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CAPTURE HEAD OFFICE 305 CAMBIE ST VANCOUVER BC V6B 2N4 CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM INFO@CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM

Capture Photography Festival is produced by the Capture Photography Festival Society, a registered not-for-profit society. Please share your Festival experience with us at capturephotofest.com/2020-survey, on Facebook, and Instagram. For further information and assistance on accessibility, please contact us at info@capturephotofest.com #CapturePhotoFest2020 #WhatDoYouSee


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR EMMY LEE WALL DIRECTOR/CURATOR KATE HENDERSON (ON LEAVE) FESTIVAL MANAGER MADALEN BENSON FESTIVAL AND PUBLICATION COORDINATOR CHELSEA YUILL TD ASSISTANT CURATOR CHEYENNE RAIN LEGRANDE ᑭᒥᐊᐧᐣ YOUTH PROGRAM COORDINATOR MARIAH BRUSATORE GRAPHIC DESIGN VICKY LUM PROOFREADER MEGAN LOW DIGITAL IMAGE EDITING ALINA ILYASOVA WEBSITE SPARKJOY STUDIOS PRINTED IN BURNABY BY MITCHELL PRESS

Front and Back Covers: Kapwani Kiwanga, Counter-Illumination, 2020

All content © 2020 the artists, authors, and Capture Photography Festival Society. Unauthorized reproduction is strictly prohibited. All images are reproduced courtesy of the artist unless otherwise specified. Capture is not responsible for the specific content or subject matter of any work displayed or advertised. Some exhibitions or installations may be offensive, upsetting, or disturbing to some members of the public. For the most up-to-date exhibition and event information, please visit: capturephotofest.com

BOARD OF DIRECTORS MIKE HARRIS IAN MCGUFFIE TOBI REYES SHEENAH ROGERS-PFEIFFER MAHDI SHAMS EVANN SIEBENS KIM SPENCER-NAIRN, CHAIR DAVID THORPE TODD TOWERS

ADVISORY BOARD GRANT ARNOLD CLAUDIA BECK HELGA PAKASAAR

FOUNDING DONORS ANONYMOUS ANONYMOUS JOHN & NINA CASSILS STEPHEN CARRUTHERS CHAN FAMILY FOUNDATION MIKE & SANDRA HARRIS BRIAN & ANDREA HILL HY’S OF CANADA LTD.A JANE IRWIN & ROSS HILL JASON & AJ MCLEAN MICHAEL O’BRIAN FAMILY FOUNDATION RADCLIFFE FOUNDATION RON REGAN ERIC SAVICS & KIM SPENCER-NAIRN LEONARD SCHEIN IAN & NANCY TELFER SAMANTHA J. WALKER (IN MEMORY OF) BRUCE WRIGHT DONORS & SUPPORTERS ANONYMOUS CLAUDIA BECK & ANDREW GRUFT RITA BEIKS MARGARET BRODIE BRIGITTE & HENNING FREYBE JANE IRWIN & ROSS HILL JASON HUTCHINSON GARETH JONES BRIAN KIPP JENNIFER MACKENZIE ELPIE MARINAKIS AJ MCLEAN MIRIAM MOSES COLEEN & HOWARD NEMTIN ASHLEY SAGER LUCIE & JOHN SPENCER-NAIRN DAVID STEPHEN MARSHALL TO EMMY & SAM WALL

THANK YOU BARBARA ADLER NEIL AISENSTAT GRANT ARNOLD JACLYN ARNDT DAINA AUGAITIS KATHLEEN BARTELS CLAUDIA BECK & ANDREW GRUFT STEPHANIE BOKENFOHR SHANNON BOOL JESSICA BOUCHARD ANNIE BRIARD SOPHIE BRODOVITCH SARAH CAVANAUGH RYDEL CEREZO LYNN CHEN MONTE CLARK SHAUN DACEY CATHERINE DANGERFIELD MARTEN ELDER FEHN FOSS DIANA FREUNDL AUDREY GENOIS LORETTA GULLION MICHAEL HANOS KRISTA HOWARD BRIGITTE & HENNING FREYBE SALIA JOSEPH STUART KEELER JEFF KHONSARY CIKWES CONNIE LEGRANDE ROBERT LEMON PIXY LIAO KLARA MANHAL SCOTT MASSEY ELAIRE MAUND JENNY-ANNE MCCOWAN JASON & AJ MCLEAN BRIAN MESSINA ALEX MORRISON GENEVIÈVE MOUSSEAU CASSANDRA NG AKEEM NERMO LAURA NOONAN HELGA PAKASAAR BIRTHE PIONTEK JUSTIN RAMSEY STEPHANIE REBICK ADRIENNE REMPEL ANGIE RICO ERIC SAVICS CHANTAL SHAH REID SHIER RACHEL TOPHAM CHEYANNE TURIONS STEPHEN WADDELL IAN WALLACE JEFF WALL MICHAEL WESIK AARON WILLIAMS ADRIENNE WOOD KATE WOOLF BRUCE WRIGHT ELIZABETH ZVONAR


Table of Contents

Texts 12

Public Art 26

Featured Exhibitions 56

Selected Exhibitions 72

Events 106

Youth Program 132

Calendar 153

Map 156

Index 158

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Welcome

EMMY LEE WALL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

On behalf of everyone on the team, I am thrilled to welcome you to the 2020 Capture Photography Festival.

image culture and lend their diverse perspectives to this multi-faceted concept.

When I began my tenure at Capture, I was asked whether photography festivals were still relevant given the proclivity for contemporary artists to work across a variety of media driven by conceptual rather than material concerns. Garry Winogrand once described a photograph as “what something looks like to a camera.” But I would alter his definition slightly to foreground the inherently subjective nature of picture-making, for what is a photograph if not a way of interpreting the world? A photograph is a manifestation of a series of decisions—what to put in the frame and what to leave out, what context matters and what is extraneous— questions that affect us all, in all lines of work, everywhere. The thoughtful decision-making around framing—the ways in which we position ourselves in this world with respect to others—could not be more significant today.

I joined the Capture team in July of 2019 and it has been an incredible 8 months. I want to sincerely thank the art community for the tremendous support and collaborative spirit I have experienced during my short time here. I am also very grateful to Capture’s Board, whose steadfast encouragement and guidance are critical to the Festival’s continued success. Capture would simply not be possible without the dedication and commitment of the staff who have worked incredibly hard to realize the magic that happens in April and I am so appreciative of their contributions.

I would argue that now, more than ever, photographs occupy primacy of place as a means of communication, making image literacy a critical skill with which to negotiate contemporary life. The access to photographic devices and the onslaught of imagery online makes it more imperative than ever to consider that which we are looking at thoughtfully, and with a critical eye. And it is this engaged and self-reflexive looking that Capture fosters. But Capture is not only about photographs; rather, the Festival’s mandate includes featuring the most compelling lens-based art, signalling the embrace of non-traditional works which may start with a photographic process but end up somewhere else entirely. This procedural and material innovation is so exciting for us to watch year after year as lens-based works burst out of their frames. As Capture advocates for these novel forms and practices, we are exploring what Helga Pakasaar, Audain Chief Curator at The Polygon Gallery, referred to as “image culture," a phrase I found intriguing and without tidy definition. To offer some reflection on this topic, we commissioned texts from Douglas Coupland, artist and writer, Cliff Lauson, Senior Curator at the Hayward Gallery in London, and Cheyenne Rain LeGrande, Capture’s TD Assistant Curator and an emerging artist, to consider the contemporary state of Photo: Rachel Topham Photography

Finally, a heartfelt thanks to the artists who make Capture so compelling and without whom the Festival would not exist. We are all grateful to you for your creative vision and the ways in which you encourage us to see the world openly, differently, and imaginatively.


KIM SPENCER-NAIRN BOARD CHAIR AND FOUNDER

On behalf of the Board of Directors, it is my great pleasure to welcome you to the seventh iteration of Capture Photography Festival. This year marks a turning point in the organization’s history, as we welcomed Emmy Lee Wall as our new Executive Director and couldn’t be more excited about the ways in which the Festival program continues to grow and evolve. Capture is a highly collaborative organization. Not only is this reflected through the many partnerships forged to deliver programming, but also through the variety of ways the Festival is funded. With only a few exceptions, Capture programming is entirely free of charge. In order to continue providing this level of access, Capture relies on the support and generosity of many different sponsors, funders, and donors. Never has there been such a challenging time to raise money for the arts, and never has it been so important.

artist edition print, or becoming a Member of the Capture Photography Festival Society. Details and links are available on our website. My final thanks is to you, our audience. Your active participation as a viewer, reader, and listener is our raison d’être. By taking part in Capture you are contributing to important conversations in our society and strengthening relationships between artists, organizations, and the community at large.

We are grateful for the continued support from the corporate community. Special thanks to our presenting sponsor TD Bank, without whom Capture would simply not be possible. Thank you also to returning sponsors Pattison Outdoor, PwC, PortLiving, and Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association. We are delighted this year to welcome new sponsors Aritzia, MLT Aikins, McKinley, and Freeman Casting. Our in-kind sponsors are Anstice Communications, Freeman Casting, Gotham Steakhouse & Bar, The Lazy Gourmet, Tricera Print, and Wild Goose Vineyards. These monetary and in-kind contributions account for the majority of the Festival’s revenue each year. Capture receives support from multiple levels of government including the Government of Canada, the Province of British Columbia, the BC Arts Council, and the City of Vancouver. We are also grateful for the ongoing support of the Vancouver Foundation and the Audain Foundation, as well as many individual donors. We sincerely appreciate all of the talented artists and dedicated partner organizations for helping to make Capture so successful. A heartfelt thank you to the dedicated team and volunteers who work tirelessly all year long to produce Capture. If you have enjoyed your experience with Capture, please consider making a donation to the Festival, buying a limited

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A Message from…

CHRISTIE LEE CHARLES VANCOUVER POET LAUREATE, 2018 – 2021

Good day From the first sunrise, the (Musqueam) people have been the caretakers of these lands and waters we now call “Vancouver.” Since time immemorial the descendants have been speaking their language, using the medicine, feasting from the waterways, and singing these songs that connect to and from the land. It’s who we are. “My heart is the earth and the earth is my heart,” is what I, Christie Lee Charles, always recite when I’m speaking to the public. I say this with an understanding and connection to our earth and our ancestors. We are the earth, we are all sacred beings. A part of Indigenous teachings that can be shared universally is the understanding of one. Being one, being connected. Together we can balance and work together so that we can all benefit from good connections. Respecting each other and making space for each other, the people, land, water, creatures that walk, swim, fly, and the medicine that grows. Across the lands are various village sites and spaces used for gathering, hunting, and practicing ceremonies. These spaces are still used today in 2020 by descendants of the first peoples from centuries ago. Prior to the advancement of technology, people captured their visions and stories in carvings, weavings, house posts, and other items created as representations of the stories being told. Today, with respect, we also capture new images through photography. Our eyes see these connections when we capture our stories in the images. These images bring us together. When we look at the earth and how the sun's light hits the land, it’s a beautiful thing. The birds chirp in the morning and the day wakes. It’s a great energy we all feel and see as one. Like the sun rises and welcomes the day, I send these greetings. Thank you for sharing your stories through these images. Thank you for continuing the stories through this work.

ANDREA BARRACK GLOBAL HEAD, SUSTAINABILITY AND CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP TD BANK GROUP

On behalf of TD Bank Group, I’d like to congratulate the organizers and contributors of the 2020 Capture Photography Festival for putting together an inspiring collection of contemporary artwork once again this year. Art is a catalyst in building vibrant, connected communities and in helping to amplify underrepresented voices. Artists of all backgrounds can share their stories and insights on the world through their craft, enabling the viewers to experience their perspectives and learn from them. That’s why we are committed to supporting arts and culture that reflect all voices to help open doors to a more inclusive and sustainable tomorrow. When people learn from one another and spark connections, they foster a sense of belonging. This grows the confidence to participate in their communities and the opportunity to reach their full potential and our collective positive impact grows exponentially. As part of The Ready Commitment, our global corporate citizenship platform, we are proud to support organizations like Capture to help build a more inclusive arts community across Canada.


HONOURABLE JOHN HORGAN PREMIER OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

HONOURABLE STEVEN GUILBEAULT MINISTER OF CANADIAN HERITAGE

As Premier of the Province of British Columbia, I am pleased to extend my greetings to everyone attending the 7th Annual Capture Photography Festival, taking place at galleries, museums, and other wonderful artistic spaces throughout Metro Vancouver.

Welcome to the 2020 Capture Photography Festival!

Launched in 2013, this Festival is an exciting opportunity for photography enthusiasts to showcase their art and learn from other remarkable professionals. The annual series celebrates and fosters an appreciation of lens-based art, exhibiting the work of critically acclaimed artists from around the world. It also supports emerging artists by providing a platform for them to develop their practice. Photography is a powerful form of artistic expression, allowing us to view the world through someone else’s eyes and experience the vibrant diversity that surrounds us.

The arts have the power to bring Canadians together in a shared celebration of our history, traditions, and cultural diversity, and are an important part of our economy—and lens-based arts are no exception. Our government is pleased to support events, like Capture Photography Festival, that put the arts within Canadians’ reach. This event gives both emerging and established artists, from Canada and beyond, a chance to share their passion and talent as they offer us a glimpse of the world as they see it. As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I would like to thank all the organizers, volunteers, and participating photographers who helped bring this year’s Festival to life.

Events of this scope take a great deal of time, energy, and dedication to produce, and I would like to thank the artists, organizers, and volunteers for making this festival an ongoing success. I encourage everyone to take advantage of this opportunity to explore all that the Capture Photography Festival has to offer. Please accept my best wishes for a wonderful event!

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Mobil Art School


Moyra Davey, Cisco (Landscape), 2019, black and white gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist; greengrassi, London; and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/ Cologne/New York.

THURSDAY, APRIL 2 6 – 7 PM—KEYNOTE LECTURE 7 – 9 PM—GALLERY HOP

THE RELIANCE THEATRE, EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN 520 E 1ST AVE CO-PRESENTED BY CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL AND FILLIP, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE AUDAIN FACULTY OF ART AT EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

Capture 2020 Festival Launch

Join us for the 2020 Festival Launch with the inaugural Keynote Lecture by New York-based artist Moyra Davey. Continue the night with a gallery hop in the False Creek Flats (p.108-109).


Cheyenne Rain LeGrande ᑭᒥᐊᐧᐣ, Nehiyaw Isko-Kona, 2018, digital photograph. Photo: Nimama (Connie LeGrande).


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10 – 11


Scott Schuman, Milan, 2018. Courtesy of the artist.


Texts

Right Now 14

Douglas Coupland

Selfie-Portraiture 16

Cliff Lauson

Those Who Came Before Me 18

Cheyenne Rain LeGrande ᑭᒥᐊᐧᐣ

Ian Wallace in Conversation with Scott Schuman 20

Fred Herzog: Photographing Yesterday Past 160

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Tom Hsu

12–13


Right Now

DOUGLAS COUPLAND

Karin Bubaš, Lauren Crying, 2009, chalk pastel on velour paper, 77.42 × 58.06 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Monte Clark Gallery.

Texts


When it comes to image-making at the present moment, there are two dominant themes that come to mind. The first theme involves going back in time to 1969, to the PNE here in Vancouver. There was a man there who used a typewriter, in what can only have been a painstakingly slow process, to make portraits of the Mona Lisa on letter paper. It was interesting to see someone locate imaging potential in a piece of mundane technology—it always is. Then a few years later there was a new and different booth on the midway where a guy would take your photo and feed it into a computer, which then printed out your photo onto tractor paper using ASCII characters to generate forms and tones. It felt crazily futuristic, and Mr. Mona Lisa surely must have been more than a bit annoyed at being both upstaged and outmoded. I think maybe this sort of technological upstaging is part of what defines the current image moment, albeit, in a much more relentless and globalized way. Basically: who can use the newest technology in the fastest and most extreme way? Driving this image-making lust is the post-2000 collective chill in our bones that from now on there’s only going to be an ever-faster onslaught of new life-altering imaging technologies. We’re used to this, now that this normalization of profound change has come to define us a species. But what will the Next Big Thing actually be? Nobody knows, which is part of the sick fun of our present moment as we all await its arrival. But also remember that it’s not as if being incredibly rich and incredibly smart helps give you an advantage. Bill Gates had all of his rich brilliant buddies, yet he missed the boat on tablets, smartphones, and search. So, it’s not like there’s someone out there who knows what’s going to happen but chooses not to say. Usually the future pops out of nowhere in the strangest places. I would add to this that not only do we have an expectation of endless new imaging technologies, we have billions of people who are going to try to max them out as quickly as possible. A year back, at Basel Miami, I saw an interesting example of the art world’s hyperalertness to images made

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from ultra-new systems, and it almost felt like a New Yorker cartoon. A dealer was showing a collector a painting that incorporated digital something in its creation, but the client was on the fence about it. So, then the dealer said, “But you know the best thing of all? The artist who made this is a digital native.” Sold. It took almost a century for people to make Mona Lisas on typewriters, but if typewriters were released today, a thousand Mona Lisas would be created overnight. Mona Lisas would all become a meme for a day, and then they’d be over. I mentioned there were two dominant themes in image creation today. The second is political rather than technical, and to enter this idea, look back at your own childhood and remember there was always that one student who could use pencils to draw almost photographically. Oh my God, is that a photo of Ric Ocasek from The Cars, or is it a drawing? Seriously! The nice thing about pencils is that they’re essentially zero technology. They’re never going to go out of date, and they’ll always be there waiting to do new things. So then, for the pencil user of 2020 who wants to delve into photorealistic imagery, what is their new reality? I imagine first off they’d be asking themselves right off the bat, “Wait …let’s start with who made this pencil? Were its fabricators fairly paid? And what kind of wood is it made from? Was it harvested sustainably? Not only this, my friends are asking if I bought it online or in a bricks and mortar store or a golf course. My friends are also asking if I already had a pencil and needlessly bought a new one. And they’re also asking why didn’t I break my pencil into two or three short pencils to give to people who didn’t have pencils? And what do I plan to do with the stub when the pencil’s used up? And then friends sat me down and asked me why I’m using a pencil at all. Did I come from a pencil-making family? Do I have permission, so to speak, to use a pencil? And is my artwork so important that it needs to be permanent? Am I egotistical? Am I using a pencil because it’s somehow nostalgic or gives my work an aura of manual labour? Am I sentimentalizing skill? And frankly, do some of the people in the room feel unsafe with me holding a sharpened object? What about their feelings? Basically, I’m an asshole, and I’m unsure if my friends are actually my friends. So getting back to the present moment, if you merge imaging tech bombardment with the “pencil critique” you end up with a fairly good sense of what the current image culture moment feels like. I might add that right now also feels a lot like the late 1980s and early 1990s—rudderless and totally up for grabs, which is the best thing about image culture—it really is always up for grabs, just sometimes more than others.

14–15


Selfie-Portraiture

CLIFF LAUSON

Lee Friedlander, Lake Powell, 2009. © Lee Friedlander, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco, and Luhring Augustine, New York.

Texts


Lake Powell (2009) is a fairly recent selfportrait by Lee Friedlander that depicts him centred in the foreground of the Utah landscape. The proximity of Friedlander’s body obscures the view of the water and interrupts the horizon of rising earthen forms. Turning his head to one side, he catches the camera out of the corners of his eyes. Most prominent however are the photographer’s arms which, awkwardly distorted by the wide-angle lens, extend outward toward the lower corners of the picture. His hands are not visible, but seem to support the edges of the frame, no doubt holding the camera at the moment of picture taking. Lake Powell is a tourist destination and Friedlander’s casual attire seems to suggest that this image is in fact a kind of holiday selfie. In addition to his best known “self-portraits” taken since the 1960s—pictures that include his own shadow—Friedlander has in fact shot hundreds of images that include himself in a more direct way. He frequently stepped out from behind the camera to be seated alongside friends and relatives at social gatherings, notable events, and often, as seen in Lake Powell, in a compelling series of pictures featuring just the photographer himself. Since the 1990s, some of these images have looked less like snaps from a family album and are more unconventional and even uncomfortable: Friedlander appears in a thicket of branches, behind a chain-link fence, half-asleep, out of focus, slumped, or prone, and in the 2010s, in an extreme state of vulnerability as he undergoes quadruple bypass surgery. There, recovering in a hospital bed, covered in tapes, bandages, and ECG sensors with trailing wires, another trailing wire from his hand becomes visible, which leads back, again to the edge of the image—the camera’s remote shutter release. Reflecting on the discourse around photography a century ago, it is rather striking to observe how much of the discussion featured ideas of stillness and death. Photography’s uniqueness was predicated on its specificity as a medium, its ability to freeze time an uncanny act of temporal preservation. Much depended upon photography’s conceptual separation from, on the one hand, less accurate forms of representation like painting, and on the other, the dynamism of film. Pictorial stasis seemed to bring with it all of the morbid associations of loss, remembrance, and history. It also enabled close readings of photographs, a mode of analytical viewership inherited from painting.

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Conversely, as it has rapidly evolved over the past decade, photography no longer seems a document of a time, but instead seems more of its time. The combination of camera phones and social media has significantly contributed to image saturation becoming a dominant social condition. Rather than an archival document, in this particular moment of iconophilia, photography seems a declaration of aliveness, of immanence and fugitive expression, almost itself a form of emoting that passes as lightly and quickly as an emotional state. Social media apps Instagram, Snapchat, and TikTok are all designed around the transmission of live content by blending photos and the moving image. Many also offer limited viewing conditions in order to promote an aspirational “nowness”: after being viewed once, the image or video disappears. Such is the immanence of the image that the hashtags #tbt and #latergram denote when a photo is exceptionally not of the present, but of some earlier moment. The changing conditions of image culture create a complexity around the viewing of Friedlander’s selfportraits, especially as his recent photographs overlap with the age of disposable selfies. Against this backdrop, Friedlander’s pictures seem to bring along with them conditions of viewing from an earlier age of portraiture. Instead of being flickers in an endless stream of images, they ask for lengthy individual consideration, appearing to hold open some aspect of historical time, and presenting themselves as objects for close inspection. Further, they are made in the realist style, avoiding the veneer and gloss of “likeable” photos and instead appearing at times unflattering and even awkward. If anything, this prevents them from being read casually as ubiquitous selfies. And yet, Friedlander’s self-portraits are perhaps made with no less of an idea of nowness in mind, of capturing the fugitive moment, but just through a slower, analogue medium. His pictures foreshadow a more contemporary mode of photography, but at the same time are not intended to participate or circulate in a high-speed image economy. They possess a kind of inertia that assures their stability, as if Friedlander’s two-handed grip on the camera—on the picture’s frame—serves to steady self-portraiture amidst the infinite scroll of real-time transmission.

16–17


Those Who Came Before Me

CHEYENNE RAIN LEGRANDE ᑭᒥᐊᐧᐣ TD ASSISTANT CURATOR, CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

Cheyenne Rain LeGrande ᑭᒥᐊᐧᐣ, Nehiyaw Isko-Kona, 2018, digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Nimama (Connie LeGrande).

Texts


When I think about image culture, I think about my ancestors. I think about how they have always brought images through storytelling. When I think about the state of image culture here and now, I think about my access to technology. I think about how I still tell stories, but it has shifted. It has reversed. I tell stories through images. For me, and many others, we tell stories by speaking through an image. An image is not simply an image. I present images through performance, video, sound, and photography. What is interesting in thinking about those who came before me is that they went through so much fucking shit, and here I am now, in a generation where I can express and feel what those before me have felt and been through. It’s a very interesting space to find myself. Technology and ways of expressing have evolved so quickly. Those before me did not have access to these means of expression. Nanaskomitin for the privilege of being here in this moment. I've learned there is not one singular way to express an image. That’s the beautiful thing. I am thankful to have access to the technologies my ancestors did not. I am thankful to have the opportunity to tell the stories of those who came before me. I am thankful for the strength they have passed down to allow me to do the work I do. Not only am I strong enough to feel and express, but I also have access to many ways in which I can do that. That to me is a representation of the “current state of image culture.”

Nitanis, Nosims, Iskotew, and Kona come together as one, they are now ready to begin. Kokum peeks from the back window to see what Nitanis and Nosims are up to. Curiosity has caught her. She slowly steps out onto her back deck to peek and watch her Nitanis and Nosims. Nosims begins to slowly apply red to her body as Nitanis softly sings. They move together in the space, through voice and body. There are many that move together with them. Nosims applies one red line on each limb until her body is fully covered in red. Her feet become one with Kona, and all feeling has left. With her body fully covered in red, Nosims picks up a white sheer fabric, takes in a large inhale of air, and begins to aggressively try to rub the redness off her body, the racism off her body, the pain off her body, the history off her body, the trauma off her body, the blood off her body. With an exhale, Nosims becomes engulfed by the white stained red. She moves in the circle of Iskotew to the rhythm of Nosims’s voice. Iskotew begins to lose its heat so Nosims makes sure to kneel down to each Iskotew that is left to thank them for their presence. She stands and begins to let the air flow through her body and now the branches only breathe grey air. She continues to move to Nosims’s beautiful voice. After Nosims feels she has healed not only herself but those before her, she raises her hands to the sky, and the white stained red slides off her body. Kokum and Natanis watch Nosims as she walks slowly towards the forest. One step after one step until she has reached the trees. Nosims continues to walk until she is no longer there. All of this being watched and recorded by a device that stands on three legs.

An example of this would be my piece Nehiyaw Isko-Iskotew. This work was created in Bigstone Cree Nation, Wabasca. To honour those who came before me, and those who brought us images through storytelling, I’d like to tell y’all a story: A burgundy log house sits quietly amongst trees. A small two-bedroom wooden hug. The air is frosty and Kona (snow) falls from the sky. Beyond the trees you can see the horses. Inside the home resides a sweet little Kokum sipping wild mint tea and watching Wheel of Fortune. She stays in that small wooden hug ninety percent of her life. Her Nosims never really understood why she only felt safe there; it seems to get worse with age. But as her Nosims grew up she learned it was an effect of colonization. She is afraid to be out in the world, and sometimes her Nosims understands the need to hide from this world. In her backyard there are two women. A mother and daughter. Kokum’s Nitanis and Nosims stand in her backyard. There is a ring of fallen branches Nosims’s uncle has collected from the forest. Iskotew (fire) connects with the branches and they begin to breathe the same grey air. Nitanis sits in a camping chair, near the ring of Iskotew. Her long braids keeping her warm. Inside the ring of Iskotew stands Nosims, her bare feet touching Kona. As

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18–19


Ian Wallace in Conversation with Scott Schuman

Scott Schuman, Rajasthan, 2018. Courtesy of the artist.

Texts


IAN WALLACE

Your work involves a number of discourses around society, art, photography, and of course fashion as an aesthetic that expresses individuality. I would say you've got a very independent and original relationship to fashion as well as art—in that sense your influence has been felt and I see it's opened up people to treat their natural sense of expressive fashion as an expressive form in the street. SCOTT SCHUMAN

I grew up in Indiana and there’s not a big fashion community there. I grew up looking at GQ and Vogue and it seemed like such another world, but I really dreamed about a place where people dressed like that. I feel like what I’ve done is, I made that kind of dream—of people dressing in a certain way and living in a certain context—more of a reality, you know? I find it more interesting to go out—and that's why, when I shoot, I try to pull back a little bit and have a little context of the place where people are and the setting where they are, because I think for someone that would be like, the fifteen year old me, now it would be even more exciting to realize that there are places where people live, that their lives are just as exciting as I was seeing in editorial magazines and they put together things in a way that's even more interesting. A lot of people say it kind of gives permission. No one in their neighbourhood dresses that way, but they can go on a site like mine and see people in different parts of the world and find their community, so to speak.

I had never picked up a camera until late because I never found anything I wanted to shoot until I had my own kids. I started taking pictures of them at the playground and stuff like that, so I really liked the idea of moving around and around the subject, and with kids you can't tell them what to do, you've got to place yourself around them. After doing that for a while I started thinking that I really want to do this more. By that time I was in my late 20s early 30s and I was smart enough to know if I was going to do this I have to do it in a way that I can do, that maybe nobody else can. I knew the two things that I had were the ability to just be able to go out and walk around and take photographs with a fashion point of view because that's where I had a unique point of view.

IW

I think that's what makes your work speak to so many people in so many different places. You've wakened up a creative impulse of people who are in the outlying areas of the centres of culture. Creative people exist everywhere don't they? So, you picked up the camera very late in life after you moved to New York and were involved in the fashion business and such, but I was just wondering how you position yourself or see yourself in the tradition of street photography. Is there some specific inspiration or influence that that led you that direction? SS

Well I started in street photography because it was how I liked to spend my day. I loved the work of Bruce Weber and Paolo Roversi and a lot of the contemporary fashion photographers and then as I started to learn about Avedon and Penn, I started to learn more about historical photographers and not just fashion photographers but, you know, the history of photography, and I think there's something that really clicked about that idea of Helen Levitt, Bruce Davidson, Brassaï, and to a certain extent Steve McCurry, people that were able to make a living just grabbing a camera and walking around and taking photographs.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

Scott Schuman, Rajasthan, 2018. Courtesy of the artist.

