the flavors you enjoy. “All of our beer pairs well with all of our food.” By working in both the kitchen and the brewery, Coudouy is able craft his beer to match his menu and vice versa. So, no matter what kind of brew you end up drinking and what kind of entrée you want to try with it, the combo is sure to be a match. Simple, pure and enjoyable – that’s the name of the game at Gore Range. SUMMER STANDOUTS The signature sautéed trout fillet is a marvel of culinary craftsmanship, “It’s hard to beat,” admits Coudouy with a smile. And after just a single succulent bite, it’s easy to taste why: served with smashed potatoes, sautéed spinach and drizzled in a lemon caper sauce, the dish is zesty and delicious. Other popular items include the fajitas made with grilled skirt steak and served with all the fixings. The prosciutto and pear pizza combines sweet and savory on a nicely crisp-chewy crust, and lighter items such as the shishito peppers and the tuna roll are great shareable appetizers. Gore Range’s beer is all brewed in-house — playfully named, eight Gore Range beers are always kept on tap (including one guest tap) and rotate each season. The Great Sex Honey Lager always lives up to its exciting moniker. And the Vail Tail Pale Ale has been a summer favorite in this happy valley for longer than most remember. Seasonally speaking, Coudouy will

PRICE

Apps: $6-$16.75; Pizzas: $12-$16; Sandwiches: $13.95-$14.50; Entrées: $16.95-$28 •••

AMBIANCE

Locals craft brewery and sports bar, slinging beercentric pub fare with a twist •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Sautéed Trout; BBQ Spice Rubbed Brisket Dip

soon release a rosé wheat: a bright and round beer with a delicate floral profile — the perfect summer thirst quencher. “That is going to be very good,” promises Coudouy. So, if you’re looking for a local favorite in the Vail Valley, an easy place to kick back with a fresh brew and enjoy a classic atmosphere, as golden and welcoming as any you’ll find in these parts, look no further. The Gore Range Brewery has everything you need. • Prosciutto and pear pizza. Skirt steak fajitas with a Gore Range Brewery flight of four 5-ounce beers. left Shishito peppers, left, and tuna roll appetizers with a pineapple, mango and mint margarita. top left

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PRICE

Starters: $5.99-$14.99; Pasta: $12.99-$14.99; Pizza $7.99-$17.99 •••

AMBIANCE

Local, family-style pizzeria •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Pizza and pasta

MARKO’S PIZZA by WILL BRENDZA photos by CHRISTOPHER DILLMANN

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here’s something deeply comforting about a local pizzeria — that place, usually tucked away in some humble corner of town, where friends and families gather, grab a table and watch the chefs hand-toss pizza, slather it in bright red tomato sauce, blanket it in mozzarella and fresh toppings and deliver it to the table still sizzling from the heat of the oven. Though it might technically be Italian food, it’s certainly a cornerstone of American tradition. And it’s something you’ll find alive and well at Marko’s Pizza in Edwards. Established in 1994, Marko’s has been serving great local pizza and pasta for nigh on 24 years. It’s a name that is recognized up and down this valley — a name that is synonymous with awesome Italian cuisine and lively local character. Old skis and snowboards adorn the walls, accented with vintage Budweiser posters, black-and-white photographs and local paintings — ski-country decor collected over the decades — articles of the community and the culture.

57 EDWARDS ACCESS RD #7 | EDWARDS 970.926.7003 | MARKOSPIZZA.COM

One of Marko’s trademark specialties is the first item you’ll encounter on the menu: their house garlic knots. Made from Marko’s signature dough, baptized in garlic and twisted for a little extra flavor flair, they are a mouthwatering treat, and the perfect tidbit to satiate your appetite just until the main course. Marko's “old school pasta” is a build-your-own laboratory for noddle enthusiasts. You can combine your choice of pasta (from spaghetti to fettucini, ziti to tri-colored spiral pasta) with marinara, meat sauce, alfredo or their classic “fatt butt” sauce. If you’re trying to keep things easy, though, check out the Marko’s style baked pasta dishes — that’s where you’ll find old favorites like the chicken parmesan, lasagna and ravioli. But, the star of the Marko’s Pizza menu is, naturally, the pizza. Hand tossed, garnished with fresh toppings, beautifully oven-blistered and bubbling with cheesy glory, Marko's pizzas are something to behold. Try any number of the house specialty pizzas, like the Supreme, the Popeye Pie or delicious Greek pizza — a spectacle of olives, artichokes and spinach piled high and generously peppered with olive

oil, feta and mozzarella cheeses. Or, build a custom pizza crafted to fit your palate like a savory slipper. Choose your sauce, choose your toppings and bueno appetito. When it comes right down to it, though, it doesn’t really matter what you order at Marko’s Pizza. It’s the simple honesty of the food served

— the beautiful basic goodness of freshly baked pizza, pasta cooked with intention and salads tossed with love — that has made Marko’s the Vail Valley staple it is today. • above Greek pizza with olives, artichoke hearts, spinach, feta and mozzarella. below Garlic knots.


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EDWARDS

THE ROSE 97 MAIN STREET RIVERWALK EDWARDS 970.855.0141 THEROSEEDWARDS.COM

by KATIE COAKLEY photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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here are certain ingredients necessary for the perfect summer dining experience: a picturesque patio, a refreshing cocktail and dishes that taste of the season, bursting with color, flavor and maybe a surprise or two. If this sounds like what you’re searching for, look no farther than The Rose in Edwards. One part atmosphere, one part mixology, two parts cuisine and one part fairy tale, The Rose welcomes guests into its newly expanded space, encouraging you to sit, relax and leave your preconceived notions behind. Like

all good fairy tales, everything is not as it seems and there’s undoubtedly a bit of magic afoot. Start with a magic potion from the restaurant's passionate bar staff. The cocktail menu is separated into present and past, paying homage to classics but offering up fun and avant-garde options as well. Creating fascinating flavors from unexpected spirits, the bartenders play with ingredients and flavors. From a classic Paloma made with house-

infused tarragon tequila to a rotating draft cocktail like a white Negroni that’d make an Italian sit up and take notice, the bartenders provide the perfect beginning to the evening. Perusing the menu at The Rose is a bit like taking a wander through an enchanted wood. You see familiar items like a beet salad, or fried chicken, or scallops. But upon closer inspection, these dishes are not quite as you expected. The recent expansion of The Rose, completed in January 2018, allowed Chef and Owner Bryan Redniss to expand his kitchen… and his toys. “We’ve been doing a lot of grilling and smoking, playing around with these tools,” Redniss says. “I’m excited about the techniques and flavors that we’re using.” Take the shaved scallop, for example. “I did a cured and smoked scallop, then dehydrated it for 36 hours so you can shave it over the homemade squid ink papperadelle that we do,” Redniss explains. “You can grate it just like parmesan cheese. It’s awesome.” It is, indeed, awesome. The pasta is excellently al dente, tossed in a sake butter with dukkah (an Egyptian condiment that is a mixture of herbs, nuts and spices). The scallop is shaved in a gloriously umami mound on top; local micro-cilantro adds the finishing touch. It’s rich and decadent and completely unexpected. Or consider the hamachi crudo. This classic dish features incredibly fresh tuna with traditional citrus flavors. However, instead of traditional olive oil, the tuna is bathed in scallion oil with gorgeous bubbles of chili oil interspersed. A bit of puffed rice adds texture while edible blossoms provide the crowning effect. And the list goes on, each dish

PRICE

$5-$18 •••

AMBIANCE

Cozy and unique with just a touch of eccentricity •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Piggy Smalls or the Number #7

thoughtful, and yet the sort of cuisine you can relax into with the people you’re sharing it with: The beet salad is a work of modern art, built with spiraled red beets as well as the golden variety, dusted with pistachio powder and puffed quinoa. The fried chicken is a sweet and savory guilty pleasure, served with sage honey butter and pickled celery. Redniss sources his produce locally, ranging from the Western Slope and Palisade to just a few miles down the road, like The Farm at Knapp Ranch. As a result, he changes up the menu often, veggiewise, adding a new puree or side as the vegetables come into season. Dining at The Rose is like immersing yourself in a favorite story, complete with unexpected twists and a bit of magic. And just like all good stories, the ending is a happy one. • above The new remodel at The Rose in Edwards includes more dining tables, another lounge area as well as a vintage pool table and a dart board. left Squid ink pasta with smoky dehydrated scallops. page 1 Summer Crudo with hamachi.


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TURNTABLE RESTAURANT by MELANIE SMITH photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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he For more than 50 years, Turntable Restaurant has been an iconic Minturn eatery, a place known for its diner-like feel, Boo’s Burrito, and quirky-collectable style. Since purchasing the restaurant about two years ago, owner trio Ryan Thompson, Mike Dennis and Steve Solomon, of the Westside Cafe, redesigned it, redecorated it and revamped the menu. Some things, however, haven’t changed — among them the throwback to the restaurant’s namesake (a piece of railroad equipment essential to the operation of the Union Pacific Railroad that ran nearby until the late 1990s), the homey, local flair central to the establishment, and the Boo’s Burrito.

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“It was really important to us that we focus on our place as an anchor in Minturn and in the community in general,” says Thompson. Keeping and honoring the historical presence of the restaurant while putting their own touch on it has resulted in a creative menu of reasonably-priced breakfast, lunch and dinner items — some recognizable from the trio’s West Vail restaurant, Westside Cafe. There’s also a nod to the needs of Saturday’s Minturn Market attendees, with a “snack shack” that will offer grab-and-go items. A Southwest flair hovers over the menu, with options such as the Breakfast Nachos, which incorporate scrambled eggs, tortilla chips, crumbled bacon, award-winning Hatch green chili, cheddar, pico de gallo, cilantro, crema and guacamole, but the fresh and often local ingredients, together with attention

160 RAIL RD AVE | MINTURN 970.827.4164 | TURNTABLERESTAURANT.COM

to vegetarian and gluten-free requests, affirm that those with all tastes and preferences are welcome. The Boo’s Burrito has long been a local’s favorite. Made with a fresh, chewy tortilla that is wrapped around scrambled eggs, hash browns, black beans, and cheese, the decadent burrito is smothered in pork green chili and topped with cilantro, cheese, and crema. It’s the perfect breakfast after a night in the tent — the trailheads of five or six wonderful hikes are within a mile or two of the restaurant. Lunch and dinner options include such offerings as a variety of appetizers (don’t miss the Jalapeño Rellenos), burgers and sandwiches, salads, and impressive remakes of classics such as the Bison Meatloaf with mushroom gravy, mashed potatoes, grilled asparagus and frazzled onions. A $29.99 Saturday-night tasting menu that changes weekly gives Chef Shinara Beauregard the chance to show off a little and delight visitors with a meal complete with an appetizer, entrée, dessert and drink specials. The drinks — especially the variety of Bloody Mary’s all served with a sidecar of beer, are also worth highlighting, including the substantial wine list. With its fun and locallyfamous mechanical train that runs near the ceiling throughout the restaurant, Turntable

PRICE

$10-$23 •••

AMBIANCE

Family friendly, mountain casual •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Boo's Burrito

Restaurant is kid-friendly and great for groups, parties and occasions of all sorts. Booths and tables fill out the dining area, and a bar that’s length is a wall-size digitized black and white version of an original postcard found in the restaurant’s office. It’s worth hopping onboard the Turntable train and enjoying the generous portions and big flavors. • Boo's Burrito with scrambled eggs, hash browns, refried or black beans and cheddar cheese in a flour tortilla smothered with spicy pork green chili and topped with chopped cilantro, cheddar cheese and crema. top right Grilled Romaine and Steak Salad with blistered cherry tomatoes, blue cheese crumbles, pickled onions, crispy bacon bits and creamy blue cheese dressing. left Avocado toast mashed with olive oil, salt and pepper served on Udi's Multigrain Bread. top left


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THE SEBASTIAN – VAIL | 16 VAIL ROAD | VAIL 970.306.4612 | THESEBASTIANVAIL.COM/DINE

by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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yson Peterson loves simplicity. As Executive Chef of Leonora in The Sebastian, Peterson is all about serving food as the best representation of itself, and very often that means simpler is better. “Even when I was a young cook, I was trained to let things taste like what they are supposed to taste like,” says Peterson. “A carrot should taste like a carrot. Vegetables don’t have to be supplementary — sometimes they are the star of the show.” Tapas have always been a highlight at Leonora, and now the menu has expanded to offer large-format options, including ingredient-inspired entrées, whole-animal butchery and prime beef and game selections. Get a round of shared plates to begin, including an order of the melt-in-yourmouth applewood-bacon biscuits with roasted poblano pepper and whipped local honey butter. Peterson has kept elements of comfort food on the menu,

