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VANCOUVER APRIL 2017


The photo was taken by Andrea Fernandez and the work shown is by Polina Lasenko, Lind Prize Finalist 2016.

Proud to support Capture Photography Festival. We are working together with Capture to make a difference in our communities.

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CONTACT Capture Head Office 305 Cambie St Vancouver BC V6B 2N4 capturephotofest.com info@capturephotofest.com Capture Photography Festival is produced by the Capture Photography Festival Society, a registered not-for-profit society. Please share your Festival experience with us at capturephotofest.com/2017-survey


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

April 2017

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Kim Spencer-Nairn

Mike Harris Ian McGuffie Eric Savics Kim Spencer-Nairn CHAIR David Thorpe Todd Towers

FESTIVAL DIRECTOR AND CURATOR

FOUNDING DONORS

Meredith Preuss

Faulhaber Communications

John and Nina Cassils Stephen Carruthers Chan Family Foundation Mike and Sandra Harris Brian and Andrea Hill Hy’s of Canada Ltd. Michael O’Brian Family Foundation Radcliffe Foundation Ron Regan Eric Savics and Kim Spencer-Nairn Leonard Schein Ian and Nancy Telfer Samantha J. Walker (IN MEMORY OF) Bruce Wright Anonymous Anonymous

PRINTED IN VANCOUVER BY

CAMPAIGN IMAGE

Mitchell Press EDITION 8,000

James Nizam Obliquity of the Ecliptic 2017

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

FESTIVAL PROJECTS MANAGER

Jaclyn Arndt COMMUNICATIONS AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT COORDINATOR

Ashleigh Withall FESTIVAL INTERN

Katherine Neil CREATIVE PARTNER

Palms PR AND MEDIA RELATIONS

FRONT AND BACK COVERS

Alex Morrison Brand New Era Social Club 2017

ALL CONTENT © 2017 THE ARTISTS, AUTHORS, AND CAPTURE. UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED. ALL IMAGES ARE REPRODUCED COURTESY OF THE ARTIST UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED. CAPTURE IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE SPECIFIC CONTENT OR SUBJECT MATTER OF ANY WORK DISPLAYED OR ADVERTISED. SOME EXHIBITIONS OR INSTALLATIONS MAY BE OFFENSIVE, UPSETTING, OR DISTURBING TO SOME MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC.


013 PUBLIC

144 CALENDAR

006 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

049 EXHIBITIONS

148 MAP

ART

129 EVENTS

151 GALLERY INDEX 151 ARTIST INDEX 159 LIMITED EDITION

ARTICLES

041

127

047

155

The Conquest of Light: A Short History of the Glass Wall Johan Österholm

Double Take: An Interview with Anne Collier Meredith Preuss

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The Great White Heist: An Interview with Sandra Shields and David Campion Helen Wong

How to Value a Book Object Benjamin Willems

Reflections on the City of Glass April Thompson

157

Explore: Photography + Architecture Jaclyn Arndt

160

Personal Grey Standard Steffanie Ling

TABLE OF CONTENTS

004 WELCOME


WELCOME

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

A Message from the Executive Director

A Message from the Festival Director and Curator

Welcome to the 2017 Capture Photography Festival. This year’s month-long celebration is our largest to date and the program is stronger than ever.

It is with great pleasure that I welcome you to the 4th annual Capture Photography Festival.

Photography has never been more present in everyday life than it is right now. It is the most significant way Vancouver has contributed to the international art conversation; Capture is proud to build upon that legacy. We invite you to discover what makes lens-based art so impactful. On behalf of the Capture Board and team, I want to extend a heartfelt thanks to all of our sponsors and funders. It is through their generous support that we are able to continue with our ambitious programming and engage the local Vancouver community and visitors alike. Capture’s annual programming is developed in collaboration with many partners and artists. Thank you for your enduring vision and contribution.

The Festival once again encompasses a wide range of programming. Both our Selected Exhibition Program and the newly introduced Open Exhibition Program highlight the incredible community of artists in the Lower Mainland and Canada. This year we’re also pleased to introduce more international artists to the Festival through our many public art installations as well as the Feature Exhibition, Song of the Open Road. Each year, we strive to generate meaningful discourse and critical engagement with photography through exhibitions, public art, and publications, as evidenced by our presentation of the first-ever Vancouver Photo Book Fair. I’m also happy to see the return of the Capture Speaker Series, which brings together a variety of voices from different photographic backgrounds, as well as the introduction of editorial content to the Capture Magazine.