Sometimes I take a picture of someone who is not wearing what's currently fashionable but you can't deny how stylish they are. For whatever reason, their charisma, their hair, whatever it is, there's just something about it, about that person that really clicks, and so I knew I was good at finding that and so I just took a chance you know? When I started the blog it didn't cost any money and my assumption that I could do something a little bit different than anyone else was correct. People started recognizing it right away. I think more and more as I get older, the way I shoot is almost with the eye of like, a costume designer—someone that thinks that the clothes the person is wearing might tell you a little bit about who they are. I think my best

20–21


photographs are very good portraits where the clothing plays an important part in the portrait. IW

Your first books, the Penguin series, are amazing—five hundred page photo books that are almost the size of pocket books. How did you come to this particular format? SS

It was very intentional. I knew my audience very well and for the most part they were young and I knew they really used the photographs. People would tell me all the time that they printed them out, put them on the wall, really look at them. When Penguin first came to me about the book I think a lot of photographers would want to do kind of a coffee table book that makes them look really important but I told them I wanted to do a little book that students and people can take, throw it in their backpack, they can put Post-its in. I'd have people coming into book signings who would have it all marked up and it was almost like a workbook more than a photo book. I also did it in a way that was not chronological—you can pick it up and flip through any page and hopefully it makes you keep wanting to look at the next page and the next page because there's no order. You never know where you're going to be next. You might be in New York, you might be in South America, you might be in Italy. So just like with the internet and understanding that moment in time, that combination of spontaneity and being able to share images very quickly. IW

You’re right, there's an infinity of space in those pages and clarity and focus of concept which equals a successful work of art in my point of view. I also see those books as falling into the framework that I recognized as kind of a concept about how to use a format that a lot of conceptual artists like Gillian Wearing and Cindy Sherman use. I'm just wondering if you were inspired by, familiar with, any of that work? SS

Maybe just a little, like August Sander—I mean I really liked his work, particularly in the beginning; full body portraits but there’s still a lot of background. IW

August Sanders's work is banal on one level, but his images are so strong that you know that's why it's captured our attention for so many decades. Let’s move on to talking about The Sartorialist: India book. It's just a very beautiful book. It seems to take another direction, both in terms of format and also the deep sense of portraiture, a real focus on the humanity of your subjects

Texts

and less on the fashion, even though your eye is caught by the clothing. Is this a new direction you're taking? SS

Well, if you look at the books you know even from the first book there are photographs from India, China, and Japan. The reality is when I started doing The Sartorialist I didn't have any money so I could only go to the places where people would pay me to go. But the dream was always to have this kind of unique mix that I’d never seen before, somewhere in between Helen Levitt, Steve McCurry, Bill Cunningham, somewhere where, you know, I was mixing style, fashion, and something cultural in a way that no one else had done. It took me ten years of working really hard where I could save enough money so that instead of shooting a lot of different places and showing the similarities and differences in the world, I chose one place to compare and contrast. I shot India the way I see it, the way I experience it, which is a mix of fashion week or staying at a beautiful hotel, but then also going to very small villages and, and really getting out amongst the people and showing that India is much more diverse than what most people see. I wanted to surprise people. I wanted people to see the images as portraits and I think as people look at this India book they can go back now to the other books and see them in a slightly different way.


2020

Capture Photography Festival

22–23


Elizabeth Zvonar, Women’s Work, 2020, digital collage. Courtesy of the artist and Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto.


2020

Capture Photography Festival

24 – 25


Bidemi Oloyede, Two Masqueraders at the Caribana Carnival Parade. Exhibition Place. Toronto, 2019, digital scan from 35mm negative film. Courtesy of the artist.

Every year, Capture programs a Public Art Program designed to engage and challenge audiences, invite discussion around critical issues, and expand ideas of what lens-based art can be. The installations are sited across Metro Vancouver and many are developed in collaboration with and supported by our community and organizational partners from around the region.


Public Art

BC Hydro Dal Grauer Substation 28

Kapwani Kiwanga

TransLink 34

Moyra Davey

Pattison Outdoor Billboards 38 40 42

Christina Leslie and Bidemi Oloyede Elizabeth Zvonar Howard Ursuliak, Kyle Juron, Barbara Cole, Lorna Brown, Marko Simcic, Colin Griffiths

Canada Line 2020 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52

Anna Binta Diallo Impatiently Inclined Madiha Aijaz Arts Umbrella Students Christopher Lacroix Angela Blažanović Manuel Axel Strain Emily Neufeld

Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen 54

2020

Elisabeth Belliveau

Capture Photography Festival

26 – 27


BC Hydro Dal Grauer Substation

APRIL 2020 – MARCH 2021

Counter-Illumination

KAPWANI KIWANGA

944 BURRARD ST, VANCOUVER SPONSORED BY THE DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

Kapwani Kiwanga, Counter-Illumination, 2020, digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist.

Kapwani Kiwanga will be giving a talk as part of the Capture Speaker Series on Sun. April 26 from at 1 pm at The Polygon Gallery (p. 111).

Public Art


CURATED BY KATE HENDERSON CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

For the 2020 Capture Photography Festival, FrancoCanadian, Paris-based artist Kapwani Kiwanga has created Counter-Illumination (2020), a site-specific commission. This work is featured on the façade of the Dal Grauer building, a modernist power structure, partly obscuring its dominant glass façade. Kiwanga’s practice queries embedded power structures and encourages what she describes as “exit strategies” in order to visualize alternatives and negotiate a different future. In her recent work, Kiwanga has been interested in surveillance and how it manifests itself in legislation and architecture. She is equally interested in ways individuals and groups counter forced visibility and reconnaissance through cloaking techniques whether physical, behavioural, or digital. Kiwanga’s still life photograph, Counter-Illumination, comprises objects and materials that are related to seeing and obscuring: curtains, blinds, mirror, and glass. This image, covering a major portion of the building’s façade, is in direct dialogue with the edifice which is supporting it, evoking questions of visibility, transparency, and their use in surveillance and control. Completed in 1954, the BC Hydro’s Dal Grauer Substation was designed by the young architect Ned Pratt and artist B. C. Binning. The building was commissioned by the B.C. Electric Company, under the helm of then-president Edward Albert “Dal” Grauer, to bridge functional design and public art. The substation would go on to serve as a three-dimensional “canvas” that was said to resemble a Piet Mondrian or De Stijl painting. The modernist philosophy with which the building was designed emphasizes the link between art, architecture, and everyday life. With this in mind, Capture Photography Festival has commissioned artists annually to create new site-specific works to be installed on the Dal Grauer Substation’s façade. Drawing on the building itself, these projects temporarily emphasize the substation in the streetscape and reassert it as an architectural icon.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

28–29


Through Windows As Through History

Kapwani Kiwanga’s studies in anthropology and comparative religion are the backbone of her work, and her commitments to these interests are revealed in vibrant ways through her research-based projects. Over the past decade, Kiwanga has created sculptures, installations, photographs, performances, and moving images that delve into issues like materiality, social asymmetry, and perception. By combining scientific rationality, a poetic sensibility, and a commitment to social justice, Kiwanga gives form to the previously inchoate. By coming at topics from multiple and unexpected angles, Kiwanga illuminates surprising conjunctions: her works often act as loci for momentary, memorable connections, marking points of connection between moving information streams. Counter-Illumination (2020), Kiwanga’s contribution to the 2020 Capture Photography Festival, is no different. With this work, Kiwanga braids together relatively recent local histories in Vancouver with temporally and geographically distant narratives, and timely present concerns. Light and visibility are the locus points around which these stories intersect and to which Kiwanga brings depth and focus. Inaugurated in 1954, the Dal Grauer Substation is a threestory facility located mid-block on Burrard Street in Vancouver. Designed by the celebrated British Columbian architect Ned Pratt in collaboration with iconic local artist B. C. Binning, the industrial structure’s resolutely symmetrical concrete and glass façade epitomizes modernist architecture’s push to merge function and form with streamlined aesthetics. B.C. Electric Company’s then-President Albert Edward “Dal” Grauer took a chance when he commissioned the project: the building he greenlighted was the first visible public example of modernist architecture in its community. Notably, its edifice incorporates a glass curtain wall; this suggestion came from Binning, who challenged Pratt to create a design that would reveal its interior structure and activities. At Binning’s suggestion, the building’s interior walls were painted in a variety of colours that emphasized its symmetry and established distinct visual zones. Visible through exterior glazing, stairwells to the far left and right of the building zigzag between the Substation’s three floors. Following its inauguration, this germinal example of modernist architecture was a local beacon. As historian

Public Art

DEAN DADERKO

Abraham Rogatnick noted, “Binning created a composition of brilliant colours to enhance the meticulously arranged architectural and industrial elements that…slowed traffic on the street as people prolonged the moment to observe and enjoy it.”1 What remains of modernism’s promises of efficiency and a better life? In hindsight, some of its experiments fared better than others, while previously unrecognized blind spots and limitations were revealed. It’s now clear, for instance, that there is not one modernist narrative, but many. At Binning’s behest in 1956, the building’s original colour scheme, featuring a palette of colours drawn from California constructions, was updated. Red, yellow, and blue-painted walls were replaced with colours that were locally resonant for Binning. They included woodsy greens, maritime blues, and a variety of greys inspired by foggy skies. From our current vantage point, staking claims for progress on how closely one adheres to a set of stylistic precepts seems blindly aspirational, if not totally misguided. Limiting modernist ideologies have been expanded through the recognition of local vernaculars. Challenging the geographic primacy of so-called centres opens new horizons: the centre is wherever we are. With this recognition comes the ability to ask broader questions about how and why particular ideological regimes gain force, and how they attempt to retain it. Since its opening, the Substation’s presence has undergone a series of changes. As previously mentioned, Binning updated the building’s interior palette. In the 1980s, B.C. Hydro replaced the plate glass windows with panes of shatter-resistant plastic. While it’s said that this decision was motivated by public safety concerns, the new windows visibly deteriorated over years of exposure to the elements. The interior life of the building was obscured by foggy, greying panes. One critic noted that it seemed “disengage from public life.”2 Clarity can be experiential, metaphoric, or both. The ability to “see into” a structure suggests both visibility and systemic transparency. Conversely, the adage “what you see is what you get” has been spectacularly hollowed out by the


praxes of digital life, where narratives of self-presentation are moulded to suit particular subjectivities. Kiwanga’s Counter-Illumination steps into these confluences. For her commission, Kiwanga has created a two-story tall photographic image—the first unique photograph of its kind in her storied career. Shot in the artist’s studio, a handful of elements—a globe light and lighted rod, sheets of two-way mirror glass, and a Venetian blind—coalesce in an elegant and dynamic composition which toggles effortlessly between abstraction and familiarity. Plays of reflection and shadow reveal the compressed depth of Kiwanga’s photographic composition. The image and the building play a game of concealing and revealing. Kiwanga’s image may function like a curtain, but it also acts like an X-ray, coaxing us to peer inside.

Kapwani Kiwanga’s work considers the phenomenology of vision. Also, and importantly, it considers the notion of vision within a broader frame: “What is invisible?” “What is made invisible?” “How can we avoid being seen?” Kiwanga shows us that transparency and perceptibility are intimately linked; they are contingent and subject to blockading. It is up to us, as Counter-Illumination suggests, to open the blinds as we assess what the future brings.

Deep looking can be thwarted or encouraged by the surfaces and systems we encounter. Mediation is a mitigating factor. Surveillance and sousveillance—acts in which participants record their activities via personal portable technologies— inspire Kiwanga. Counter-Illumination is a clear descendant of a recent series of the artist’s sculptures in which she affixes lighting elements to geometrically-solid stone plinths. Kiwanga’s sculptures—and Counter-Illumination by extension—come out of her research of lantern laws. Enacted in New York City in the eighteenth century, lantern laws demanded that enslaved black, mixed-race, and indigenous peoples were required to carry lit candles if they were moving through the city after dusk and were unaccompanied by a white person. “Lantern laws made the lit candle a supervisory device…that marked these people as security risks after dark.”3 In lantern laws, visibility is a structure of monitoring and control exercised by invisible legal and civic power structures.

Kapwani Kiwanga, Counter-Illumination, 2020. Courtesy of the artist. Installation mock-up: Alina Ilyasova. Photo: Nelson Mouëllic.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

1  Abraham J. Rogatnick, “A Passion for the Contemporary,” in B.C. Binning (Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre Ltd., 2006), 18 – 21. 2  Adele Weder, “City Abandons Its Heritage Gems,” The Tyee, November 5, 2007, https://thetyee.ca/ Views/2007/11/05/NoHeritage/. 3  Simone Brown, Dark Matters (Durham: Duke University Press, 2015), 78.

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Capture Limited Editions

Kapwani Kiwanga Counter-Illumination (detail), 2020 digital photograph 20.32 Ă— 25.4 cm Courtesy of the artist Edition of 30 $400

View all the Capture Artist Editions on the Capture website at capturephotofest.com/capture-artist-editions/ Krista Belle Stewart, Earthbound Mnemonic (detail), 2019

Edition of 24, $100

Nadia Belerique, In the Belly of a Cat (detail), 2018

Edition of 30, $300

Capture is pleased to announce the addition of Kapwani Kiwanga’s Counter-Illumination (detail), 2020 to the Capture Artist Editions series.

Alex Morrison, Brand New Era Social Club (detail), 2017

All proceeds from sales of editions, which range in price from just $100 to $400, support Capture Photography Festival Society, a non-profit cultural organization.

Edition of 50, $350

To purchase, email info@capturephotofest.com or visit www.squareup.com/store/capturephotofest/

Edition of 40, $350

Stephen Waddell, The Collector and Showroom, 2016

Jessica Eaton, DG Weave, 2015

Edition of 50, SOLD OUT

Patryk Stasieczek, Tactile Compositional Iteration, 2016

This edition was printed by Tricera Print, the exclusive print partner of the 2020 Capture Photography Festival.

Varied edition of 30, $123

With each Kapwani Kiwanga Artist Edition purchased, Tricera Print offers a 15% discount on framing.

Edition of 50, $400

Ian Wallace, Clayoquot Protest (August 9, 1993), 1993/2015

Dana Claxton, WHY, 2014

Edition of 30, $300

Scott Massey, Spectrum Study 4 (infrared), 2014

Edition of 50, $100

Danny Singer, Trossachs, 2005/2014

Edition of 100, $200

Birthe Piontek, Trouts, 2013

Edition of 50, $100

Public Art


Kapwani Kiwanga, Counter-Illumination (detail), 2020, digital photograph, 20.32 Ă— 25.4 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

32–33


TransLink

APRIL 2020 – MARCH 2021

MOYRA DAVEY

Plymouth Rock

PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH TRANSLINK

Moyra Davey, Untitled (animal pictures), 2019. Courtesy of the artist; greengrassi, London; and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York. Installation mock-up: Alina Ilyasova.

Moyra Davey will deliver the inaugural Capture Keynote Lecture on Thur. April 2 at 6 pm at Emily Carr University of Art + Design (p. 109).

Public Art


CURATED BY EMMY LEE WALL CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

The Stadium – Chinatown SkyTrain Station features the work of New York – based artist Moyra Davey in the inaugural presentation of her series Plymouth Rock. This suite of black-and-white photographs of fowl and equines offers an affecting juxtaposition to the surrounding urban environment in which they are installed. The focus on animal imagery speaks to rural life in a language that arguably positions its subjects “outside of history.” We had the opportunity to discuss this body of work with Davey and she kindly offered insight into the series.

EMMY LEE WALL

Can you tell us a bit about how the idea for the Untitled (animal pictures) series came to be? MOYRA DAVEY

I’d been planning to photograph the political theorist Dalie Giroux, but ended up taking pictures of her animals instead. ELW

What inspired you to visit the home of the political philosopher Dalie Giroux in La Pêche, Québec? MD

I got to know her first via her writing and a YouTube lecture, then I met her in Montreal and we did a recording together. She had wanted that meeting to take place in La Pêche, but I was only able to visit her there at a later date. By then it was spring and there were swarms of voracious mosquitos and near-constant rain, and I was trying to take photographs in those conditions with an old Hasselblad camera.

Moyra Davey, Untitled (animal pictures), 2019, silver gelatin print, 30.7 × 38.6 cm. Courtesy of the artist; greengrassi, London; and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.

At the same time, I was reading a very beautiful bestiary text by Dalie Giroux, about art for animals. I was thinking about it as I made the photographs, and would email certain scans to her, such that the photos became part of a dialogue with Dalie. ELW

ELW

These photographs relate to a film. Can you tell us about the film and describe the relationship between the film and the photographs?

What unites these three writers—Baldwin, Vallières, and Giroux—for you? MD

They are all revolutionary thinkers and activists.

MD

The film is called I confess, and it triangulates three writers: the novelist and essayist, James Baldwin, the Québecois revolutionary, Pierre Vallières, and the political philosopher, Dalie Giroux. It’s an essayistic work anchored by the emergent themes of race, poverty, and language in North America. It began as a meditation on Baldwin’s novel Another Country then took an unexpected deep dive into the turbulent separatist politics of Québec in the 1960s and 70s, as filtered through my childhood recollection of the events. Dalie’s dogs and chickens made their way into the film via a Skype recording—the chickens are in the yard and on the porch, and the dogs are a wild pack bumping up against the camera and gamboling through the frame.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

ELW

When we were discussing this series earlier, you very poetically described these works as being about animals that stand "outside of history.” Can you tell us what you mean by this? MD

I have to credit Liz Magor with that observation. She watched the video and immediately started to comment on how all the humans are consumed or inspired by one thing or another, caught up in history, ending history, and the animals are oblivious—free and wild and untrammeled by the weight of human concerns. Until we take them down with us, that is.

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ELW

This phrase “outside of history” really struck a cord because, for me, there is something very timeless about this suite of images, almost universal. Is that something you were deliberately thinking about when you were shooting these animals? Is this why they are shot in black and white versus colour? MD

There is actually another player in my constellation of influences, and it is Peter Hujar, who was unrivaled when it came to photographing animals. Shooting in square format and in black and white, I am actively channelling him, and finding out how unbelievably difficult it is to make this type of photograph. I am still trying to relax into the process and learn from it. ELW

Hujar’s depiction of animals is so striking—they are very much portraits or studies of each individual subject. Is capturing the essence of each animal what you consider so challenging about creating this kind of work? MD

There’s the technical aspect—animals rarely hold still—so you need a fast shutter speed, you can’t direct, and you need to be quick, but the bigger challenge, “capturing the essence” as you say, is harder to put into words. I found that some of the better photographs came about when I was learning about equine behaviour, like pair bonding and the habit of standing mane to tail to double up on fly-swishing. ELW

What considerations come into play for you when you are conceiving a public art installation rather than preparing works for a more typical gallery installation? MD

There is a certain freedom to working on the public art piece. The photos get blown up, cropped, things I rarely do. You can be more loose and experimental in your approach to the photograph because it’s about what will make an impact when seen quickly and from a distance. ELW

There’s a definite power to these images and I think they are even more affecting because of their site of presentation. The works will be installed at the Stadium – Chinatown SkyTrain Station, which is quite a juxtaposition for these rural, quiet, contemplative images. Were you thinking about this context when you proposed this series? MD Yes. I love the stark contrast of rural/animal and urban/ human cultures.

Public Art

Moyra Davey, Untitled (animal pictures), 2019, silver gelatin print, 30.7 × 38.6 cm. Courtesy of the artist; greengrassi, London; and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York.


2020

36 – 37


Pattison Outdoor Billboards

MARCH 20 – APRIL 26

Absence / Presence

CHRISTINA LESLIE BIDEMI OLOYEDE

SITED ON SEVEN BILLBOARDS ALONG THE ARBUTUS GREENWAY, BETWEEN FIR ST AND BURRARD ST, VANCOUVER

Christina Leslie, Bathers, 2018, digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist. Installation mock-up: Alina Ilyasova.

Join Madalen Benson, Festival Manager, for the Arbutus Greenway Billboards Tour on Sat. April 18 at 2 pm (p. 122).

Public Art


CURATED BY JULIE CROOKS

The works of Christina Leslie and Bidemi Oloyede explore the tensions of race, place, and belonging. Leslie’s photographs are drawn from her Morant Bay series—a personal meditation on loss, absence, and resilience in a small town in Jamaica. Leslie employs a distant, detached approach to photographing her subjects and uses the lush natural landscape as a backdrop. Her subjects are at one with their surroundings as they seek solace in a local waterfall known for its healing properties. The results are masterful photographs characterized by a reserved intimacy. Oloyede’s images are mined from his extensive personal archive of street photography featuring portraits of racialized subjects in Toronto. A new immigrant himself, Oloyede has experienced the pain of alienation and invisibility in a big city. As a result, he is not a neutral or detached observer. One can sense his presence and his insistence on making the random strangers he encounters hyper-visible within the bustling urban landscape that he walks and shoots. Through their works, Leslie and Oloyede position the global multiplicity of blackness both within the Caribbean and in Canada. Christina Leslie makes photographs that mine/excavate and respond to her Jamaican-Canadian heritage and personal family histories. These concerns have preoccupied her work beginning with her series Every Ting Irie (2010), her graduate thesis work at Ontario College of Art and Design University (OCAD U) in Toronto. These portraits use the colour palette of Pan-Africanism and reference the jacket covers of Jamaican records and reggae and ska posters from the early 1960s and 1970s. Leslie's insertion of the language of Jamaican patois offered intimate reflections from Leslie’s family on migration and notions of settlement and life in Canada. Morant Bay (2019) extends some of the themes that continue to preoccupy Leslie almost a decade later but from the perspective of the community in which her father grew up before immigrating to Canada. The small town of Morant Bay is in southeast Jamaica and the capital of St. Thomas Parish. In 1865, the town was the scene of a protest (later to be called the Morant Bay Rebellion) by its local black and brown peasants against the country’s deeply unequal and racist social and political policies more than thirty years after the abolition of slavery. The protests escalated and were eventually brutally quashed by the colonial regime. In the aftermath, over six hundred people were killed, many of them hanged for their roles in the rebellion. According to legend, after the Rebellion, Queen Victoria, in anger, broke her pen and uttered the words "those rebels, let them suffer.” More than 150 years later, Christina Leslie’s series confronts the residues of slavery and emancipation as evidenced in the economic decline of the community. Yet despite such

2020

Capture Photography Festival

precarious conditions, Leslie captures fleeting moments of transcendence. In the photograph Falls, Leslie’s unobtrusive camera captures the contrasting moods of the dynamism of the thundering Falls against the perfect stillness of the lone figure in the foreground. Leslie’s Morant Bay portraits are shot with intimacy and directness to record the resiliency of the people whose lives she continues to document. Bidemi Oloyede’s practice is chiefly concerned with Black subjectivity in the Canadian landscape. As a new émigré who arrived in 2014 to study photography at OCAD U, Oloyede has been intrigued with two things: the materiality of the photographic object and how to document the multiple and complex black communities in the urban Canadian landscape. Oloyede is not only interested in the photograph, but also its making. This interest led to a fascination for the older photographic processes such as daguerreotypes and tintypes and their ability to produce vibrant and evocative images. In his final year research project, Oloyede used a large format camera to take photographs of friends and acquaintances who are of African descent. He then created tintypes using the nineteenth-century process, which uses metal blackened with lacquer and coated with photographic emulsion. His tintypes of sitters wearing an assortment of hoodies, trainers, and braided Afro hairstyles places these objects in dialogue with the problematic history of photography and Black subjectivity. In his series Canada Day (2019), Oloyede extends his explorations of blackness in Canada characterized by his intuitive eye and fluid street documentary approach. His curiosity about the long history of blacks in Canada served as the catalyst to photograph the Canadian cultural landscape and their presence therein. Here he records a range of individuals during Canada Day festivities. Over the course of an hour he captured a range of black subjects whom, as he observes, “enact self-fashioning gestures” to position their identities as Canadians. For example, in one photograph Oloyede captures two Muslim women. One woman confronts his camera with a weary gaze while the other, seemingly unaffected by the intrusion, takes a selfie. Their attire, the demure headdress under the cowboy hat emblazoned with the Canadian flag, sutures together the complex notion of “multiculturalism” that Oloyede is so keen to unpack in his photography. Oloyede’s moody photograph highlights such dualities framed within a public spectacle of nationhood. The works on view are part of a larger series in which he continues to explore the enduring presence of black subjects within the fabric of Canadian society.

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Pattison Outdoor Billboards

ROTATING INSTALLATION FROM APRIL 2020 – MARCH 2021

ELIZABETH ZVONAR

Cut and Paste SITED ON A BILLBOARD AT KINGSWAY AND FRASER ST, VANCOUVER THE GREYCHURCH BILLBOARD IS GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY JANE IRWIN AND ROSS HILL

Elizabeth Zvonar, French Fantasy, 2020, digital collage. Courtesy of the artist and Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto.

Canadian Art Spring Issue Launch: In Conversation with Elizabeth Zvonar and Julian Hou on Tue. April 7 at 6 pm at Inform Contract (p. 110).

Public Art


CURATED BY EMMY LEE WALL CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

French Fantasy APRIL 2 – J ULY 14, 2020

Gattamelata AUGUST 1 – N OVEMBER 17, 2020

Women’s Work DECEMBER 1, 2020 – MARCH 18, 2021

Fragmentation and juxtaposition are two ways in which Elizabeth Zvonar challenges the power of representation within iconic images from Western art history. Cutting and pasting pictures from art history textbooks into collages, Zvonar examines their underlying systems and structures.

TEXT BY MADALEN BENSON CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

image of hell from Last Judgement (c. 1430 – 4 0). The result is a commentary on labour in cities, identifying the strife of ill-paying jobs as a hellish condition of cosmopolitan life. By appropriating, splicing, and remixing these images, Zvonar forces them to recontextualize one another. She uses a formal gesture of mirroring throughout all three images: the feet and the curtains in French Fantasy extend beyond the frame, architectural motifs in Gattamelata transform building façades into endless patterns, and the mirror is cut in Women’s Work shifting the perspective. Through mirroring, a multiplication of the subject and form emerges, reinforcing Zvonar’s move to recontextualize the original images. From the objectification of women, to power relations inherent in images, and to the realities of labour in urban life, they serve as a testament to the relation between representation and reality, or idealization and life.

In French Fantasy, the face and torso of the figure from Ingres’s La Grande Odalisque (1814) is removed and replaced with a detail from an image of a funerary statue of ancient Egyptian Prince Rahotep and Princess Nofret (c. 2600 BC). This arrangement obscures the identity of the woman in Ingres’s portrait, replacing it with the stylized arm of Nofret. In Zvonar’s image, both women are released from idealization and the viewer’s fantasy; their objectification becomes obfuscated. Gattamelata juxtaposes the Mona Lisa (1503 – 6) by Da Vinci with an image of Donatello’s Equestrian Statue of Gattamelata (c. 1453). The image of the statue, which represents Erasmo da Narni, a military captain, is removed and replaced by an offset image of the Mona Lisa. The arms from another image of the Mona Lisa floats below, proportionally larger in scale than the fragment of the face above. In Zvonar’s collage, the figure from the Mona Lisa becomes larger than life, her face much greater in size than that of the statue, with her hands enveloping the ground on which he stands. The equestrian statue as a symbol of male power is negated by the male representation of a woman. Systems of power and representation in both images are challenged. In Women’s Work, Zvonar cuts up both black-and-white and colour images of Manet’s Un bar aux Folies Bergere (1882) and mixes it with Fernand Leger’s The City (1919). The section of Manet’s painting that is removed from Zvonar’s collage is that of the mirrored male figure that appears to be the subject of the worker’s attention. What remains is her despondent gaze, multiplied through two additional sets of eyes. This combination lays over Jan Van Eyck’s

2020

Capture Photography Festival

40–41


Pattison Outdoor Billboards

APRIL 6 – MAY 10

FLOOD (Displaced Horizon)

HOWARD URSULIAK KYLE JURON BARBARA COLE LORNA BROWN MARKO SIMCIC COLIN GRIFFITHS

SITED ON FOUR BILLBOARDS ALONG EXPO BLVD BETWEEN CARRALL ST AND ABBOTT ST IN NORTHEAST FALSE CREEK, VANCOUVER

Howard Ursuliak, Kyle Juron, Barbara Cole, Lorna Brown, Marko Simcic, Colin Griffiths, FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) VA014942, 2020, digital image, printed, folded, and re-photographed, installation mock-up.

A tour of FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) will take place on Sat. April 25 at 2 pm (p. 124).