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PRICE

Small and Shared Dishes: $11-$44; Large Plates: $24-$58 •••

AMBIANCE

Upscale wine and tapas restaurant tucked into a quaint corner of Vail Village •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Colorado lamb chops with beluga lentils, black pepper jam, tarragon and panko

like these divine biscuits, but has also included a variety of vegetable tapas that really hold their own. Try the roasted cauliflower with edamame pesto and lime, and the brick ovenroasted carrots with mint and white

miso yogurt. The Hawaiian sunfish ceviche is another bright standout, served with sweet potato, aji amarillo leche de tigre and red onions. These lighter dishes do stand out on the tapas menu, and it’s also fun to share a spread like the cheese and charcuterie platter for the table. It’s a chef’s choice of rotating house-made and local salami, sausage and specialty cheese with accoutrements and a baguette. With the large plate options, substantial portions of protein steal the spotlight. Local trout comes brick oven-roasted and accompanied by carrot puree, swiss chard and sauce Grenobloise, and the mouthwatering Colorado lamb chops arrive crusted with black pepper jam and tarragon panko, served atop beluga lentils. Peterson’s style of allowing the ingredients to do the talking is most apparent with the clean preparations for beef and game on the menu: cuts

like beef tenderloin and ribeye served simply with a choice of sauce. Leonora has also really embraced a whole-animal butchery program, offering a nightly special based on the whole animal featured. In the winter, pork was offered, and lamb in the spring. “I wanted to be creative, so this one’s fun for me, because not only is it my chance to do something unique daily and weekly, but because we buy the whole animal, it’s a lot more sustainable for the farmer who we purchase it from,” explains Peterson. “It gives me a chance to express my style in different cuts of meat and with different techniques.” • Colorado lamb chops with beluga lentils, tarragon panko and black pepper jam. left Watermelon gazpacho with verbana shrimp, cucumber, raspberry, Marcona almonds, basil oil and fresno chilis. cover Hawaiian sunfish ceviche. above

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ALMRESI RESTAURANT

298 HANSON RANCH ROAD, TOP OF BRIDGE STREET 970.470.4174 | ALMRESI-VAIL.COM

by WILL BRENDZA photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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t’s easy to forget that you’re still in Vail when you walk into Almresi. Sure, Bridge Street’s Seibert Circle Fountain is just outside the front doors, and the grassy slopes beneath Gondola One lie in full view beyond the back windows of the restaurant. But all of those earthly reminders seem to fade into the periphery as soon as you’re beneath Almresi’s rustic woodbeamed ceiling. The Alpen authenticity is striking. Truly. Everything from the furniture you dine on, to the artwork adorning the wood-paneled walls, to the cowhide-covered bar lights, the smiling lederhosen/dirndl-clad staff and, of course, their incredible cuisine, speaks of genuine European highcountry tradition. “Our mother actually had all of the furniture brought over from Germany, piece by piece,” explains Alyssa Thoma, who manages Almresi with her brother, Joshua. The Thoma family started Almresi in Vail in 2016. And although it’s only been two years, their establishment is already a treasured part of the Vail Village. From the high-country of the Alps to the high-country of the Rocky Mountains, this family-run restaurant has transfused not only the flavors of another alpine world, but their rich mountain culture as well. “When people are here it’s an escape for them,” says Alyssa. An escape from one beautiful place to another. An escape that saturates the dining area in accordion folk

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PRICE

$16-$40 •••

AMBIANCE

Authentic, rustic, cozy, alpine style •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Austrian traditional Hut Essen, "eat your hat"

music; where the bar, the wait staff and the kitchen all exchange rapid-fire German dialogue; where everyone feels like a family member in some warm and far off Alpen home. The menu is every bit as true to spirit as the décor and ambiance, too. You will probably recognize several dishes typical to American menus — but one does not walk into Almresi to experience the typical American restaurant. “We encourage our customers to try something new,” says Alyssa. Which is not a very risky thing to do here — if only because the menu is so alive with comforting, time-tested, appetiteapproved recipes. The käsefondue (cheese fondue), infused with kirschwasser and white wine, sprinkled with salt and pepper and served with Almresi’s rustic bread, is, honestly, worth two orders. When you’re finished with the first one, you’re only going to be left wanting more. Then there’s the Almresi flammkuchen. It’s a borderline French dish that apparently snuck its way onto this traditionally GermanAustrian menu — but it’s a welcome addition. The classic tarte flambee comes dressed with your choice of goat cheese, arugula salad and figs, or sour cream, onions and bacon. And when it comes time to order the main course, the schweinshax'n (pork shank) is a classic Alpen favorite that Almresi has mastered. The delicate pork falls straight off the shank, into the creamy mashed potato side it comes with. Of course, the seriousness of a German-Austrian restaurant like this is judged by the sauerkraut.

Mildly acerbic, vaguely salty but without compromising the underlying foundation of the fresh cabbage they use, Almresi’s sauerkraut acts almost as a stamp of authenticity on the establishment itself. It’s hard to put your finger on what exactly makes this place so special. Maybe it’s the love that the Thoma family has put into Almresi, maybe it’s their incredible food or that genuinely friendly staff; or, perhaps it’s that beautiful furniture they lugged all the way from Europe. When you walk through those front doors, you may never want to leave. • Family-style dinner at Almresi. Dining room "Kuhstall."

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LA TOUR by KATIE COAKLEY photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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here are certain sights that just lift the heart, and the first glimpse of the yellow umbrellas at La Tour is one of them. Shading the spacious patio, those cheerful umbrellas beckon, pledging a meal to be savored, a drink to be clinked and an evening not to be forgotten. When you’re comfortably situated at the perfect table, the difficult choices begin. Wine or cocktail? The answer is clear: Why not both? The cocktail menu offers choices from “refreshing

122 E. MEADOW DRIVE | VAIL | 970.476.4403 | LATOUR-VAIL.COM PRICE

and delicious” to “boozy and complex,” with almost every concoction featuring at least one homemade ingredient from sommelier Kainoa Guerin. Ask questions: Hearing Kai describe the care and detail taken in creating the “blue butterfly” ice cubes in the White Walker and the evolving taste experience that results is almost as good as the drink itself. Fruity and floral without being overpowering, featuring green tea-infused gin, apricot liquor and lemon cordial in addition to the striking blue ice cubes, this is one Walker that you’d not mind being caught by. The dinner menu is equally tempting.

Caviar, foie gras, lobster and oysters on the half shell remind you that every occasion can be special and indulging is what keeps life interesting. Entrées are created to satisfy almost any palate, from hand-cut steaks to panko-crusted sea bass and cast iron seafood fideuà, a Spanish paella made with vermicelli noodles and a bounty from the sea including octopus, mussels, clams and shrimp. However, sometimes it’s best to leave the decisions in the hand of the experts — choose the chef’s tasting menu. With five courses perfectly paired with the best of La Tour’s extensive wine list, this option allows you to bask in the knowledge that you’re in good hands with Executive Chef Sammy Shipman. “I get to come in and be creative,” Shipman says. “I get to be an artist.” And it’s the diners who get to enjoy his art. An heirloom tomato salad becomes a modern art masterpiece with the glowing yellow and red tomatoes and bright verjus vinaigrette; a house-made ricotta is a light, refreshing alternative to the classic mozzarella and a smoked almond granola adds a pleasant crunch. Seasonal ingredients are the stars, with Shipman sourcing produce from the Vail Farmers’ Market & Art Show when possible. A Colorado sweet corn soup is garnished with truffled popcorn and preserved truffle, its gorgeous yellow taste singing of summer. But dining at La Tour this summer also presents the opportunity to taste a blast from the past. This year celebrates two decades of Chef-Owner Paul Ferzacca

Starters $6-$29; Mains $25-$31. Chef’s tasting menu: $89-$120 •••

AMBIANCE

Approachable elegance •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Dover sole meuniere served in brown butter sauce with haricots verts

at the helm of La Tour and to celebrate, the menu features two beloved favorites every week for 20 weeks. Breaking open the pastry present that wraps the baked salmon feuille de brick, one is reminded of the penchant for en papillote that reigned in 1999 — this version is even better as it’s edible, allowing the crispy phyllo to contain the mushroom duxelles and perfectly cooked salmon. Each week features a different entrée, giving you the perfect excuse to maintain a weekly date. Those yellow umbrellas are beckoning — it’s time to indulge. • Porch Pounder with lemon zestinfused gin, tequila, lime liqueur, Chareau aloe liqueur, cucumber, basil and watermelon. top right Heirloom tomato salad with house-made cheese, basil, corn, smoked almond granola, and verjus dressing. left Black Angus Manhattan with king trumpet mushrooms, creamed spinach, potato Lyonnaise and a green peppercorn sauce. page 67 Salmon feuille de brick. top left


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FALL LINE

KITCHEN & COCKTAILS 232 BRIDGE ST. | VAIL | 970.470.4803 | FALLLINEVAIL.COM

by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ail has international taste, and that’s the same dynamic style that has helped shape Jake Burkhardt’s inspired cuisine. “With my travels around the country and the many places I have lived and worked, I compiled a menu of some of my favorite dishes, stretching all the way from steamed buns I would get in Manhattan, to Tennessee hot chicken that I would get in Nashville,” shares Burkhardt, the Executive Chef of Fall Line Kitchen & Cocktails. “It’s just a collaboration of food that I feel is really fun.” Fall Line has broad appeal, serving the same menu from lunch through dinner (along with some late-night options this summer), for those looking to grab a simple yet delicious sandwich, soup or salad, a shot and a beer or a creative craft cocktail. Fall Line has a solid reputation in town for its cocktails, and I ordered the Bee Sting. The drink is a perfectly balanced combination of fennel-polleninfused tequila blanco with Albariño wine, lemon and honey. With just about all my favorite things in one

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PRICE

Shared and starters: $8-$18; Mains and hand-tossed, artisan pizzas: $16-$22 •••

AMBIANCE

Casual neighborhood eatery and bar right on Bridge Street in Vail •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Tennessee hot chicken sandwich with pickled mustard seed slaw, vine ripe tomatoes, house-made hot sauce and Colorado honey

glass, I was in heaven as I peoplewatched from the patio overlooking Vail’s famous Bridge Street. The atmosphere at Fall Line draws you in, from the vintage ski town photographs on the wall to classic hits turned up on the speakers. Burkhardt

works with Chef de Cuisine Christian Colter to come out with bold flavors on dishes. The Tennessee hot chicken sandwich is a juicy and satisfying showstopper for sure, while the steamed buns with pork belly or shiitake mushrooms also please with every bite of pickled cucumber, radish sprouts, green onion and hoisin sauce. The lobster BLT is the best of two classic sandwiches, with bacon, lettuce and tomato embellishing a lobster roll. This summer, Fall Line will use its rotisserie for a section of the menu dedicated to succulent lamb legs and chickens. Pick-up options will also be available if you’re looking for a dinner at home or to create the perfect evening picnic. The salads are robust. Fall Line's version of a wedge salad included grilled Black Angus sirloin steak, little

gem lettuce, diced tomatoes, smoked bacon, crumbled blue cheese and a jalapeño-cilantro dressing. To share, side dishes like the grilled asparagus have a lot of flavor, along with handtossed, artisan pizzas like the Hawaiian Chicken with rotisserie chicken, grilled pineapple, red onion, mozzarella cheese and teriyaki-tomato sauce. Burkhardt says he wanted to create a concept and a menu that appeals to a wide spectrum of guests. He lets the food speak for itself, and it speaks the most delicious words. “Simple is beautiful,” says Burkhardt. “That’s the way I cook.” Save room for dessert, and try Pastry Chef Jessica Anderson’s brown butter crumble with mixed berries and cream cheese whipped cream — it’s so good you won’t want to put the spoon down. • above Grilled Steak Wedge Salad with Black Angus sirloin steak, little gem lettus, diced tomato, smoked bacon, crumbled blue cheese and a jalapeño-cilantro dressing. left Maine Lobster Roll BLT with sweet chunks of Maine lobster, lemon aioli and smoked bacon. page 64 Chicken tortilla soup.