Thank you to our presenting sponsor, TD Bank Group, and our other returning sponsors: London Drugs, PWC, Pattison Outdoor, and the Downtown Vancouver BIA. I would also like to welcome our new contributing sponsors: Fuji Film, ACD Systems International, Seaspan, and the Gastown and South Granville BIAs. Also to our many inkind sponsors—Gotham, Harrison Art Service, Lazy Gourmet, the Listel Hotel, the Loden Hotel, Palms, Westbank, and the Wine Syndicate—many thanks.

The result is our largest Festival yet, with more partners, exhibitions, events, and public art than ever. I would like to sincerely thank the artists who’ve contributed, as well as our many partners whose enthusiasm has played a crucial role in our growth this year. I’m very proud of the work the Capture team has done, and I hope you’ll find as much joy in exploring the Festival as we did in putting it together.

Kim Spencer-Nairn

Meredith Preuss

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

FESTIVAL DIRECTOR AND CURATOR


A Message from the Senior Vice President, TD Bank Group

A Message from the Minister of Canadian Heritage

A Message from the Mayor of Vancouver

On behalf of TD Bank Group, I am very pleased to extend greetings and best wishes to the organizers of the 2017 Capture Photography Festival.

Canada’s greatest strength lies in its diversity, which is reflected in the arts and culture that define us, unite us, and help build links between communities all across the country. This year, as we celebrate the 150th anniversary of Confederation, it is a wonderful time to highlight Canada’s artistic and cultural excellence. Our government is proud to support events, like the Capture Photography Festival, that put the arts within Canadians’ reach. Photographers are adept at capturing a single moment in time and using the images they take to give us a glimpse of the world as they see it. The Capture Photography Festival gives artists—emerging and established, Canadian and international—a chance to share their passion and talent. It also lets visitors explore the world of photography and take part in a dialogue about the nature of the art form. As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I would like to thank the Capture Photography Festival Society and all the participating photographers who made this event possible.

On behalf of my colleagues on Vancouver City Council and the citizens of Vancouver, I want to send my sincere best wishes to the 4th annual Capture Photography Festival.

Giving back to our communities in meaningful ways is a source of pride for us at TD. Additionally, we believe it’s important to showcase and present the wealth of artistic talent available locally and to encourage an appreciation of the arts among all Canadians. Visual art in the form of photography has blossomed in popularity in recent years. The beauty that comes from the camera lens has engaged a collective arts community consisting of art collectors, galleries, and students and has become a point of interest for the general public. We believe our support of Capture will help to further develop this art form and inspire the next generation of emerging artists who will take up this medium. Enjoy this year’s festival.

Arts and culture play a vital role in the livability of any city. At the City of Vancouver, we realize how important supporting our arts and cultural communities is and how essential this investment is to our city. From music and dance to visual arts to publishing, Vancouver is tremendously enriched and enlivened by our world-class local artists and creative community. The Capture Photography Festival has a strong mandate to shed light on the local and international talents that our city hosts. Congratulations on your 4th Anniversary and best wishes for continued success.

Mauro Manzi

Mélanie Joly

Gregor Robertson

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT

MINISTER OF CANADIAN HERITAGE

MAYOR

TD BANK GROUP, PACIFIC REGION

CITY OF VANCOUVER

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

PRESENTED BY

MAJOR SUPPORTING SPONSOR

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE THE SUPPORT OF

VANCOUVER PHOTO BOOK FAIR

PARTNERS

FOOD & DRINK

COMMUNITY PARTNER


MEDIA SPONSORS

CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS

IN-KIND SPONSORS

PARTNERS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

THANK YOU

Neil Aisenstat Susan Almrud Martine Argent Holly Armishaw Michael Audain Yoshi Audain Mark and Jan Ballard Linda Banecevic Phuong Banh Michael Barrow Maryse Bataillard Claudia Beck Merla Beckerman Nancy Bendtsten Megan Buckley Rudy Buttignol MaryAnn Camilleri Jennifer Chaput Bopha Chhay Dana Claxton Jacqui Cohen Travis Collier Catherine Cook Krista Cooper Jeff Curry Zandi Dandizette Patricia de la Maza Malania Dela Cruz Christos Dikeakos Dennis Dong Jessica Eaton Emily Elias Shelley Engelhardt Murray Fraeme Lise Gaudette