Public Art


CURATED BY OTHER SIGHTS FOR ARTISTS’ PROJECTS

FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) is a series of images located on four billboards facing east and west on Expo Boulevard between Carrall and Abbott Streets in Northeast False Creek. Working in collaboration with the Other Sights team, Howard Ursuliak photographed features of the neighbourhood’s shorelines and skylines in a standard digital format, and worked with Kyle Juron to print and manipulate the images while still wet, folding the horizon in and behind the foreground. These tactile compositions— pleated into the correct billboard ratio—were then rephotographed. Towering glass buildings are glimpsed behind a forest of wharf pilings; flotillas of pleasure craft collide with waterfront properties on the swell formed by the folded paper. Placed back into the site of False Creek, FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) triggers and disturbs our recognition of the familiar surroundings and iconic details of urban Vancouver. Very recently underwater, this former tidal mudflat supported major salmon and trout runs and was an abundant locale for First Nations people. Northeast False Creek—land created a hundred years ago to underpin the expansion of the Great Northern and Canadian Northern Railways—has given a foundation to waves of development stirred by resource extraction industries, the Expo 86 World’s Fair, and the future removal of the Georgia Viaduct. Floods of capital have rushed in over the century, to the condominiums, marinas, and casinos that line the foreshore. A horizon conjures a future—an aspirational trajectory into photography’s pictorial space. Its forward focus generates desire for an imagined outcome, as does the advertising image. Billboards carry quick messages, also urgent, for viewers moving from one place to another. The four images, two facing east, two facing west, reflect back to the viewer the arc of the SkyTrain line and the vertical high rises that we pass alongside. This uncanny effect is perceived subtly,

through repeated views, in the way that a city’s identity is reinforced and accrues as we come and go. When a horizon goes missing, the future is obscured and indeterminate. FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) has tucked it out of sight. The wetness of the pictures, captured in the detail of droplets and watery distortions, reveals the complex process of their production. Without the expected element of language or text, un-slick and hyper-located, the artwork situates us in our present moment, perhaps bottoming out, perhaps run aground. FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) is the most recent in a series of Other Sights projects that consider the Vancouver foreshore and waterways as public space. These include The Blue Cabin (2019) in collaboration with grunt gallery and C3; The Foreshore and The Foreshore Listens (2016 – 18) in collaboration with Access Gallery and Contemporary Art Gallery; Coastal Camera Obscura (2017) with Donald Lawrence; Deadhead (2014) with Cedric, Nathan, and Jim Bomford; and The Games are Open (2010 – 15) with Folke Köbberling and Martin Kaltwasser. In 2014, as part of Capture Photography Festival, Other Sights presented Monument to Mysterious Fires. Made up of four billboards installed collectively in a parking lot in East Vancouver, the project triggered historical and recent memories of the neighbourhood and explored the history of the city through the lens of the FIRE economy (Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate). The images on display juxtaposed archival images of the 2009 fire in Mount Pleasant where several local businesses and over seventeen artist studios were lost with archival images from the Great Fire of 1886—an event that harkened the original development of Mount Pleasant itself. www.othersights.ca

Howard Ursuliak, Kyle Juron, Barbara Cole, Lorna Brown, Marko Simcic, Colin Griffiths, FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) VA014932, 2020, digital image, printed, folded, and re-photographed.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

42–43


Canada Line 2020

APRIL – S EPTEMBER 2020

PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CANADA LINE PUBLIC ART PROGRAM—INTRANSIT BC

For the 2020 multi-sited Canada Line Public Art Project, Capture has installed lens-based artworks at Canada Line stations throughout Greater Vancouver. This year’s project stretches across eight locations, from Waterfront to Lansdowne Station, and includes contributions from Capture and other local art organizations including Access Gallery, Arts Umbrella, Booooooom, Contemporary Art Gallery, grunt gallery, and Richmond Art Gallery.

Waterfront Vancouver City Centre Yaletown – Roundhouse Olympic Village Broadway – City Hall

King Edward

ZONE 1 ZONE 2

Aberdeen Lansdowne

Public Art


Waterfront Station

➊ Wanderings

ANNA BINTA DIALLO

CURATED BY KATIE BELCHER ACCESS GALLERY

In Wanderings, Anna Binta Diallo presents seven works of photographic collage, to be read individually or in series, considering how folk stories influence the formation of identity. Iterative in nature, this body of work shifts with each presentation, sometimes expanding into an exhibition space through sculpture. With the Waterfront Station installation, Diallo reimagines elements of her ongoing project as a sequence, inviting commuters to “read” the images as they pass—finding a narrative, or pausing in a single moment. Of her work, Diallo writes, “Casting a wide net on our Collective History, I reinterpreted folk stories and reimagined or reused them in my own way to create new mythologies. Using archives, books, found imagery, the Internet, memory, and oral traditions, I created a series of new images that can be continuously re-organized.”

If photography freezes a moment in time, these collaged images release and recapture this moment, turning photographic fact to expansive folklore. Refusing to privilege any fact over folklore, Diallo makes space for complex and contradictory experiences, upending the linear narrative privileged by colonial histories. Diallo’s images reject a single truth, implicating countless and complex understandings of Self and Other. Part of Capture Photography Festival’s 2020 Feature Exhibition program, an installation of Wanderings will also be on view at Access Gallery, April 4 – May 30 (p. 62 – 65).

Collecting visual materials, folktales, and histories from her own heritage and beyond, Diallo investigates shared stories through a transcultural lens. Drawing on a wide array of stories, Diallo’s weighted imagery is eased from their sometimes-heavy contexts, allowing them to be read simultaneously as specific and unfixed. As a whole, her project engages with contemporary issues of colonialism, slavery, displacement, national identity/affiliation, migration/exile, racism and Othering, the refugee crisis, and geographical borders, ultimately investigating identity as it relates to various histories, loss, nostalgia, and diaspora. Through cutting, pasting, and splicing photographs, she builds new photographic, illustrative, and geographic fictions. Figures and animal forms composed from varied sources are situated in a white space, disrupting any sense of ground or landscape. The figures are at once historical characters and deep space wanderers; their faces made of galaxies and landforms; wearing motifs constructed from material residue of myriad cultural lexicons, ethnographic illustrations, and various landscapes.

Stephanie Bokenfohr will be guiding a Described Tour of Anna Binta Diallo's artwork on Sun. April 5 at 11 am at Waterfront Station (p. 120).

2020

Capture Photography Festival

Anna Binta Diallo, Whisperin’ Doves from the Wanderings collage series, 2019, digital reproductions of collages printed on Photo-Tex removable adhesive fabric and originally mounted on walls, aluminum composite, and PVC board. Courtesy of the artist.

44–45


Vancouver City Centre Station IMPATIENTLY INCLINED

➋ Human Nature—Last Supper

CURATED BY WHESS HARMAN GRUNT GALLERY

For grunt gallery’s curatorial contribution to Capture's Public Art Program, we have selected an image from Impatiently Inclined’s series, Human Nature. The collective, comprised of Theo Pelmus, Kris Snowbird, and Daina Warren, have been building a series of work that connects these three artists from vastly different backgrounds by finding points of commonality through process. The selected photograph harkens to Da Vinci’s Last Supper, but is also an image laden with signifiers of a vernacular specific to Snowbird’s home. Carefully suspended with an imperious gravity, the composition is initially easily recognizable through a lens of Western art history, but quickly distorts and begins to speak through another dialect. Snagged between these two visual languages, the dialogue of this image broadens into a wider net of questions in Indigenous and non-Indigenous relations while the informal composure of the image’s participants shapes a new lens wherein the subjects are unconcerned with facilitating that translation.

The image captures a point of departure; it draws attention through the ubiquity of religious iconography, but falls back easily and unruffled into its own vernacular. Doing so demonstrates the power in abandoning the tension that often comes from a pressure to conform to Western art history citation to become legible. What remains in the space between the languages of this image is if the viewer is entitled to an answer, or must consider the discomfort in encountering a barrier in understanding. While potentially frustrating, this question is also the power of this work and that power is managed through a carefully considered act of withholding that is both protective and humorous. This work is both familiar and poignantly illegible; placing this work within the urban landscape allows it to lend its dissonance in the overpacked social situation of urban spaces by presenting a not entirely decipherable intimacy.

Impatiently Inclined, Human Nature—Last Supper, 2019, digital photograph. Courtesy of the artists.

Public Art


Yaletown – Roundhouse Station

➌ A Railway Pilgrimage in Pakistan

MADIHA AIJAZ

CURATED BY KIMBERLY PHILLIPS CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY AND ZARMEENE SHAH

As part of her solo exhibition Memorial for the lost pages at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Yaletown – Roundhouse Station hosts a suite of images from A Railway Pilgrimage in Pakistan, a collaboration that Pakistani artist Madiha Aijaz embarked on with the late New York – based writer Annie Khan in 2014. Aijaz’s photographs, which accompanied Khan’s essay, described Pakistan’s most famous (if slightly beleaguered) rail line, the Khyber Mail. Aijaz’s richly cinematic and intimate pictures offer complex meditations on pleasure, public space, and the legacies of colonialism. See also the exhibition Memorial for the lost pages at the Contemporary Art Gallery, April 17 – July 5 (p. 101).

Madiha Aijaz, from the series A Railway Pilgrimage in Pakistan, 2014, archival inkjet print on Legacy fibre paper. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

46–47


Olympic Village Station SLATER BILN, AVI MARU, EVAN MUIR, SAM TORTELL, AND MATISSE WENBAN WERE LED BY ARTISTS KRISTEN ROOS AND LEAH PERRY

➍ construct: past, present and future visions

CURATED BY ROXANNE GAGNON AND KRISTEN ROOS, ARTS UMBRELLA

construct: past, present and future visions (2020) is an installation of works by Arts Umbrella Teen Intensive photography students exploring contrasting areas of Vancouver. These emerging photographers created these works on photo walks, representing both the past and present state of the city where the future was not so far away from the images captured. Their future visions emerged through experiments in digital and physical manipulation in the studio. The installation features photographs created by a class of photography students ages thirteen to nineteen during the summer session at Arts Umbrella. See also the exhibition Location; past, present and future at Arts Umbrella South Surrey, April 4 – 25 (p. 139).

Arts Umbrella Photography Students, construct: past, present and future visions, 2020. Courtesy of the artists. Installation mock-up: Alina Ilyasova.

Public Art


Broadway – City Hall Station CHRISTOPHER LACROIX

➎ We do not know when we started, we will not know when we will end

CURATED BY EMMY LEE WALL CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

Christopher Lacroix’s work investigates the ways in which queer existence simultaneously aspires to and rejects dominant social norms and structures. This tension is played out in a multidisciplinary practice that includes photography, video, and performance that, as the artist states, employs “abject self-deprecation as a means of self‑preservation and resistance.” His work, at once tragic and campy, acknowledges and explores this space of being that is often inherently conflicted and requires constant effort to negotiate.

deflated vessels. Rather than discarding these objects that have served their purpose, the artist holds them up triumphantly, monumentalizing them perhaps in the hopes that they will once again become legible.

We do not know when we started, we will not know when we will end is a series of photographs of the artist holding crumpled foil letter balloons. The foil balloons are the remnants of a video work in which the artist used these party decorations to spell out the statements “I AM SORRY,” “YOU’RE WELCOME,” “YOU’RE SORRY,” and “I AM WELCOME," eventually squeezing each balloon letter until it popped. These statements, both submissive and defiant, through this humorous act of destruction, become as impotent as their

Christopher Lacroix, Hold tight, I have a story (I am sorry), 2019, archival inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

48–49


King Edward Station Fragments of a River

ANGELA BLAŽANOVIĆ

CURATED BY CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL AND BOOOOOOOM

PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH BOOOOOOOM

Angela Blažanović’s practice, which incorporates sculpture and photography, investigates the relationship between the natural and the artificial. In her series installed at the King Edward Station titled Fragments of a River, she has photographed repurposed discarded objects retrieved from the banks of the river Thames in London. Blažanović started this project in September 2018 after she first visited the shore of the river Thames. She was interested in the random objects that would wash ashore, stating “…I realized that we are so used to seeing any kind of waste and rubbish scattered around everywhere that we do not question their existence; we accept it as part of the landscape. I started imagining where the objects came from and what stories lay behind them.”

composing these sculptures to create what the artist called a “moment of balance” which almost anticipates an eventual collapse, she invites her audience to reevaluate the purpose of this waste and breathes new life into objects that were forgotten on the river’s shore. Blažanović uses these poetic images to evoke for the viewer the invisible narratives and histories that objects carry with them. While these images are void of figures, these largely human-made objects also evoke the relationship between humans and their environment, specifically the current environmental crisis that affects us all.

A piece of rope, a blue plastic ball, bottles, and wire, amongst other found debris, are combined to form delicately balanced sculptural arrangements. Blažanović would typically create one sculpture per day, relying on her daily findings to create a sort of record of her outing. In carefully

Angela Blažanović, Two Glass Bottles, Pint Glass, Round Metal Plate, some Wire and a White Tile I, 2019, digital scan from 120 film. Courtesy of the artist.

Public Art


Aberdeen Station

➐ Self-portrait with mended flesh

MANUEL AXEL STRAIN

CURATED BY SHAUN DACEY RICHMOND ART GALLERY

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH RICHMOND PUBLIC ART

Self-portrait with mended flesh by two-spirit artist Manuel Axel Strain is a diptych depicting the artist’s connection to their Grandmother. The work is born out of the artist’s internalized struggle to accept their own identity. Wrapped in their grandmother’s scarf, the artist’s arms metaphorically carry a spiritual connection and kinship to their ancestors. With such gestures of guidance and care by the older generation, the artist reflects on the traumatic times of their life, expressed in terms of vulnerability and resilience in reference to current and historical forms of colonial violence. “It is my personal belief that the insecurities I felt in relation to who I am are a direct impact of the forced assimilationist [...] values put onto First Nations people. The work addresses death, mourning, healing, revitalization, personal narratives, mental health, and colonization.” —Manuel Axel Strain

Manuel Axel Strain, Self-portrait with mended flesh, 2020, photo installation. Courtesy of the artist's ancestors, Helen Point, and Marie Eustache.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

50–51


Lansdowne Station

➑ Schilling’s House

EMILY NEUFELD

CURATED BY NAN CAPOGNA RICHMOND ART GALLERY

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH RICHMOND PUBLIC ART PROGRAM

Schilling’s House is one of many abandoned farmhouses punctuating the Canadian prairies, homes built by settler migrant farmers, who came in waves during the 1800s. Forming part of the complex history of colonization in Canada, the houses—now decaying—are slowly returning to the land.

to follow the same fate as the house. Neufeld likens the interventions to “funerary rites,” a final acknowledgement of the synthesis between people and the place they occupied.

Emily Neufeld’s practice focuses on place, specifically examining human traces within the domestic environment. Growing up on the Canadian prairies, a descendant of Mennonites, her interest lies in the relationships between the environment and the people who inhabit it, and the influence each has on the other. Over the last two years Neufeld has visited and photographed a dozen of these empty houses, where the work takes on a performative aspect. Once in the structures, she considers the history of the inhabitants, the building with its contents, and performs interventions—creating sculptures from the various materials found within the homes and yards. These are photographed and left with the house when she leaves,

In the Schilling house, located in southeastern Alberta, Neufeld removed the lower corner of the structure and brought prairie grasses back inside, across part of the first floor. Neufeld summarizes the experience and intervention— “the house remains standing, though more precariously than before, while the prairie waits patiently to reclaim this recently ceded bit of territory.”

Emily Neufeld, Schilling’s House, 2018, photograph of sculptural intervention. Courtesy of the artist.

Public Art


2020

Capture Photography Festival

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Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen ELISABETH BELLIVEAU

CURATED BY EMMY LEE WALL WITH CHELSEA YUILL CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

APRIL 2020

A Vase with Pale Roses (Animations on Still Life) INTERSECTION OF BROADWAY AND KINGSWAY ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE INDEPENDENT BUILDING, VANCOUVER SCREEN HOURS: SU – TH: 9 AM – 9:30 PM; FR&SA: 9 AM – 10:30 PM PRESENTED BY CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL IN PARTNERSHIP WITH GRUNT GALLERY, ORGANIZERS OF THE MOUNT PLEASANT COMMUNITY ART SCREEN

Elisabeth Belliveau, Still life with fallen fruit, 2019, time lapse and stop-motion animation video, 5:51. Made by Elisabeth Belliveau at Studio Kura (Itoshima) and Youkobo Art Projects (Tokyo). Courtesy of the artist.

Public Art


TEXT BY CHELSEA YUILL CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

As a self-taught animator, Elisabeth Belliveau explores contemporary life through stop-motion animation and sculpture. For this year’s Festival, Belliveau presents four works on grunt gallery’s Mount Pleasant Community Art Screen: Still life with fallen fruit (2019), Troisieme (2017), Izanami (2017), and Ballroom (2016). Through movement and digital technology, Belliveau creates a stage to capture the life of objects that reference the Western canon, hierarchies, value, labour, and interdisciplinarity from a feminist material perspective. Teetering between the artificial and natural, her works consider what image-making is and can be while posing the question, “What are the politics involved when things come to the table?” Originally from Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Belliveau is currently based in Treaty 6 Territory ᐊᒥᐢᑿᒋᐚᐢᑲᐦᐃᑲᐣ Amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton, AB) where she teaches at MacEwan University. Belliveau completed a BFA with Honours at the Alberta University of the Arts, and an MFA in Studio Arts at Concordia University. She has completed several international residencies and has recently exhibited at Momenta Biennale, Montreal (2019), and at The Embassy of Canada Prince Takamado Gallery, Tokyo (2020). In the fall she will be presenting new work for the Alberta Biennial.

CHELSEA YUILL

How did you begin creating stop-motion animation? ELISABETH BELLIVEAU

After my undergrad—being a young artist, broke and doing residencies—I needed to find a way of having a sculptural practice that was mobile and inexpensive. A friend of mine snuck me into Quick Draw animation in Calgary and it just clicked. I thought “this is a way I can work where I can bring together, writing, time, and sculptural worlds through animation.”

women were limited to “low genres” such as still life, I was impressed with their subversion in this genre—what seems mundane hints to a narrative charged with meaning. I had the privilege of attending art residencies in Japan, where I saw Kabuki theatre, which has also been a major influence in the way that costumes and environments seamlessly transform right before your eyes. I was staging a lot of time-lapses that mixed organic and non-organic forms and I kept thinking about the moments in-between that are hard to catch because they’re invisible in human time. I started 3D printing organic materials, excerpting them in and out between the digital and material world to make visible that transformation. Now, I’m exploring lenticular printing and hope to use virtual reality in the future. CY

A term you’ve coined to describe the conceptual, material, and technological elements of your practice is the “digital erratic.” Could you share a bit more about this term? EB

The digital erratic comes from thinking about excerpting objects in and out of 3D space—from the digital to the material and the glitches or things that don’t translate. Years ago, I visited a glacial erratic in Okotoks, Alberta known as “Big Rock.” It’s a giant rock that was left behind when a glacier passed through. This rock bears a story of time and place yet is completely out of sync with its surroundings, a kind of glitch. I think of digital erratics similarly, as something that falls out, is left behind, or is out of place. “Digital” can be defined as relating to fingers, or to data and technology and “Erratic” is to deviate, to be inconsistent. CY

CY

There’s a circular rhythm to your work, sometimes looping between decay and life. Can you speak to the symbolism of it?

EB

The work I’ve been making for the past few years is in constant dialogue with the writings of Clarice Lispector (1920 – 77), a Brazilian novelist. The way she writes about inner lives and cycles resonates, as she thinks about time in a geological, cosmic, slow, and sometimes non-human way. The title of my forthcoming show this May in Toronto at Gallery 44 Centre for Contemporary Photography is Alone in the House, a line from Lispector’s last work A Breath of Life, where the character Angela desires to write a novel about the world of things.

What is your process when collecting materials and how do you actualize these moments of transformation where objects warp, morph, and become hybrids?

EB

Most of the objects I choose are based in an experience of place or time. They’re partly biographical and partly what’s at hand that I can use to quote artists, historical paintings, or poetry. Lately, I think a lot about women’s stories and women in art history, painters like Clara Peeters and Rachel Ruysch, who made their mark by inserting themselves into the Western canon through still life. With Peeters, she often painted her portrait into the reflections of household objects like cutlery and glass vessels. Since painters who were

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Jompet Kuswidananto, Body of God, 2011, video still. Courtesy of FarEastFarWest collection.

Capture's 2020 Featured Exhibition Program represents some of the most compelling lens-based art presented in this year's Festival.


Featured Exhibitions

Third Realm 58

The Polygon Gallery

Wanderings 62

Access Gallery

Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya 66

2020

Capture Photography Festival

Contemporary Art Gallery

56–57


Third Realm GROUP EXHIBITION

MARCH 31—MAY 17, 2020

THE POLYGON GALLERY 101 CARRIE CATES CT, NORTH VANCOUVER TUE – SU: 10 AM – 5 PM; M: CLOSED

CURATED BY DAVIDE QUADRIO

OPENING RECEPTION SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2 – 4 PM

Davide Quadrio will be giving a talk as part of the Capture Speaker Series on Thur. April 30 at 7 pm at The Polygon Gallery, followed by the Closing Reception of Capture Photography Festival (p. 111).

Xijing Men (Xijing Men, Tsuyoshi Ozawa , Chen Shaoxiong, and Gim Hong-sok), This is Xijing—The Life of the Xijing Presidents (Urban Planning), 2008, c-print. Courtesy of the artist, FarEastFarWest collection, and Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago.

Featured Exhibitions


Third Realm

Third Realm showcases a crucial period of artistic production in Asia from 2004 – 2019. The exhibition features artists who use photography, film, installation, and performance to investigate liminal spaces. Spanning a range of cultural contexts, the works disrupt binaries of global and local, past and present, sacred and secular. Including artists predominantly from China, as well as Thailand, the Philippines, Japan, Korea, and Indonesia, and projects developed in Asia by international artists, Third Realm brings together artworks from across East and Southeast Asia. The exhibition features many seminal figures in the Asian art scene, among them Birdhead, Cao Fei, Heman Chong, Comfortable Collective, FX Harsono, Jompet Kuswidananto, Lu Yang, Sutee Kunavichayanont, Surasi Kusolwong, Gary Ross Pastrana, Paola Pivi, Sun Xun, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Xijing Men, Yang Zhenzhong, Zhou Xiaohu, and others. Most of the works incorporate elements of performance and duration, and are concerned with ritual. The time-based actions are related to Buddhism, in which it is the process of an action that inscribes it with sacredness. Similarly, in process-driven art, the practice of the action in itself carries meaning. The artists employ ritual acts in the broadest sense to uncover the third realms that lie within liminal conditions. The tension between secular and sacred ritual is made apparent in the photographs of Paola Pivi and Lu Yang. Paola Pivi (Italy, b. 1971) compiles a photographic archive of Tibetan Buddhist tulkus, the recognized reincarnation of previous Buddhist masters. Lu Yang (China, b. 1984), on the other hand, is more interested in conflating the secular world of science with religion; her pop culture-influenced videos present animated Tibetan Buddhist deities using the latest technology in brain mapping. Several of the artists examine the performativity of ritual. Zhou Xiaohu (China, b. 1960) is interested in the various ways that performance can take on religious undertones. Using absurdist humour, Crazy English Camp (2010) explores the phenomenon of Li Yang, the founder of Crazy English, whose methods of teaching the language include shouting slogans from a pulpit in high-energy recitation. Zhou’s video emphasizes the spectacle of these presentations,

2020

Capture Photography Festival

and the associated fanaticism that borders on religious frenzy. Comfortable Collective (Jin Shan, China, b. 1977; Maya Kramer, USA, b. 1977; and Li Mu, China, b. 1974) is similarly concerned with critiquing institutions and group mentality, documenting a performance that slyly calls into question displays of national identity and group behaviour. FX Harsono (Indonesia, b. 1949) investigates his identity as an ethnically Chinese Indonesian by writing his name in Chinese characters in the rain, a meditative act that highlights the delicate nature of identity. Gary Ross Pastrana (Philippines, b. 1977) conducts an examination of selfhood using his own blood—which he literally forges with metal—in a work that explores the materiality of the body. Other artists observe the ritual of everyday life, particularly the collectives Birdhead (Song Tao, China, b. 1979, and Ji Weiyu, China, b. 1980) and Xijing Men (Ozawa Tsuyoshi, Japan, b. 1965; Chen Shaoxiong, China, 1962 – 2016; and Gim Hong-sok, Korea, b. 1964). Taking diaristic snapshots that range from self-portraits to glimpses of a shifting urban landscape, Birdhead’s photographs attempt to document urban life, fragment by fragment. Their approach incorporates a variety of images to represent the lives of urban Chinese youth during the early 2000s whereby the artistic action of documentation becomes, by extension, a

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Chinese currency. Her performance of RMB City Opera (2010) underscores modern China’s urban development and the related tension between past and present in a rapidly changing country. Sutee Kunavichayanont (Thailand, b. 1965) and Surasi Kusolwong (Thailand, b. 1965) also examine urban development and globalization, and its inherent threat to local culture—in their case, in their native Thailand. The exhibition offers insights into the sociopolitical shift during the 2000s when Asia’s economic prosperity began to command global attention. While often calling into question the limits of camera documentation and historical record, the artists exploit the directness of documentary images to reveal the complexities of hybrid identities and social change. Zhou Xiaohu, Vandalism portfolio (detail), 1974-75 (printed 1993), gelatin silver prints. Courtesy of Dr. J. Patrick & Patricia Kennedy.

ritualized act. Taking a more satirical approach, Xijing Men present a fictitious city that revels in the absurd, creating a set of rules of city life to satirize Chinese social and bureaucratic customs. Singapore-based conceptual artist Heman Chong (Singapore, b. 1977) similarly upends social norms in his installation of a million solid black business cards scattered on the gallery floor. While business cards represent the rules and rituals that define capitalist exchange, the emphasis on the cards as physical objects on the ground points to the hollowness of ritual gestures. Yang Zhenzhong (China, b. 1968) highlights the empty ritual of photography itself. While his portraits of laughing subjects suggest an authentic reaction to an off-camera person or scene, they are actually staged actors photographed alone in a studio and thus hover between reality and fiction. In this exhibition, such dynamics are also evoked as a means of exploring national history. In the titular piece Third Realm (2011) by Jompet Kuswidananto (Indonesia, b. 1976), unembodied figures in nineteenth-century colonial dress are arranged like phantoms in a configuration that suggests a religious rite with the underpinnings of a military exercise. In searching for modern national identity, the artist implies that a colonial past is inescapable, as history and the current moment tensely converge in a ghostly third space that is neither past nor present. Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Thailand, b. 1970) and Sun Xun (China, b. 1980) also explore the residual effects of past national trauma. Weerasethakul does so through filmed reenactments, while Sun Xun draws on old newspapers, his illustrations purposely obscuring the official narratives of history. Cao Fei (China, b. 1978) uses the third space of the digital realm to explore the unmaking of the self in the context of national identity. Using Second Life, an online game that emerged in the early 2000s, Cao Fei created the fictitious RMB City (2008 – 11), which stands as a critique of China’s rampant consumerism, taking the name itself from the

Featured Exhibitions

Third Realm is drawn from the FarEastFarWest collection, a Shanghai-based organization that commissions and acquires contemporary Asian artworks and is housed at the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College in Chicago. FarEastFarWest was founded in 2007 by Eric Guichard and Davide Quadrio and serves as a production platform for artistic projects. The shared goal of its co-founders is to identify artists, select projects, and produce historic pieces that address contemporary issues relevant to life in Asia. Third Realm is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College in Chicago.


FX Harsono, Writing in the Rain (still), 2011, video. Courtesy of FarEastFarWest collection.

Presenting Sponsor:

This presentation is part of The Polygon Gallery's exhibition series New Perspectives: revealing diverse perspectives, untold stories, and new voices in visual art.

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Wanderings ANNA BINTA DIALLO

APRIL 4 – MAY 30

ACCESS GALLERY 222 E GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU&M: CLOSED

CURATED BY KATIE BELCHER

OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 7 PM

In Conversation: Anna Binta Diallo with Diyan Achjadi on Sat. April 4 at 2 pm at Access Gallery (p. 112).

Anna Binta Diallo, studio installation of Wanderings at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, 2019, collages printed on Photo-Tex removable adhesive fabric, mounted on aluminum composite and PVC board, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

Featured Exhibitions


like all else, wandering

TEXT BY KATIE BELCHER DIRECTOR/CURATOR, ACCESS GALLERY

In Wanderings, Anna Binta Diallo presents an installation of photographic collages in both two-and three-dimensions. The works consider how folk stories influence the formation of identity. Iterative in nature, the ongoing installation-based project shifts with each presentation, sometimes expanding into the exhibition space through sculpture. Of her work, Diallo writes, “Casting a wide net on our Collective History, I reinterpreted folk stories and reimagined or reused them in my own way to create new mythologies. Using archives, books, found imagery, the Internet, memory, and oral traditions, I created a series of new images that can be continuously re-organized.” Figures and animal forms, constructed from varied sources, are scattered throughout the visual field. The figures are at once historical characters and deep space wanderers, their faces made of galaxies and landforms, wearing motifs “built from the textures, debris and remnants of various cultural inheritances. They wear the rich patterns of forests, black-and-white ethnographic drawings and vibrant purple fabric—infinitely alterable assemblages of what was and what is to come.”1 If photography freezes a moment in time, these collaged images release and recapture this moment, turning photographic fact towards expansive folklore. Diallo’s images reject a single truth, implicating myriad understandings of Self and Other. Drawing on a wide array of stories and perspectives, Diallo reveals the affinities and tensions that exist between these and the mythologies of her own Franco – Métis and Senegalese ancestry, striving to make work that questions and subverts patriarchal ideals and racism. Easing her subjects from their sometimes – heavy contexts allows them to be read simultaneously as specific and unfixed. As a whole, her project engages with Othering, the legacies of colonialism and slavery, language, and contemporary issues of migration/displacement, as well as the problematic definition of geographical borders, ultimately investigating identity as it relates to various histories, loss, nostalgia, and diaspora. Through cutting, pasting, and splicing photographs, Diallo builds new fictions.