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223 GORE CREEK DRIVE | VAIL 970.763.5470 | WHITEBISONVAIL.COM

by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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ust as every visit to Vail creates a memorable occasion, to experience White Bison is to remember how truly special a meal can be. Set on Gore Creek, this contemporary mountain grill makes it easy for guests to settle in and stay a while. Executive Chef Jake Burkhardt adds vibrant and intricate details to his cuisine, highlighting the local and seasonal ingredients that inspire him. “Summertime is about being active and enjoying the outdoors, and getting fresh, local ingredients for very bright, colorful dishes,” says Burkhardt. “We get as much locally as possible. This is a Colorado-driven

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and farm-driven menu that will reflect the season and the area.” Start with a grilled Caesar salad. A light char on the romaine wedges add beautiful contrast to the bright greens, alongside thin slices of radish, homemade croutons, pumpkin seeds, and a black garlic dressing — it’s a lovely and refreshing tribute to the classic dish. Let Wine Director Ian Gray guide your drink selections for the evening and he will only steer you right. The by-the-glass list Gray has curated is a reflection of good taste with broad appeal. He started us with flutes of Italian Prosecco that were nothing short of delightful. Gray paired a Spanish rosé for what came next, the Farmers Goat Cheese Dip with spring peas, fava beans, wild onions and grilled

sourdough. The cheese was creamy and tangy, perfectly balancing the fresh vegetable flavors and the pleasant pop of peas into every bite. BALANCED DISHES “I feel like each dish has to have balance,” explains Burkhardt. “It’s very important that you balance fat with acid, and sour with sweet. When I am creating a dish, I make sure that all those balancing elements are there so that the dish isn’t one-sided.” Don’t miss the grilled shrimp risotto, a savory and satisfying starter that could be a main dish for some, and it just shines with a glass of Albariño. Heartier appetites will swoon over the bison strip steak entrée with roasted king trumpet mushrooms, charred broccolini, huckleberries and sauce Diane, or a mouthwatering plate of grilled Black Angus ribeye, garlic rosemary smashed potatoes, glazed peas and carrots, wild arugula and whiskey butter. Gray is crazy about Tokaji, the great Hungarian sweet wine, and who can blame him? Ask for a pour with dessert, as Pastry Chef Jessica Anderson delights with gorgeous and delicious creations like a perfectly sweet and rich flourless chocolate cake. •

PRICE

Starters: $14-$22; Entrées: $24-$42 •••

AMBIANCE

Creekside mountain grill with a seasonally inspired menu •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Bison strip steak with roasted king trumpet mushrooms, charred broccolini, huckleberries and sauce Diane

Bison strip steak with roasted king trumpet mushrooms, charred broccolini,huckleberries and sauce Diane. left Farmers Goat Cheese Dip with spring peas, fava beans, wild onions and grilled sourdough, and Fried Oysters Rockefeller with garlicky creamed spinach, Pernod and house hot sauce. above

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LUDWIG'S BREAKFAST AT THE SONNENALP 20 VAIL ROAD | VAIL | 970.479.5429 | SONNENALP.COM

by KATIE COAKLEY photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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alking around Vail Village, the town’s Bavarian-inspired roots can be seen in the pitch of the roofs, the iconic paintings on several buildings and in the style of the clock tower. But to truly feel the warmth of the European hospitality on which Vail was based, a visit to the Sonnenalp is in order. Start your day off with a full heart and satisfied stomach by enjoying breakfast at Ludwig’s. The warmth of the butter-like spread of sunshine that pours through the retractable glass roof and doors that encapsulate the gem-like dining room is matched by the warmth of the traditionally clad staff as they greet you. “At the Sonnenalp, we are living that European hospitality,” says Daniel Spingler, director of food and beverage at the Sonnenalp Hotel. “It’s a very kind service and very honest and friendly. When you go to a hotel in Austria, that’s the most important thing over there, to be friendly. And it’s true, if you get greeted with a smile and good morning, it already starts off your day.” Choose to sit in the sunshine or cozy up in the alpine-inspired dining room. Several patios are also available for a leisurely meal, including a small oasis that holds only four tables but affords an enviable location adjacent to Gore Creek. After you’re comfortably seated, be sure to order a glass of freshsqueezed orange juice and begin the journey to breakfast bliss.

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CULINARY ADVENTURES You have two options: the set menu or the buffet. Peruse the breakfast menu for a composed plate of morning favorites from various cuisines, from classic omelets and huevos rancheros to Monte Cristo and Croque Monsieur (add an egg and this decadent breakfast sandwich becomes a Croque Madame). New this summer is the “Fit Menu,” a collection of items designed to accommodate almost any dietary

requirements. Choose from options like homemade Bircher muesli, an acai bowl with superfood berries, cauliflower, chia seeds and more, or the savory breakfast sandwich with spinach, egg whites, Swiss cheese and turkey on an English muffin. Each item includes the nutritional information so that you can plan for later splurges in the day. “It’s so that you can be healthy the way that you define it,” Spingler says. “In the end, whatever you like is healthy for you.” However, the jewel of Ludwig’s breakfast experience is the buffet. Wrapping almost 360 degrees around the recently expanded nook, the buffet is an adventure for every palate. Featuring a selection of both American and European items, it’s worth perusing the options so as to compose one’s plate to the full effect. Each station includes the small details that elevate the classic to exceptional. Instead of large bowls of fruit, individual servings of various berries and melon are offered in small vessels, creating a rainbow of fresh, often-replenished options. The yogurt topping selections allow for almost infinite mix-and-match combinations spanning dried fruit and gogi berries to six different types of seeds and nuts. Then there are the fresh veggies and sliced meats and cheeses along with

PRICE

A la carte breakfast: $21 per plate; European breakfast buffet: $38 •••

AMBIANCE

Ensconced in the outdoors •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The breakfast buffet

artisan bread, a staple of all European buffets, and the cakes which are changed daily. “If you stay here for five days you get a different cake every single day,” Spingler promises. That’s a challenge worth accepting. • above The

pastry table at the breakfast buffet. Monte Cristo — a fried cinnamonswirl ham, turkey and cheese sandwich with lingonberry jam — and a Croque Madam — a grilled ham and cheese sandwich topped with a fried egg. Both served on Sonnenalp's signature hand-painted china. left A


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AMBIANCE

On-mountain European chalet set amidst wildflower fields •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Herb-crusted Colorado lamb with polenta panisse, fava beans, huckleberry demi

GAME CREEK RESTAURANT GAME CREEK BOWL | VAIL MOUNTAIN | ACCESSIBLE VIA GONDOLA & SHUTTLE FROM EAGLES NEST 970.754.4275 | GAMECREEKVAIL.COM by HEATHER HOWER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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he only Forbes Four-Star restaurant in the valley, Game Creek Restaurant is tucked away on Vail Mountain, nestled beneath towering pines just below Eagle’s Nest in Game Creek Bowl. The location may feel rustic and remote but the cuisine is anything but simple. Part of the allure of this mountain restaurant is the adventure in making your way to dine: in the summer, plan on hiking or being shuttled in a four-wheel drive vehicle from the top of the Eagle Bahn Gondola. Considering the views overlooking Beaver Creek, Mount of the Holy Cross and the Vail Valley as the sun slowly dips below the horizon — the journey

is, indeed, just part of the culinary adventure. The European-style chalet’s decks, overflowing with colorsoaked blooms, encourage easing your way into the night with friends, conversation and a glass of wine. “Having earned the Wine Spectator ‘Best of Award of Excellence’ since 2015, Sommelier Josh Maclean has developed a list with many unique regions as well as classic wine terroirs, offering a myriad of selections for guests wanting a glass to a full bottle of wine,” says Jennifer Rizza, General Manager of Fine Dining at Game Creek Restaurant and The 10th. The wine list complements all that Executive Chef Dan Maguire creates nightly. He has updated the menu for summer with a variety of palate pleasers, including options for vegans and others with dietary restrictions.

A few of Maguire's new summer starters include the Summer Vegetable with turnip, squashes, cucumber, herbs, baby lettuces and ver jus featuring in-season Colorado produce; and the Prawn with chorizo, saffron grits, forest mushroom, poblano and a bit of brightness with cilantro. The Scallop entrée pairs perfectly with summer: squid ink vermicelli, smoked trout roe, fiddleheads, ugni and watercress. However, to many people the Game Creek Restaurant is synonymous with Colorado game — and the longstanding favorites of Colorado lamb, elk and Palisade peaches remain part of the menu. Dinner at Game

Creek Restaurant is a prix fixe menu with three, four or five courses. Summers are special at Game Creek Restaurant, as it brings Sunday brunch. With a selection of sweet and savory options, it's an eminently civilized way to spend a leisurely Sunday morning or early afternoon, before heading off to another adventure. • top Scallop with squid ink vermicelli, smoked trout roe, fiddleheads, ugni and watercress. above Iberico with melon, chicory, sherry and Manchego. left Summer Vegetable with turnip, squashes, cucumber, herbs, baby lettuces and ver jus.

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Prix Fixe is $99 for 3-courses, $109 for 4-courses, and $140 for 5-course Chef's Menu

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PEPI’S BAR AND RESTAURANT

231 EAST GORE CREEK 970.476.5626 | PEPIS.COM

by WILL BRENDZA photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

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hese days, sitting on Pepi’s massive patio, looking out over the bustling village streets and the upscale shops, restaurants and bars at the heart of Vail, it’s difficult to imagine — but 54 years ago, Pepi’s was the only thing on this corner of Bridge Street and Gore Creek Drive. A lot has changed since 1964. But Pepi’s Bar and Restaurant is still largely the same at its heart. Still owned and operated by Pepi and Sheika Gramshammer. Still situated on that iconic village corner. And still the embodiment of Austrian hospitality and festivity. Only now, they are internationally renowned for their wild game and tableside service, and locally adored for their Old World beer, European atmosphere and Austrian-American menu. Chef Helmut Kaschitz has been manning the helm of this legendary establishment’s kitchen for 12 years now. An Austrian himself, he came to Vail in 1997, started working for the Gramshammers in 2006 and has been fixing fine European-American cuisine at Pepi’s Bar and Restaurant ever since. “I love it,” says Chef Kaschitz, in his rhapsodic Austrian accent. “Shieka and Pepi, the owners, they take care of me and I take care of them. It works out very nicely.” In the summertime, the lunch menu is rife with sandwiches, pastas, salads and European staples like Hungarian veal goulash, Leberkase and buffalo, veal and pork bratwurst. It’s a melody of cultures, a bill of fare that spans from Austria to Germany to France, Italy, America and Mexico.

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Then, from 5:30 to 10 p.m. the dinner menu features continental and American cuisine specializing in Austrian dishes — cultural icons like jäeger schnitzel and wiener schnitzel, even wild game delights such as rack of caribou and roasted venison loin. “Our most famous dish is the wiener schnitzel,” says the chef, describing the juicy veal cutlet with a tender fondness. Served with roasted new potatoes and summer vegetables, it’s a truly savory throwback to its Old-World,

High-Country origins. “Everybody is familiar with the wiener schnitzel — and it’s my favorite as well, by the way. So you cannot go wrong with that.” Lighter dishes, such as pan-seared salmon with lentils, and a variety of salads, will please summer palates, too. Throughout the summer, diners can enjoy meals outside on the massive patio, under the shaded awning area or inside the main dining room. The bar area is also a great place to relax, brew in hand and watch the constant foot traffic of Bridge Street pass by. Pepi’s Bar and Restaurant offers daily specials for both lunch and dinner, too. It is a day-to-day spotlight of unique dishes and time-tested favorites. “We have two menu boxes out front, usually hanging there by 10 a.m.” says Kaschitz. “So the people who are walking by know exactly what the soup of the day is, what the lunch special is and what the dinner special is.” So, when you’re wandering through the heart of Vail, looking for a culinary adventure and you come upon that European-style yellow and black building just south of the covered bridge, look no further. Pepi’s has what you’re looking for — and probably even more. •

PRICE

Lunch – Soups: $7-$9; Salads: $13-$18; Sandwiches/ Hamburgers: $13-$16; Mains: $13-$19 Dinner – Appetizers: $17; Salads: $13-$18; Mains: $22-$42 •••

AMBIANCE

Traditional Austrian restaurant and bar, featuring European and American cuisine, wild game specialties and live entertainment •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Wiener Schnitzel

above Pan-seared left

salmon with beluga lentils. Classic apple strudel.


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•••

AMBIANCE

Refined and inviting setting where the European Alps meet the Rocky Mountains •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Colorado lamb chops with crispy polenta, foraged mushroom duxelle, au jus

GESSNER by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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hen there’s a new restaurant in town, curious diners first explore the establishment’s menus and descriptions to observe its pronounced identity, special offerings or unique flavor. I suspect Conrad Gessner did similar investigations in the Alps in the 15th century when he caught wind of a new plant. He likely pondered the simplest questions initially: What is it called? What does it look like? How does it feel? Nearly 500 years later, one of Vail’s newest restaurants carries inspiration from its namesake, Gessner, who was a Swiss physician and naturalist, among other things. From the intricate details and bold flavors on Executive Chef Jay Spickelmier's lobster crostini, to the hearty and delightful Colorado lamb chops, the modern play on Gessner’s legacy honors the beautiful and intricate elements of the European Alps that have become ever-present in this Rocky Mountain region. Located within the new Hotel Talisa west of Vail Village, this restaurant is one to be discovered and shared with the world. The menu is rooted in French classical cuisine, yet brought to life with innovative renditions in every dish. “We’re taking what has been done very

HOTEL TALISA | 1300 WESTHAVEN DRIVE | VAIL HOTELTALISA.COM | 970.479.1538

well for a long time and continuing with those traditions,” says Spickelmier. “As well as having our own little personal touch, and finding influence and inspiration from local ingredients and our surroundings.” The smoked pheasant soup — a delicious representation of rustic elegance — pairs perfectly with a glass of Jordan chardonnay. For a lighter start to your meal, the spinach and beet salad includes farm-fresh beets from The Farm at Knapp Ranch, along with cipollini onions and a mustard tarragon vinaigrette. Alongside the vibrant salad, a pour of Whispering Angel French rosé invites the earthy beets to really shine. Entrées range from light and bright to rich and savory, with options like the seared rainbow trout with braised endive and English peas, and Colorado lamb chops, served with crispy polenta, foraged mushroom duxelles and au jus. And from Russian River to Burgundy, the restaurant’s wine-by-the-glass list offers a range of international tastes. The entire wine list, which runs several pages, has been carefully curated by Assistant Director of Food and Beverage Adam Lewis and his team. Leave room for an order of White Chocolate Cheesecake. It’s creamy and decadent enough to create its own legacy. And much like the dishes from each previous course, every bite creates another reason to remember Gessner. ” •

top Lobster crostini with avocado, tomato, corn, lemon tarragon and creme fraiche. above Pan-seared duck breast with sautéed stone fruit, roasted salsify, black pepper and

juniper berry wine reduction and the Tahone Margarita. page 66 Artisan charcuturie and Colorado cheese board.