Raymond Girard John Goldsmith Judith Guzmán Michael Hanos David Harrison Asia Harvey Helen Hayter Caitlin Jones Megan Jones Richard Kanazawa Jeff Khonsary Jeff Klaver Carolynn Lacasse Jas Lally Hweely Lim Victoria Lum Zoe Mackoff de Miranda Lise Magee Hanif Mamdami Emily Marston Scott Massey Kevin Mazzone Donna McGeachie Steve McGregor Ryan McGrew Jason and AJ McLean Susan Mendelson Brian Messina Laura Moore Lori Morgan Coleen Nemtin Yashar Nijati James Nizam Michael and Inna O’Brian Shane O’Brien

Denise Oleksijczuk Helga Pakasaar Gale Penhall Robin Peterson Jody Phillips Birthe Piontek Glenna Pollon Neil Anthony Prasad Michael Preuss Nigel Prince Cate Rimmer Ashleigh Rockwood Debra Rolf Ryan Romero Leanore Sali Chantal Shah Reid Shier Danny Singer John Skinner Janet Smith Patryk Stasieczek Tracy Stefanucci April Swanson Jessica Taylor Sharon Townsend Biliana Velkova Stephen Waddell Cameron Walker Ian Wallace Ilana Weitzman Stephanie and Michael Wesik Jennifer Winsor Lisa Wolverton


APRIL 1, 2017

Capture Photography Festival 2017 Launch

Join Capture and the Contemporary Art Gallery for the launch of the 2017 Festival and the 2017 Feature Exhibition

Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St Vancouver FEATURE EXHIBITION

Song of the Open Road 12–6 PM 4–6 PM food trucks arrive, the cash bar opens, and the artists are in attendance

CURATED BY

Nigel Prince, CAG Director

FEATURING ARTISTS

Vikky Alexander Robert Arndt Gerard Byrne Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn Kelly Jazvac Kelly Lycan Niamh O’Malley Dawit Petros Greg Staats Lisa Tan ROBERT ARNDT PURSUIT, PLUNDER & FLEECE, 2015 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MACAULAY & CO. FINE ART, VANCOUVER


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Public Art Brand New Era 015 Social Club Inorganic Seductions 017 On and Off the Road 022 Precession 030 of the Feminine Art in Your 031 Neighbourhood Offshore – 033 Hyundai Patriot Capture New West 034 Growing and Rising 037


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

ALEX MORRISON BRAND NEW ERA SOCIAL CLUB (INSTALLATION MOCKUP), 2017 DOCUMENTATION OF BC HYDRO DAL GRAUER SUBSTATION COURTESY OF NELSON MOUËLLIC

APRIL 1, 2017 – MARCH 31, 2018

Brand New Era Social Club BC Hydro Dal Grauer Substation Alex Morrison 944 Burrard St Vancouver Alex Morrison’s diverse practice explores architecture’s role in reflecting and shaping ideologies, with an interest in how these ideologies fail and shift while the buildings embodying their beliefs live on. By analyzing architectural forms, Morrison explores how alternative narratives and histories trouble and intertwine with those prescribed by an architect. Moreover, through his interest in counterculture signifiers and facade-ism, he points to potential failings of aesthetic identification on a grand scale. Reflecting thematically upon the fragmented nature of Vancouver’s story as a city, Morrison’s Brand New Era Social Club (2017), his site-specific work for the Dal Grauer Substation, comments on both digital and analogue forms of representation and their importance in the construction of past narratives and contemporary reality. The multimedia work questions the nature of photography today and represents more broadly the aims of the Festival to drive photography discourse forward and encourage critical thinking and visual literacy.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Substations have historically been a boon for young architects, who could create showpieces of high-concept design that illustrated the architectural trends of that moment. Morrison’s project looks to the Dal Grauer’s surrounding neighbourhood, Vancouver’s West End, and draws on its adornmentrich and eclectic mix of architectural styles, ranging from Edwardian to postmodern, to create a three-dimensional virtual rendering. The work is a visual and material comment on the substation, referencing the building’s facadical nature as an icon of midcentury modern aesthetics and values. The Dal Grauer is mostly a presentation site, highlighting and framing the almost sublime nature of the generation of hydroelectric power. Morrison’s photomural acts much in the same way, showing how architecture both produces and frames a narrative, its architectural scale inviting the viewer to engage in a dialogue with the urban fabric around it. The three-dimensional room that appears in Morrison’s work was rendered in Sketchup, a software marketed to architects, urban planners, and interior designers that allows users to create and navigate a virtual space from all angles. Once the room was completed, Morrison framed the angle he wished to capture and generated an image. This act mimics that of making a photograph, but speaks directly to the constructed nature of many of the images circulating today, especially those emerging from the real estate or industrial design worlds. Though outside of the traditional definition of photography (whereby photo = light and graphia = writing or inscription), Morrison’s work suggests that this definition no longer reflects the medium’s current conditions. Like much of Morrison’s two-dimensional work, Brand New Era Social Club veers into the territory of expanded photography, as he