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Visual media—by nature immediate and ahistorical—is uniquely suited to “restore the nonsequential energy of lived historical memory and subjectivity" as fundamental to the construction of meaning.2 Diallo plays with the potential of collage to conflate time or re-remember the past, but through its iterative nature and disruption of visual space, she resists linear definition. The evidently fabricated nature of collage belies any attempt at deception—even digital collages have seams.3 “As the early twentieth century discovered the power of images and photography, artists felt the urge to reconfigure this amorphous mass of anomic images by creating connections, links, possible narrative, sudden classes, and interpretation. It was an attempt to make sense of the world, to structure it, while still reserving its absurdly cacophonic, at times sublime, multiplicity. Since its very origin, collage has appeared as an art of crisis that has entertained a deep relationship with traumas and violations.”4 We are taught that literature and visual art are imaginative and constructed, but science and history are immovable. Yet, evidenced within living memory, we know that facts—planetoids, espionage files, dietary advice, national borders, dinosaur species, etc.—are elastic. Our attachment to geography as static, “the idea that space ‘just is,’ and that space and place are merely containers for human complexities and social relations, is terribly seductive: that which ‘just is’ not only anchors our selfhood and feet to the ground, it seemingly calibrates and normalizes where, and therefore who, we are.”5 Writer Taiye Selasi speaks of holding space for multiple experiences in a world bent on categorization,

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“… to say that I came from a country suggested that the country was an absolute, some fixed point in place in time, a constant thing … In my lifetime, countries had disappeared—Czechoslovakia; appeared—Timor-Leste; failed—Somalia... To me, a country—this thing that could be born, die, expand, contract—hardly seemed the basis for understanding a human being.”6 Ultimately, Selasi proposes replacing the question where are you from? with the more nuanced where are you a local? in an attempt to find echoes in our experiences. Despite varied nationalities, we may share numerous localities that inform how we host, give, avoid, navigate, etc. Diallo’s work upends a sense of linear time privileged by official curriculums that “conceal colonialism’s processes of self-invention, a history marked by white supremacy’s erasure and rewriting.”7 In Demonic Grounds, Katherine McKittrick speaks to the knife’s edge of locating these erasures while resisting the replication of white/colonial history-making. “I have turned to geography and black geographic subjects not to provide a corrective story, nor to ‘find’ and ‘discover’ lost geographies. Rather, I want to suggest that space and place give black lives meaning in a world that has, for the most part, incorrectly deemed

black populations and their attendant geographies as ‘ungeographic’ and/or philosophically undeveloped.”8 The imagery refuses a fixed truth or identity, attending instead to the cultural efflorescence or resonances emerging from multiple stories.9 In her work, I see a distinction between fact, which as Toni Morrison describes in The Site of Memory, “can exist without human intelligence,” and truth, which cannot.10 Like Morrison, reconstructing interior black lives through investigating their remains, as opposed to their monuments, Diallo builds her visual fictions from the inner and outer worlds of her subjects. References to West African villages, colonial era military personnel, Indigenous hunters, suited men, text in several languages, hoop skirts, and the cosmos, explode a linear chronicle. Of Black archival practices, Maandeeq Mohamed writes, “We know that the archive will never be sufficient—if we are accounted for, it is via the violence of fact: scientific racism, and catalogues listing enslaved people as property.… Perhaps not knowing can be useful, insofar as it allows for a recognition of the fact that what is/isn’t archived is but one of many fictions (a dominant one to be sure, but still fiction nonetheless) that constitute blackness in public life.”11 Refusing to privilege any fact over folklore, Diallo makes space for complex and contradictory experiences. Diallo’s

Anna Binta Diallo, studio installation of Wanderings at Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, 2019, collages printed on Photo-Tex removable adhesive fabric, mounted on aluminum composite and PVC board, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

Featured Exhibitions


figurative images, collaged from visual material such as magazines, scientific and historical illustrations, literature, and personal archives, are grouped in unexpected arrangements, and extend into the exhibition space through planar sculpture. Through shifts in scale, and use of a spatial field rather than ground, landscape conventions are disrupted as often as they are employed. As viewers, walking amongst the installation, we are implicated as participants. Animated by their interactions with each other and the viewer, these figures inhabit deep time and space. Like Diallo’s flat outline of a face containing star systems, our bodies hold collections of our own experiences, further expanding a shared narrative. We are large, we contain multitudes.12

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1 Joy Xiang, “Bending the Light. A national survey of 10 artists who are reforming material practice,” Canadian Art, December 12, 2019, http://canadianart.ca/features/ bending-the-light/. 2  Edward Said, “Opponents, Audiences, Constituencies, and Community,” in Art in Theory 1900-2000: An Anthology of Changing Ideas, eds. Charles Harrison and Paul Wood (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2003), 1057. 3  Laura Hoptman, “Collage Now: The Seamier Side,” in Collage: The Unmonumental Picture (New York: The New Museum of Contemporary Art, 2007), 11. 4  Massimiliano Gioni, “It’s Not the Glue that Makes the Collage,” in Collage: The Unmonumental Picture (New York: The New Museum of Contemporary Art, 2007), 11 – 12. 5 Katherine McKittrick, Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2006), xi. 6 Taiye Selasi, “Don’t ask where I’m from, ask where I’m a local,” TED Talks, TEDGlobal 2014, video, 16:04, https://www.ted.com/talks/taiye_ selasi_don_t_ask_where_i_m_ from_ask_where_i_m_a_local 7 Yaniya Lee, “Anxious Territory: The Politics of Neutral Citizenship in Canadian Art Criticism,” C Magazine 128 (Winter 2016), https://cmagazine. com/issues/128/anxious-territorythe-politics-of-neutral-citizenshipin-canadia. 8  McKittrick, xii – x ii. 9  Here I’m borrowing the term from Hoptman, “Collage Now: The Seamier Side,” 11. 10  Toni Morrison, “The Site of Memory,” in Inventing the Truth: The Art and Craft of Memoir, 2d ed., ed. William Zinsser (Boston; New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1995), 93 – 94. 11  Maandeeq Mohamed, “Somehow I Found You: On Black Archival Practices,” C Magazine 137 (Spring 2018), http://cmagazine.com/ issues/137/somehow-i-found-youon-black-archival-practices. 12  Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself” in Leaves of Grass (Philadelphia: David McKay, 1891 – 1892), 78, https:// whitmanarchive.org/published/ LG/1891/poems/27.

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Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya ALTHEA THAUBERGER

APRIL 17 – J ULY 5

CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY 555 NELSON ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SU: 12 – 6 PM; M: CLOSED

CURATED BY KIMBERLY PHILLIPS AND ZARMEENE SHAH

OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 6 – 9 PM

Althea Thauberger and Zarmeene Shah will be giving a talk as part of the Capture Speaker Series on Tue. April 14 at 6 pm at Inform Contract (p. 110).

Althea Thauberger, Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya (Mad Mad Mad Mad Filmy World) video still, 2017, single channel video projection. Courtesy of the artist.

Featured Exhibitions


A Simultaneity of Stories-So-Far: Althea Thauberger’s Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya

TEXT BY KIMBERLY PHILLIPS CURATOR, CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

Situated along Muhammad Ali Jinnah Road in the centre of Karachi, Pakistan, the Capri Theatre is itself the stuff of movies. It is the last remaining historic single-screen cinema house in the city that welcomes general audiences, designed and built in 1968 by Pakistani architects Rizki & Co. under the guidance of the theatre’s owner, Chaudry Abdul Razaque. Its open-plan, modernist architecture, and advanced screening technology—the auditorium was outfitted with a curved screen and zeroangle projection—embodied Pakistan’s “golden age” of cinema and the cultural liberalism that had earned Karachi its nickname as the City of Lights. During the country’s religious and political shifts of the late 1970s and 1980s, which decried the “deviance” of the movies, the Capri survived numerous violent attacks by bunkering itself behind heavy fortifications. But it continues to thrive, and with 200Rs ticket prices in the lower seats, the Capri remains accessible to almost anyone who desires to see a film. The Capri is the site and subject of Althea Thauberger’s most recent single-channel video work, Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya [Mad Mad Mad Mad Filmy World] (2017). As in so many of the artist's large-scale projects, the artist recognized in the Capri Theatre a complex knot of histories, social relations, and power dynamics that she desired to imaginatively document. As she frequently approaches her subjects as an outsider, Thauberger’s methodology involves developing projects through a process of extended engagement with the communities of her chosen sites. She works collaboratively and experimentally with a large and often intergenerational group of participant-actors who shape the project for themselves. Throughout this process, Thauberger understands her role to be that of a producer/ instigator, rather than a singular author, and the success of her projects is entirely dependent upon the relationships she is able to forge with her co-creators. Pagal describes a world in the cinema—not any of the worlds presented on screen, but rather one built by the unruly, heterogenous group of people that constitutes its audience. As we view the video, we learn a number of things about the Capri, its history, and the rapidly changing city in

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which it stands. But the film’s documentary framework is repeatedly interrupted as the Capri’s spaces—its expansive stairwells, broad, open concourses, and double-height auditorium—are overtaken by a teeming crowd of actors. They fill its container with their bodies and voices and, as if testing the limits of its capacity, transform the movie house into an exploratory stage. They perform acting exercises, rehearse invented scenes, and improvise choreographies. While fully aware of the camera’s presence, they perform as much for one another as for us (in only one brief clip are the participants actually seated and regarding the theatre screen, and we realize they are not watching the latest blockbuster but rough cuts of their own prior performances). These participants are not always in harmony: they sometimes mishear and speak over one another, and they express confusion over the purpose of the project. There are moments of camaraderie and levity, of giggly self-consciousness, pensive reflection, and grief. Pagal is a profoundly intimate document of a singularly unique configuration of agents in time and space. The sociality of cinema-going has been largely overlooked in film theory, but several recent studies have worked to

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re-situate the focus from the content on the screen to the bodies in the space of the theatre.1 The work of British Marxist-feminist geographer Doreen Massey has been instrumental in this shift. She reminds us that space is neither static nor neutral; it is relational. It is the product of a multiplicity of interrelationships and interactions extending from the intimate to the global, and as such, is always in process. It is not the structure against which agency or history can be counter-posed. Space is uniquely and unpredictably eventful: never finished and never closed. In fact, we might describe space, as Massey suggests, as a “simultaneity of stories-so-far.”2 Before the video camera, Thauberger’s participants perform the inherent eventfulness of the social space that is the Capri. Despite the fact that, save for the briefest moment at the outset of the film, we never glimpse a view of the streets outside the cloistered interiors of the theatre, the Capri’s actors invoke the teeming, ever-evolving openness of the city itself. But the artist’s work points to something more elusive and nuanced than simply celebrating a community that is, because the crowd that performs together in Pagal was brought into being expressly for the purpose of creating the work. And this fact points towards an important element of Thauberger’s projects, which is her conviction that not all socially engaged work needs to have long-term impact of a community as its goal: Pagal is transformative for the brief moment of the togetherness that the project creates, in the momentary intersection of all its components; the simultaneity of the stories-so-far.3

In its lyrical meditation on light and darkness, survival and tenacity, togetherness and aloneness, conviction and doubt, Thauberger—together with her participants—creates an imaginative structure that asks us to think differently about the complexity of space and its profound role in the way political questions can be formulated. She asks this of us, perhaps, because as Massey stresses: The way we think about space matters. It inflects our understandings of the world, our attitudes to others, our politics. It affects, for instance, the way we understand globalization, the way we approach cities, the way we develop, and practice, a sense of place. If time is the dimension of change then space is the dimension of the social: the contemporaneous coexistence of others. That is its challenge, and one that has been persistently evaded.4 The opening frames of Pagal linger on a young Capri patron who offers a poem about his city to his fellow participants. His words remain present throughout the film: “Come, let’s go to the cinema in Karachi,” he recites, “but this time, don’t forget, never leave each other’s side in Karachi.” Through its momentary, collectively imagined interpretation of an alive and complex space, Pagal invites us to consider the sheer tenuousness of any community, which exists only as long as we continue to demonstrate a shared commitment to being together.

Althea Thauberger, Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya (Mad Mad Mad Mad Filmy World) video still, 2017, single channel video projection. Courtesy of the artist.

Featured Exhibitions


1  See for example Lies Van de Vijver, “The cinema is dead, long live the cinema!: Understanding the social experience of cinemagoing today,” Participations: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies 14, no. 1 (May 2017): 129-144; Robert C. Allan, “The Place of Space in Film Historiography,” TMG 9, no. 2 (2006): 15-27. For a good discussion on film and social change in Pakistan, see Ali Khan and Ali Nobil Ahmad, eds., Cinema and Society: Film and Social Change in Pakistan (Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2016). 2  See Doreen Massey, For Space (London: SAGE Publications Ltd., 2005), 26-28. 3  See Althea Thauberger’s response to the question of impact in the case of her 2005 project Murphy Canyon Choir in “An Interview with Althea Thauberger,” by Noni Brynjolson, FIELD: A Journal of Socially-Engaged Art Criticism 1 (Spring 2015), 211-12. 4  Doreen Massey, Ibid., back cover.

Althea Thauberger, Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya (Mad Mad Mad Mad Filmy World) video still, 2017, single channel video projection. Courtesy of the artist.

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TD Highlights

CHEYENNE RAIN LEGRANDE ᑭᒥᐊᐧᐣ TD ASSISTANT CURATOR, CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

In the works of Pixy Liao, Pao Houa Her, Jake Kimble, Marlon T. Riggs, and Althea Thauberger, ayisiyiniw speak, the bodies speak. I have chosen these works because they allow for diverse voices to be heard, through the use of photographing bodies. In my own practice, I use my body to speak through performance. Similarly, each artist has carefully considered the use of the body as a medium. Visibility was most important to me when choosing these photographs. Diverse bodies allow for diverse voices to be heard. Join Cheyenne Rain LeGrande on Sat. April 11 at 3 pm for a Gallery Hop (p. 121).

Pahpitos kîkway

Nach' FACILITATED BY SALIA JOSEPH TRANSLATED BY AARON WILLIAMS

Voices heard through images Speaking or not speaking

na7t wa tkwáya7nmixws kwi ntélktns na wa níchim walh hawk wa ntélktn

The bodies speak

, na tsuntm i7xw kwi slálaw , an nach kwi swa7tas ta slálaws

Visible Diverse bodies Allow for Diverse voices to be heard Through a world of images An Image language is born They speak their own language They speak through the body Body language The bodies speak through their very existence Their voices heard through images of Race Gender Sexuality Age Culture Love Performing bodies Performing body language Performing a story Performing a portrait Performing an image Performing a photograph

Featured Exhibitions

, ánunmin kwi ntélktn men swa7s tiná7 ta temíxw , tíwa sníchim na7t wa esmi nekw esxwéy na wa níchim ta swa7swit sníchim , tkwetsi slálaws na7xw es wa níchim , sníchim tl'a slálaw , wanaxw tsi7 kwis wa níchim ta slálaws ta swa7swit ntélktns na7xw wa tkwáya7nmins men i7xw swat tta stélmexw , slánay swí7ka, wa lhtmá Iy kwis swat wa tem stl'i7s , na skwiyíntm ta slálaws , na stsuntm ta sníchims tl'a slálaws , , na wa xwexwiyám na télmixws men i7xw kwi stam na wáytm ta iyímiwan, na kw'achmixws men i7xw kwi stam


STUART KEELER SENIOR CURATOR, TD BANK ART COLLECTION

Art tells stories about who we are, as well as teaches us about new viewpoints and lived experiences. The TD Assistant Curator role is a new position at Capture that allows an emerging curator to gain tangible working experience in a professional environment, with full access to the inner workings of the programming and learning department of a major Canadian public art and culture platform. Coaching, research, documentation, professional development, and mentoring are at the heart of the program. In her new position at Capture, Cheyenne Rain LeGrande is working closely with the Festival’s Executive Director, Emmy Lee Wall, and is being exposed to internationally acclaimed curators and artists with the goal of championing professional experience. Through initiatives like this, we hope to provide more opportunities for emerging curators to develop their skills, and in turn—through their curation of art and ideas—help amplify diverse voices in pursuit of a more inclusive tomorrow. Here are the TD Assistant Curator Highlights from Capture’s 2020 program.

Experimental Relationship (for your eyes only, or maybe mine, too) ARTIST: PIXY LIAO LOCATION: CENTRE A

See page 93.

After the Fall of Hmong Teb Chaw ARTIST: PAO HOUA HER LOCATION: OR GALLERY

See page 83.

Reading and Being Read ARTIST: JAKE KIMBLE LOCATION: EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

See page 87.

The Sodomite Invasion ARTIST: MARLON T. RIGGS LOCATION: GRIFFIN ART PROJECTS

See page 75.

Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya ARTIST: ALTHEA THAUBERGER LOCATION: CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

See page 66.

Pao Houa Her, untitled from After the Fall of Hmong Tebchaw, 2018, digital photograph, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Bockley Gallery, Minneapolis.

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Althea Thauberger, Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya (Mad Mad Mad Mad Filmy World) video still, 2017, single channel video projection. Courtesy of the artist.

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Jake Kimble, Moribund, 2019, inkjet print, 60.96 Ă— 78.74 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

The Selected Exhibition Program features participating photography and lens-based exhibitions at galleries, museums, and other venues around the Metro Vancouver area. The program is chosen by a jury, who evaluated submissions according to four criteria: conceptual rigour, artistic excellence, curatorial vision, and overall impact.


Selected Exhibitions

2020 Jury DIANA FREUNDL INTERIM CHIEF CURATOR/ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, VANCOUVER ART GALLERY SCOTT MASSEY ARTIST CHEYANNE TURIONS CURATOR, SFU GALLERIES EMMY LEE WALL EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

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David Wojnarowicz: Photography & Film 1978 – 1992

ON UNTIL APRIL 5

MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1825 MAIN MALL, VANCOUVER TUE – F: 10 AM – 5 PM; SA&SU: 12 – 5 PM; M: CLOSED

CURATED BY KRIST GRUIJTHUIJSEN

David Wojnarowicz: Photography & Film 1978 – 1992 is the first exhibition to solely concentrate on the artist’s photographic and filmic work and presents over one hundred works including photographs, test prints, silkscreens, 16mm and Super 8 film, and collaborative video works. Wojnarowicz (1954 – 92) came into prominence in the New York art world of the 1980s, actively embracing all media and forging an expansive range of work both fiercely political and highly personal. Although largely self-taught, he worked as an artist and writer to merge a sophisticated combination of found and discarded material with a deep understanding of literary influences. First displayed in storefront galleries in the East Village, his work had already gained national prominence by the time he was diagnosed with HIV in 1988. From the late 1970s until his death in 1992, Wojnarowicz produced a body of work that was as conceptually rigorous as it was stylistically diverse, resolutely and fervently political at a time when the AIDS epidemic was cutting down a generation of artists due in large part to government inaction. The exhibition reflects on Wojnarowicz as a source

for both art-making and activism at a time of political and personal uncertainty, shedding light on a practice that has been exemplary and inspirational, not only for his contemporaries but also for current generations.

This exhibition contains work that may not be suitable for some viewers. Please note that certain parts of this exhibition are not wheelchair accessible. A digital tablet with images of the works in these areas is available at the reception desk. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Andreas Sterzing, David Wojnarowicz (Silence = Death): New York, 1989/2014, pigmented ink print on paper, 61 × 47 cm. Courtesy of the Andreas Sterzing, the Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P·P·O·W, New York.

Selected Exhibitions


The Sodomite Invasion: Experimentation, Politics and Sexuality in the work of Jimmy DeSana and Marlon T. Riggs

ON UNTIL APRIL 25

GRIFFIN ART PROJECTS 1174 WELCH ST, NORTH VANCOUVER SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU – F: CLOSED

CURATED BY LORENZO FUSI

Griffin Art Projects presents a double solo show pairing the work of two American artists: the fine art photographer Jimmy DeSana, a radical spirit and highly influential voice in the field of photography based in NYC, and the experimental filmmaker and documentarist Marlon T. Riggs, a vocal activist in the fight against HIV/AIDS, whose filmic work primarily explores race relations and sexuality. This exhibition contains work that may not be suitable for some viewers.

Jimmy DeSana, Untitled (Male Nude), 1985, vintage c-print, 25.4 × 20.3 cm. Courtesy of the Jimmy DeSana Trust and Salon 94, New York.

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The Extended Moment: Fifty Years of Collecting Photographs

ON UNTIL MAY 24

GROUP EXHIBITION

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 BLACKCOMB WAY, WHISTLER SA – TH: 10 AM – 5 PM; F: 10 AM – 9 PM; TU: CLOSED

CURATED BY ANN THOMAS, SENIOR CURATOR OF PHOTOGRAPHS, CANADIAN PHOTOGRAPHY INSTITUTE, NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA

FREE FOR AUDAIN ART MUSEUM MEMBERS, 10% OFF ADMISSION PRICE FOR CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL MEMBERS

The National Gallery of Canada (NGC) has one of the most comprehensive, international, and respected collections of photographs in North America. Established in 1967 and covering the history of the medium up to today, The Extended Moment is a selection of over eighty photographs that will be exhibited at the Audain Art Museum from February 8 to May 24, 2020. Because of the breadth and depth of the NGC collection, as well as an equal weighing of historic and contemporary works, there are resonances between images made more than one hundred years apart. These photographs move and enlighten the visitor as they chart a history of image-making, technological change, and social transformation. It is this aspect of the collection that forms the core of this exhibition. Prominent photographers included in this impressive selection of works from the NGC holding are: Diane Arbus, Edward Burtynsky, Julia Margaret Cameron, Lynne Cohen, Camille Corot, Stan Douglas, Walker Evans, Anne Fishbein, Isabelle Hayeur, Fred Herzog, Spring Hurlbut, Arnaud Maggs, Man Ray, Yasumasa Morimura, Gary Schneider,

Edward Steichen, Hiroshi Sugimoto, John Vanderpant, and David Wojnarowicz. Organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada. The Founding Partner of the Canadian Photography Institute is Scotiabank. Funded in part by the Resort Municipality of Whistler and the Province of British Columbia. Ann Thomas, Senior Curator of Photographs, Canadian Photography Institute, National Gallery of Canada will be giving a talk as part of Capture’s Speaker Series at Inform Contract on Tue. April 21 at 6 pm (p. 110).

Josef Maria Eder and Eduard Valenta, Snake, 1896, photogravure, image: 27.2 × 21.7 cm; object: 30.3 × 24.9 cm. Purchased 2017. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo: NGC.

Selected Exhibitions


Trace

ON UNTIL APRIL 26

GWENESSA LAM HYUNG-MIN YOON

ART GALLERY AT EVERGREEN 1205 PINETREE WAY, COQUITLAM W: 12 – 8 PM; TH – SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU: 12 – 4 PM; M&TU: CLOSED

CURATED BY KATHERINE DENNIS

Every day, we peer into a black mirror and ask it to help us understand the world. We wake our sleeping, darkened screens and attempt to make sense of the world through pixels and bytes. We read newsfeeds, “favourite” tweets, send emails, scroll through Instagram feeds. The devices that feed us this information are black boxes in more than just their colour and shape—their systems and processes remain opaque and largely unknowable to us, the users. Catalyzed by Gwenessa Lam’s and Hyung-Min Yoon’s recent artists’ books, the exhibition Trace brings together works by the two multidisciplinary artists that explore the power of the black mirror in a range of its incarnations. Lam’s What Magic (2018) is a photo-etching installation and book based on a photograph the artist discovered during an internet search for “house fire.” She traced the digital life of this catastrophic picture through a reverse image search and found the same burning home on twenty-nine unconnected websites matched with wide-ranging stories originating in multiple countries. Lam translated this

photograph—from drawing to photo etching and finally into a book—to look at how an image operates as information. Before screens, images were framed by the pages of books. Yoon’s Black Book (2019) is an analogue film installation that translates the artist’s recent bookwork of the same name into a large-scale projection. She reproduced woodblock prints from a fifteenth-century Confucian text that was widely distributed in Korea to disseminate moralistic teachings, which she disrupts with contemporary cartoon effects and black humour quips. Through this re-narration, Yoon explores similarities in ideologies past and present and how these social constructions allow the onlooker to make sense of, and in some cases permit, dark realities.

Gwenessa Lam, What Magic, 2018, photo etching with chine collé, 15.24 × 20.32 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

76–77


Passage

ON UNTIL APRIL 11

NOAH FRIEBEL

REPUBLIC GALLERY 3RD FLOOR, 732 RICHARDS ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 10 AM – 5 PM; SU&M: CLOSED

Passage brings together a body of recent photographic works by Noah Friebel centred on the picturing of architected spaces. Friebel’s works utilize both depicted and actual space to consider the ways in which we are affected by and internalize structures within our built environment.

their physicality, the works presented in Passage open new views into photography’s representation of urban and domestic architecture, engaging the body in the act of viewing to better consider the influence of these spaces and generate new spatial encounters.

Depicting a variety of locations, the places pictured share a common tension between their historic practical purpose and their current aesthetic function. Many of the images included in this body of work are of barriers found on the border between public and private space. For Friebel, this sociopolitical and economic space serves as an allegorical conflict that runs parallel with artistic conflicts that grapple with the border of inner and outer spaces.

Please note that this exhibition is not wheelchair accessible.

Friebel’s images are enclosed in framing devices that physically repurpose and visually disrupt the motifs within the image. These framing devices, both handmade and mechanically produced, become extensions of the images and allow possible sites for the pictures to inhabit. Through

Noah Friebel, Arch, 2019, archival pigment print in custom frame, 127 × 96.52 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


Dissonance

MARCH 18 – MAY 9

GOHAR DASHTI

WEST VANCOUVER ART MUSEUM 680 17TH ST, WEST VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 11 AM – 5 PM; SU&M: CLOSED

CURATED BY PANTEA HAGHIGHI

On November 13, 2018, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees warned there are about twelve million stateless people in the world. This exhibition features photographs by Iranian artist Gohar Dashti that explore notions of home and sanctuary, which are inverted and reframed. The photographs from her series Stateless situate human occupants and observers in wild, visually hostile landscapes: arid deserts, rugged mountain paths, and craggy crevasses become makeshift kitchens and living rooms for their dispossessed inhabitants. There is both hope and implicit fruitlessness in the efforts of Dashti’s subjects, who vacillate between determination and despair. Mirroring these images is her Home series, wherein plants have overtaken domestic spaces. Staged in mostly dilapidated interiors stripped of fixtures and furnishings, the vegetation invades and proliferates. Does this greenery evince new beginnings and life’s endurance, or is it a marker of cataclysm and absence?

Dashti’s transposition of home and wilderness into unexpected and uncertain places evokes the fragility of daily norms during wartime and migration. The walls and ceiling may crumble without warning, or home must be abandoned at a moment’s notice; and yet, life must go on. Dashti was born in the city of Ahvaz, Iran near the border of Iraq in 1980. Her work is informed by childhood memories of the eight-year war between Iran and its neighbour—the legacy that this conflict left on her hometown is integral to her practice.

Taken together, the works in this exhibition subvert the distinction between indoor and outdoor environments.

Gohar Dashti, Stateless 2, 2014, digital print, 129.54 × 152.4 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

78–79


NEXT Matilda Aslizadeh: Moly and Kassandra

MARCH 21 – AUGUST 23

MATILDA ASLIZADEH

VANCOUVER ART GALLERY 750 HORNBY ST, VANCOUVER M – SU: 10 AM – 5 PM; TU: 5 – 9 PM BY DONATION; FIRST FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH: 10 AM – 9 PM

CURATED BY GRANT ARNOLD, AUDAIN CURATOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ART; MANDY GINSON, ASSISTANT CURATOR

ADMISSION: $6.50 (CHILD)  –  $24 (ADULT) TICKETS AT VANARTGALLERY.BC.CA

NEXT Matilda Aslizadeh: Moly and Kassandra is a video installation produced by the Vancouver-based artist Matilda Aslizadeh in 2018. This will be its first presentation in Western Canada. The work features three sculptural components that evoke film flats of a mountain landscape that are positioned in a darkened room. A video image is projected onto each flat, so the viewer encounters three simultaneous operatic performances by a solitary female figure who stands in the midst of three different open-pit mines. The scale of each figure has been manipulated so that the relationship between figure and landscape evokes a performer in an ancient amphitheatre. The costumes worn by the performers reference the haute couture fashion of 1979, a year marked by the shift from Keynesian to neoliberal economic policies in Western democracies. The compositions of the ostensibly lyrical songs performed by the singers are actually based on economic charts that trace the value and levels of production of molybdenum, an element used to strengthen steel alloys deployed in the weapons industry, among other fields. As Aslizadeh

notes, “The charts track statistical information from 1912 to the present; therefore the figure who sings from the vantage point of 1979 is both a historian and a prophet— akin to Cassandra from classical Greek mythology whose predictions were cursed to inspire only disbelief.” The video installation will be accompanied by three inkjet prints that layer figure, landscape, and the charts on which the compositions of the songs are based. Moly and Kassandra brings together three thematic concerns that have been central to Aslizadeh’s practice: the relationship between material and immaterial manifestations of the economy, the role of women as allegorical figures who exceed the metaphoric, and the possibility of agency in forms of knowledge or sensation that lie beyond common experience.

Matilda Aslizadeh, Currency from Moly and Kassandra, 2018, three-channel video installation with sound and still photographs. Courtesy of the artist and Pari Nadimi Gallery, Toronto.

Selected Exhibitions


Pictures of the Year GROUP EXHIBITION

MARCH 23 – APRIL 24

PENDULUM GALLERY 885 W GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER M – F: 9 AM – 6 PM; SA: 9 AM – 5 PM; SU: CLOSED

CURATED BY RIC ERNST AND ALI LEDGERWOOD

OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 6 – 8 PM

The News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) celebrates and champions quality and ethical photography in journalism. Through a variety of efforts, the association challenges its members to better themselves and to continually raise the bar of industry standards. NPAC hosts the annual National Pictures of the Year awards (NPOY) each spring. This event is the largest annual photo contest in Canada and showcases the best work of NPAC’s members. This work represents all of the nominees of the NPOY.

Eric Demers, Greta Thunberg on stage in front of a crowd of approximately 500,000 people marching against political inaction in face of the climate crisis in Montreal, Quebec, 2019, digital photograph. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

80–81


Crossing

MARCH 26 – APRIL 25

GROUP EXHIBITION

MONTE CLARK GALLERY UNIT 105-525 GREAT NORTHERN WAY, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 10 AM – 5:30 PM; SU&M: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 7 – 9 PM

CURATED BY CLAUDIA BECK

Crossing: crossing a boundary, crossing a limit, crossing outside a traditional definition, crossing an expected appearance, cross pollination of media. Here appearances bear an unusual relation to the photographic, often oblique. In Peter Galassi’s seminal exhibition and catalogue Before Photography: Painting and the Invention of Photography at Museum of Modern Art in 1981, he showed late eighteenthand nineteenth-century landscape oil and watercolour sketches that had many of the attributes of early photographs. This was a major shift in pictorial vision, which he argued linked the photographic image to a transition in paintings. In 2000, Roy Arden curated a show and wrote an essay for the Monte Clark Gallery, After Photography, citing Galassi’s work. Arden saw the contemporary work he presented as on the cusp of the digital deluge. Significant in both exhibitions was seeing the photographic as related to shifts in pictorial vision.

all in some way linked to popular culture. Crossing brings together a group of artists including Roy Arden, Karin Bubaš, Karel Funk, Tim Gardner, Anthony Goicolea, Owen Kydd, Evan Lee, Scott McFarland, and Stephen Waddell, working in and out of the medium of photography in divergent ways.