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First Bites: $11-$32; Entrées: $18-$64

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THE 10th TOP OF GONDOLA ONE MID-VAIL | 970.754.1010 THE10THVAIL.COM

by HEATHER HOWER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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here aren’t many fine-dining restaurants that welcome those not dressed to the nines. However, The 10th makes a friendly exception to that rule. The airy and bright restaurant, located just steps from the top of Gondola One at Mid Vail, is an oasis from the everyday. The restaurant welcomes those who don mountain bike gear right alongside those who prefer pumps to Patagonia. Earn your meal with a mountain bike ride up the mountain right to The 10th’s front door. Of course, there’s always the option to swoosh up the mountain via Gondola One from the base of Vail. The sunny deck feels worlds away from the hustle and bustle below. The restaurant itself is a nice diversion from the more typical cabins that dot the mountains… the mountain modern design goes hand in hand with the carefully curated menu. Executive Chef Tim McCaw is a Vail Resorts veteran, and he brought a fresh outlook when he migrated to The 10th a few years ago. “This will be Chef Tim’s third summer at The 10th, and he has brought a new perspective and elevation for the menu with him,” says Jennifer Rizza, General Manager of Fine Dining for Game Creek Restaurant and The 10th. Be ready for an elevated experience — and not just because it’s set at 10,250

feet. There’s little as special as gazing out the floor-to-ceiling windows; the Gore Range stunning in the distance, a bright blue Colorado sky overhead. Or settle in on the expansive outdoor patio, perusing the extensive wine list for a glass or bottle that complements the alpine-inspired menu. Small and shared plates offer a glimpse into Chef McCaw’s repertoire from decadent truffle fries to Bangs Island mussels that are melt-in-your-mouth delicious. Lunch is both creative and delicious with Chef McCaw’s creations. Though he’s got a solid menu of favorites, he has a few more delicious additions in store this summer including the porciniscented quail. The delicate bird is served with a medley of crisp-tender vegetables including beet greens, roast cauliflower and baby carrots in a light sauce. For those who prefer a sandwich, Rizza has a recommendation: “The 10th’s culinary promise is modern, alpine-inspired, and the Chicken

Bruschetta is all of that: grilled chicken topped with fontina cheese, crispy prosciutto, a fried basil leaf, and balsamic reduction, served open-faced over house-made focaccia bread. Yum!” Take a relaxing afternoon to enjoy the views at The 10th, with the upscale, chill atmosphere and menu with ingredients that shine. •

PRICE

Appetizers: $14-$26 Entrées: $19-$32 •••

AMBIANCE

Upscale and chill •••

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The 10th has scenic views of Vail Mountain, from the sophisticated dining room or sunny summer deck. above Burrata Salad with Parma ham, artisan greens, balsamic vinaigrette, dates, roasted cipollini jam and crostini. left Salmon Carpaccio from summer 2017 — new this year, try the Loch Etive Steelhead Trout variation. top

SIGNATURE DISH

Handcrafted Lobster Raviolis with soy beans, charred corn, roasted mushrooms, butter-poached lobster and tarragon beurre monte


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EAGLES NEST VIA EAGLE BAHN GONDOLA | VAIL MOUNTAIN 970.754.4530 | VAIL.COM

by HEATHER HOWER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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owever you make your way to the top of Vail Mountain, just make sure you get there… and get there with a blazing appetite to be quenched at Bistro Fourteen in Eagle’s Nest. It’s not every day you can sit on top of the world and be spoiled with libations, views, a gastro pub-type menu and homemade desserts. Bistro Fourteen is home base for all the mountaintop fun: Epic Discovery is steps away, biking, hiking and running trails are just beyond that; come Friday and Saturday afternoons the place is positively rocking with happy hour, live music and shenanigans. The restaurant, with high-altitude outdoor seating, provides sustenance and with Chef de Cuisine Connor Metevier at the helm, is also a perfect final destination. Metevier has worked under chefs that were classically French trained as well as others who had modern visions. His unique background allows him to bring bold pops of flavor to the menu. His goal? To build beautiful plates that are colorful, full of flavor with contemporary twists on fan favorites. Metevier can’t stop smiling as he talks about the menu. A relative newcomer to

PRICE

Appetizers: $14-$18 Entrées: $21-$28 •••

AMBIANCE

Family-friendly mountain casual dining •••

SIGNATURE DISH

any of the Petite Sweets desserts

Vail, he’s learning the ropes and even comes up with specials on his arduous commute to work — come to find out the 5-minute gondola ride from Lionshead to Eagle’s Nest is the perfect time to ruminate and create. Can a chef ever pick a favorite? Probably not, but Metevier raves about the Lamb Rueben: a lovely twist on the corned-beef stand by with housemade lamb pastrami, braised red cabbage, dill havarti, spicy horseradish mustard on pumpernickel. He’s also a fan of the watermelon caprese. The melon is marinated in ginger beer, then

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compressed, ensuring an intensely juicy and flavorful experience. Served with creamy, savory burrata, it’s a mix of sweet and salty. Though Bistro Fourteen serves a mean burger, try the grilled portabella sandwich with goat cheese spread, arugula and truffle aioli. The Bistro Summer Salad offers mixed greens, grilled peach vinaigrette and buffalo feta. And it, it must be said, it pairs perfectly with a Berry Picker cocktail. After you’ve eaten your apps and main course, wander outside, sit by the firepit, take in the view of the Mount of the Holy Cross, comment on the crazies who have run or hiked up the Berry Picker and head back inside for Pastry Chef Anne Armstrong’s decadently delicious desserts. Armstrong has been with Vail Resorts for

almost 15 years. We should all be grateful she switched careers from engineering to pastry cheffing. The Petite Sweets are generally sold as trios, which makes it slightly easier to decide how to end the meal. You might see Armstrong wandering the farmers markets on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Pay attention to what she selects because she gets insider information from the farmers on what is best and freshest… then she incorporates that into her sweet treats. That’s what Bistro Fourteen is all about: sweet, fresh, bold eats every day of the week. Bistro 14 is open 7 days a week from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; open for dinner Friday and Saturday nights. Take the Eagle Bahn Gondola from Lionshead. • Bistro Summer Salad with grilled peach vinaigrette, buffalo feta, pickled red onions, heirloom cherry tomatoes and watermelon radish with a Berry Picker cocktail. left Balsamic-marinated grilled portabella sandwich with goat cheese spread, arugula, heirloom tomato and truffle aioli with handcut fries. above

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GRILL ON THE GORE VAIL GOLF CLUB | 1775 SUNBURST DRIVE | VAIL 970.477.5277 | GRILLONTHEGORE.COM

by HEATHER HOWER photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

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ith a tremendous outdoor patio that has spectacular views of the Gore Range as well as the manicured greens of the Vail Golf Course, Grill on the Gore is the sort of summertime spot everybody wants to discover. And at the restaurant, it's all about an elevated experience: not the altitude, the attitude of Executive Chef David Sanchez. “Everything on the menu has a twist or is elevated,” he says. “We’re a full-service scratch restaurant with original recipes.” He adds that the staff focuses on how to take dishes to the next level, elevating the recipes. It’s a typical case of the sum is greater than the parts. The ingredients are sourced as locally as possibly, whether it’s honey from Berthoud, microgreens from Edwards or even peach wood for the smoker from Grand Junction (more on that in a bit). In addition to using the freshest ingredients, the flavors really shine with the chef’s secret seasoning blend that enhances the flavor of everything from

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PRICE

Starters: $8-$15; Soups, salads & sandwiches: $5-$17. •••

AMBIANCE

Warm and welcoming clubhouse •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Anything from the smoker

French fries to heirloom tomatoes. Sanchez is fully hands-on. He has a special place in his repertoire for smoked meats — and this summer diners get to revel in his experience. A brand new, custom-made smoker was delivered in late spring. The beast sits adjacent to the course and will be fired up to smoke everything from whole pigs to brisket, bacon and sausage to prime rib, salmon, trout and even chicken wings. Sanchez can even host a crawfish boil right there. Dive into the Smoked Pork Belly BLT for a glimpse into the smoky deliciousness; it’s sandwiched between thick slices of sourdough bread, meaty slabs of tomato, avocado aioli and lettuce. The side of fries is a terrific ride-along. Non-meat eaters can rejoice in the Clubhouse Salad—a hearty mix of greens, strawberries, goat cheese (from a farm in Buena Vista), avocado, candied pecans, dressed in a zingy, bright champagne vinaigrette. While the greens are locally sourced, soon they will be from even closer to home: right off the patio. Sanchez tilled the soil and soon there will come to be a bounty of veggies and herbs: kohlrabi, strawberries, raspberries, a variety of lettuce, chiles, peppers, tomatoes, beets and squash. “We’ll expand the garden once we know what grows well here,” Sanchez adds. “We focus on farm, or garden, to

table. It’s artisan-type cuisine.” It’s not only about using the best, highest-quality ingredients, it’s also about having a passionate staff, Sanchez says. “We have conversations in the kitchen about the quality we are putting out. Everybody’s passionate about what they are doing,” he shares. The lovingly crafted food beckons, as does the friendly ambiance. And although it’s set on the Vail Golf Course, it’s certainly not only for golfers. Families, bikers, hikers, Segway riders — all are welcome. The wedding and banquet facility can hold 160 guests and is available for corporate events, parties and weddings. The restaurant opens at 11 a.m. through early dinner. • Peachwood smoked pork belly B.L.T. on sourdough with ancho aoili and the V.G.C. Signature Lemonade with wild blueberry and mint. left Prime beef ribeye from Creekstone Farms with parsnip mash and Bee Squared honey horesradish demi. above


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WESTSIDE CAFE by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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t always seems like the right time for a Big Ass Bloodie from Westside Cafe. From breakfast through dinner, this local eatery in West Vail has everything you need to fuel up for a big day, recover from a bigger night or keep you nourished breakfast, lunch or dinner. So back to those Bloody Marys… these delectable drinks are served in a large glass goblet to make your meal feel like a party from the start, properly accompanied with a sidecar of Fat Tire Amber Ale. Try the Westside, the Bacon or the Spicy, all with their own flair and a full skewer of goodies — you’ll think it’s all you need for breakfast. As your morning appetite grows, dive into the Benedict menu without hesitation. Westside is known for its bennies, and offers almost a dozen renditions. You can even mix and match between them. Try the Bison Tenderloin on an English muffin with poached eggs and béarnaise, or really reach for delicious with an order of the Chicken & Waffles Benedict. Westside is known for Cap-N-Crunch French Toast — made from a secret cinnamon batter that coats brioche bread, but try the Monkey Bread French

2211 NORTH FRONTAGE ROAD WEST | VAIL 970.476.7890 | WESTSIDECAFE.NET

Toast, including caramel and cream cheese frosting, along with berries and house whipped cream. But those craving something more demure can opt for something from the Healthy Start menu as well, which includes vegetarian and vegan options full of quinoa protein and topped with avocado. LUNCH & DINNER Though breakfast is truly epic, the restaurant stays lively throughout lunch and dinner. Like all things Westside, you’ve got solid standards, like wings, beef burgers and sandwiches that run the gamut from meatloaf to blackened snapper— but there are also some fun twists and turns. Bacon-wrapped tater tots, anyone? Butternut squash hummus, spicy shrimp and blue cheese grits, a Greek burger made of beef and lamb, topped with feta — there are lots of creative options throughout. Befitting its place in a health-minded community, the salads are abundant and sustaining, some embellished with seared ahi tuna, teriyaki salmon or grilled chicken. And the noodle bowls are full of brothy goodness. With such a deep menu, it’s easy to get swept up in the sheer magnitude of options. But at its core, Westside is a neighborhood cafe, opening at 7 a.m.