applies a magpie-like sensibility to merging scanned, photographed, and computergenerated imagery. In combining scans from his collection of antique wallpaper books, renderings of iconic design pieces, recent memories of spaces he’s experienced while living in Brussels, and less reliable longheld sensory impressions from his youth in Vancouver and Victoria, Brand New Era Social Club imparts a generalized atmosphere that feels both strange and familiar. If realism is an icon of truth, Morrison ventures to question the ubiquity of digital imagery and the overwhelming use of Photoshop or similar software under various guises. Through this framework, his work considers photography as a stand-in for truth and memory: what people want from art and what they need from photography. In some ways, the process used to create his image is akin to nineteenth-century portrait photography, when artists would set up a room with props and require their subjects to sit still for long periods of time while the aperture remained open. On the other hand, it’s closely tied to digital photography, for no image has been burned onto film, existing instead as a series of computed and processed numerical formulations. Morrison’s rich and eclectic image offers influences as far-flung as Vancouver’s skate (and stoner) culture and local architectural history, alongside a sophisticated knowledge of design vernacular. In this sense, Morrison offers a sense of humour to a building that is primarily concerned with effectiveness without much thought for the affect that observers might experience in seeing it. It is with a sharp eye for detail and a subtle visual wit that Morrison merges the two realities with the sublime role of the substation, generating a fresh narrative for an oft-forgotten piece of Vancouver’s history.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

APRIL 1 – 23

Inorganic Seductions Pattison Outdoor Billboards Barb Choit Anne Collier Annette Kelm Evan Lee For Billboard locations, see capturephotofest.com/public-art Inorganic Seductions, the 2017 Capture Billboard Project, brings together four local and international artists in an unprecedented public presentation in Canada. Examining the genre of still life photography and its ambivalent relationship with advertising, Inorganic Seductions features innovative photographic works by Anne Collier, Barb Choit, Annette Kelm, and Evan Lee. Each artist employs different photography techniques and methodologies to take a contemporary look at the petit genre of still life, a style tied to the paintings of the sixteenth and seventeenth century during the expansion of the

Dutch empire. Traditionally these paintings dealt with themes of decay and mortality to remind viewers of the brevity of life, unchanged by a wealth of earthly delights. However, the symbolically laden artworks also played a role in the expansion of trade, as merchants would commission still life paintings to show off their wares acquired from “exotic” locations. By co-opting strategies from the commercial world and considering the powerful gaze of the camera, the works in this series of public installations reciprocate the deadpan and disinterested way that viewers typically encounter advertising images. Without logos or copy to ground them, the images seem out of place, and the viewer is unsure whether to read them as contemporary vanitas or viral marketing. By situating this group exhibition on outdoor billboards, Inorganic Seductions ventures to emphasize how public space is used to multiple and often conflicting ends, suggesting an ambiguity between the forms inherent to advertising and the works that critique them.

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ANNE COLLIER EYE #1, 2014 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST; ANTON KERN GALLERY, NEW YORK; GALERIE NEU, BERLIN; THE MODERN INSTITUTE/TOBY WEBSTER LTD., GLASGOW; AND MARC FOXX GALLERY, LOS ANGELES © ANNE COLLIER


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PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

Anne Collier’s minimalist compositions Eye #1, #2, and #3 (2014) each depict a photograph of an eye held by a woman’s hand against a white background. Collier rephotographs found images under a seemingly neutral lens, dislocating them from their original source and leaving the viewer to consider their meaning afresh as well as their role in how we see the world. The photograph of the eye, which shifts slightly from one composition to the next, stares back at the viewer with an almost godlike omniscience. Photographs of eyes and notions of

the authorial eye recur in Collier’s practice, but presented on a billboard they adopt new reference points, in this case alluding to the symbolic eyes of optometrist T. J. Eckleburg that look out from the roadside billboard in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel The Great Gatsby. In the novel, the eyes are a symbol of godlessness, moral corruption, and the failure of the American Dream in capitalism’s golden age. Presented here, Collier’s eyes eschew straightforward symbolism to consider a range of contemporary and historical influences that defy easy categorization.