Artists now have an enormous archive of images to draw from: internet, films, illustrations, paintings, and drawing,

Owen Kydd, Kasbah, 2019, video, 139.7 cm digital display. Courtesy of the artist and Monte Clark Gallery.

Selected Exhibitions


After the Fall of Hmong Tebchaw PAO HOUA HER

MARCH 30 – MAY 10

OR GALLERY 236 E PENDER ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU&M: CLOSED

CURATED BY GODFRE LEUNG

After the Fall of Hmong Tebchaw, by Hmong-American photographer Pao Houa Her, features photographs taken at the Hmong Elders Center and Marjorie McNeely Conservatory in St. Paul, Minnesota. The project’s title refers to an incident in 2016 in which a conman claiming to be working with the US White House and United Nations to secure land in Southeast Asia for the stateless Hmong people defrauded more than $1.7 million from Hmong seniors with promises of citizenship and land in the future Hmong nation, named Hmong Tebchaw.

After the Fall of Hmong Tebchaw illustrates the complexity of national imaginaries and the practices of belief that they engender. The project spatially mimics the dispersion and the imaginary, ungraspable nature of Hmong Tebchaw. The photographs are exhibited in bus shelters around Vancouver. They are accompanied by a single photograph of a Southeast Asian jungle displayed in Or Gallery’s front window. The junglescape, taken by Her in Laos, stands in for the imaginary referents of the studio portrait style and the conservatory environment.

Her’s photographs at the Elders Center are portraits of Hmong seniors—most of whom resettled in the United States as refugees—flanked by artificial plants, following the conventions of traditional Hmong studio portraiture. The photographs at the Conservatory depict tropical plants reminiscent of those found in Southeast Asia, transplanted to an indoor environment in snowy Minnesota.

After the Fall of Hmong Tebchaw is presented in parallel with the solo exhibition Pao Houa Her: Emplotment, which runs from March 27 – May 16 at Or Gallery. Supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

Pao Houa Her, untitled from After the Fall of Hmong Tebchaw, 2018, digital photograph, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Bockley Gallery, Minneapolis.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

82–83


To Be From The Same Tree RYDEL CEREZO

APRIL 1 – 29

MASSY BOOKS 229 E GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER SU – W: 10 AM – 6 PM; TH – F: 10 AM – 8 PM

CURATED BY ANGIE RICO

In Sara Ahmed’s text “A Phenomenology of Whiteness,” the notion of bodies being seen or felt “not at home” in a Western “white” world, devolves and considers how metaphors of familiarity are made up on the basis of likeness. In this way, “a particular version of race and a particular version of a family” is consequently perpetuated. If we are to think of “family” as an institution, what does it mean to introduce a “foreign” body to it? Drawing from literature and photo album making, To Be From The Same Tree showcases a body of photographic work that seeks to probe this phenomenon through the act of remembering, retelling, and remaking. Philippine-born artist Rydel Cerezo tenderly points his lens towards his Belgian partner’s family to reflect on the position of power in constructing, continuing, and discovering historical crossovers seemingly apart from his own. Initially, they learned that their Spanish and Dutch last names shared the same meaning—cherry tree. Unearthed in the process

OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 7 – 9 PM

of making this work is Cerezo’s family history with Catholic Belgian missionaries and a coincidence that a relative of his partner happened to be one of the missionaries. In collaboration with Patricia Massy, owner of Massy Books, the exhibition responds to its location within a bookshop by integrating literary works that seek to form a larger conversation surrounding intimacy, belonging, and historymaking. To Be From The Same Tree is comprised of a series that exists on the knife’s edge of staged and documentary portraits. The exhibition uses the “family album” as a point of departure in addressing cultural disorientation and racial entanglement while combining moments that testify love as a process of understanding. Please note that this exhibition is only accessible by stairs. Supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

Rydel Cerezo, Andreas & I, 2019, inkjet print, 50.8 × 60.96 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


Transmutations: Visualizing Matter | Materializing Vision JESSE ANDREWARTHA

APRIL 2 – 12

CINEWORKS INDEPENDENT FILMMAKERS SOCIETY UNIT 300-1131 HOWE ST, VANCOUVER M – F: 12 – 6 PM; SA&SU: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 7 – 9 PM

I have long been fascinated with the power of photography to illuminate the intersection of humanity and the physical world and more broadly, a deeper realization that human-material practices move toward self-annihilation. Transmutations: Visualizing Matter | Materializing Vision is a unique media arts exhibition using autoradiography (images created by the “light” of radioactive materials), uranotype, 35mm film, and digital video to investigate how images condition material practices and how matter conditions both imaging and imagination.

approach is to mix digital video and analogue film formats to draw out the textural qualities and material implications of each, reflecting the connection between the viewer and the materiality of the work. But I will take this approach one step further. The exhibition features uranotypes (hand coated images made with photosensitive uranium salts) of historical uranium samples from mines documented. Thus the metal itself forms a permanent, radioactive image, a vibrant index of the specimens photographed that no current digital technology can replicate.

A postgraduate in scientific photography, I am interested in how the unique photographic capacities of uranium, combined with associations of the geopolitical history in which it is entangled, can illuminate the agency of matter as a matter of urgency in our changing geopolitical reality. To explore this, this exhibition has two components: an ultra-large format platinotype series documenting uranium mines throughout North America and a hybrid black-and-white 35mm/HD video documentary film. My

Exhibiting the work as an immersive experience, I hope to help audiences form an image of material vibrancy that speaks not only to the dangers of nuclear escalation that seems beyond the experience of the general public, but also to the dangers of a cultural imaginary without images adequate to the task of conveying the force of matter in all human-material practices.

Jesse Andrewartha, Uraninite, Blue Lizard Mine, Utah, 2019, uranotype print, 38.1 × 38.1 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

84–85


Blank Occupation SIDI CHEN

APRIL 2 – 13

STUDIOLAND 115 E PENDER ST, VANCOUVER SA&SU: 10 AM – 6 PM; M – F: BY APPOINTMENT PLEASE CONTACT SIDI CHEN AT SCHENSART@GMAIL.COM OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 6 – 8 PM

Blank Occupation is an ongoing site-specific investigation using fully- or partially-wrapped architectures as a critical lens to probe into the relationship between the process of urbanization and the population who are purposefully and consequentially marginalized, such as low-income residents, foreign labourers, the homeless, and other groups who are the most vulnerable in the capitalist construct. Macroscopically, the urban landscape of construction is transient yet everlasting, and such a duality roots on the irreconcilable conflict between the developmental demands of capitalism and people’s survival needs to rely on its systematic exploitation. However, the wrapped structures also resemble and reflect on the micro-communities who are erased, silenced, repressed, diminished, disrupted, and disconnected. Therefore, by examining the life conditions (physical, emotional, cultural, and spiritual) of such populations, I want to rethink and to discuss the priorities of urbanism under the capitalist framework, and ultimately

to raise the question: How can we sustain, recharge, and change the system whilst relying on its abuses to survive? Thus, I’ve purposefully removed the colours from the photo documentations taken through the on-site research. With such removals, not only did I want to emphasize the disconnections between the structures and the people but also to invite the viewers to reimagine the possibilities of the city life. Also, I’ve used the accuracy of poetry as the organizing principle to create photo installations with reclaimed and repurposed objects to echo to each verse that is composed of the vocabularies from intuitions and found on-site. With the visual-poetry installation, I want to explore the boundaries and intersections of the lens language and literatures to further consider the transdisciplinary possibilities in the visual practice.

Sidi Chen, One's Life Pursue Is What the City Consumes, 2019, inkjet print on semigloss photo paper fixed with door handle, screws, and ice in baking tray, 6.35 × 22.22 × 28.57 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


Reading and Being Read

APRIL 2 – 16

GROUP EXHIBITION

MICHAEL O'BRIAN EXHIBITION COMMONS, EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY ART + DESIGN 2ND FLOOR, 520 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER SU – SA: 8:30 AM – 11 PM

CURATED BY BIRTHE PIONTEK

OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 5 – 9 PM

At a time when photographic images are omnipresent, one could ask: What’s the value of a photograph? Furthermore, at an art school where photography is taught: Why study photography? The students who are currently enrolled in the photography program at Emily Carr University of Art + Design have asked these questions and the exhibition Reading and Being Read is their answer.

The exhibition Reading and Being Read brings together critical works by Emily Carr’s photography students including Luis Villarreal, Svava Tergesen, Bruce Fraser, Delaney Soumang, Jake Kimble, Andres Imperial, and Mikhela Greinert, and traces a line through significant themes and ideas that are in correspondence with the asked questions. The photographs in the exhibition also address the complexities and various layers that are inherent within the photographic medium: reading the photograph is tied to our predispositions—some of which viewers are conscious of, while others remain subconscious influences. In the words of Susan Sontag, “considered in this light, the photographs are us.”

In a world that is saturated by photographic imagery, one needs to be image literate. The ability to read and fully understand a photograph is necessary to create meaning and navigate the complexity of the world. The students chose the photographic medium to not only eloquently respond to the pressing questions asked by our current times but also by the photographic medium itself. In the twenty-first century, the photographic image clearly has expanded beyond the act of exposing a light-sensitive medium to capture the world. So, what is a photograph and how can it be read in the year 2020?

Reading and Being Read is an inquiry and a celebration of the photographic medium—from “straight forward” to abstract, from documentary to staged: the exhibition functions as a survey of the current state of the photographic image as well as an introduction to young and relevant voices working with the medium in Vancouver.

Svava Teregesen, Crudites, 2019, archival pigment print, 58.42 × 48.26 cm. Courtesy of the artist. The printing of work by Svava Tergesen is supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

86–87


Fold Unfold

APRIL 2 – MAY 2

KIRA WU

ON MAIN GALLERY UNIT 427-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU: CLOSED

CURATED BY PAUL WONG

OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 6 – 9 PM

In Chinese culture, we find a common belief in luck and fortune. For instance, friends and family members give money inside red envelopes (lai see) to children at Chinese New Year—giving and receiving lai see signifies good luck for all. Working through these beliefs, Kira Wu explores questions surrounding her diagnosis of stage 3 breast cancer. Why did I get cancer? What caused it? Why am I so unlucky, so unfortunate? In these photographs, Wu brings us in the state of unknowing, of asking questions with no answers.

In Fold Unfold, Wu transforms materials of children's games, red money envelopes, cancer clinic pamphlets, and fashion magazine pages into intimate, still, and contemplative images. As large-scale photographs and video projections, Wu brings the artwork out of its familiar, playful place, and gives it a new context and agency in the On Main Gallery space. These visceral images become gifts, quietly drawing us into a narrative of perseverance and the importance of believing in luck.

This work returns to familiar games of luck and chance, in constructed and photographed origami fortune tellers. Paper found in doctor's offices, in waiting rooms, or lobbies of hospitals, are transformed in a symbolic gesture. On average, Wu folded one origami fortune teller every day for 365 days. Multiple origami pieces were constructed through the repetition of folding, bending, and shaping fragile twodimensional pieces of paper into solid three-dimensional forms. Enfolded in them are thoughts of acceptance, fragility, the body, and resilience.

Kira Wu, from the series Fortune Teller, 2017, light-jet print on aluminum panel, 68.58 × 68.58 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


Janus

APRIL 2 – MAY 2

BIRTHE PIONTEK

GALLERY JONES UNIT 1-258 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER TUE – F: 11 AM – 6 PM; SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU – M: CLOSED

CURATED BY SHANE O'BRIEN

OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 7 – 10 PM

Much of Birthe Piontek’s work to date has had an emotional gravitas peppered with a wry appreciation of the absurd. Her work is succinct, and using the photographic bounds of light, shadow, symbol, and composition she is able to elucidate a narrative of place, time, and human experience. In her new body of work, this formalism comes up against the wave of change: change of body, change of mind, change of state of being. Disembodied elements of the artist’s physical self interact with equally temporal set pieces such as gourds, flowers, and fruit. In some cases, this unlikely alliance is forced into being by a pair of nylons: the absurd is beginning to dictate terms to the norm. Like the Roman god after whom the exhibition is named, Piontek is giving substance to the change that comes as deliberately as sunlight across a room.

Birthe Piontek, Untitled #1 from the series Janus, 2019, archival pigment print, 40.64 × 50.8 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

88–89


Artificial Shrimp and Other Simulacra THEO TERRY

APRIL 2 – 28

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE 495 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 10 AM – 5 PM; M&SU: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8, 7 – 9 PM

Since antiquity, the still life has been a space in which social relations and value systems are performed by objects, both every day and extraordinary. Artificial Shrimp and Other Simulacra engages the still life to examine the hierarchies of objects which constitute contemporary material reality. Informed by historical still life painting, commercial photography, collage, and the aesthetics of digital processes, Theo Terry’s recent work recontextualizes materials and objects in order to navigate both pictorial concerns and those of wider society: wealth, labour, and consumption. Through the layering of representational modes and the hyperbolization of framing, apparent oppositions—between image and object, natural and artificial, depth and flatness, authenticity and mass production—play out within each composition. Sculptural components, digitally drawn and cut from stone, plastic, and wood, sometimes provide conventional framing functions but at times obscure photographic elements. Combining a crude, handmade aesthetic with a hyperreality of colour,

scale, and tactility, the works in Artificial Shrimp and Other Simulacra suggest a latent potential in the objects which constitute our world. Please note this exhibition is wheelchair accessible from 8 am – 4 pm via a freight elevator that can be accessed from the back of the building. Supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

Theo Terry, Pomegranates and Tasseled Cord with Bianco Carrara and Yellow Acrylic, 2019, archival pigment print, marble, acrylic sheet, 55.88 × 68.58 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


BAF Residency Exhibition: Jackie Dives

APRIL 2 – MAY 30

BAF GALLERY UNIT 2-258 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU&M: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 7 – 11 PM

When you choose not to become a mother there is no word for what you are becoming. In this photo series, Vancouver-based artist Jackie Dives explores what it looks and feels like to become not a mother. With her diaristic and whimsical images she has documented her life as she processes this choice and examines women's roles in society and the idea of what makes a family. Dives is an emerging artist who works auto-ethnographically to explore themes of identity, womanhood, grief, and healing. Her photographs are diaristic, vulnerable, and sometimes confrontational. Although the image above isn't from the forthcoming exhibition, it is a part Dives's overall body of work observing and documenting women's roles, contemporary identity, and empowerment, which she will continue to explore during the BAF residency.

financial resources needed to create art can be scarce, and these limitations can constrain artists, preventing their work from reaching its full potential. The BAF Residency Program helps artists surpass these barriers, providing a dedicated space to creative production in Vancouver and facilitating work that otherwise may not have been realized. The Burrard Arts Foundation Residency Program is made possible by the generous support of the Chan Family Foundation and the City of Vancouver Cultural Grants Program. This exhibition contains work that may not be suitable for some viewers.

A cornerstone of Burrard Arts Foundation programming, the BAF Artist Residency Program offers creative support and professional development to qualified Vancouver-based artists. Vancouver is a city where the space, time, and

Jackie Dives, Brahmi, 2016, digital photograph, 45.72 × 60.96 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

90–91


Wait Until Dark GROUP EXHIBITION

APRIL 2 – J UNE 2

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE 495 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 10 AM – 5 PM; M&SU: CLOSED

CURATED BY STEPHEN WADDELL

Wait Until Dark attempts to describe some portion of the relationship of figuration, realism, and photography. In different moments since modernism representation has been described as conveying an uncontrollable surplus that at times shatters art’s ability to convey the “unrepresentable.” It was thought at the beginning of the twentieth century that abstraction might reveal an aesthetic mode capable of expressing more about our enhanced presence and diminished existence as humans. It has been imagined that art built on non-resemblance could perhaps exceed thought and call into question the validity of knowledge derived mostly from images. This pursuit sought a sublime path around a “straight forward re-telling” and energized abstract art to be more than a witness. At the same time many artists, and specifically photographers, intensified their approaches to an art focused on observation, figuration, and resemblance. Artists like Hannah Collins, Wols, Miroslav Tichy, Richard Learoyd, and Jacqueline de Jong have all differently employed a kind of objectivity that moves beyond the visible

OPENING RECEPTION WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8, 7 – 9 PM

towards a visceral refiguration of the seen and unseen. This exhibition will attempt to show that that resemblance almost certainly carries the promise of the unknowable and/or the unrepresentable in plain sight. Please note this exhibition is wheelchair accessible from 8 am – 4 pm via a freight elevator that can be accessed from the back of the building.

Hannah Collins, Sex II Plural/Wet, 1992, silver gelatin print mounted on cotton, 191 × 246 cm. Private collection.

Selected Exhibitions


Experimental Relationship (for your eyes only, or maybe mine, too)

APRIL 3 – MAY 16

PIXY LIAO

CENTRE A: VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART UNIT 205-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU&M: CLOSED

CURATED BY HENRY HENG LU

OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 6 – 9 PM

Brooklyn-based artist Pixy Liao’s ongoing project, Experimental Relationship, dwells on sociocultural tendencies, power plays, and emotional sustenance by examining the dynamics of her personal, romantic relationship, performed with photography and print matter. Since 2007, the Chinese-born artist has staged photographs and live performances with her Japanese boyfriend, Moro, in keen attempts to balance, reverse, or subvert cultural traditions and gendered behaviours in a seemingly tonguein-cheek, yet graceful manner. The sometimes-surreal images created throughout the process signal some of the traditional values and views of intimacy that are dictating interactions between the two lovers; they also point to a broader context in which gender dynamics and gendered expectations are questioned: Who is leading the relationship, who has the deciding voice in decision-making, and who is gazing? Pixy and Moro’s relationship, in a way activated (not documented) by the project, has also been growing with it. Accompanying the photographic works and acting as an extension of Experimental Relationship in the exhibition is

Pimo Dictionary, a collection of hybrids of Chinese, Japanese, and English words and phrases, as well as slang, which was inspired by Pixy and Moro’s communication barriers. This exhibition at Centre A also provides a rare platform to discuss intricacies of romance, sex, and desire within a culturally specific framework, against the Western backdrop of the fetishization of Asian women and the denial of Asian masculinity. The exhibition is Pixy's first solo exhibition in Canada, and includes new works of the Experimental Relationship series from 2019 and 2020. This exhibition contains work that may not be suitable for some viewers. Supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

Pixy Liao, How to build a relationship with layered meanings, 2008, digital photograph, 75 × 100 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

92–93


COMPOUND

APRIL 4 – 26

GROUP EXHIBITION

TERMINAL CREEK CONTEMPORARY 569 ARTISAN LANE, BOWEN ISLAND F – SU: 12 – 4 PM; M – TH: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 12 – 4 PM

CURATED BY PATRYK STASIECZEK

Photographic images are phrased and an education in photography enables partnership with the material world. A national selection of emerging photographers including Nabil Azab, Alejandro A. Barbosa, Matthew Daly, Marisa Kriangwiwat Holmes, Clara Lacasse, Claude LabrècheLemay, and Lucas Regazzi will present new and ongoing works as the result of an invitation by their former professor to work through an expanded materiality of images. These artists will work closely through a queering of a traditional academic model to fully articulate and unpack the gestures that inform an identifiable moment of image-material practices. As their curatorial pedagogue, I am interested in what arises from embodied gestures and material impulses. I view photography as a rephrasing of the world that enables one to critically situate oneself within it.

criticality with the world, its surfaces, relations, and affects. As photographs, images are written, made, and constructed. As spaces, images are a dialogue and exchange, they operate on the same immediate wavelength. As impulses, images are emptied of their origins. When they are looked at and studied, images continue to be emptied of their meaning through a language that pours out of their constructed immediacy and relationships to the body. They situate a vital materiality in the world. The printing of work by Marisa Kriangwiwat Holmes and Claude LabrècheLemay were supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

Photographs are an integral component of modern society; their ubiquity reflects their value as actions. Images have accelerated realities and are an indiscernible quality of our current history. As actions, images position an engaged

Clara Lacasse, Sheeting (detail), 2020, inkjet print, 20.32 × 25.4 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


Lindsay McIntyre

APRIL 4 – MAY 2

MARION SCOTT GALLERY 2423 GRANVILLE ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 10 AM – 6 PM; SU&M: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 7 – 9 PM

In recent years, artists of Inuit heritage have been moving to the forefront of the art world in Canada. Long known for their carving, printmaking, and in recent decades, for drawing practices, now Inuit voices are being heard across the country and around the world as they tell their stories of personal and cultural change in the modern age of colonialism. Set within the context of a commercial gallery with a forty-five year history of working with Inuit artists, Lindsay McIntyre's deeply intimate filmic exploration of family history is part of a new contemporary expression. Inuit artists today speak not only of life on the land in the North but also of the diasporic experience.

McIntyre's richly textured, grainy, or diaphanous imagery is more visual art than cinema, with marks and signature characteristics showing the hand of the artist as much one would expect to see in carving or painting. For this exhibition, outtakes from films are mounted in lightboxes, bringing the work into the discourse now intrinsic to that form and inseparable from Vancouver's history of photography. A live performance of the original 16mm projected celluloid will take place during the exhibition.

Much of McIntyre's extensive catalogue represents a parallel investigation into her personal identity and family history as well as celluloid itself, its processes, and associated mechanisms—manipulating at various steps in hand developing process of 16mm film and being the “one-woman machine” behind every role behind the camera.

Lindsay McIntyre, Her Silent Life (film still), 2012, 16mm film. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

94–95


All the Light You Cannot See ANNIE BRIARD

APRIL 6 – 30

MÓNICA REYES GALLERY 602 E HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER TUE – F: 11 AM – 2 PM; SA: 12 – 4 PM; SU&M: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 6 – 9 PM

All the Light You Cannot See presents multidisciplinary artist Annie Briard’s latest exploration into the poetics of vision. The work presented in this solo exhibition take up additive and subtractive colour and light waves revealing the visible spectrum through photographic processes and modes of display.

perception of light, colour, and the natural environment manifests as cyclical, shifting, meditative colour fields, as viewers bathe in a glow of past, present, and future. The colours that shift become just a memory, or capacity of vision. As the cycles unfold, knowing is undone, and perception begins.

Inspired by the fiery skies of the western coasts, and the starkness of the desert landscape, the celestial representations evoke the romanticized image of sunsets, science fiction atmospheres, and the Aurora Borealis. With shifting ecologies, and environmental changes that seem at once imperceptible and extreme, the perception and sensation produced by Briard’s new series bring to mind a desire to see, a comfort in return, and the passivity of beauty.

Supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

Colour-shifting horizon lines and skyscapes are artificially produced using photographic images and programmed LED lightboxes, and celluloid projections blur and expand the definitions of natural light. Briard’s interest in our

Annie Briard, Sun Stone, 2020, inkjet on rag paper, 152.4 × 101.6 cm. Courtesy of Mónica Reyes Gallery.

Selected Exhibitions


Informer

APRIL 9 – MAY 1

LAURA GILDNER

VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE 2625 KASLO ST, VANCOUVER TUE – F: 11 AM – 6 PM; SA – M: CLOSED

CURATED BY LIANNE ZANNIER

OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 7 – 9 PM

VIVO Media Arts Centre presents a solo exhibition of Laura Gildner’s multi-channel video installation Informer throughout April 2020. Comprised of nine concurrently running video portraits of Caucasian male emcees from various cities and towns across Canada, Informer is a poignant rumination on performative masculinity, fanaticism, and whiteness within contemporary hip hop culture. Filmed individually within personal spaces of their own choosing, subjects are depicted within single extended takes. As each emcee awaits their turn to perform, tensions between constructed identities and non-performative personas begin to collide. Escalating into a makeshift rap battle that becomes as provocative as it is tender, Informer confronts viewers with the aspirational struggles of nine individuals while reflecting on rhetorical understandings of honesty in the process.

A wheelchair ramp is located at the west side of the main entrance.

Laura Gildner, Informer (installation documentation), 2019, 8 channel HD videos on 8 free standing wood panels, 9.14 × 0.91 × 1.90 m. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

96–97


No.223: Satellite of Love LIN ZHIPENG

APRIL 11 – MAY 31

CANTON-SARDINE UNIT 071-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 6 PM; SU&M: CLOSED

CURATED BY STEVEN DRAGONN AND KELVIN HUANG YIQUN

Satellite of Love is the title of a rock ’n roll song composed by Lou Reed in 1970, when he was still part of The Velvet Underground. The song describes a man watching a satellite launch on television while feeling "the worst kind of jealousy" about his unfaithful girlfriend. It resonated with the hippie movement along with the influence of the Beat generation, a youth movement in the 1950s characterized by underground and anti-conformist art and literature in New York, starred by Kerouac among others. The wave of the Beat Generation had great influence on China’s post-‘80 generation, especially in South China, along with J-pop and Hong Kong subculture. No.223 (Lin Zhipeng) is certainly a pilgrim. Inspired by Wong Kar-Wai’s film, Chungking Express, Lin named himself “No. 223,” intending to evoke a poetic and dream-like aura, as well as the feeling of loneliness and mystery characterized by this film. Lin offers an alternative point of view on youth in a relatively conservative Chinese culture. In an indifferent and fastchanging society, his spontaneous photography portrays

OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 3 – 6 PM

a young generation indulged in love and life, oscillating between jubilation and deep melancholy, playful sexuality and a basic human need to be loved. Inspired by the song, Satellite of Love is also the title of No.223’s book, a photography-poetry album published in 2012. “No. 223 is a visual version of Kerouac” described by Hong Huang, a renowned editor in China, “Like Dean in On the Road, he is always asking: ‘What's your road, man?— holyboy road, madman road, rainbow road, guppy road, any road. It's an anywhere road for anybody anyhow. Where body how?’ His photography invites you on this road of discovery.” This exhibition contains work that may not be suitable for some viewers.

No.223, Spring Light, 2009, inkjet print, 48.26 × 33.02 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


FACSIMILE

APRIL 16 – MAY 23

PATRYK STASIECZEK

WIL ABALLE ART PROJECTS 1129 E HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 5 PM; SU&M: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 6 – 9 PM

CURATED BY WIL ABALLE

This exhibition features works by Patryk Stasieczek that present a continued exploration of the performative ontologies that intermingle within the production of photographic images. These works will be in direct conversation with a curatorial project that features a selection of Stasieczek’s former students at Terminal Creek Contemporary on Bowen Island, BC. Photographs are an integral component of modern society; their ubiquity reflects their value as actions. Images have accelerated realities and are an indiscernible quality of our current history. As actions, images position an engaged criticality with the world, its surfaces, relations, and affects. As spaces, images are a dialogue and exchange, they operate on the same immediate wavelength. As impulses, images are emptied of their origins through the ways in which they are constructed. When they are looked at and studied, images continue to be emptied of their meaning through a language that pours out of their constructed immediacy and relationships to the body. They situate a vital materiality in the world.

Patryk Stasieczek, Inverse Light, Centre Clark, 2018, photographic installation, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Wil Aballe Art Projects.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

98–99


A Room for the Pain JACKIE DIVES

APRIL 17 – MAY 23

GALLERY GACHET 9 W HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SA: 12 – 6 PM; SU&M: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 6 – 9 PM

A Room for the Pain is a photo series by documentary photographer and contemporary artist Jackie Dives. Created soon after the death of the artist's father to drug overdose, the series is a personal testament to a public health emergency. When Dives was informed of her father's death, she visited the single-room occupancy hotel where he had been living. She was compelled to photograph the room, his body in the funeral home, and places and things that reminded her of him. Working with film, she documented her experience of the "strange and jarring circumstances of losing a parent to such a stigmatized death." Dives used double exposure to compose each image, a technique that traces her "confused, layered, and fraught emotions," as the photographs honour her father, mourn her loss, and commemorate their relationship. Dives's documentary photography has been published internationally for newspapers, magazines, and websites

and exhibited in galleries in Vancouver. For A Room for the Pain, Dives seeks the space of an art gallery, emphasizing the detail and effect of each c-print and situating the series beyond journalism. As art, the series is immersed in the diaristic and vulnerable aspects of Dives's practice, becoming autoethnographic: "for the first time I felt like I was photographing inward instead of outward." A Room for the Pain has particular meaning in the neighbourhood of Gallery Gachet, the Downtown Eastside, where those most directly affected by substance use are often the object of journalism and research rather than the narrating subjects. The exhibition offers space to reflect on the value of harm reduction in the context of Vancouver's overdose crisis, conventions and ethics of documentary, as well as a photographic tradition including the work of Sally Mann, Jo Spence, and Nan Goldin, whom the artist cites as feminist inspiration. Supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

Jackie Dives, Grandpa’s Painting, 2017/2019, c-print, 91.44 × 60.96 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


Memorial for the lost pages MADIHA AIJAZ

APRIL 17 – J ULY 5

CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY 555 NELSON ST, VANCOUVER TUE – SU: 12 – 6 PM; M: CLOSED

CURATED BY KIMBERLY PHILLIPS AND ZARMEENE SHAH

Memorial for the lost pages presents the intimate video and photographic work of Madiha Aijaz in Canada for the first time. Aijaz, who died unexpectedly last year, was an award-winning Pakistani artist whose work considered questions of privacy and pleasure, and often studied public spaces that appear peripheral to contemporary life, but which by tenacity or chance continue to survive. The exhibition draws together a suite of Aijaz’s most recent still and moving works, including the meditative video projects These Silences Are All the Words (2018) and Memorial for the lost pages (2018), which explore the public libraries of Karachi—quietly crumbling repositories of traditional knowledge—against the backdrop of the rapidly changing city. Positioned alongside these videos, which are defined by Aijaz’s characteristic long, lingering camerawork, is a selection of photographs from the series Death sentence in two languages (2016), first commissioned for the Poets Translating Poets Festival by the Goethe Institutes in South Asia. Inspired by a poem of the same title by contemporary Urdu poet Afzal Ahmed Syed, Aijaz’s images examine

OPENING RECEPTION THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 6 – 9 PM

longing and loss, the tension of admissible sexuality, and the awakening of desire in contested, often fractured sites. Yaletown – Roundhouse Canada Line Station (p. 47) will host a series of enlarged images from A Railway Pilgrimage in Pakistan (2014), a collaboration Aijaz embarked on with the late New York-based Pakistani writer Annie Khan to describe the country’s most famous (if slightly beleaguered) rail line, the Khyber Mail. Aijaz’s rich, contemplative pictures offer complex meditations on language, urban space, and the legacies of colonialism.