and feeding people all day long until 9:30 p.m. Casual, upbeat and energetic, it’s a fun place any time of day. • Seared Tuna and Chili Salad with cucumber ribbons and mango slices tossed in a cilantro-ginger vinaigrette. top right The Bacon Bloody Mary made with bacon-infused vodka, candied bacon and Westside Bloody Mix. below Eggs Benedicts: half Caprese Eggs Benedict with house-made mozzarella, sun dried tomato, basil and balsamic syrup, and half South of the Boarder Benedict with crispy tamale cakes, pulled pork, chipotle bernaise topped with avocado, queso fresco and pico de gallo. top left

PRICE

Breakfast dishes: $9-$17; Lunch and Dinner dishes: $8-$28 •••

AMBIANCE

Locals’ spot from breakfast to dinner with vintage Vail decor •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Chicken & Waffles Eggs Benedict with poached eggs, fried chicken, sweet potato wafflettes and chipotle béarnaise

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FLAME

AT FOUR SEASONS

ONE VAIL ROAD | VAIL FOURSEASONS.COM/VAIL/ DINING/RESTAURANTS/FLAME/ 970.477.8650

by TRACI MACNAMARA photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

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ucked inside Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail, Flame is a steak-lover’s destination, but it’s also a place to go for an elevated dining experience, whether the occasion is a first date or a family-friendly night out. With an elegant lodge-style dining room, high ceilings, and wide windows that open up to the outdoors, Flame has a classy ambiance but yet radiates the comfort of its mountain surroundings. And this summer, the restaurant is excited for Summer Après, a celebration of the beloved alpine tradition. Daily from 5 to 6 p.m. guests and locals alike are welcome to enjoy a cocktail and light bites before dinner on the restaurant’s terrace to savor the cool summer nights while taking in the beautiful views of Vail Mountain. Choose

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from among several flavor-bursting options including the Barrel Proof, which uses the Resort’s barrel pick of Russell’s Reserve. The Szechuan peppercorn syrup and lemon in this cocktail pairs especially well with the guajillo pepper jelly glazed pork belly, a savory-sweet starter that includes tender-centered pork belly bites, creamy Colorado goat cheese smoked grits and a charred tomatillo relish. The main attraction at Flame is its meaty entrées, from dry-aged ribeye and T-bone steaks to lamb chops

and the melt-in-your-mouth filet mignon. Feeling saucy? Here’s where dining at Flame becomes fun — and creative. With an array of sauces that come out as colorful as an artist’s palette, it’s possible to dip and dunk until you discover the perfect flavor combination. Customize your plate even further by choosing from a variety of house-made rubs and irresistible toppings such as the seared foie gras or the blue cheese butter, which offer additional opportunities for flavor and decadence. Exciting new takes on classic sides include the crispy Brussels sprouts kimchi and the smoked Gouda dill mac and cheese. Executive Chef Marcus Stewart remains at the helm of the Flame kitchen. “At Flame, our kitchen is like the heart that pumps life into everything we do,” says Stewart. “We have established relationships with local suppliers to bring the freshest, highest quality ingredients into our kitchen throughout the summer season.” Farm-fresh produce comes just west of Vail from Palisade, and Colorado’s own 7X Ranch and Rosen Farms supply several Wagyu steak options and the lamb chops, respectively. With its farm-to-table philosophy and sustainable approach to cuisine, Flame gives you one more reason to feel good about this dining experience—from start to finish. But don’t walk out the door without at least tasting a few sweet

PRICE

Apps: $14-$24; Entrées: $38-$75, for the ultimate Colorado experience, the 7X Ranch Wagyu steaks: $105-$300 •••

AMBIANCE

Modern mountain steakhouse •••

SIGNATURE DISH

18-ounce 7X Wagyu NY strip steak

bites. The Reese's Bar with concord grape sorbet and peanut butter creme anglaise is a standout among Flame’s desserts, with its light layers of berry cake and mousse topped with a crunchy peanut brittle exterior. The Flame atmosphere is refined, and very fun, which makes it an inviting place to come after an adventure-filled day — and linger beyond sunset in the company of good food, family and friends. • A display of Flame’s steaks and chops. Broiled Octopus Kabayaki with grilled scallions, aji panca and gochujang aioli. above left


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THE REMEDY BAR

ONE VAIL ROAD | FOUR SEASONS RESORT AND RESIDENCES VAIL FOURSEASONS.COM/VAIL/DINING/LOUNGES/THE_REMEDY_BAR/ 970.477.8600

by KIM FULLER photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON and DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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t might be the elevated energy, or the terrific patio views of Vail Mountain. Maybe it’s that perfect burger, or the relaxation that takes over when it’s happy hour at Four Seasons Vail. There’s just something about The Remedy that makes everyone feel good, creating the best kind of contagion between locals and visitors, families and friends. “One of the best things about The Remedy is our varying seating which allows us to accommodate everyone and every type of party,” says Aaron Ritrovato, Remedy Bar Manager. "The Remedy patio is the ideal spot this summer with fantastic views of Vail Mountain and to take in the wonderful Colorado sunshine.” It’s a perfect setting to pair with a craft cocktail. Director of Beverage Steven Teaver recommends the The Caraway Sour. The drink is made with caraway seeds, grapefruit, aquavit and egg white. “To me, this concoction really reminds me of summertime,” Teaver says. “It’s light and refreshing — ideal to sip on The Remedy patio. And the caraway seeds plays well with citrus.” One of the bar’s newest food menu additions is the Green Chile & Boulder Chèvre Dip, with a combination of caramelized onions, green chile and toasted miche that makes for a satisfying snack to share. Beer drinkers will enjoy a draft of Tivoli German-style lager, paired with an order of the pretzel charcuterie — complete with house-made pickles and mustards, an impressive spread of charcuterie and a Bavarian pretzel. Bite into a single, double or triple patty of The Remedy’s signature burger, and your expectations for this savory classic will be forever elevated. The burger is prepared using locally sourced Colorado wagyu beef from 7X Ranch, and enhanced with a secret sauce called the “cure-all.” For a lighter option that still has big flavor, the Skuna Bar Salmon Burger is topped with a red curry aioli and an excellent Asian slaw. Be sure to save some room for the best liquid dessert around, the Remedy Haute Chocolate — made with melted Swiss chocolate, marshmallow and chantilly cream. When you’re in the mood for indoor entertainment, The Remedy has sports viewing opportunities and live music throughout the season. Saturdays are

A spread of The Remedy's offerings including Bi Bim Bap, Spicy Tuna Bowl, Pretzel Charcuterie, Bison Flatbread Pizza, Truffled Goat Cheese Flatbread Pizza, and the V and Old Fashioned cocktails. left The "V" made with Breckenridge vodka, lemon, blueberry, St. Germain and Veuve Clicquot. above

PRICE

Share Plates, Soups and Salads: $14 - $24; Pizzas and Mains: $16 - $26 •••

AMBIANCE

Hip bar and lounge with upscale bites •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Remedy Burger made with 7x Ranch Wagyu beef

Speakeasy nights at the bar, but you’ll have to stay in “the know” on the The Remedy’s Facebook page for special instructions on how to enter the party. Especially after a late night, there’s no better way to celebrate the weekend than a dose of The Remedy’s Munchie Brunchie, offered on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. •

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Small plates, sushi and sashimi: $6-$34 Specialties and Entrées: $12-$50 •••

AMBIANCE

New-style Japanese cuisine in a modern setting with panoramic mountain views and an expansive outdoor patio •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Ask for the seasonally inspired chef’s creation for the freshest, most creative dish of the day

MATSUHISA VAIL by TRACI J. MACNAMARA photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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n the second level of Solaris Plaza, Matsuhisa Vail is perched up high like a bird’s nest with a wall of windows that exposes panoramic views of Vail mountain’s greening slopes and lime-colored aspen leaves glinting gold in evening light. Not much could top a dining atmosphere this charmed, but when the food and drinks start flowing from the kitchen, you’ll discover that each plate one-ups the last until you’re taking a final bite beneath the star-filled sky. Matsuhisa Vail is masterminded by celebrity chef Nobu Matsuhisa, who’s best known for his Peruvianinfluenced Japanese cuisine with fusion techniques. Head Kitchen Chef Brian Busker and Head Sushi Chef Munetoshi Taira bring Nobu Matsuhisa’s vision to life at Matsuhisa Vail, where you’ll want to begin your summer dining experience

141 EAST MEADOW DRIVE | SOLARIS | VAIL 970.476.6628 | MASTUHISAVAIL.COM

with some drinks and small plates to awaken the senses. Standout sippers include the Gardener, a green-hued gin cocktail that creates a tangy sensation with its serrano pepper, cilantro, ginger and lime; and the Matsutini, a vodka-based beauty with the mild, fruity flavors of passion fruit and yuzu citrus. Both of these pair well with a favorite new-style signature sashimi, the thinly sliced yellowtail that’s drizzled with sesame oil and yuzu soy sauce, and served with fresh cilantro and raw jalapeño slices that get the taste buds fired up for what comes next. SUSHI, SAKE AND SUN Much of the Matsuhisa menu lends itself to a family-style dining experience, so embrace the opportunity to mix, match, explore and share. While only about one-third of Matsuhisa’s menu is devoted to sushi and sushi rolls, these things are certainly among what’s done best, and when you’re relaxing after a sunfilled day, a sampling of sushi and chilled sake that arrives in a frozen bamboo stalk goes down so smoothly. For a taste of Chef Matsuhisa’s Peruvian influences, try the Tiradito Roll that’s filled with tempura shishito pepper and fresh avocado, and topped with fresh cilantro, yuzu citrus juice, tiradito white fish, and dots of spicy rocoto

chili paste that add a surprising and unexpected flavor to the sushi scene. “We’re a place where we take the time to get to know guests and their expectations,” says General Manager Jordan Harrill. “We work with you to curate an experience that matches your individual tastes with the best ingredients and best flavor combinations possible.” With this mindset, Matsuhisa Vail becomes accessible for everyone. No fish? Nothing raw? No problem. Salads, tempura, lamb, chicken, and beef are all here, in addition to fish, in abundant supply. And for those who might want to venture into new terrain, several menu items are lightly seared, a practice that both brings out new flavors and makes them more accessible to

those who don’t usually go for raw meat. No matter which direction you choose to explore, bring the table back together with a dessert everyone will love: a volcano-shaped mound of fluffy shave ice covering a vanilla ice cream core that’s drizzled with passion fruit puree and crème anglaise. • top Matsuhisa-Style Sashimi Quartet with, clockwise from front, Wild King Salmon New Style, Yellowtail Jalapeño, Kinmedai Dry Miso Uni and Japanese Wild Golden Eye Snapper, and Scallop Wasabi Salsa. above Sake-steamed sea bass, crusted with dried miso and finished with garlic chips, yuzu juice and olive oil. left Roasted cauliflower dressed with jalapeño vinaigrette, topped with red onion jalapeño salsa.


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352 E. MEADOW DRIVE | VAIL MOUNTAIN LODGE | VAIL 970.476.6836 | TERRABISTROVAIL.COM

VAIL

by HEATHER HOWER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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t 26, Terra Bistro is the triedand-true cool older sister of Vail’s dining scene. Serving globally inspired seasonal American cuisine, the restaurant is located in the Vail Mountain Lodge. It’s one of Vail’s more established restaurants, but it’s not staid or set in its ways. The open dining room layout, pops of wall art and modern bar area is mountain contemporary — but not too cool for anyone from rock climbers to, say, the grand-dame of Vail. It also happens to be one of the last stops on the way to Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater — a worthy stop for its popular Happy Hour and magical elixirs created by the talented bar staff, led by Beverage Director Jessica Rethman. Keep an eye on the time: You would hate to miss the show… or would you? Sidle up to the bar and try to ignore your inner savignon blanc fanatic. Let fate take over your taste buds. Admittedly some of the ingredients in the cocktails sound like they don’t “go together.” Oh they do. The Kombucharita combines kombucha with pepper-infused tequila for a healthy drink with a serious kick. If time is short, order a few items from the Happy Hour menu — specially priced smaller plates with just as much flavor as entrées. It’s a perfect way to get a sample of all that the kitchen can

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create, and makes sharing easier too. Chef-Owner Kevin Nelson’s dishes have layers of flavors and textures that work together to invigorate the palate. Case in point: the coriander-rubbed Ahi that comes with rice “Terra Tots,” the creamy rice fried to perfection, offering

a beautiful contrast to the crisp-tender vegetables. Not just delicious, but nourishing, too. And his sweet corn soup studded with chunks of lobster is a beautiful homage to summer, the coconut milk broth uplifted with just enough spice.

PRICE

Starters: $11-$18; Entrées: $33-$42 •••

GLOBAL INSPIRED SEASONAL AMERICAN CUISINE It’s not by accident that Terra Bistro serves healthy fare; it goes hand in hand with the mission of the health club and spa on the lower level. And although the restaurant takes organic products and sustainability seriously, both Nelson and Executive Chef Shawn Miller are big on whimsy. “I have a big passion for flavor profiles,” Chef Miller says. “It’s hard to come up with a dish that no one else came up with before,” he says. He’s managed quite nicely with the ricotta ravioli with asparagus, the pillows of pasta handmade with a citrus lemon ending — decadent but definitely not heavy. As with all of the items on the menu, the flavors celebrate the season. If Vail has a place to see and be seen — it’s Terra Bistro. Luckily, it offers so much more than a cool vibe. If you didn’t make it before the show, make sure to stop in after… you just don’t want to miss this restaurant.

AMBIANCE

Inviting village bistro for a casual bite or upscale meal •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Coriander-rubbed Ahi "everything" stir fry with tamari vinaigrette and fried rice tots  

Breakfast is offered throughout the summer. Happy Hour runs from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Dinner offered from 5 p.m. to close. • Asparagus and ricotta manti ravioli with lemon brown butter, pinenuts and pecorino left Sweet corn soup with lobster, coconut milk, chili oil, micro basil. page 66 Gyukatsu, or chicken fried Wagyu. above

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141 EAST MEADOW DRIVE #113 | SOLARIS | VAIL | 970.476.5300 | BOLVAIL.COM

by WILL BRENDZA photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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here’s a place where extraordinary entertainment and exceptional dining come rolling to an intersection, right in the heart of Vail. At once it is a sleek, modern restaurant, serving flavors from around the world and it is also Vail’s worldclass bowling alley. Bōl, tucked against the east side of Solaris Plaza, has been a favorite in the Vail Village for 10 years and counting. And it is expanding. Between a new extended liquor license that covers the Solaris green and a recent partnership with bōl’s neighbors upstairs at Vail Brewing Company, bōl’s presence in Solaris is snowballing.

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PRICE

Now, in the summertime, you can enjoy a drink from bōl’s broad specialty cocktail menu anywhere on the oval turf at the center of Solaris Plaza. Play a round of bocce ball, ladder ball, corn hole or any number of other lawn games, order a bucket of beer and kick back to enjoy some High Country sunshine. Or, if you wander into Vail Brewing (directly upstairs from bōl) and feel famished for a flavorful bite to eat, you can now order directly from the kitchen downstairs. Bōl’s abbreviated bar menu is an exceptional complement to the local craft flavors flowing out of Vail Brewing’s Solaris tap house, such as the fried calamari embellished with pico de gallo. But, naturally, the best place to enjoy the food of bōl is at the restaurant

itself. Whether you’re inside their slick metropolitan-styled dining area or outside on the cobbled patio, it’s a voguish experience worth soaking up. “All summer long our patio’s open and our umbrellas are up,” promises Executive Chef Paula Turner, the craftswoman behind the diverse and innovative world-menu. DIVERSE MENU Spanning the breadth between culture and cuisine, bōl’s menu is an adventure from top to bottom, with something for everyone. Chef Paula uses local ingredients wherever she can, tapping into her relationship with local farmers in Gypsum for fresh produce and using beef from Eaton Ranch in Edwards. You’ll find some tried and true favorites such as the crispy confit chicken wings, the honey-glazed baby back ribs and the colorful, flavorful deviled eggs. But when you’re dining at bōl, half of the experience is in trying something new, something perhaps even out of the ordinary. The banh mi takes Vietnamese staple street fare to another level of culinary creativity. Stacked high with Taylor ham, pickled vegetables, fresh jalapeños, radish sprouts and cilantro, it’s a quilt of hearty flavors, acerbic essences and just a hint of piquancy. The summer squash gratine is hard to beat, though. Lightly breaded green and yellow squash comes with marinated tomatoes, fontina cheese and sprinkled with Grana Padano cheese. It is summer personified,

Snacks and shareables: $5-$18; Starters: $8-$18; Pizzas and mains: $18-$65 •••

AMBIANCE

Trendy, energetic dining experience with world-class bowling. •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Bōl Banh Mi; Summer Squash Gratine

served in a sizzling cast iron skillet. “It’s a vegetarian dish, and it is really delicious right now,” says Chef Turner. Of course, when you’re finished enjoying bōl’s world-inspired menu and you’ve had your fill of sunshine, lawn games and signature cocktails out on the Solaris green, there’s still an essential piece of the bōl experience yet to be had. Follow the elated shouts, and the percussive music of crashing pins back, through and beyond the dining room to their world-class 10-lane bowling alley. It is the perfect high-energy finale to this popular dining experience. • Deviled Eggs 3 Ways: dill and caviar, wasabi and scallion, tomato and smoked pimento. top right From left to right: Spicy Margarita, Mother's Mercy and Coco Loco. left Fish Tacos with seared striped bass, cabbage, avocado vinaigrette, pico de gallo and cilantro crema. top left


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THE FITZ BAR & RESTAURANT T

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MANOR VAIL LODGE 595 EAST VAIL VALLEY DRIVE | VAIL 970.476.4959 | THEFITZVAIL.COM

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by MELANIE WONG photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

ucked in the Manor Vail property on the far east end of Vail’s Golden Peak area, The Fitz is not a restaurant that diners would accidentally stumble upon. However, once discovered, this hidden gem nestled up against the Gore Creek and the Betty Ford Alpine Gardens is a spot that diners will return to again and again. Mountain ambiance? Check. Views of the creek and mountains? Check. Fresh Colorado ingredients, a killer deck and a unique, dynamic menu? Check, check and check. The restaurant is particularly popular with concert-goers before heading to the Ford Amphitheater, which is why Executive Chef Ken Butler created a number of light bites and appetizers perfect for sharing. “The idea behind the menu was to create shared apps that can be enjoyed with friends,” he says. For example, dig your fork into the show-stopping Brussels sprouts, deep-fried, mixed with pancetta, shishito peppers, bright pickled radish wedges and smothered in a sweet, reduced balsamic dressing. The dish was a surprise hit with guests. “This was one of those situations where we thought this was just the proper way to prepare a pretty standard dish, but people absolutely love it,” he says. Or, go lighter with the classic Italian panzanella salad, rife with

.

PRICE

$4-$26 •••

AMBIANCE

Creekside, locally sourced dining in a casual atmosphere •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Wild mushroom risotto, with a poached egg, arugula and Parmigiano

chunks of burrata cheese, oliveoil-soaked cubes of bread, crisp greens and herbs straight from the restaurant’s garden plot out back. It’s hard not to feel like you’re getting something uniquely Colorado at The Fitz, a sense that’s created with rustic, colorful dishes that focus on using locally sourced ingredients. You’ll taste veggies from the Western Slope, herbs from the garden, and meats and cheeses that come from within the state whenever possible. This shines in The Fitz’s entrées, such as with the tender elk medallions, served on a bed of parsnip puree and drizzled with a carefully crafted demi glaze. Or, get a taste of wild mushrooms with the incredibly satisfying mushroom risotto, a decadent dish topped with a softpoached egg (don’t forget to mix it in), Parmesan cheese and spicy arugula.

The Fitz’s creative streak and love for fresh ingredients even extends to its drinks. Anyone who enjoys cocktails would be remiss if they didn’t try Bar and Restaurant Manager Taryn Miletti’s sous vide concoctions. Using this waterbath method typically used to cook food, Miletti infuses spirits like rum, tequila and mezcal with herbs and berries. The result is incredibly flavorful, brightly colored liquors that can be served on the rocks with a spritz of lime. You’ll notice that even a drink or an appetizer at The Fitz invites you to experience something unique, and that’s by design. “We try to create a sense of place, to create a story,” Butler explains. “This spot has been in Vail forever. We could have turned this into something super modern, but instead we’ve chosen to bring people back to what Colorado was. We’ve got Vail Mountain on one side and Gore Creek on the other, so it’s a pretty inspiring spot.” • Elk medallions atop parsnip puree. Wild mushroom risotto. left Panzanella with burrata, greens and herbs with a Summer Daze cocktail. page 63 Drunken Mango cocktail. top

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TAVERN ON THE SQUARE LIONSHEAD VILLAGE | 970.754.7704 | THEVAILCOLLECTION/TAVERN-ON-THE-SQUARE

PRICE

Munchies & Shares: $16-26 Mains: $13-39 •••

AMBIANCE by HEATHER HOWER photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY & JONATHAN HUFFMAN

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avern on the Square sits at the base of the Eagle Bahn Gondola, adjacent to the opulent Arrabelle Hotel. This means the chefs are just as adept at creating a casual, filling meal for a hungry mountain biking clan, or a plate refined enough for a 50th-year anniversary celebration. Chef Paul Wade and his team are up to the task. And since it’s right at the base of the gondola, it calls to diners and drinkers alike, with cozy outdoor sofas surround-

ing a fire pit for late-in-the-evening soirées along with tables with bright umbrellas. The cozy interior has a highalpine feel, with loads of natural light from the open bar and large windows. Chef Wade hails from California and has led the charge in kitchens in Vail, Aspen, Beaver Creek and Maui. While he’s frequently recognized for his work from Food & Wine, Zagat and more, here at home, diners care less about his credentials and more about his inventive plates made with unusual ingredients. HIT LIST The Tavern on the Square comes to life as the sun comes up with breakfast offerings

for those who want to tackle the trails, as well as those who prefer a leisurely affair. Smoothies with kale, spirulina, bee pollen, chia or ginseng add zing to the morning. Or settle in with almond and orange brioche French toast with spiced apricots and Marcona almonds. For those of us who prefer happy hour, settle in with the Ginger Fresh, made with Ketel One cucumber vodka, ginger, lemon, mint and simple syrup. Try it with something on the fun appetizer list, which includes fried octopus, salumi, flatbreads and a variety of poutine options. We highly recommend the wild boar quesadilla, meltin-your-mouth tender and surprisingly light with a kick of spicy sofrito and touch of sweetness from Dolomite pine syrup. Feeling demure? Opt for the boldly colorful summer tomato salad with burrata, basil and pickled vegetables. The Island Poke Bowl is both light and filling, the sticky rice topped with kimchi, squid salad, edamame and more, followed by your choice of protein — ahi tuna, unagi eel, crispy tofu, beef, octopus or salmon. Or stick to local cuisine, and go for the grilled Colorado bass resting on a bed of succotash, brightened with an herb salad. In deference to changing palates and numerous restricted diets, the Tavern offers gluten-free sauces along with a robust vegan menu. The salads are hearty enough for a full meal but the Impossible Burger is giving cows a run for their money. Created from David Chang’s heme coconut, potato and wheat

Upscale yet casual mountainside bar and restaurant •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Island Poke Bowl with fresh ahi tuna, sticky rice, kimchi, chili mango salsa, pickled ginger and choice of protein

vegan burger, it comes with arugula, tomatoes, pickled onions and jardinière. The menu has plenty of options but doesn’t feel overwhelming. It’s dreamy to sit at the base of the mountain, watching bikers and hikers play on the trails as the sun sets, sipping a cocktail and listening to a waiter share their recommendations. Come with friends and family so you can try a bit of everything — but save room for the s’mores taco… way beyond the campfire fare. • Island Poke Bowl with ahi tuna, sticky rice, kimchi, kaiware, sensei squid salad, cucumber, wakame, edamame, crispy glass noodles and sesame-peanut dressing. top right S'mores Taco with Felchlin chocolate waffle, toasted marshmallow ice cream, graham cracker whipped cream and chocolate sauce. bottom left Summer Tomato Salad with local heirloom tomatoes, burrata, pickled vegetables, kitchen basil, balsamic vinegar and red pepper gel. top left


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ALE HOUSE KITCHEN & TAP 2161 N FRONTAGE RD W. | 970.476.4314 | VAILALEHOUSE.COM

by KATIE COAKLEY photos by KRISTIN ANDERSON

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here are plenty of restaurants in the Vail Valley that offer elevated cuisine: think foie gras, lobster or steak, complete with white glove service. However, there are times when you simply want good food, elevated. When the urge hits for an experience that will cure what ails you, head to the Ale House Kitchen & Tap in West Vail. The name might be a slight giveaway, but the Ale House Kitchen & Tap combines a stellar beer list with a menu focusing on burgers, flatbreads, apps and other hearty fare in a warm, welcoming atmosphere with excellent service clad in t-shirts rather than gloves. The space is perfect for large groups and equally comfortable if you just want to belly up to the bar. In short — there’s something for just about everyone. Let’s start with the beverages. Craft is the word here, with both craft cocktails (martinis, mules and margaritas, to name a few) for sipping and craft beer for sampling. There are about 20 taps to consider with classic brews on the left side — the right side is reserved for whatever takes bar manager Greg Lam’s fancy. “We usually have one or two kegs and when it’s done, it’s done,” Lam explains. “It’s more seasonal, but we have fun.” The right side is where the Vail Ale House shines, offering up beers

PRICE

Soups, salads and appetizers: $7.95-$14.95; Entrées $12.95-$21.95 •••

AMBIANCE

Warm and welcoming for 2 to 200 •••

SIGNATURE DISH

The Ale House burger and a pint

from smaller breweries like New Image, Mockery and Ursula Brewing. From hazy New England-style IPAs to tart and flavorful farmhouse styles, be sure to peruse the chalkboard for your next favorite beer. Every great beverage deserves a great meal to go with it. The beauty of the Ale House’s menu is that there’s a wide range of fare, from more healthy options like the homemade hummus, four different salads (the Nuts N’ Berries, studded with strawberries and blueberries in addition to candied walnuts, goat cheese and cucumber is a favorite) and even a side of Brussels sprouts to the classically comforting bacon mac n’ cheese, your choice of burger (beef, bison or veggie)

or the Southern fried chicken sandwich — "a monster of a sandwich which has become one of the locals' favorites," enthuses Lam. Then there are the favorites like the shrimp tacos, available either grilled or Baja style, and the steak frites: perfectly cooked hangar steak, adorned with chimichurri and splayed on a bed of truffle fries. It’s a generous portion that you could share if you were feeling generous, but you might be inclined to hoard it. Looking for late-night sustenance? The Ale House Kitchen & Tap has, again, got you covered. From 10 p.m. to midnight, you can enjoy munching on select appetizers, a classic cheeseburg-

er or one of their famous flatbreads. Though Lam says the chicken pesto is probably the most popular, the fig and goat cheese is the most unique. With poached figs, crème fraiche, goat cheese and balsamic onions, dotted with fried sage, it’s a sweet and tangy nibbler that will keep you going into the wee hours. Or any time at all. • top The Ale House Burger with Pulp Fusion, a Boulder Beer. above Hummus platter with roasted tomatoes, Kalamata olives and feta, an Avery White Rascal beer and an Odell 90 Shilling beer. left The Nuts and Berries Salad with New Belgium’s Agua Fresca beer.