Madiha Aijaz, from the series Death sentence in two languages, 2016, archival inkjet print on Legacy fibre paper. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

100–101


Twilight on the Edge of Town

APRIL 18 – J UNE 7

MARK SOO

SURREY ART GALLERY 13750 88 AVE, SURREY TUE – TH: 9 AM – 9 PM; F: 9 AM – 5 PM; SA&SU: 12 – 5 PM; M&HOLIDAYS: CLOSED

CURATED BY JORDAN STROM

OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 6:30 – 9 PM

Mark Soo’s new multimedia art installation Twilight on the Edge of Town will bring an immersive installation of two large semi‑transparent theatre projection screens, each representing background and foreground images. Through their interplay, viewers will see through the mesh of one screen onto the other as a succession of layers evocative of the phenomenon of parallax. The moving image work will feature animated images suggestive of both real and fictive landscapes and urban features: architectural forms familiar to the local area, neighbourhood buildings, street ephemera, weather phenomena, and plant life will be rendered in contrasting genres of “Tron-like” digital three-dimensional wireframes with rudimentary hand-shaded drawings. The installation includes a choreographed room lighting system that is synced to the two screens and a surreal voiceover along with fragments of electronic music.

understanding of history and contemporary culture. Together, the two versions of the project span a precisely conceived range of experiences and forms of participation, from the digital, decentralized, and fragmented to the embodied, singular, and experiential. Bringing together a poetic juxtaposition of visual and experiential phenomena, the work aims to guide audiences in exploring subjective associations to place, reality, and imagination, and the interpretation of events from the distant past to the speculative future.

Twilight on the Edge of Town continues the artist’s ongoing exploration of human vision and technology, and the relationship between reality and myth that underscore our

Mark Soo, Twilight on the Edge of Town, 2019, multimedia installation, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

Selected Exhibitions


Against Working ADA DRAGOMIR

APRIL 22 – 24

THE TOAST COLLECTIVE 648 KINGSWAY, VANCOUVER W – F: 4 PM – M IDNIGHT CLOSING RECEPTION FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 6 – 11:30 PM

Against Working is an exhibition that uses lens-based media including video, projection, and performance to interrogate raced and gendered modes of work, question the nature of production and maintenance, and speak to the precarious, part-time, digitized, and contingent nature of labour today. Viewers will be invited into The Toast Collective by the rhythmic loop of Strike—a projection of three thousand matches glued into the word “strike” being set ablaze over and over again. Farther back into the gallery, spectators will be able to view two satirical ASMR videos on small cell phone screens embedded directly into the wall. Interspersed throughout the installation will be bed-shaped candles which burn from both ends. Against Working harnesses video’s ubiquitous populism and simultaneous marginality within art discourses in order to poke fun at connections between capitalism, digital culture, and work. Against Working can be read both as a refusal to work in the sense of politicizing laziness and in

the sense that one is “forced up against” or “squeezed in beside” work. Also included are two related live performances: one involving small frozen balls of swept-up gallery detritus which I push around with a bristle-less broom, and another involving a pink toilet, powdered charcoal, linseed oil, and an excerpt from “Bartleby the Scrivener.” My concern with work and unproductivity is inspired not only by my status as an emerging artist who hustles between cleaning jobs and my final year of art school, but also by the slow process of learning to push back against a deeply ingrained “immigrant work-ethic.” In the disembodied, digitized, gig economy of neoliberal cities like Vancouver, Against Working asks viewers to think about the complexities of labour, both within and beyond the institutions of art.

Ada Dragomir, Strike (still), 2018, video projection with plinth, matches. Courtesy of Jessica Li.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

102–103


A pot lid for the sky CHRISTOPHER LACROIX JOHN BALDESSARI

CURATED BY JUSTIN RAMSEY

A pot lid for the sky brings into dialogue the works of Vancouver artist Christopher Lacroix and pioneering American conceptualist John Baldessari, which embrace self-parody, irony, and absurdist humour to translate ideas into visual form. Playing across multiple mediums but rooted in photography, the artists engage repetitive tasks and hapless gestures, allowing trial—and often error—to yield unexpected delight. The exhibition features photographs, sculpture, printed matter, and video. Prominent in the exhibition is Lacroix’s new work Erased Degree (2019), in which the artist ordered nearly two thousand pencils from LACMA’s gift store printed with Baldessari’s writing —“I will not make any more boring art”—and used their erasers to meticulously erase his own MFA diploma. The photographic blow-up of the parchment highlights his painstaking labour, calling to mind Baldessari’s scribbling out of that same phrase dozens of times in 1971. Through Erased Degree, Lacroix contemplates his condition as an early career artist, at

APRIL 26 – MAY 31

THE POLYGON GALLERY MAIN FLOOR, 101 CARRIE CATES CT, NORTH VANCOUVER TUE – SU: 10 AM – 5 PM; M: CLOSED OPENING RECEPTION SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 3 – 5 PM

once celebrating and rebuking the institutions, systems, and histories that have contextualized his work. The exhibition draws on Lacroix’s camp sensibility of drama and effervescence, with his jewel-toned images of deflated foil balloons paired with Baldessari’s colourful interventions in celebrity selfies. Recurring throughout are excerpts from Baldessari’s Brown and Green and Other Parables (2001), a series of short, satirical texts that muse on what it is to be an artist.

John Baldessari, Man With Snake, 1990, colour lithograph. Private collection.

Selected Exhibitions


Rydel Cerezo, Annick, 2019, inkjet print, 50.8 Ă— 60.96 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

The Events Program includes those presented by Capture as well as participating events submitted by arts organizations, artists, and other venues. Events include artist talks, lectures, tours, gallery hops, workshops, and film screenings. This section is organized by category. Please see the Calendar (p. 153) for chronological listings. Dates and times are subject to change. For the most up-todate information, please visit capturephotofest.com


Events

Festival Launch 108

Capture Speaker Series 110

Talks 112

Tours 120

Screenings & Broadcasts 126

Community Events 128

Workshops 130

2020

Capture Photography Festival

106–107


Festival Launch THUR. APRIL 2

Capture 2020 Festival Launch

THE RELIANCE THEATRE, EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN 520 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS

Join us for the launch of the 2020 Festival with Capture’s inaugural Keynote Lecture, co-presented by Fillip, in partnership with the Audain Faculty of Art at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. The lecture will be followed by a gallery hop in the False Creek Flats, at BAF Gallery, Gallery Jones, Monte Clark Gallery, and the Michael O’Brian Exhibition Commons at Emily Carr University of Art + Design.

Images from Left to Right: Moyra Davey, Image credit: Gene Pittman; Moyra Davey, Untitled (animal pictures), 2019, silver gelatin print, 30.7 × 38.5 cm. Courtesy of the artist; greengrassi, London; and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York; Moyra Davey, Untitled (animal pictures), 2019, silver gelatin print, 30.7 × 38.5 cm. Courtesy of the artist; greengrassi, London; and Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

Events


LECTURE AT 6 PM FOLLOWED BY GALLERY HOP

Festival Launch Keynote Speaker: Moyra Davey

THE RELIANCE THEATRE, EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN 520 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS CO-PRESENTED BY CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL AND FILLIP, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE AUDAIN FACULTY OF ART AT EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

The 2020 Capture Photography Festival launches with a keynote lecture by New York – based artist Moyra Davey. Davey will offer a chronological account of her work and process, including what she is making, reading, writing, and looking at, from July 2019 to present. Davey is a multidisciplinary artist whose work comprises the fields of photography, film, and writing. She has produced several works of film, most recently i confess (2019), which will premiere in the United States at the Museum of Modern Art this coming spring. She is the author of numerous publications including Burn the Diaries and The Problem of Reading, and is the editor of Mother Reader: Essential Writings on Motherhood. Davey has been the subject

2020

Capture Photography Festival

of major solo exhibitions at institutions including Portikus, Frankfurt/Main (2017); Bergen Kunsthall, Norway (2016); Camden Arts Centre, London (2014); Kunsthalle Basel, Switzerland (2010); and Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (2008). Her work is found in major public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and Tate Modern in London. She is the 2018 recipient of the Scotiabank Photography Award, and in 2004 was granted the Anonymous was a Woman Award.

108–109


Capture Speaker Series TUE. APRIL 7 RECEPTION 5 PM, TALK 6 – 7 PM

TUE. APRIL 14 RECEPTION 5 PM, TALK 6 – 7 PM

TUE. APRIL 21 RECEPTION 5 PM, TALK 6 – 7 PM

Althea Thauberger and Zarmeene Shah

Ann Thomas, Senior Curator of Photographs, Canadian Photography Institute, National Gallery of Canada

INFORM CONTRACT 365 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS

Canadian Art Spring Issue Launch: In Conversation with Elizabeth Zvonar and Julian Hou INFORM CONTRACT 365 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS

Join Capture for the launch of Canadian Art’s Spring 2020 issue, “Influence.” Managing Editor Tess Edmonson will facilitate a conversation between artists and issue contributors Elizabeth Zvonar and Julian Hou on expanding collage into multimedia three-dimensional and digital forms, and how the medium continues to evolve as a critical filter through which to view our screen-mediated world. Elizabeth Zvonar (b. 1972) is a mixed-media collage and sculpture artist. Her solo exhibition I Spy: Elizabeth Zvonar was at The Polygon Gallery from January 10 – March 1, 2020. Julian Hou (b. 1980) works in textiles, sound, writing, installation, and performance. His exhibition Pink Cloud will be on display at the Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver in spring 2020. At the event, the Spring issue of Canadian Art will be available with the purchase of subscriptions. Zvonar will be showing throughout 2020 on the GreyChurch Billboard Public Art Project (p. 36). Please note that this event is not wheelchair accessible. Presented by Capture Photography Festival in partnership with Canadian Art Magazine and Inform Interiors

Events

Althea Thauberger converses with Karachibased curator Zarmeene Shah about the artist’s lens-based practice, and about the production of her most recent work in Pakistan. This discussion also serves to tether together the solo exhibition by Thauberger (p. 66) with that of the late Karachi-based photographer and filmmaker Madiha Aijaz (p. 101), presented simultaneously at the Contemporary Art Gallery (CAG). Shah, a close colleague of both Thauberger and Aijaz, co-curated Aijaz’s exhibition with CAG Curator Kimberly Phillips. Please note that this event is not wheelchair accessible. Presented by Capture Photography Festival in partnership with the Contemporary Art Gallery and Inform Interiors and supported in part by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory at UBC

INFORM CONTRACT 365 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS

Ann Thomas’s talk will look at the evolution of collecting and exhibiting over the half century during which the National Gallery has assembled a major body of photographs of national and international importance. It will highlight major holdings and iconic works, and touch on the changing nature of curating that witnessed the breaking down of medium specific barriers and the wider reach of collecting areas that embraced vernacular and documentary image-making. The Extended Moment: Collecting and Curating Photographs at the National Gallery of Canada (p. 76) Please note that this event is not wheelchair accessible. Presented in partnership with the Audain Art Museum and Inform Interiors and generously supported by Claudia Beck and Andrew Gruft


SUN. APRIL 26 1-2:30 PM

Kapwani Kiwanga THE POLYGON GALLERY 101 CARRIE CATES CT, NORTH VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS

For the 2020 Capture Photography Festival, Franco-Canadian, Paris-based artist Kapwani Kiwanga has created a site-specific work for the Dal Grauer building on Burrard Street in Vancouver (p. 28). In her Speaker Series talk, Kiwanga will discuss her practice, and more specifically, some recent work which has fed into her thinking around this commission which is interested in surveillance and how it manifests itself in legislation and architecture. The artist is equally interested in ways individuals and groups counter forced visibility and surveillance by utilizing cloaking techniques, be they physical, behavioural, or digital.

TUE. APRIL 28 RECEPTION 5 PM, TALK 6 – 7 PM

THUR. APRIL 30 TALK 7-8 PM, RECEPTION TO FOLLOW

Scott Schuman, The Sartorialist

Davide Quadrio and Capture Closing Reception

INFORM CONTRACT 365 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER

THE POLYGON GALLERY 101 CARRIE CATES CT, NORTH VANCOUVER

FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS

FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS

Known internationally as The Sartorialist, Scott Schuman became widely recognized in the late 2000s for his prescient blog on which he posted photographs of “street style” from around the world. He has since attracted more than one million followers on Instagram. In 2009, Penguin published his first anthology of his images that sold well over one hundred thousand copies. His fourth and most recent book, The Sartorialist India, was published in 2019 with Taschen. In his talk for Capture, Schuman will discuss the development of his practice, which marries the traditions of street photography and portraiture, with an abiding interest in the creativity of the individual as expressed through fashion.

Join curator Davide Quadrio at The Polygon Gallery for a talk on the exhibition Third Realm (p. 55). Based between Milan and Shanghai, Quadrio founded the first non-profit independent creative lab in Shanghai, BizArt Center, and has organized hundreds of exhibitions, educational activities, and exchanges in China and abroad. Recent curatorial projects include Visions in the Making at the Italian Cultural Center, New Delhi, and Zhang Enli at Galleria Borghese, Rome. He is currently working for the Gwangju Biennale, Korea on several performance-based projects.

Please note that this event is not wheelchair accessible. Presented in partnership with Inform Interiors and generously supported by Aritzia

Presented in partnership with The Polygon Gallery and generously supported by Brigitte and Henning Freybe

Drawn from the FarWestFarEast collection, Third Realm offers critical insights into the sociopolitical shifts occurring during the 2000s, when Asia’s economic prosperity began to command global attention. The artists exploit the directness of documentary images to reveal the complexities of hybrid identities and social change. Following the talk will be a reception celebrating the seventh edition of Capture Photography Festival, to conclude the 2020 season. Presented in partnership with The Polygon Gallery

Images from Left to Right: Elizabeth Zvonar, I Spy, 2020, photographic mural, 2.43 × 3.65 m. Courtesy of the artist and Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto; Althea Thauberger,Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya (Mad Mad Mad Mad Filmy World) video still, 2017, single channel video projection. Courtesy of the artist; Photo: NGC/Mdba; Kapwani Kiwanga, 2016, © photo Bertille Chéret. Courtesy of the artist and galerie Jérôme Poggi, Paris; Scott Schuman, Milan, 2010. Courtesy of the Artist; Cao Fei (Second Life Avatar: China Tracy), RMB City Opera: The Look of Love, 2009, inkjet print, image: 68.85 × 90.17 cm. Courtesy of FarEastFarWest collection.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

110–111


Artist Talks & Panel Discussions SAT. APRIL 4 2 – 4 PM

SAT. APRIL 4 2 – 4 PM

SAT. APRIL 4 2 – 4 PM

In Conversation: Anna Binta Diallo with Diyan Achjadi

Pixy Liao

Evan Lee Artist Talk on Fugazi

ACCESS GALLERY 222 E GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER FREE

Access Gallery’s In Conversation events invite artists and thinkers into dialogue with our exhibiting practitioners, with the aim of creating conversations that "thicken" our experience of exhibitions, and link artists' practices to one another and to the wider community. Join Vancouver-based artist Diyan Achjadi in conversation with visiting artist Anna Binta Diallo as they discuss resonances in their practices, in the context of Diallo's collagebased installation, Wanderings. Relying heavily on visual research, memory, and assemblage, both artists work to reorganize and reimagine various cross-cultural narratives. Join the artists in considering how their practices align and differ—in material process, conceptual interest, familial/cultural experiences, and approach. This event is part of the programming for Anna Binta Diallo: Wanderings (p. 62) on exhibition from April 4 to May 30, 2020, in conjunction with Capture Photography Festival’s Feature Exhibition program. An installation of Wanderings will also be on view at the Waterfront Canada Line Station (p. 45).

CENTRE A UNIT 205-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER FREE

In this talk, Brooklyn-based artist Pixy Liao will share her practice and inspirations, in connection with her exhibition Experimental Relationship (for your eyes only, or maybe mine, too) at Centre A (p. 93), which stems from her ongoing exploration of the dynamic of a romantic relationship.

TECK GALLERY SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY, 515 W HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER FREE

Evan Lee will speak about Fugazi in the context of his practice, which undertakes interdisciplinary considerations of vision and constructions of value. Fugazi begins from photographic scans of cubic zirconia, an inexpensive crystalline form of synthesized material that often stands in for diamonds. The images are enlarged to a scale that transforms the gemstones' appearance and magnifies the fracture of light. Because of low cost and visual and material likeness, cubic zirconia is a key competitor for diamonds and is seen as a potential solution to the controversy surrounding their valuation. "Fugazi" is a fictionalized slang term for a counterfeit gemstone. Lee’s talk will address how we understand value in the image and its referents. Lee is a Vancouver-based artist.

Presented in partnership with Capture Photography Festival

Evan Lee, Fugazi, 2019, installation view. Courtesy of SFU Galleries.

Events


SAT. APRIL 4 3 – 4 PM

APRIL 4 – 28

Noah Friebel with Christos Dikeakos

Langara College Photography Speaker Series

REPUBLIC GALLERY 3RD FLOOR, 732 RICHARDS ST, VANCOUVER FREE

Please join us for an artist talk with Noah Friebel in conversation with Christos Dikeakos as they explore themes in Friebel's solo exhibition Passage, part of Capture Photography Festival’s Selected Exhibition program (p. 78). Please note Republic Gallery is not wheelchair accessible.

LANGARA COLLEGE 100 W 49TH AVE, VANCOUVER ADMISSION BY DONATION FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.LANGARA.CA/PHOTO-MONTH OR EMAIL ALUMNI@LANGARA.CA

Langara College is hosting our second year of Photography Month at Langara. With four guest speakers, four workshops, an alumni show, and our Professional Photography Grad show, there is a lot to do at Langara in April. Langara College has been educating photographers since 1970. With the Professional Photography Program, Continuing Studies Photography Program, and the Photography Education Travel Programs, Langara's diverse set of offerings allow students to choose the education that suits their individual needs.

SAT. APRIL 4 2 – 3:30 PM

Photography Masters Speaker Series: Erin Hogue Sponsored by Sony Canada

TUE. APRIL 7 5 – 7 PM

Photography Masters Speaker Series: Dina Goldstein Sponsored by Beau Photo

SAT. APRIL 11 2 – 3:30 PM

Lecture: Studio Lighting with Greg Blue TUE. APRIL 14 5 – 7 PM

Photography Masters Speaker Series Sponsored by B3K

SAT. APRIL 18 2 – 3:30 PM

Lecture: Business of Photography by Lisa Kaulback TUE. APRIL 21 5 – 7 PM

Photography Masters Speaker Series: Alec Jacobson Sponsored by the Schwartz Family

SAT. APRIL 25 2 – 3:30 PM

Lecture/Demo: Wet Plate Photography with Calvin Gehlen TUE. APRIL 28 5 – 7 PM

Photography Masters Speaker Series: Viktoria Haack Sponsored by Nikon Canada

Noah Friebel, Garden Gate, 2019, archival pigment print in custom frame, 74.29 × 58.08 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

112–113


Artist Talks & Panel Discussions SUN. APRIL 5 1 – 3 PM

WED. APRIL 8 7 – 9 PM

THUR. APRIL 9 5 – 6 PM

ERROR: FILE NOT FOUND GLITCH ART

Reading Photography: A conversation with Emily Carr's photography students

Gabor Gasztonyi: Hamlin's Women

BRAID ST STUDIOS UNIT 200-100 BRAID ST, NEW WESTMINSTER FREE

Hear from local glitch artists Dizz McGruber, David Collins, Daffodil, and Seattle glitch artist Adrian Cain, who are participating in the exhibition ERROR: FILE NOT FOUND GLITCH ART SHOW about what it is like to belong to an international peer group of artists and options for getting connected to this world. Each artist will speak about how they were introduced and came to be involved with this form of art, the individual processes that each of them uses, and the opportunities and doors that have opened for them to create a living from their work.

MICHAEL O’BRIAN EXHIBITION COMMONS, EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN 2ND FLOOR, 520 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER FREE

This event functions as an exhibition tour and talk. Photography students will walk the audience through the exhibition Reading and Being Read (p. 87) to talk about their work and give insights into their current discourses and thought processes. The event will also shed light on the photography program at Emily Carr University and offers an opportunity for the audience to learn more about new voices in contemporary photography in Vancouver.

GABOR GASZTONYI STUDIO 730 12TH ST, NEW WESTMINSTER FREE

Gabor Gasztonyi’s artist talk discusses photojournalistic portraiture and the process of developing a relationship with the subject. His exhibition Hamlin’s Women is about women he photographed at the rehabilitation hospital in Addis Ababa. They are photographs of women suffering from gynaecological fistula resulting from early childbirth.

No.223, Hao, 2018, inkjet print, 48.26 × 33.02 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Events


SAT. APRIL 11 2 – 3 PM

SAT. APRIL 11 3 – 4 PM

WED. APRIL 15 7 – 9 PM

The diversity of love

Kira Wu

Followed by the opening reception of No.223: Satellite of Love

ON MAIN GALLERY UNIT 427-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER

Anomaly: A panel discussion on climate change

FREE CANTON-SARDINE UNIT 071-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER FREE

Join exhibition artist Lin Zhipeng as they discuss the diversity of love in relation to their exhibition No.223: Satellite of Love (p. 98).

How do we navigate the terrain of women’s body image in disease, health, and beauty? Artist and breast cancer survivor, Kira Wu’s Fold Unfold (p. 88) speaks about gathering strength, drawing courage, and remaining resilient in her artistic journey while living the journey of medical treatment. She transforms written text in personal journals, magazines from doctors’ offices, brochures from waiting rooms, patient information forms, and medical literature into new spaces of negotiation. Fragile, torn, flat, two-dimensional paper becomes multidimensional origami as pieces of found paper are folded and unfolded and as the content they carry is framed and reframed in new contexts.

FERRY BUILDING GALLERY 1414 ARGYLE AVE, WEST VANCOUVER FREE TO REGISTER CALL 604-925-7270 (COURSE #69165) SEATING LIMITED

Join exhibiting artist Desirée Patterson and panelists from other local environmental organizations as they discuss the implications of the current climate crisis. The focus of this panel discussion will be to inspire dialogue around climate change, providing a civilian platform that can empower and incite concrete progressive action. This panel discussion is presented in conjunction with the Anomaly exhibition that showcases a selection of photo-based documentation of the world’s highest glaciers merged with climate data that illustrates surface temperature increases recorded in the Himalayan region in the past one hundred years. Please note that the main gallery is wheelchair accessible, however the washroom is not as it is located on the second floor.

Kira Wu, from the series Fortune Teller, 2017, light-jet print on aluminum panel, 68.58 × 68.58 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

114–115


Artist Talks & Panel Discussions SAT. APRIL 18 11 AM – 12 PM

SAT. APRIL 18 2 – 3 PM

SAT. APRIL 18 2 – 5 PM

Jo Ann Kronquist: View to the Horizon, Capturing the Journey

Waterlogue: A Conversation with Artist Valerie Durant and Marine Biologist Elaine Leung

229 1/2 Main

HOWE STREET STUDIOS 1265 HOWE ST, VANCOUVER

In this talk, book launch, and reading, join artist Shirley Wiebe, local resident and third generation building owner Eric Siu, along with writer Lori Bamber as they speak about 229 ½ Main and the possibilities of transforming a historic district into a contemporary neighbourhood.

BEAU PHOTO UNIT 110-1401 W 8TH AVE, VANCOUVER FREE

Jo Ann Kronquist discusses the development of her work View to the Horizon, Capturing the Journey during a talk at Beau Photo and how her collection of vintage suitcases led to this ongoing photographic series.

FREE BUT REGISTRATION REQUIRED TO BOOK VISIT WWW.ARTSCI-ANTHROPOCENEDIALOGUE.EVENTBRITE.CA

Poetic imagery intersects with science in this dialogue and presentation between artist Valerie Durant and marine biologist Dr. Elaine Leung, with Gerri York as the moderator. Durant’s images and sculptural works are made up of organic and inorganic found materials. Often, these objects are discovered washed up along the shoreline then shot above and below the surface to make visible seemingly invisible connections as a way to reflect on the impact of human actions on the natural world.

AIR STUDIO 529 CARRALL ST, VANCOUVER FREE

Shirley will talk about how her photo-based works evolve and transform through the use of mixed media. Her newly self-published book 229 ½ Main will be available. AIR Studio is an architectural firm located at 529 Carrall Street in historic Chinatown. This exhibition depicts the gutted interior of a 1907 building several blocks away in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside.

Elaine Leung, PhD, Marine Biologist, is the Founder of Sea Smart, an NGO empowers youth to respect our oceans, through connection with the environment. Learn more about Durant’s practice and her current exhibitions by visiting www.valeriedurant.com

Shirley Wiebe, If Memory Walks, 2019, photo/ mixed media on board, found objects, 45.72 × 30.48 × 15.24 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Events


SUN. APRIL 19 1:30 – 3:30 PM

TUE. APRIL 21 7 – 9 PM

THUR. APRIL 23 6 – 8 PM

A Touch of Hand: Alternative Processes in Photography

Sense of Place

Jackie Dives: A Room for the Pain

SHADBOLT CENTRE STUDIO UNIT 105-6450 DEER LAKE AVE, BURNABY FREE

The iPhone has both democratized and transformed photography and digital media creating a rise in interest in traditional and historical photographic processes. In conjunction with the group exhibition A Touch of Hand: Alternative Processes in Photography, Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, artists/photographers who use alternative photographic processes will present a lecture and slide presentation offering insight into the process behind their work.

CRESCENT BEACH POPUP GALLERY 12160 BEECHER ST, SURREY FREE

Join artists Roxanne Charles, Wei Chen, Steven Lee, and Merry McMullen as they discuss their photo-based artwork that focuses on a personal exploration of a location in the City of Surrey. Together, the artists have created an installation that examines the juxtaposition of Surrey’s past and present. Each artist will examine ideas such as aspects of the location's history including how it has been developed, transformed, and remembered over time.

GALLERY GACHET 9 W HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER FREE

A Room for the Pain (p. 100) is an exhibition by documentary photographer and contemporary artist Jackie Dives. Created soon after the death of the artist's father to drug overdose, the photo series is a personal testament to a public health emergency. Gallery Gachet will host a speaker’s panel to discuss themes addressed through the exhibition, including conventions and ethics of documentary photography and the value of harm reduction in the context of Vancouver's overdose crisis.

Ed Peck uses Scanographs, a platen-based composition technique for creating highresolution digital images without using a camera. Phyllis Schwartz creates Lumen prints directly on both fibre papers and sheet film, without the use of cameras. Ross den Otter blends paint, wax, and resins with modern and historical photographic processes occasionally using a homemade camera.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

116–117


Artist Talks & Panel Discussions THUR. APRIL 23 6 – 8 PM

SAT. APRIL 25 2 – 4 PM

SAT. APRIL 25 3 PM

The Persistence of Analogue

Movement and the Still Image

Matilda Aslizadeh

MASSY BOOKS 229 E GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 BLACKCOMB WAY, WHISTLER

FREE

FREE FOR AUDAIN ART MUSEUM MEMBERS 10% OFF ADMISSION PRICE FOR CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL MEMBERS FOR ADMISSION RATES VISIT WWW.AUDAINARTMUSEUM.COM

How is analogue photography creatively relevant today? And why is it an affordable and accessible alternative to using digital tools for image creation? Join us at Massy Books as we search for answers. Panelists: Take Kayo is a Vancouver photographer, reviewer, writer, public speaker, and YouTuber. Nicole Langdon-Davies pushes the boundaries of photography, sculpture, and natural found beauty into thoughtful mixed media pieces. She is also the analogue expert at local hub Beau Photo.

Throughout history, artists have explored different ways of capturing movement through the medium of photography, from Eadweard Muybridge to professional action photographers in Whistler. In a panel discussion and Q&A session inspired by The Extended Moment: Fifty Years of Collecting Photographs (p. 46) organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada, hear from artist and photographer Chad Chomlack about capturing movement today and how he is influenced by historical techniques.

VANCOUVER ART GALLERY ROOM 4EAST, 750 HORNBY ST, VANCOUVER REGISTRATION REQUIRED TO BOOK VISIT WWW.VANARTGALLERY.BC.CA/ EVENTS

Join Matilda Aslizadeh for a discussion about neoliberalism, economic policy, divination, and agency in relation to her exhibition NEXT Matilda Aslizadeh: Moly and Kassandra (p. 80) at the Vancouver Art Gallery. Moly and Kassandra includes a sculptural video installation and photographic prints in which statistical charts, unheeded prophets, and open-pit mines collude to deflect dominant representations of the economy.