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PIVOT62 by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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f you live in the Vail Valley or you visit this area, you know what it means to live big and play hard. West Vail’s newest restaurant is named for the movements made to keep up with this vibrant lifestyle — pivoting from work to play to family. And even on vacation,

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DOUBLETREE BY HILTON VAIL | 2211 N FRONTAGE ROAD | WEST VAIL 970.476.2739 | DTVAIL.DOUBLETREEBYHILTON.COM

you can’t just press pause on your life. Pivot62 — paying extra homage to the founding year of Vail Ski Resort, 1962 — is a place you can relax or work in a comfortable setting while enjoying hand-crafted cocktails and Coloradosourced shareable plates. Located in the newly revamped hotel in West Vail, DoubleTree by Hilton Vail, Pivot62 is spacious and comfortable, with a menu that is centralized around the woodburning oven. Dishes are prepared from locally sourced ingredients to create elevated dishes the entire family can enjoy. “It’s really designed as a family destination and gathering spot,” explains Jason Polland, General Manager of the hotel. “It’s great for groups of

families and friends, and the menu is very approachable and fun.” On a hot summer day, the Painkiller frozen cocktail may be the perfect way to wind down. Sip it at the bar or bring it out to the hotel’s beautifully redone pool, as full food and beverage service is available throughout the social areas. Shareables like hummus made with Hatch green chiles and the bacon and blue cheese dip are crowd-pleasing for a group, or get your own serving of meatballs from Colorado grass-fed beef, local pork and veal, San Marzano tomatoes, warm ricotta and parmesanreggiano. For dessert or an afternoon sweet treat, the DoubleTree’s ice cream sandwich is made with chocolate chip cookies and Haagen-Dazs vanilla ice cream and fudge. While you’re digesting, it’s important to note that the property is also implementing some noble initiatives for less waste, including eliminating the use of plastic straws and reducing the use of single-use plastic containers on the property. Stop in Pivot62 on Friday evenings for live music in the bar through the summer, and on Saturday afternoons, dive into live music out at the pool. •

PRICE

Pizzas, salads and shareables: $8-$15 •••

AMBIANCE

Newly renovated hotel lobby and lounge with a bar, comfortable seating and dishes meant for sharing with friends and family •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Meatballs from veal, Colorado grass-fed beef and local pork, with San Marzano tomatoes, warm ricotta and parmesan-reggiano

The Cookie Martini includes Grey Goose vodka, Godiva Dark, Baileys, cream and a DoubleTree Cookie Crumble rim. top right The bar at Pivot62 offers mountain views and craft cocktails in a modern elegant setting. left The Paloma with Espolon Silver, Giffards Grapefruit, lime and fresh grapefruit juice. top left


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174 EAST GORE CREEK DRIVE | LODGE AT VAIL | VAIL 970.754.7818 | ELWAYS.COM/VAIL

by MELANIE WONG photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

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here are many places to order a steak around Vail, but few restaurants can claim to have dedicated their kitchen to steak perfection. Located just a block from Gondola One and Mountain Plaza, adjacent to the Lodge at Vail, Elway’s provides a secluded dining spot while simultaneously sitting in the heart of Vail Village. Choose from the wonderfully peaceful patio, decked with bistro lights and surrounded by greenery, belly up at the clubby, coolly lit bar for a cocktail or sit in the sleek, cozy dining room. Start your meal with a drink and an appetizer, making sure to peruse the wine list, which includes a number of solid, high-value pours. All the steakhouse staples, from crab legs to calamari, are on the appetizer menu, but many choose to go with the savory grilled artichoke, charred just right with steak seasoning and served with a sinful butter sauce. Elway’s is no slouch when it comes to salads, either. The classic iceberg wedge salad is crisp, dressed with just the right amount of blue cheese dressing and crumbles, and topped with a crisp strip of bacon. New to the

PRICE

$11-$65 •••

AMBIANCE

Sleek, bustling, high-end steakhouse in Vail Village •••

SIGNATURE DISHES

New York strip steak, Oscar style

Vail menu this summer, diners can also try John’s Salad, an approachable, vegetarianfriendly salad topped with cheese shreds, fresh tomatoes and a tangy double treatment of sherry vinaigrette and green goddess dressing. EMBRACING DECADENCE Of course, steak is the star at Elway’s, and you can always expect to cut into an expertly executed, high-quality USDA prime steak, no matter what cut you order. Purists will have plenty to savor with an unadorned filet or New

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VAIL

ELWAY’S VAIL

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York Strip, but for an extra layer of decadence, order your steak Oscar style (topped with asparagus, lumped crab and creamy hollandaise sauce). You can get it on the side or on top of the steak, but we loved this treatment because it added complexity and flavor without detracting from the meat itself. Those looking for simpler accoutrements will appreciate a side of chimichurri sauce, a distinctive green olive, herb and oil sauce reminiscent of a spicy pesto. And save room for dessert, because you won’t want to pass on the restaurant’s soft-andchewy chocolate chip cookies baked to order, served with local ice cream. MORE THAN A STEAKHOUSE Executive Chef Jeremy Barrett aims to make Elway’s a spot that both tourists and locals alike will visit, and not just for a special occasion. Get a more casual sampler of what Elway’s has to offer with its daily happy hours from 3:30 to 6 p.m., featuring seven menu items for $7 (Elway’s fabled Broncos jersey number).

“We are a steakhouse, but we’re also much more than that,” says Barrett. “I’ve really tried to focus on producing the best that the Elway’s menu offers, while also offering composed plates and interesting flavors.” • top Signature Prime 12-ounce filet with fries and house-made chimichurri sauce, and John's Salad with iceberg lettuce, green goddess dressing, cucumber, bell peppers, red onion, hearts of palm and cheddar cheese. left Oaxaca Passion with Mezcal Joven, serranos, passion fruit and lime.

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LOS AMIGOS 400 BRIDGE STREET | VAIL 970.476.5847 | LOSAMIGOSVAIL.COM

by MELANIE WONG photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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o experience Bridge Street like a true local, head to Los Amigos, a restaurant nearly as old as Vail Village itself. In the winter, its location — just steps from Gondola One in Mountain Plaza — makes Los Amigos a great place to watch skiers scream down the frontside of the mountain. During the summer, the long, sunny deck invites diners to bask in the sun with a margarita in hand as hikers, bikers and tourists file past. It’s a quirky, welcoming place that’s equally great as a spot to grab a quick bite to eat, to bring the family for dinner or to belly up to the bar and people watch. As one of the few truly casual restaurants in Vail Village with prices to match, Los Amigos can be a refreshing alternative to the town’s many upscale dining options. As an institution, Los Amigos has been in Vail for more than 40 years. When current owners Michael Staughton and Ron Riley bought and rebuilt the property in 1995, the restaurant stayed, with Executive Chef Todd Purse at the helm. Purse has now been at Los Amigos for nearly 20 years, making the small, colorful restaurant with the million-dollar view into a Bridge Street staple. “It’s a beautiful view, and

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PRICE

$5-$20 •••

AMBIANCE

Energetic bar and taqueria in the heart of Vail Village •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Lobster tacos

everyone loves to hang out on the deck,” says Purse. “I like to think it’s the food, but we’ve gotten quite a following over the years.” With the help and expertise of his kitchen staff, Purse and company have come up with a winning menu filled with fresh, Mexican favorites such as steak street tacos and cheesy enchiladas, complete with all the satisfying fixings. However, they stretch their creative wings with a constant rotation of specials that often feature seafood-focused entrées and creative combinations. One special that has become a diner favorite is Los Amigos’ rendition of lobster tacos, with the shellfish deep fried, served with a spiced mayo saucer and topped

with a refreshing cabbage slaw. A side of squash blossom rellenos hit the spot fried into gooey cheese. Want a bit of everything? Try the Three Amigos, a combination plate that includes two mini tacos, a chimichanga and a jalapeño shrimp popper. The latter is generously portioned and packs a spicy punch that nicely complements the juicy shrimp. More favorites include the chicken mini tacos, proof that simple ingredients can create an exceptional meal. The meat on these hand-sized tacos is tender, and each taco is topped with a housemade mango salsa that first sizzles sweet, then spicy on the tongue. The secret to Los Amigos’ success, says Purse, lies in fresh ingredients, a menu almost completely made

from scratch, and a seasoned staff that has been churning out Los Amigos hits for years. Purse often works hand in hand with his longtime sous chef, who brings expertise from his Mexican heritage, to create and tweak new recipes. “Everything is fresh, and it’s authentic,” Purse says. “We always use dried or fresh chilies, we cut our own meats and all our salsas and sauces are made in house.” • Lobster tacos are a summer-only special. Sliders with buffalo, bacon, jalapeño and cheddar cheese. bottom right Three Amigos: two mini tacos, one mini chimichanga, one shrimp jalapeño popper, served with cocktail sauce and mango salsa. above

bottom left


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•••

AMBIANCE

Warm and welcoming with the comforting veneer of history •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Surf & Turf with Alaskan King Crab and an 8-ounce filet

RUSSELL’S by KIM FULLER photos by JUSTIN Q. McCARTY

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n a world in which reinvention and stretching the boundaries are revered, there’s something to be said for dependability, for being a bedrock in a sea of change. In Vail, that cornerstone is Russell’s. For almost 30 years, this steakhouse, located on the southeast side of the Covered Bridge, has been serving up steaks and seafood in an inclusive atmosphere where, even if it’s your first time, you feel as if everybody knows your name. It’s more than just the convivial staff which puts you at ease almost immediately. Perhaps it’s the “strangers are just friends you haven’t met yet” vibe that is almost palpable. “It gets loud,” explains Manager Michael Scola. “But we’re Vail’s cozy steakhouse. We play our own music, march to the beat of our own drum.” It’s a beat that brings people in, again and again. “We have families come in that come here every year and they’ll dine with us four out of seven nights of their vacation,” says Kent, who has been a waiter at Russell’s for 11 years. “They’ll start with the crab legs and order the ribs. Every single night.” It’s hard to argue with that level of dedication. But just because some folks have

228 BRIDGE STREET | VAIL | 970.476.6700 | RUSSELLSVAIL.COM

favorites, that doesn’t mean that you can’t branch out. For those who have trouble with commitment, try the half and half salad. Half tomato basil salad, garnished with blue cheese, pine nuts, onions and dressed with a basil vinaigrette, and half classic Caesar salad, it’s the perfect antidote to indecisive ordering. Or perhaps just put a new spin on an old favorite. There’s no such thing as a bad steak at Russell’s — this is where the experience of the long-tenured kitchen shines through. it’s perfectly cooked to your desired temperature (even going so far as executing a “medium rare +”), has impeccable grill marks and a flavor that makes you want to do a happy little chair dance. It’s a carnivore’s version of nirvana. It doesn’t really need sauce; adding it is just gilding the lily. However, don’t be afraid of a bit of allegorical gold leaf. Though the 8-ounce filet mignon, Russell’s Steak Diane and 12-ounce New York strip are all served with different sauces (Béarnaise; shallot, mustard and brandy cream; peppercorn, respectively), feel free to ask for a side of each and enjoy playing musical steak with your options. That’s the beauty of dining at Russell’s. Yes, it’s classic, but there are opportunities to play if you’d like — or simply enjoy the artists at work. So the next time you want an

evening that is both familiar and yet surprising, sit by the window and watch the colorful multitudes go by, secure in the knowledge that though everything changes, Russell’s is a tangible pulse in the heart of Vail. •

Russell's Steak Diane, the house specialty, includes a grilled filet served with a mild brandycream sauce with shallots and mustard. below Alaskan King Crab Legs, steamed and cracked, served with drawn butter. above

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Appetizers and salads $10-$22; Mains: $28-$83

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YAMA SUSHI

168 EAST GORE CREEK DRIVE | VAIL | 970.476.7332 | YAMASUSHIVAIL.COM

by KIM FULLER photos by DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

W

hen the locals love it, that’s always a good sign. Yama Sushi isn’t a secret, as it’s certainly a favorite sushi spot among many in Vail. The quaint space holds lively energy and serves up creative cocktails, shareworthy small plates, specialty sashimi and innovative rolls, from clean and classic to more complex combinations. “We strive to create a fun, inviting atmosphere for guests to enjoy their meal,” explains Executive Chef Efrain Canales. “While the quality of food is the main focus, the guests' overall experience at Yama is just as important to us and I think that is why locals love dining at Yama.” Order a bottle of Dreamy Clouds chilled sake for the table. Its slight sweetness is met with a dry finish, providing an ideal pairing for all that’s to come. Yama’s fried Shishitos are the best in town, served with yaki sauce and kosher salt. Pair the slight spice of the peppers with an order of Yama Poke with diced tuna tossed with sesame oil, white onion wakame seaweed, serrano and soy. Scoop it up with wonton crisps. SUSHI, SASHIMI & MAKI Get the sushi rolling with the Shiso Tuna, a beautiful plate of thinly sliced yellowfin wrapped around shiso leaf, julienned cucumber, freshly grated wasabi root, topped with Japanese mignonette, citrus garlic soy and scallion-infused olive oil. On the sashimi menu, Canales really highlights raw fish with the most intricate and flavor-filled details. Case in point: the Spanish mackerel sashimi with ginger, scallion and red chilie. The rolls coming from behind the sushi bar are given the same care and also boast interesting ingredient combinations. Try the Yen Yen Roll, a perfect taste of the summer season, with

VAIL

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PRICE

Sushi and small plates: $6-$29 •••

AMBIANCE

Lively sushi lounge in Vail Village •••

SIGNATURE DISH

Yama Poke with diced tuna tossed with sesame oil, white onion wakame seaweed, serrano and soy

spicy tuna, mango and cilantro topped with avocado and serrano. A taste of the tropics is in the Beach Break Roll, combining coconut-fried shrimp, mango, cucumber and cilantro with toasted coconut flakes and lemon plum sauce. “Our food is the perfect complement to the warmer temperatures of summer,” says Canales, “providing a refreshing and relaxing experience after a day spent hiking, biking or exploring all that Vail has to offer.” It wouldn’t be sushi night without mochi. Ask for the current flavors,

and you’ll be able to swing from rich flavors like chocolate mint to fruit flavors, such as mango. • top Yaki Saba, torched Japanese mackerel topped with finely julienned ginger, green onion, topped with citrus garlic soy. above Yama's Poke, diced tuna tossed with spicy sesame oil, white onion wakame seasweeed, serrano, sesame seeds and soy. Served with wonton chips. left Tempura rock shrimp with mixed greens, drizzled with yuzu avocado coulis, topped with pickled red ginger.


Executive Chef John Zavoral crowns Toscanini's heirloom tomato gazpacho with PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

avocado, cucumber, fresh tomato and basil oil.


Gessner Executive Chef Jay Spickelmier provides house-made duck prosciutto on his rotating Artisan Charcuterie and Colorado Cheese Board.

PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR


Created by Restaurant and Bar Manager Taryn Miletti, The Fitz’s Drunken Mango cocktail features Wheatley vodka, Grand Marnier, peach liqueur and fresh mango.

PHOTO BY KRISTIN ANDERSON


At Fall Line, Executive Chef Jake Burkhardt layers the chicken tortilla soup with pulled chicken, avocado, cilantro, tortilla strips and fresh lime. The broth is poured tableside.

PHOTOS BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR


Chef Hector Martinez of Green Elephant Juicery serves Thai Peanut Noodle Salad topped with red peppers, carrots, PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR

chili sauce and cilantro.


Terra Bistro Chef-Owner Kevin Nelson's Gyukatsu, AKA chicken-fried Wagyu, pairs the delicately fried pristine beef with wasabi butter, tiger salad and chili garlic tare sauce.

PHOTO BY DOMINIQUE TAYLOR


To celebrate his 20th anniversary as Chef-Owner of La Tour, Paul Ferzacca is offering two "blast from the past" menu favorites each week for 20 weeks, in addition to the regular menu. The Baked Salmon Feuille de Brick reigned supreme in 1999.

PHOTO BY JUSTIN Q. M c CARTY


The bar at Sauce on the Creek is fully stocked with magical elixirs, including 100 different bottles of bourbon and managing partner Tim Applegate’s Barrel-Aged Manhattans. Enjoy a little something on the patio outside. PHOTO BY CHARLES TOWNSEND BESSENT


HOW

Sweet I T IS

• A S ELECTI ON OF DESS E RTS FROM E AT S HOOTS •

• The Rhubarb Bar from White Bison includes strawberry semifreddo, brown butter crumble and vanilla bean anglaise with a strawberry glass garnish. photo by dominique taylor


• right: Kaiserschmarrn, an original Austrian specialty served at Almresi with cherry compote. photo by justin q . mccarty • below: Here Comes The Sun, coconut-pineapplepassion fruit panna cotta from Spendido at the Chateau Pastry Chef Sebastien Schmitt. photo by dominique taylor


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c o m

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• top: Lemon semifreddo with graham cracker crust, blueberry compote and sugar decor from Toscanini Ristorante. • above Fall Line’s Brownie Sundae Ice Cream Bar includes layers of brownie, fudge, salty chocolate cookie crumble, Butterfinger bits and vanilla bean ice cream, dipped in a chocolate shell and served on caramel and banana sauce. • left: At Pivot62, perhaps the best desserts are those that are served in a cocktail glass. photos by dominique taylor

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a joyful table H Y G G E - S T Y L E S U M M E R BY PHOTOS BY

t

D I N I N G

Y O U R S C E N E

Traci J. Macnamara

Karen Mitchell, Elan Photographie Studio

he Danish concept of hygge has recently taken the American home décor scene by storm, with devotees stocking up on sheepskin throws, swaddling themselves in cozy textiles galore and firing up glowing candles for all occasions. But now, as the hygge (pronounced HOO-gah) concept continues to expand into areas beyond home décor, it’s turning out that Americans are embracing hygge as a lifestyle and not just a trend. “Hygge is all about creating moments of joy and coziness,” says Alexandra Gove of Hygge Life, a buzzing online home décor business with a storefront in EagleVail. Gove and her Dutch husband Koen van Renswoude met in Vail and then lived together for more than four years in Europe, where Gove discovered hygge culture, design and inspiration on a trip to Copenhagen. Hygge Life grew out of the couple’s enthusiasm for sharing the Danish way of living well — first, with Europeans at markets where they sold pancakes and textiles from their camper van, and then

with Americans once they returned to Colorado. Now hosting a series of Hygge Table dinners, Hygge Life is extending its Danish-way inspiration into the realm of dining and culinary creation. The Hygge Table concept brings together a group of people to experience the joy of dining in a spectacularly hyggelig venue, such as The Rose in Edwards, where a recent Hygge Table event was held. From drinks to dessert, guests at the Hygge Table get a taste of how a hygge-minded menu and location pair well together. Summertime in Vail is the perfect time to test out the Hygge Table idea in your own dining room or outdoor space. Sharing a meal with others among Vail’s mountain landscape naturally inspires moments of joy and contentment, making open-air dining, patio parties, and picnics all a good fit for adding some hygge into the scene. But you don’t have to wait for natural inspiration to hit. Simply invite over some friends, and get the hygge party started by planning with the five senses of hygge in mind.


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“ H YG G E

I S

A L L

A B O U T

THE FIVE SENSES OF HYGGE

Capturing the full flavor of hygge requires appealing to all five senses: taste, touch, sight, sound and smell. Doing so doesn’t have to be expensive or over-thetop, but it’s important to take care in creating several joy-filled moments, no matter how small, because these special touches can add up to a big effect over the course of an evening. “To me, bringing the hygge concept into dining means being comfortable and casual — not pretentious,” says Bryan Redniss, chef and co-owner of The Rose, where a Hygge Table event was held in partnership with Hygge Life in April. “At The Rose, our style is already comfortbased, and we do creative takes on traditional comfort foods. So our menu and space was a good fit for the Hygge Table event, but planning the menu challenged me to up the wow and joy factors of eating good food.” Redniss accomplished the task by choosing dishes that appealed specifically to the five senses. He created a mini touch plate of finger foods including a gourmet mini pizza, a taco and an ice cream cone. Soundpopping puffed rice was incorporated into a poke bowl, and a rainbow colored beet plate appealed to the sense

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C R E AT I N G

moments of joy and coziness. ”

of sight. A rose petal floating on top of a fizzy cocktail piqued the sense of smell, and new taste combinations arrived with each course. The sounds of an acoustic guitar and vocal duo filled the room, which was illuminated with flickering candles spread end-to-end across one large communal table. Now that it’s summertime, this kind of a dining experience can be heightened with the addition of outdoor elements: the tickle of grass touching your legs, the first sparkle of starlight in the sky. Whether you’re packing up a picnic basket or setting an outdoor table for a dinner on the deck with friends, here are a few ways to incorporate the five senses of hygge into your outdoor dining scene this summer: SETTING THE SPACE

Break out the quality linens, soft blankets and even sheepskins — which are naturally temperature regulating — to cozy up your outdoor space. Choose a few favorite things that will add personal touches to the table, such as handcrafted pottery picked up on travels or the cocktail glasses that you normally only use on very special occasions. For extra visual appeal,

add fresh greenery and flowers to the scene. Setting the space doesn’t have to be an expensive endeavor: Go outside and pluck wildflower blooms or cut wild grasses from the border of your yard for extra color and texture at the table. When picnicking, don’t skimp on the small things: Put a few wow-factor items in the basket such as a favorite set of salt and pepper shakers or a luxurious picnic blanket. LE MENU

Food is the centerpiece of a hygge dinner, so begin tantalizing guests with pleasurable smells emanating from the kitchen when they arrive — freshly baked bread, or another foreshadow of what’s to come. Generate excitement by announcing the menu in an artful way, either by having it written out in calligraphy and hung near the table, or by having a menu card on each plate. “I think rich and sweet when I think of what to plan for a hygge menu,” says Gove. “A big thing about hygge dining is that it’s really about indulging as well — and accepting that this is a moment in life when it’s okay to indulge with a sweet or treat that you don’t have every day.”


A hygge dinner E N D S A

B E S T

W I T H

S U R P R I S E

T H AT

H E I G H T E N S E X T E N D S O F

T H E

A N D

T H E

O CC A S I O N .

S E N D

G U E S T S

H O M E

W I T H

M E M O RY

R E V E A L

T H E

O F

E XC I T I N G

T H E

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L I M O N C E L LO T H E I R

J OY

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L I P S .

COZY LIGHTING

Candles are a hygge must-have. Soft lighting sets a joyful, comfortable mood, and the act of lighting candles when sitting down at a table brings people together. Kids especially love to be in charge of candle lighting. Line the length of a table with unscented candles down the center, or arrange them in groups within several glass hurricane candleholders to capitalize on the warm glow. If you’re going on an evening picnic, pack a small travel candle in your basket, and plan to stay out late so that you can lie back and enjoy the light of the stars. THE SOUNDS OF MUSIC

Capture the pleasure of sound by having music playing softly in the background at your hygge dinner. Create a playlist that connects with the mood you’d like to foster, and amplify the sound with wifi speakers that can travel easily to an outdoor space. Better yet, pack a hygge picnic basket and head to an outdoor venue this summer for a Bravo! Vail event, a Vail Jazz performance or a Hot Summer Nights free concert at Ford Amphitheater in Vail. SURPRISE ENDING

Shhhhhh: don’t tell! A hygge dinner ends best with a surprise that heightens and extends the joy of the occasion. Send guests home with the memory of an exciting dessert reveal or with the taste of limoncello on their lips. Having a hygge dinner is about the environment you create and about what goes on the plate, but it’s also a shared experience that lingers on after the final goodnight.

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dumplings Baozi

Empenada

Beggar's Purse

Kreplach

Khachapuri Ravioli

Gyoza

ShuMai Tortellini

Manti 76

Samosa

Xiao Long Bao


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EAT // Summer 2018  

The magazine for eating and drinking establishments throughout the Vail Valley, featuring restaurant reviews, photo essays, food and lifesty...

EAT // Summer 2018  

The magazine for eating and drinking establishments throughout the Vail Valley, featuring restaurant reviews, photo essays, food and lifesty...

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