Lauren Ray received a BFA in Photography at Emily Carr University. Ray’s practice is created almost exclusively with 35mm analogue camera technology. Alistair Henning (moderator) is an award‑winning photographer whose work has been exhibited throughout North America and Europe. Please note this event is not wheelchair accessible.

Zhang Huan, To Raise the Water Level in a Fish Pond (Close Up), 1997, dye coupler print, 83 × 117 cm approx.; image: 69 × 103 cm (includes dark border). Purchased 2011. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. © Zhang Huan, Courtesy of Zhang Huan Studio. Photo: NGC

Events


2020

Capture Photography Festival

118–119


Tours SAT. APRIL 4 3 – 4:30 PM

SUN. APRIL 5 11 AM – 12 PM

WED. APRIL 8 6 – 7 PM

Vancouver Street Photography Collective Photo Walk

Described Tour

Curator’s Tour with Stephen Waddell

ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS & RECREATION CENTRE 181 ROUNDHOUSE MEWS, VANCOUVER

WATERFRONT STATION CANADA LINE, 601 W CORDOVA ST, VANCOUVER MEET BESIDE THE STARBUCKS INSIDE THE STATION FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE OR BY PHONE: # 236-858-7171 GUIDE: STEPHANIE BOKENFOHR

FREE

In 2019, a group of street photographers formed the Vancouver Street Photography Collective because of a firm belief and desire to document our city. While we call upon the history of street photography in Vancouver as our inspiration, we also look to the future through our efforts to promote street photography as a medium of both inclusion and diversity. The Vancouver Street Photography Collective will celebrate this history and the contemporary state of street photography with an introductory presentation on the genre in Vancouver followed by a photo walk to some of Vancouver's most photographed locations, stopping to highlight street photography techniques and approaches. This event is open to anyone with a camera, including digital, analogue, and phone cameras.

Capture Photography Festival presents a described tour of the work of Anna Binta Diallo's public art installation at the Waterfront Station on the Canada Line (p. 45), a project curated by Katie Belcher. The tour will be led by Stephanie Bokenfohr and is intended to increase accessibility for people who are blind or partially-sighted. She is currently the Adult Public Program Coordinator at the Vancouver Art Gallery and is passionate about arts-based learning, community, and supporting living artists.

FREE

Stephen Waddell offers insight into the work comprising Wait Until Dark (p. 92), a group exhibition he curated including the work of Hannah Collins, Wols, Miroslav Tichy, Richard Learoyd, and Jacqueline de Jong, all of whom employ a kind of objectivity that moves beyond the visual towards a visceral refiguration of the seen and unseen. Waddell is a Vancouver-based artist who was the 2019 recipient of the Scotiabank Photography Award. A solo presentation of his work will be presented as part of the 2020 Contact Photography Festival with an accompanying catalogue published by Steidl.

Please note this is a walking tour. Presented by Capture Photography Festival and the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association

Please note this is a walking tour.

Anna Binta Diallo, Swamp kids and Turtle Island from the Wanderings collage series, 2019, digital reproductions of collages printed on Photo-Tex removable adhesive fabric and originally mounted on walls, aluminum composite and PVC board, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

Events

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE 495 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER

Please note this event is not wheelchair accessible.


SAT. APRIL 11 2 – 4 PM

SAT. APRIL 11 3 – 5 PM

SAT. APRIL 11 3 – 5 PM

Curator’s Tour with Claudia Beck

Gallery Hop: Or Gallery, Centre A, Massy Books, and Access Gallery

North Vancouver Through the Lens of Jack Cash: Photographs from 1939 – 1970

MONTE CLARK GALLERY UNIT 105-525 GREAT NORTHERN WAY, VANCOUVER FREE

Claudia Beck offers insight into the work featured in Crossing (p. 82), an exhibition she curated at Monte Clark Gallery, including the work of Roy Arden, Karin Bubaš, Karel Funk, Tim Gardner, Anthony Goicolea, Owen Kydd, Evan Lee, Scott McFarland, and Stephen Waddell. The exhibition sees the photographic as related to shifts in pictorial vision. The artists presented in Crossing (p. 82) draw upon an enormous archive of images including the internet, films, illustrations, paintings, and drawings, and work out of the medium of photography in divergent ways.

MEET AT OR GALLERY 236 E PENDER ST, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS GUIDE: CHEYENNE RAIN LEGRANDE TD ASSISTANT CURATOR, CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

This tour, led by Cheyenne Rain LeGrande, Capture’s TD Assistant Curator, will include visits to Or Gallery, Centre A, Massy Books, and Access Gallery. The Or Gallery features a solo exhibition by Pao Houa Her titled After the Fall of Hmong Tebchaw (p. 83) that includes a series of evocative portraits of Hmong seniors. At Centre A, Pixy Liao’s exhibition, Experimental Relationship (for your eyes only, or maybe mine, too) (p. 93), uses photography as performance with images that speak to the artist’s own personal romantic relationship. Massy Books presents the work of Rydel Cerezo. As a Philippine-born artist, Cerezo’s exhibition To Be From The Same Tree (p. 84) explores the artist’s relationship to his Belgian partner’s family through a series of staged/ documentary photographs. At Access Gallery, Anna Binta Diallo’s show titled Wandering (p. 62) includes seven photographic collage works that address folk stories and identity.

NORTH VANCOUVER MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES 3203 INSTITUTE RD, NORTH VANCOUVER FREE

Join Jessica Bushey, Archivist and Curator of Photography at the North Vancouver Museum and Archives for a tour of the Jack Cash photography exhibition. Learn about the career of one of the North Shore's most prominent commercial photographers, Jack Cash (1918 – 2 005). As the son of Gwen Cash, the first woman general reporter in Canada, Jack found his way into the news industry through photography by working as a staff photographer at the Vancouver Sun in the late 1930s. After World War II he opened his own studio, Jack Cash Commercial Photography, and created a unique body of work that spans over four decades. Key works and techniques will be discussed in the context of photographic practices influenced by modernism and post-modernism.

Please note that this is a walking tour and and that the exhibition at Massy Books is not wheelchair accessible. Presented by Capture Photography Festival

2020

Capture Photography Festival

120–121


Tours WED. APRIL 15 5 – 9 PM

SAT. APRIL 18 11 AM – 1 PM

SAT. APRIL 18 2 – 3 PM

Tricera Print Open House

Photo Walk: Investigating Vancouver through its Built Environment

Arbutus Greenway Billboards Tour

TRICERA PRINT STUDIO 1830 W 5TH AVE, VANCOUVER

Tricera Print is the exclusive print partner for the 2020 Capture Photography Festival. Our bespoke print studio and custom framing service has served the artistic community for thirty years. We invite you for an opportunity to learn about the digital print process. As one of Canada's largest Epson Pro Graphics dealers, we'll answer questions about fine art printing. Open house attendees receive a voucher for 15% off their next fine art print order. We will also have exclusive discounts on Epson papers and exciting door prizes. As you explore the Selected Exhibitions, we hope you pause to enjoy the print quality and fine art paper we used to print the work of those who were recipients of Tricera Print Grants participating in this year's festival. We look forward to seeing you!

MEET AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY AT HOMER ST AND W GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS GUIDE: MICHAEL LOVE

Michael Love is a photo-based artist whose work explores history through photography and collage. Much of his work has focused on the ongoing ramifications of the Cold War conflict through his own photographs and through the examination and reconstruction of archival images. Travelling from downtown to Chinatown, this walk will explore aspects of Vancouver through its built environment, considering the city’s complex history and the land on which it’s built. This walk will look for indicators of these histories. Love will discuss his strategies for image‑making, from research, to surveying locations, to camera techniques. Please note this is a walking tour.

MEET AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE ARBUTUS GREENWAY ON THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF BURRARD ST AND W 6TH AVE, VANCOUVER FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS GUIDE: MADALEN BENSON, FESTIVAL MANAGER, CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

Join Capture's Festival Manager, Madalen Benson, for a guided tour of an outdoor public art project curated by Julie Crooks, Associate Curator of Photography at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Located on a series of Pattison Outdoor Billboards along the Arbutus Greenway (p. 38), the project features photography by Christina Leslie and Bidemi Oloyede and explores issues of race, place, and belonging. Leslie is a Toronto-based photographer whose work centres on themes of immigration, marginalization, race, and memory. Creating images of social landscapes, Oloyede is a Toronto-based street and documentary style portrait photographer. Please note this is a walking tour. Presented by Capture Photography Festival

Presented by Capture Photography Festival and the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association

Bidemi Oloyede, A Man Sticks Canadian Flags into his Front Pocket. Yonge-Dundas Square. Toronto, 2018, digital scan from 35mm negative film. Courtesy of the artist.

Events


SUN. APRIL 19 1 PM

SAT. APRIL 25 11 AM – 1 PM

週六4月25日 上午11點至下午1點

Curator’s Tour with Ann Thomas

Mandarin Language Tour: Vancouver City Centre Canada Line Station, Pendulum Gallery, Dal Grauer, Contemporary Art Gallery

Capture 攝影節中文步行導覽

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 BLACKCOMB WAY, WHISTLER FREE FOR AUDAIN ART MUSEUM MEMBERS 10% OFF ADMISSION PRICE FOR CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL MEMBERS

Ann Thomas, Senior Curator of Photographs, Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada will provide a guided tour of The Extended Moment exhibition (p. 76) and examine themes ranging from new narratives to discovery and invention of photo-based art.

MEET OUTSIDE OF THE VANCOUVER CITY CENTRE CANADA LINE STATION PUBLIC ART PROJECT AT W GEORGIA ST AND GRANVILLE ST FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS GUIDE: LYNN CHEN

Join Lynn Chen for a Mandarin language tour of Capture exhibitions and public art. The tour begins with a viewing of Human Nature – Last Supper by the collective Impatiently Inclined at the Vancouver City Centre Canada Line station (p. 46), one of Capture’s public art projects presented in partnership with Canada Line Public Art Program – InTransit BC. Next, the tour will stop to view Kapwani Kiwanga’s Counter-Illumination, a public art installation on the façade of the BC Hydro Dal Grauer Substation (p.28). The tour will then continue to Pendulum Gallery to view the News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) Pictures of the Year exhibition (p. 81). The tour concludes at the Contemporary Art Gallery to see one of Capture’s Featured Exhibitions Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya (p. 66) featuring the work of artist Althea Thauberger with its sister exhibition Memorial for the lost pages (p. 101) by artist Madiha Aijaz.

參觀地點:溫哥華市中心加拿大線天車站 (VANCOUVER CITY CENTRE CANADA LINE STATION),PENDULUM 畫廊,BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER 變電站,當代美術館 (CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY) 請在GEORGIA西街跟GRANVILLE街口的溫哥華市中心 加拿大線天車站公共藝術項目旁集合 (準時開始) 活動免費但因人數有限,請提前登記報名 報名連結請至:CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS 中文導覽員:LYNN CHEN 在專業的解說引導下,一同與導覽員  Lynn  Chen 一起 參觀了解年度 Capture 攝影節所規劃的展覽和公共藝 術項目。導覽步行首先從溫哥華市中心加拿大線天車 站開始,講解由不耐煩的集體(collective Impatiently Inclined) 所創作的《觀看人性—最後的晚餐》 (Human Nature – L ast Supper) (第46頁)介紹起,這是  Capture 攝影節與加拿大線公共藝術計劃 - InTransit BC共同 合作的公共藝術項目之一。緊接著步行至  BC Hydro Dal Grauer 變電站參​​觀公共藝術裝置由弗裡茲藝術家 獎的首位獲獎者 Kapwani Kiwanga 創作的《反照明》 ( Counter-Illumination)( 第 28頁 )作 品 。隨 後 前 往,Pendulum畫廊參觀加拿大新聞攝影協會(News Photographers Association of Canada)年度攝影展 (第81頁)。最後抵達當代美術館參觀 Capture 攝影節特 別策劃展《Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya》 (第66頁) 此展介紹了藝術家Althea Thauberger的精彩 創作及藝術家Madiha Aijaz《紀念遺失頁》(Memorial for the lost pages)作品(第101頁)。

Lynn Chen  為溫哥華美術館亞洲館行政及活動助理及 Cinevolution  媒體藝術協會聯合創始人兼項目總監。

Chen is the Programming Administrative Assistant at the Vancouver Art Gallery Institute of Asian Art and a Co-founder and Program Director for Cinevolution Media Arts Society. Please note this is a walking tour. Presented by Capture Photography Festival and the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association

2020

Capture Photography Festival

122–123


Tours SAT. APRIL 25 12 – 1 PM

SAT. APRIL 25 2 – 4 PM

SAT. APRIL 25 11 AM – 5 PM

Canada Council Art Bank at the Vancouver Public Library

Tour of FLOOD (Displaced Horizon)

Guest Artists' Print Reveal

CENTRAL LIBRARY, VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY 350 W GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER MEET AT THE BASE OF THE STAIRCASE ON LEVEL 8 FREE GUIDE: NICHOLE DEMICHELIS

Visited our Central Library recently? You may have noticed some new artwork. The Vancouver Public Library is currently displaying a selection of photography, featuring local works from the outburst of talent in the 1960s, to the Vancouver leaders of the conceptualist movement of the 1970s, to the photoconceptualists of the 1980s, as well as today’s Indigenous art of resistance. Join us for a tour of these photographic works on loan from Canada Council Art Bank on Levels 8 and 9. Artists include Vikky Alexander, Roy Arden, Marian Penner Bancroft, Dana Claxton, Stan Douglas, Liz Magor, N.E.Thing Co., Marianne Nicolson, Ian Wallace, and many more.

MEET AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF EXPO BLVD AND ABBOTT ST FREE Join Howard Ursuliak and Kyle Juron, along with Other Sights members Barbara Cole, Lorna Brown, Marko Simcic, and Colin Griffiths for an on-site tour and reception. The four billboards face east and west on Expo Boulevard between Carrall and Abbott Streets in Northeast False Creek. Placed back into False Creek, FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) (p. 42) triggers and disturbs our recognition of the familiar surroundings and iconic details of urban Vancouver. When a horizon goes missing, the future is obscured—this billboard series has tucked the horizon out of sight. Without language or text, un-slick and hyper-located, the artwork situates us in our present moment, perhaps bottoming out, perhaps run aground. Please note this is a walking tour.

CHURCHLAND STUDIOS 823 JACKSON AVE, VANCOUVER FREE

Join artist Torrie Groening and recent studio guests for a behind-the-scenes tour of their new photo-based projects. Groening brings her experience as a traditional master printer/publisher to unique one-on-one creative residencies for artists. Here, each artist approaches photography as the leading force in work that employs layered multimedia images. This year, we welcomed San Francisco's Francesca Pastine with her giant colour-soaked gems and layered watercolours. Los Angeles – based photographer Jane Szabo’s Map House series found new staging locations in Vancouver. Sally Buck’s photo-collages embrace environmental alchemy and adventure with startling juxtapositions. Groening’s still life photo-collages draw inspiration from a curious collection of past-era self-help books. Artists will be in attendance to discuss their projects and work in photography. Please note that this event is not wheelchair accessible.

Howard Ursuliak, Kyle Juron, Barbara Cole, Lorna Brown, Marko Simcic, Colin Griffiths, FLOOD (Displaced Horizon) VA014931, 2020, digital image, printed, folded, and re-photographed. Courtesy of the artists.

Events


2020

Capture Photography Festival

124–125


Screenings & Broadcasts Knowledge Network

CURATED SPECIALLY FOR CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL 2020, WATCH KNOWLEDGE NETWORK’S COMMERCIAL-FREE TELEVISION AND STREAMING SERVICES AT WWW.KNOWLEDGE.CA AND ON THE KNOWLEDGE NETWORK APP.

NEW:

PAST FAVOURITES:

THUR. APRIL 2 10 PM

THUR. APRIL 2 9 PM

MON. APRIL 14 10:30 PM

Camera Trap

Ansel Adams: A Documentary Film

Family Camera

THUR. APRIL 2 10:30 PM

MON. APRIL 20 9 PM

Foncie’s Photos

Jeff Wall: In Order to Make a Picture

Aspiring wilderness photographer Peter Mather puts everything on the line in his quest to capture one photo that tells the story of the greatest land migration on earth.

MON. APRIL 6 9 PM

Seeing Daylight: The Photography of Dorothy Bohm A retrospective on one of Britain’s most accomplished street photographers.

TUE. APRIL 7 9 PM

Raghu Rai: An Unframed Portrait An unframed portrait of Magnum photographer Raghu Rai and his fifty-year long journey capturing the stories of India.

TUE. APRIL 14 10 PM

TUE. APRIL 7 10 PM

Pedro E. Guerrero: A Photographer’s Journey

TUE. APRIL 7 11 PM

Karsh is History

TUE. APRIL 13 9 PM

Photographing Africa

Shooting War The story of the Iraq war through Franco Pagetti’s photographs, revealing the lasting impact this war has had, on a country, a region, and the world.

Events

MON. APRIL 14 9 PM

Eye of Istanbul


WED. APRIL 29 7:30 – 9 PM

Zadie Xa DIM CINEMA, THE CINEMATHEQUE UNIT 200-1131 HOWE ST

Program:

CURATED BY TOBIN GIBSON

CHILD OF MAGOHALMI AND THE ECHOES OF CREATION (2019), 50 min.

DIM Cinema is pleased to present the premiere Canadian screening of work by the artist Zadie Xa. This event introduces videos made between 2016 and 2019, with recent work shot during Xa’s visits to Vancouver. Through performance, video, painting, and textiles, Xa explores the overlapping and conflation of cultures that inform self-conceptualized identities and notions of self.

MOODRINGS, CRYTALS AND OPAL COLOURED STONES (2016), 20 min. DEEP SPACE MATHEMATICS AND THE TRANSFER OF KNOWLEDGE (2016), 2 min.

Zadie Xa, Child of Magohalmi and the Echos of Creation film still, 2019, HD video. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

126–127


Community Events WED. APRIL 15 6 – 8 PM

SUN. APRIL 19 11 AM – 2 PM

FRI. APRIL 24 6:30 – 8 PM

Cabinet of Curiosities: A Collection of Analogue Photography

Capture × skatejam

Sylvia Grace Borda Book Launch

SCIENCE WORLD AT TELUS WORLD OF SCIENCE 1455 QUEBEC ST, VANCOUVER FREE Join us for an evening of discovery as curiosity seekers gather to celebrate the diversity of the photographic medium. You can take part in creating your own objects of curiosity at the Fujifilm photo booth or have your portrait taken on Polaroid 8x10 instant film. As a window into the science of the arcane, cabinets of curiosity have historically been places to find mysterious items of significance; oddities, relics, antiquities, archaeological or geological finds, anything that fascinates and inspires scientific exploration. This group exhibition is a collection of images created with analogue photographic processes.

PETER SULLIVAN SKATEPARK 1200 ARGYLE AVE, WEST VANCOUVER FREE

SURREY ART GALLERY 13750 88 AVE, SURREY

CHECK FOR UPDATES AT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM

FREE

Photographer Alana Paterson owes a lot to skateboarding. It gave her confidence, and the strong ties she forged in that community carried her forward in her career. Paterson is known for her striking and empowering portraits. The mural at the Peter Sullivan Skatepark features four of Canada’s brightest stars in skateboarding: Una Farrar, Breana Geering, Annie Guglia, and Shari White. As the sport officially moves out of the shadows and premieres in the 2020 Olympics, there is no better time to spotlight the talented women forging their own path and inspiring future generations of girls to skate.

This event commemorates the launch of Shifting Perspectives, a publication that captures the breadth of photographer and researcher Sylvia Grace Borda's practice over three decades. Borda's work, which explores the interrelationship between cameras, images, place-making, labour, and identity, is renowned for its intensive engagement with social and cultural histories. Shifting Perspectives features a wealth of scholarly texts, which highlight and elaborate upon the scope of some of Borda's most expansive projects, such as This One's For the Farmer, Every Bus Stop in Surrey, and EK Modernism. Join us for an evening of rich conversation, featuring talks from Borda herself, as well as art historian Dorothy Barenscott and local farming advocate Ron Tamis.

Join Capture on April 19 for a skatejam at the Peter Sullivan Skatepark, Ambleside Beach in West Vancouver. Presented in partnership with VANS, District of West Vancouver, Canada Skateboard, and Antisocial Skate Shop.

Alana Paterson, Breanna Geering, Ollie North, October 2018, 35mm Kodak film. Courtesy of the artist.

Events


2020

Capture Photography Festival

128–129


Workshops SAT. APRIL 4 & SUN. APRIL 5 12 – 6 PM BOTH DAYS

SUN. APRIL 5 & SAT. APRIL 11 2 – 4 PM

THUR. APRIL 9 6 – 8 PM

Photography Retouching and Compositing

Analogue Photo Studio Tour and Printing Demo

Vanishing Vancouver

VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE 2625 KASLO ST, VANCOUVER

STUDIO F6O4 SOUTH UNIT 106-107, 334 E KENT AVE, VANCOUVER

ADMISSION: $170 OR $125 WITH ANY VIVO PRODUCER MEMBERSHIP

FREE BUT TICKETED VIA EVENTBRITE TO BOOK VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS LIMITED CAPACITY

TO BOOK VISIT WWW.PHOTO-RETOUCHCOMPOSITE.EVENTBRITE.CA

Michael Wesik will host an open house, touring his one-of-a-kind photography studio. The studio tour and printing demo will include a behind-thescenes look at Wesik’s seven thousand square foot studio, focusing on its unique darkroom and wet lab facilities. The printing demonstration will feature a process using rehalogenizing bleach, redevelopment, and toning followed by a discussion about Wesik’s use of unorthodox silver-printing methodologies, and analogue practices in a digital world.

TWO FREE SPOTS FULLY SUBSIDIZED BY CAPTURE AND VIVO. VISIT CAPTUREPHOTOFEST.COM/EVENTS TO APPLY. This workshop focuses on developing correct techniques in Photoshop to mask and reveal different images, layers, and effects, providing students with the foundation needed to combine multiple photos, retouch portraits, and source and blend different elements to create any image desired. By engaging in hands-on practice, students will understand how Photoshop works, allowing them to create powerful portraits, band photos, fashion photographs, landscapes, etc.

MASSY BOOKS 229 E GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER FREE

Accessible spaces for creative expression are disappearing in Vancouver. During this workshop lead by Alistair Henning, we welcome all local artists working with analogue photography to bring in their recent prints documenting spaces that either no longer exist, or are at risk. During this one-night-only pop-up event, the community’s images will be displayed on a portable wall at the centre of Massy Books. Please note that this event is not wheelchair accessible.

Presented by Capture Photography Festival in partnership with Michael Wesik and Studio f604.

With these skills students will feel confident when: • combining and colour-correcting multiple images into a final composite • retouching portraits • accentuating or warping features of a face or scene • relighting figures • removing or adding blemishes and wrinkles • adding effects such as fire, smoke, or sparks Computer with Photoshop is provided with registration. A wheelchair ramp is located at the west side of the main entrance.

John Mutter, Jo Passed for the Photography Retouching and Compositing Workshop at VIVO Media Arts, 2020. Courtesy of the artist.

Events


SAT. APRIL 11 1 – 4:30 PM

SUN. APRIL 19 11 AM – 12:30 PM

SUN. APRIL 26 10 AM – 4 PM

You Be the Judge: An Introduction to Constructively Critiquing Photographs with PhotoClub Vancouver

Artwork Documentation Workshop for Artists and Photographers with Rachel Topham

Pinhole Photography Workshop

ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS & RECREATION CENTRE 181 ROUNDHOUSE MEWS, VANCOUVER FREE PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED, NO DROP INS. TO BOOK EMAIL COMMUNICATION@PHOTOCLUBVANCOUVER.COM LIMITED CAPACITY

This workshop lead by PhotoClub Vancouver is designed to help new photographers to recognize and understand key attributes of good photographs so that they can constructively critique images they see and create better photographs themselves. Topics will include elements of composition, a framework for critiquing, and tips for creating better images. Participants will practice assessing images during the workshop and are invited to bring one to three examples of their own work (JPEG files on a USB stick) for discussion.

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE 495 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER ADMISSION: $10 PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED, NO DROP INS. TO BOOK VISIT WWW.MOBIL-ART.CA

Rachel Topham, a photographer who specializes in documenting artworks, performance art, and spaces will lead a workshop demonstrating different ways to approach documentation of two-dimensional artwork. Participants will get a unique opportunity to take part in this course which covers general art documentation techniques on site at an exhibition at Howard495 Project Space. Please note this event is wheelchair accessible from 8 am – 4 pm via a freight elevator that can be accessed from the back of the building.

SHADBOLT CENTRE FOR THE ARTS STUDIO F, MATHER'S HOUSE, 6450 DEER LAKE AVE, BURNABY ADMISSION: $5 REGISTRATION REQUIRED TO BOOK VISIT WWW.BURNABY.CA/WEBREG OR BY PHONE 604-297-4440 CODE 527286

In honour of Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day (WPPD), the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts will be hosting a pinhole photography workshop in which participants make their own pinhole cameras out of recycled materials, learn how to make pinhole images, and process their photos, which will then be scanned and uploaded to the WPPD website where it will become part of the annual Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day celebration’s online gallery. Last year, participants created 2,033 pinhole images from fifty-seven countries from around the world. The workshop will be facilitated by four Shadbolt photographic artists. Ages: 13+.

Presented by Capture Photography Festival in partnership with Mobil Art and generously supported by Howard495 Project Space.

Rachel Topham, self-portrait, 2019.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

130–131


Ella Goldman, Polluted by Ignorance, 2020, digital print, 60.69 Ă— 45.72 cm. Courtesy of the artist.


Youth Program

Flash Forward Incubator 134

Exhibitions 137

Workshops 141

2020

Capture Photography Festival

132–133


Flash Forward Incubator Capture is pleased to partner with the Magenta Foundation, Canada's pioneering charitable arts publishing house based in Toronto and the founder of the Flash Forward Incubator Program, to present the third edition of the Incubator in British Columbia. The Incubator proposes a new and exciting model for arts education in Canada by preparing emerging artists for their transition out of high school and into the next phase of their artistic careers. The Incubator integrates interactive instructional methods, both online and in-person, to provide students with diverse opportunities to receive feedback on the evolution of their artistic ideas and projects. The program is offered free of charge outside of the regular school curriculum and is an opportunity for students to engage with critical art ideas and contemporary methodologies that may be broader than the scope of their art classes. The Incubator is developed in collaboration with industry professionals and educators, including teachers and artists, as well as Magenta and Capture's education teams. In addition to an educational experience, the Incubator supports students in the creation of a signature piece for their portfolios. They receive a publication produced by Magenta and their works are included in a professional exhibition and silent auction held every April during Capture Photography Festival. The theme of this year's Flash Forward Incubator Program is “It's a Plastic World.” It will be the inspiration for a wide range of photography-based projects created by the students in the program. These artworks examine the impact of the thematic statement and consider how literal and conceptual interpretations of plastic may affect us personally in regard to behaviours, values, and a sense of self in conjunction with the current intellectual, moral, and cultural climate of our era.

“Through PwC Canada’s commitment to digital upskilling, we’re once again delighted to support Capture’s 2020 Youth Program. At PwC, our people are becoming future-ready. We’re sharing that knowledge by supporting upskilling with our clients and within our communities. We’re committed to providing training to 1 million people and NPOs across Canada to help them maximize their potential with our program New World. New Skills. Encouraging our people to engage in meaningful community experiences that build capabilities and help ensure that people have the skills they need will help them succeed in our new digital world. Let’s celebrate the achievements of this year’s participants in the Flash Forward Incubator and the creative community supporting them.” JESSICA MACHT, PWC CANADA PARTNER AND INNOVATION LEADER, BC REGION

BC PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS ARGYLE SECONDARY, NORTH VANCOUVER ERIC HAMBER SECONDARY, VANCOUVER GEORGES P. VANIER SECONDARY, COURTENAY-COMOX HIGHLAND SECONDARY, COURTENAY-COMOX JOHN OLIVER SECONDARY, VANCOUVER KAMLOOPS SCHOOL OF THE ARTS, KAMLOOPS LORD BYNG SECONDARY, VANCOUVER MARK R. ISFELD SECONDARY, COURTENAY-COMOX POINT GREY SECONDARY, VANCOUVER STRATFORD HALL, VANCOUVER TEMPLETON SECONDARY, VANCOUVER UNIVERSITY HILL SECONDARY, VANCOUVER WINDERMERE SECONDARY SCHOOL, VANCOUVER Presented by

In partnership with

Generously supported by

Youth Program


Emma Gibb, New Natural, 2019, digital print, 60.96 Ă— 45.72 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

134–135


Exhibitions

Sophie Kerr, Trinkets and Glue, 2020, digital print, 60.96 Ă— 45.72 cm.

Youth Program


Flash Forward Incubator It's A Plastic World GROUP EXHIBITION

APRIL 1 –  APRIL 4

ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS & RECREATION CENTRE 181 ROUNDHOUSE MEWS, VANCOUVER M – F: 9 AM – 9:45 PM; SA: 9 AM – 4:45 PM

CURATED BY MARIAH BRUSATORE CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

Incubator participants exhibit their final works in the exhibition It's a Plastic World, the 2020 Flash Forward Incubator Exhibition, at Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre in Yaletown. As many of the students will be in attendance for the Silent Auction, it is an opportunity for the community to congratulate them on their completion of the program as well as to see the work of emerging photographic talent in British Columbia.

CELEBRATION & SILENT AUCTION SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 1 – 3 PM

For more information on the Flash Forward Incubator Program, visit www.magentafoundation.org/ flash-forward-incubator If you are a teacher or principal in BC and would like to participate in next year’s Incubator, please email engagement@capturephotofest.com

Each of the professionally printed and framed works are available for purchase at the Silent Auction on April 4. All funds raised will go towards the participating schools' art programs. Supported by a Tricera Printing Grant.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

136–137


Chester Fields 2020: Global Warming

APRIL 4 – 12

GROUP EXHIBITION

THE POLYGON GALLERY MAIN FLOOR, 101 CARRIE CATES CT, NORTH VANCOUVER TUE – SU: 10 AM – 5 PM; M: CLOSED

CURATED BY JUSTIN RAMSEY

OPENING RECEPTION SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 1 – 3 PM

Chester Fields is an initiative of The Polygon Gallery that encourages the development of visionary young photographers and gives them an opportunity to show their work at a professional venue. Each year, The Polygon announces a new theme for Chester Fields. Teen artists from across the region are invited to submit original works of photographic art in response to that theme. All submittals are reviewed by a jury of artists and arts professionals, who select finalists to be shown in a week-long exhibition. The 2020 theme takes up one of the oldest challenges of photography: conveying dynamic processes in still images. Global Warning asks emerging photographers to use their creativity to capture the forces of nature at work around us. It is an opportunity for artists to reflect on our changing climate, and to think carefully about how to draw the viewers' attention to the environmental issues that matter to them.

Anna Wang, Unnatural Pipeline, 2018, digital photograph, 60.96 × 91.44 cm. Chester Fields Finalist in 2018.

Youth Program


Location; past, present and future visions

APRIL 4 – 25

GROUP EXHIBITION

ARTS UMBRELLA SOUTH SURREY THE SHOPS AT MORGAN CROSSING, N116-15850 26 AVE, SURREY M: CLOSED; TU&TH: 10 AM – 8 PM; W: 10 AM – 8:30 PM; F: 9 AM – 8 PM; SA: 10 AM – 5:30 PM; SU: 9:30 AM – 5:30 PM

CURATED BY ROXANNE GAGNON AND JOCELYN SANCHEZ

OPENING RECEPTION SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 1 – 3 PM

Within the photographic process of image-making, the artist is given tools to alter and manipulate the evidence of what is witnessed. During the summer, students involved in the Photography Intensive were led through a series of photo walks and workshops aimed towards meaning and making.

layering, and digital alteration in preparation for their exhibit construct: past, present and future visions at the Olympic Village SkyTrain Station (p. 48) as part of the Capture Photography Festival Public Art Program.

Students including Slater Biln, Avi Maru, Evan Muir, Sam Tortell, and Matisse Wenban were encouraged to work with past and present approaches to photography such as analogue photography in the darkroom and digital processes in the computer lab. Through experimentation and the practice of seeing, students were challenged to respond to the ever-changing landscape of Metro Vancouver and create work that reflected their ideas of the past, present, and future of their home. With guidance from their instructors, students explored a range of techniques and ideas that focused on contrast,

Avi Maru, Coloured Glasses Radial Blur, 2019, digital photograph, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist.

2020

Capture Photography Festival

138–139


Workshops

Exploring photography in ArtStarts' exhibition, Maker Space, 2019. Courtesy of Vincent Tom.

Youth Program


Art After Dark In conjunction with the Capture Photography Festival, explore image-making, photography techniques, and collage through a range of hands-on activities inspired by the Audain Art Museum’s Permanent Collection and Special Exhibition, The Extended Moment: Fifty Years of Collecting Photographs, organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada.

APRIL 3, 10, & 17 3:30 – 5:30 PM AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 BLACKCOMB WAY, WHISTLER FREE FOR AUDAIN ART MUSEUM MEMBERS 10% OFF ADMISSION PRICE FOR CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL MEMBERS

Designed for ages 18 and under. Ages 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

Family Studio Day In conjunction with the Capture Photography Festival, explore image-making, photography techniques, and collage through a range of hands-on activities inspired by the Audain Art Museum’s Permanent Collection and Special Exhibition, The Extended Moment: Fifty Years of Collecting Photographs, organized by the Canadian Photography Institute of the National Gallery of Canada.

Explores!

APRIL 5, 12, 19, & 26 12 – 4 PM AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 BLACKCOMB WAY, WHISTLER FREE FOR AUDAIN ART MUSEUM MEMBERS 10% OFF ADMISSION PRICE FOR CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL MEMBERS

APRIL 4 – 18 11 AM – 12 PM

APRIL 4 11 AM – 12 PM

ARTSTARTS IN SCHOOLS 808 RICHARDS ST, VANCOUVER

Lenses—In this hands-on workshop facilitated by artist Kay Slater, we’ll be zooming in and out on our surroundings and playing with how lenses change the way we perceive light, colour, space, and art!

FREE VISIT WWW.ARTSTARTS.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION

APRIL 11 11 AM – 12 PM

Framing —Get ready to play with grids, arrangement, cropping, and viewfinders during this workshop with artist Lily Cryan. Look beyond cameras and our gallery walls and be prepared to get curious about how we put together photos and images!

Visit ArtStarts every Saturday in April to participate in free, drop-in programs for families and young people as we capture your creativity! Each of our programs is designed by a professional artist to explore interdisciplinary artistic mediums with young people in mind. ArtStarts Explores are free, process-based workshops for families with young people ages 3 – 8; all adults must be accompanied by a minor. Drop in and be prepared to get messy, creative, and hands-on!

APRIL 18 11 AM – 12 PM

Light—This Explores is the perfect opportunity to check out

our low-waste, hands-on DIY ArtStarts Maker Space. This guided activity focuses entirely on light! Play with our green screen, lightbox, and more in this child-friendly environment while artist Lily Cryan supports young learners as they get curious about the role of light in photography and beyond!

2020

Capture Photography Festival

140–141


2020 Event Calendar DATE & TIME

EVENT TYPE

TITLE

LOCATION

PAGE

5 – 9 PM

OPENING

Reading and Being Read

EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

87

6 – 7 PM

KEYNOTE LECTURE

Moyra Davey

EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

109

6 – 10 PM

FESTIVAL LAUNCH

Capture 2020 Festival Launch

EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

108

7 – 9 PM

OPENING

Crossing

MONTE CLARK GALLERY

82

7 – 10 PM

OPENING

Birthe Piontek: Janus

GALLERY JONES

89

7 – 11 PM

OPENING

BAF Residency Exhibition: Jackie Dives

BAF GALLERY

9 PM

BROADCAST

Ansel Adams: A Documentary Film

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

THUR. APRIL 2

91 126

10 PM

BROADCAST

Camera Trap

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

10:30 PM

BROADCAST

Foncie’s Photos

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

FRI. APRIL 3 3:30 – 5:30 PM WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Art After Dark

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

141

6-9 PM

OPENING

Fold Unfold

ON MAIN GALLERY

88

6 – 9 PM

OPENING

Pixy Liao: Experimental Relationships

CENTRE A

93

7 – 9 PM

OPENING

Anna Binta Diallo: Wanderings

ACCESS GALLERY

62

141

SAT APRIL 4 11 AM – 12 PM

WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Explores! Lenses

ARTSTARTS

12 – 4 PM

OPENING

COMPOUND

TERMINAL CREEK CONTEMPORARY

12 – 6 PM

WORKSHOP

Photography Retouching and Compositing

VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE

130

94

1 – 3 PM

OPENING

Location; Past, Present and Future

ARTS UMBRELLA SOUTH SURREY

139

1 – 3 PM

OPENING

Flash Forward Incubator Celebration & Auction

ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE

137

2 – 4 PM

TALK

In Conversation: Anna Binta Diallo with Diyan Achjadi

ACCESS GALLERY

112

2 – 4 PM

TALK

Pixy Liao

CENTRE A

112

2 – 4 PM

TALK

Evan Lee Artist Talk on Fugazi

TECK GALLERY

112

2 – 3:30 PM

TALK

Langara Speaker Series: Erin Hogue

LANGARA COLLEGE

113

3 – 4 PM

TALK

Noah Friebel with Christos Dikeakos

REPUBLIC GALLERY

113

3 – 4:30 PM

TOUR

Vancouver Street Photography Collective Photo Walk

ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE

120

6 – 8 PM

OPENING

Sidi Chen: Blank Occupation

STUDIOLAND

7 – 9 PM

OPENING

Lindsay McIntyre

MARION SCOTT GALLERY

86 95

7 – 9 PM

OPENING

Rydel Cerezo: To Be From The Same Tree

MASSY BOOKS

84

7 – 9 PM

OPENING

Transmutations: Visualizing Matter | Materializing Vision

CINEWORKS

85

SUN. APRIL 5 11 AM – 12 PM

TOUR

Described Tour: Anna Binta Diallo

WATERFRONT STATION

12 – 4 PM

WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Family Studio Day

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

120 141

12 – 6 PM

WORKSHOP

Photography Retouching and Compositing

VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE

130

1 – 3 PM

TALK

ERROR: FILE NOT FOUND GLITCH ART

BRAID ST STUDIOS

114

1 – 3 PM

OPENING

Chester Fields 2020: Global Warming

THE POLYGON GALLERY

138

2 – 4 PM

OPENING

Third Realm

THE POLYGON GALLERY

2 – 4 PM

WORKSHOP

Analogue Photo Studio Tour and Printing Demo

STUDIO F604

130

BROADCAST

Seeing Daylight: The Photography of Dorothy Bohm

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

INFORM CONTRACT

110

58

MON. APRIL 6 9 PM TUE. APRIL 7 5 – 7 PM

CAPTURE SPEAKER SERIES Canadian Art Spring Issue Launch

5 – 7 PM

TALK

Langara Speaker Series: Dina Goldstein

LANGARA COLLEGE

113

9 PM

BROADCAST

Raghu Rai: An Unframed Portrait

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

10 PM

BROADCAST

Pedro E. Guerrero: A Photographer’s Journey

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

11 PM

BROADCAST

Karsh is History

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

2020

Capture Photography Festival

152–153


WED. APRIL 8 6 – 7 PM

TOUR

Curator’s Tour with Stephen Waddell

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE

7 – 9 PM

OPENING

Wait Until Dark

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE

120 92

7 – 9 PM

OPENING

Theo Terry: Artificial Shrimp and Other Simulacra

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE

90

7 – 9 PM

TALK

Reading Photography

EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

114

THUR. APRIL 9 5 – 6 PM

TALK

Gabor Gasztonyi: Hamlin’s Women

GABOR GASZTONYI STUDIO

6 – 8 PM

WORKSHOP

Vanishing Vancouver

MASSY BOOKS

114 130

6 – 8 PM

OPENING

NPAC: Annual Pictures of the Year

PENDULUM GALLERY

81

6 – 9 PM

OPENING

Annie Briard: All the Light You Cannot See

MÓNICA REYES GALLERY

96

6 – 9 PM

OPENING

Laura Gildner: Informer

VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE

97

Youth Program: Art After Dark

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

141

FRI. APRIL 10 3:30 – 5:30 PM WORKSHOP SAT. APRIL 11 11 AM – 12 PM

WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Explores! Framing

ARTSTARTS

141

1 – 4:30 PM

WORKSHOP

PhotoClub Vancouver

ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY CENTRE

131

2 – 3 PM

TALK

The Diversity of Love

CANTON-SARDINE

115

2 – 3:30 PM

TALK

Langara Speaker Series: Studio Lighting with Greg Blue

LANGARA GOLLEGE

113

2 – 4 PM

TOUR

Curator’s Tour with Claudia Beck

MONTE CLARK GALLERY

121

2 – 4 PM

WORKSHOP

Analogue Photo Studio Tour and Printing Demo

STUDIO F604

130

3 – 4 PM

TALK

Kira Wu: Fold Unfold

ON MAIN GALLERY

115

3 – 5 PM

TOUR

Gallery Hop

ACCESS GALLERY

121

3 – 5 PM

TOUR

Jack Cash: Photographs from 1939-1970

NORTH VANCOUVER MUSEAM & ARCHIVES

121

3 – 6 PM

OPENING

No.223: Satellite of Love

CANTON-SARDINE

98

WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Family Studio Day

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

141

BROADCAST

Photographing Africa

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

INFORM CONTRACT

110

SUN. APRIL 12 12 – 4 PM MON. APRIL 13 9 PM TUE. APRIL 14 5 – 7 PM

CAPTURE SPEAKER SERIES Althea Thauberger and Zarmeene Shah

5 – 7 PM

TALK

Langara Speaker Series: Photography Masters

LANGARA COLLEGE

113

9 PM

BROADCAST

Eye of Istanbul

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

10 PM

BROADCAST

Shooting War

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

10:30 PM

BROADCAST

Family Camera

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

5 – 9 PM

TOUR

Tricera Print Open House

TRICERA PRINT

122

6 – 8 PM

COMMUNITY

Cabinet of Curiosities

SCIENCE WORLD

128

7 – 9 PM

TALK

Desirée Patterson: Anomaly

FERRY BUILDING GALLERY

115

6 – 9 PM

OPENING

Althea Thauberger: Pagal Pagal Pagal Pagal Filmy Duniya

CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

66

6 – 9 PM

OPENING

Madiha Aijaz: Memorial for the lost pages

CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY

101

6 – 9 PM

OPENING

Patryk Stasieczek: FACSIMILE

WIL ABALLE ART PROJECTS

99

WED. APRIL 15

THUR. APRIL 16

FRI. APRIL 17 3:30 – 5:30 PM WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Art After Dark

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

141

6 – 9 PM

OPENING

Jackie Dives: A Room for the Pain

GALLERY GACHET

100

TALK

Jo Ann Kronquist: View to the Horizon, Capture the Journey

BEAU PHOTO

116

SAT. APRIL 18 11 AM – 12 PM

2020 Event Calendar


11 AM – 12 PM

WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Explores! Lenses

ARTSTARTS

141

11 AM – 1 PM

TOUR

Photo Walk with Michael Love

VPL CENTRAL BRANCH

122

2 – 3 PM

TALK

Waterlogue: A conversation with Valerie Durant & Elaine Leung HOWE STREET STUDIOS

116

2 – 3 PM

TOUR

Arbutus Greenway Billboards Tour

122

NE CORNER OF BURRARD ST & W 6TH

2 – 3:30 PM

TALK

Langara Speaker Series: Lisa Kaulback

LANGARA COLLEGE

113

2 – 5 PM

TALK

229 ½ Main

AIR STUDIO

116

6:30 – 9 PM

OPENING

Twilight on the Edge of Town

SURREY ART GALLERY

102

11 AM – 12:30 PM WORKSHOP

Artwork Documentation with Rachel Topham

HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE

131

11 AM – 2 PM

Capture × skatejam

PETER SULLIVAN SKATEPARK

128

SUN. APRIL 19 COMMUNITY

12 – 4 PM

WORKSHOP

Youth Program: Family Studio Day

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

141

1 PM

TOUR

Curator’s Tour with Ann Thomas

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

123

A Touch of Hand: Alternative Processes in Photography

SHADBOLT CENTRE FOR THE ARTS

117

Jeff Wall: In Order to Make a Picture

KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

126

1:30 – 3:30 PM TALK MON. APRIL 20 9 PM

BROADCAST

TUE. APRIL 21 5 – 7 PM

CAPTURE SPEAKER SERIES Ann Thomas: The Extended Moment

INFORM CONTRACT

110

5 – 7 PM

TALK

Langara Speaker Series: Alec Jacobson

LANGARA COLLEGE

113

7 – 9 PM

TALK

Sense of Place

CRESCENT BEACH POPUP GALLERY

117

THUR. APRIL 23 6 – 8 PM

TALK

Jackie Dives: A Room for Pain

GALLERY GACHET

117

6 – 8 PM

TALK

The Persistence of Analogue

MASSY BOOKS

118

6:30 – 8 PM

COMMUNITY

Sylvia Grace Borda Book Launch

SURREY ART GALLERY

128

6 – 11:30 PM

CLOSING

Ada Dragomir: Against Working

THE TOAST COLLECTIVE

103

FRI. APRIL 24

SAT. APRIL 25 11 AM – 1 PM

TOUR

Mandarin Language Tour

VANCOUVER CITY CENTRE STATION

123

11 AM – 5 PM

TOUR

Guest Artists’ Print Reveal

CHURCHLAND STUDIOS

124 118

12 – 1 PM

TOUR

Canada Council Art Bank

VPL CENTRAL LIBRARY

2 – 3:30 PM

TALK/DEMO

Langara Speaker Series: Wet Plate Photography

LANGARA COLLEGE

113

2 – 4 PM

TALK

Movement and the Still Image

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

118

2 – 4 PM

TOUR

FLOOD (Displaced Horizon)

SW CORNER OF EXPO BLVD & ABBOTT ST

124

3 PM

TALK

Matilda Aslizadeh

VANCOUVER ART GALLERY

118

10 AM – 4 PM

Pinhole Photography Workshop

SHADBOLT CENTRE FOR THE ARTS

131

12 – 4 PM

Youth Program: Family Studio Day

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM

141

SUN. APRIL 26 WORKSHOP

1 – 2:30 PM

CAPTURE SPEAKER SERIES Kapwani Kiwanga

3 – 5 PM

OPENING

A pot lid for the sky

THE POLYGON GALLERY

111

THE POLYGON GALLERY

104

TUE. APRIL 28 5 – 7 PM

CAPTURE SPEAKER SERIES Scott Schuman, The Sartorialist

INFORM CONTRACT

111

5 – 7 PM

TALK

Langara Speaker Series: Viktoria Haack

LANGARA COLLEGE

141

SCREENING

Zadie Xa

DIM CINEMA, THE CINEMATHEQUE

127

THE POLYGON GALLERY

111

WED. APRIL 29 7:30 – 9 PM THUR. APRIL 30 7 – 9 PM

2020

CAPTURE SPEAKER SERIES Davide Quadrio & Festival Closing Reception

Capture Photography Festival

154–155


Map Exhibitions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

ACCESS GALLERY 222 E GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER

p. 45/62/112/120/121

ART GALLERY AT EVERGREEN 1205 PINETREE WAY, PORT COQUITLAM

p. 77

ARTS UMBRELLA SOUTH SURREY THE SHOPS AT MORGAN CROSSING, N116-15850 26 AVE, SURREY

27. THE TOAST COLLECTIVE 648 KINGSWAY, VANCOUVER

p. 103

28. VANCOUVER ART GALLERY 750 HORNBY ST, VANCOUVER

p. 80/118

29. VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE 2625 KASLO ST, VANCOUVER

p. 97/130

p. 139

30. WEST VANCOUVER ART MUSEUM 680 17TH ST, WEST VANCOUVER

p. 79

AUDAIN ART MUSEUM 4350 BLACKCOMB WAY, WHISTLER

p. 76/118/122/141

31. WIL ABALLE ART PROJECTS 1129 E HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER

p. 99

BAF GALLERY UNIT 2-258 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER

p. 91

CANTON-SARDINE UNIT 071-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER

p. 98

CENTRE A UNIT 205­-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER

p. 93

CINEWORKS INDEPENDENT FILMMAKERS SOCIETY UNIT 300-1131 HOWE ST, VANCOUVER

p. 85

CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY 555 NELSON ST, VANCOUVER

10. EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN EXHIBITION COMMONS, 520 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER 11. GALLERY GACHET 9 W HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER 12. GALLERY JONES UNIT 1-258 E 1ST AVE, VANCOUVER 13. GRIFFIN ART PROJECTS 1174 WELCH ST, NORTH VANCOUVER 14. HOWARD495 PROJECT SPACE 495 RAILWAY ST, VANCOUVER 15. MARION SCOTT GALLERY 2423 GRANVILLE ST, VANCOUVER 16. MASSY BOOKS 229 E GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER 17. MÓNICA REYES GALLERY 602 E HASTINGS ST, VANCOUVER

Public Art 32. BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION 944 BURRARD ST, VANCOUVER 33. MOUNT PLEASANT COMMUNITY ART SCREEN INTERSECTION OF BROADWAY & KINGSWAY ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE INDEPENDENT BUILDING, VANCOUVER

p. 28/123

p. 54

p. 47/66/101/110 BILLBOARDS p. 87/109/114 p. 100/117 p. 89 p. 75

34. ARBUTUS GREENWAY SEVEN BILLBOARDS BETWEEN FIR ST AND BURRARD ST, VANCOUVER 35. GREYCHURCH KINGSWAY AND FRASER ST, VANCOUVER 36. FALSE CREEK EXPO BLVD BETWEEN CARRALL ST AND ABBOTT ST IN NORTHEAST FALSE CREEK, VANCOUVER

p. 38/122

p. 40

p. 42/124

p. 90/92/120/131 CANADA LINE STATIONS p. 95 p. 84/118/121/130 p. 96

37. WATERFRONT STATION

p. 45/120

38. VANCOUVER CITY CENTRE

p. 46

39. YALETOWN  –  ROUNDHOUSE STATION

p. 47

18. MONTE CLARK GALLERY UNIT 105-525 GREAT NORTHERN WAY, VANCOUVER

p. 82/121

40. OLYMPIC VILLAGE STATION

p. 48

19. ON MAIN GALLERY UNIT 427-268 KEEFER ST, VANCOUVER

p. 88/115

41. BROADWAY – C ITY HALL STATION

p. 49

20. OR GALLERY 236 E PENDER ST, VANCOUVER

p. 83/121

42. KING EDWARD STATION

p. 50

21. PENDULUM GALLERY 885 W GEORGIA ST, VANCOUVER

p. 81/123

43. ABERDEEN STATION

p. 51

22. ROUNDHOUSE COMMUNITY ARTS & RECREATION CENTRE 181 ROUNDHOUSE MEWS, VANCOUVER p. 120/131/133

44. LANSDOWNE STATION

p. 52

23. STUDIOLAND 115 E PENDER ST, VANCOUVER

SKYTRAIN STATION

24. SURREY ART GALLERY 13750 88 AVE, SURREY

p. 86 p. 102

25. TERMINAL CREEK CONTEMPORARY 569 ARTISAN LANE, BOWEN ISLAND 26. THE POLYGON GALLERY 101 CARRIE CATES CT, NORTH VANCOUVER

Map

p.94 p. 58/104/111/138

45. STADIUM–CHINATOWN STATION EXPO LINE

p. 34


25

4 30

13

26

2

14

37 21 32 28 38

11

23 20

8

9 22

36

39

12

18 10

40 41

15

31

1 16

5 34

17

6 7

45

32 29

33 27

35

42 19

Arbutus Greenway

3 24

43 44


Artist Index JESSE ANDREWARTHA

p. 85

PAO HOUA HER

p. 83/121

DIANE ARBUS

p. 76

SOPHIE KERR

p. 136

ROY ARDEN

p. 82/124

MADIHA AIJAZ

p. 47/101/110/123

MATILDA ASLIZADEH

p. 80/118

NABIL AZAB

p. 94

HIROSHI SUGIMOTO

p. 76

THEO TERRY

p. 90

MARISA KRIANGWIWAT HOLMES

p. 94

SVAVA TERGESEN

SPRING HURLBUT

p. 76

ALTHEA THAUBERGER

p. 87

MIROSLAV TICHY

p. 92/120

SAM TORTELL

p. 48/139 p. 42/124

ANDRES IMPERIAL IMPATIENTLY INCLINED:

p. 46/123

p. 87 p. 66/110/123

THEO PELMUS

HOWARD URSULIAK

ALEJANDRO A. BARBOSA

p. 94

KRIS SNOWBIRD

JOHN VANDERPANT

p. 76

ELISABETH BELLIVEAU

p. 54

DAINA WARREN

LUIS VILLARREAL

p. 87

JOHN BALDESSARI

p. 104

SLATER BILN

p. 48/139

BIRDHEAD: SONG TAO

p. 59

JACQUELINE DE JONG

p. 92/120

WOLS

KYLE JURON

p. 42/124

STEPHEN WADDELL

ANGELA BLAŽANOVIĆ

p. 50

JAKE KIMBLE

ANNIE BRIARD

p. 96

KAPWANI KIWANGA

LORNA BROWN

p. 42/124

KARIN BUBAŠ

p. 14/82/121

EDWARD BURTYNSKY

p. 76

JULIA MARGARET CAMERON RYDEL CEREZO

p. 76 p. 84/121

SUTEE KUNAVICHAYANONT SURASI KUSOLWONG

CLARA LACASSE

p. 59

CHRISTOPHER LACROIX

LYNNE COHEN

p. 76

GWENESSA LAM

p. 59

RICHARD LEAROYD EVAN LEE

MAYA KRAMER

CHRISTINA LESLIE

LI MU

PIXY LIAO ARNAUD MAGGS

JIN SHAN HANNAH COLLINS

p. 92/120

DAVID WOJNAROWICZ

p. 82/121

p. 86

p. 42/124

p. 59

OWEN KYDD

HEMAN CHONG

COMFORTABLE COLLECTIVE:

MATISSE WENBAN

p. 56/59

CLAUDE LABRÈCHE-LEMAY

p. 94 p. 94 p. 49/104 p. 77 p. 92/120 p. 82/112/121 p. 38/122 p. 93/112/121 p. 76

AVI MARU

p. 48/139

CAMILLE COROT

p. 76

SCOTT MCFARLAND

p. 82/121

MATTHEW DALY

p. 94

LINDSAY MCINTYRE

p. 95

GOHAR DASHTI

p. 79

XIJING MEN:

p. 59

MOYRA DAVEY

p.34/109

ERIC DEMERS

p. 81

JIMMY DESANA

p. 75

ANNA BINTA DIALLO JACKIE DIVES

p. 45/62/112/120/121 p. 91/100/117

STAN DOUGLAS

p. 76

ADA DRAGOMIR

p. 103

GIM HONG-SOK, CHEN SHAOXIONG OZAWA TSUYOSHI YASUMASA MORIMURA EVAN MUIR EMILY NEUFELD NO.223: LIN ZHIPENG

WALKER EVANS

p. 76

BIDEMI OLOYEDE

CAO FEI

p. 59

GARY ROSS PASTRANA

p. 76 p. 48/139 p. 52 p. 98/115 p. 38 p. 34/122

ANNE FISHBEIN

p. 76

BIRTHE PIONTEK

BRUCE FRASER

p. 87

PAOLA PIVI

LEE FRIEDLANDER

p. 17

MAN RAY

p. 76

LUCAS REGAZZI

p. 94

NOAH FRIEBEL

p. 78/113

KAREL FUNK

p. 82/121

MARLON T. RIGGS

TIM GARDNER

p. 82/121

THE SARTORIALIST:

EMMA GIBB

p. 135

LAURA GILDNER ANTHONY GOICOLEA

p. 97 p. 82/121

MIKHELA GREINERT COLIN GRIFFITHS FX HARSONO

p. 87

p. 59

p. 75 p. 20/111

MARKO SIMCIC MARK SOO

p. 76 p. 42/124 p. 102

p. 42/124

DELANEY SOUMANG

p. 87

p. 59/61

PATRYK STASIECZEK

p. 32/99

ISABELLE HAYEUR FRED HERZOG

p. 32/89

SCOTT SCHUMANN GARY SCHNEIDER

p. 76 p. 76/160

Artist Index

ANNA WANG APICHATPONG WEERASETHAKUL

p. 59

JOMPET KUSWIDANANTO

SIDI CHEN

BARBARA COLE

p. 72/87 p. 28/30/32/111/123

EDWARD STEICHEN

p. 76

MANUEL AXEL STRAIN

p. 51

p. 92/120 p. 32/82/92/120

KIRA WU

p. 138 p. 59 p.48/139 p. 74/76 p. 88/115

ZHOU XIAOHU

p. 59

SUN XUN

p. 59

LU YANG

p. 59

HYUNG-MIN YOON

p. 77

YANG ZHENZHONG

p. 59

ELIZABETH ZVONAR

p. 40/110


Capture Membership Program

To purchase a Capture Membership or become a Supporter, contact coordinator@capturephotofest.com or visit www.squareup.com/store/capturephotofest By purchasing a membership you are contributing to our mandate to present the most compelling lens-based art annually and foster meaningful dialogue through a diverse range of events and programs.

2020 Membership Benefits include: • • • • • •

• •

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Fred Herzog: Photographing Yesterday Past

TOM HSU

Fred Herzog, Black Man Pender, 1958. Courtesy of The Estate of Fred Herzog and Equinox Gallery, Vancouver © The Estate of Fred Herzog, 2020

Looking through photographs by Fred Herzog, it is clear that the city of Vancouver was his principal subject. He shows us what the city once was and will never be again. After immigrating to Canada in 1952 from Germany, Herzog made his way to Vancouver and began making images of the city he was fascinated by. Herzog captured everyday moments: storefronts, neon signs, people strolling the streets. He had a way of observing his surroundings and bringing moments to a halt with startling clarity. Black Man Pender (1958) depicts a man holding his daughter's hand, walking their cocker spaniel in Vancouver's Chinatown. Today, Chinatown is undergoing many changes—the paint on the walls is fading and some buildings no longer exist. In this photo, we see shadows and reflections cast on the surfaces of the building. The deep red and green hues were possible due to Herzog’s use of Kodachrome. The film requires a slow shutter speed and has a way of illuminating certain colours.

Texts

As someone who also immigrated to Canada and works with observing the everyday, I found myself drawn to Herzog's carefully considered photographs. As observers with cameras, we act like ghosts roaming the streets, studying how light and characters play within the frame. What keeps us wandering is the desire to capture something that can transcend the mundane and stand the test of time. Moments and observations are threads that weave together a photographic practice. As Vancouver has grown taller with more glass and concrete, what we experience in the city now is no longer like the images captured by Herzog's eyes. His images captured Vancouver at a certain time and his gaze remains undeniably potent. What we have left to reminisce on with Herzog’s photographs are a city, and an artist, that once were.


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