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ANNETTE KELM PIZZA, PIZZA, PIZZA, 2016 4 C-PRINTS 28.7" X 23.6" EACH


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Barb Choit’s out-of-focus Polaroids of vintage shoes rely on a neutral composition similar to that of Collier’s works, but here it instead evokes the white studio backdrops of catalogues and fashion editorials. As a collector and seller of vintage shoes, Choit is intimately familiar with these pictorial conventions. Her deliberately blurry photographs trouble the way viewers typically respond to images of this nature, that is, as the bland, utilitarian fodder of the retail industry. A person approaching these billboards from afar might wait for their eye to adjust the image into focus. The realization that there’s no further detail to be revealed highlights viewers’ often inadvertent complicity in the seductive act of being advertised to. Annette Kelm’s signature deadpan photographs feature a range of subject matter and often mimic commercial modes of display

and image making. For Inorganic Seductions, Kelm’s Pizza, Pizza, Pizza (2016) is featured four times throughout the city, like a campaign for a generic pizza shop that neglected to include key information, or even an image of the food itself. The photograph depicts a disorienting frontal view of a pizza box with the word “PIZZA” repeated three times in bold red text. There’s also an inexplicable piece of brown tree bark seemingly floating over the right-hand corner, all in front of a flat, mustard-coloured background. The initial effect of the image is a kind of bland disgust, followed shortly by a double take— what is this image selling me and why on earth would I want bark on my pizza? As with much of Kelm’s work, the answer to these questions isn’t found in what the image depicts, but in the nature of its display and strangely coded composition.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

Evan Lee’s Hyakkin Still Life series (2017) is a continuation of his Dollar Store Still Lifes from over a decade ago. For this iteration, Lee purchased a variety of cheap trinkets from Daiso, a Japanese dollar store in Richmond’s Aberdeen Centre, and sorted them into loose categories to create compositions that are strongly evocative of Dutch still life paintings, which he then scanned with a household desktop scanner. The result is five rich and highly detailed images that recall the origins of the still lifes, but whose inanimate subjects subvert

the conventions of the genre: one image turns the decomposing fruit of the classical vanitas paintings on its head with stacks of dried ramen noodles and hamburger-shaped candies that show no sign of decomposing; another depicts plastic sushi dividers with the same gravitas as would be expected for a sumptuous bouquet of flowers; and yet another uses a cheap compact to play with the motif of the mirror as a symbol of worldly vanity. In this case, the mirror reflects the scanner itself, revealing the image’s source and actively resisting moralizing.

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opposite page BARB CHOIT CAMPAIGN, 2017 EVAN LEE HYAKKIN STILL LIFE, 2017


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL – SEPTEMBER 2017

On and Off the Road Canada Line, InTransit BC PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and the Canada Line Public Art Program—InTransit BC For the multi-sited public art project On and Off the Road, Capture has installed photo-based artworks on the exteriors of Canada Line stations across Vancouver. The series broadly reflects on how modes of mass transportation can simultaneously be places of intense control while remaining emblems of freedom and adventure in the Western pop cultural imagination. The artworks consider the road narrative in modern and contemporary art, literature, and film, as well as the limits of that narrative and the need for alternatives. On and Off the Road stretches across seven locations, from Waterfront to Marine Drive, and includes curatorial contributions from art organizations alongside Capture, including Artspeak, Charles H. Scott Gallery, and the SFU School for the Contemporary Arts.

Each organization has presented a unique perspective on this discursive topic. According to the French collective Tiqqun, the highway (the largest of all roads) is not the rebellious path to self-realization it is made out to be by folk singers and beat poets, but rather a highly regulated space with its own policing system, fuelling stations, and even the predetermined allowance for accidents. They warn too of the term “information superhighway,” in reference to the Internet, as forecasting the total surveillance of that space that’s to come,1 leading us to consider how virtual space might adopt the same dichotomy of freedom and control as real-world highways. The installed artworks variously address, expand upon, and problematize the dominant road narrative’s supposed essential qualities of adventure and catharsis by offering alternatives through the meandering lens of contemporary art.

WATERFRONT

2 1

Tiqqun, “ A critical metaphysics could emerge as a science of apparatuses...,” in This Is Not a Program, trans. Semiotext(e) (Los Angeles: Semiotext(e), 2011), 151–53.

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VANCOUVER CITY CENTRE

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BROADWAYCITY HALL

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MARINE DRIVE ALEJANDRO CARTAGENA CARPOOLERS, 2011–12

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1 GRANVILLE SOUTH

OLYMPIC VILLAGE

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KING EDWARD


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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Carpoolers Waterfront Station Alejandro Cartagena CURATED BY

Capture Photography Festival In 2011, Alejandro Cartagena stood atop a bridge running across the highway between Nuevo Laredo and Texas—a lucrative drug corridor between Mexico and the US. From that elevated vantage point, he photographed the many trucks that drove by on their way south to Monterrey, carrying labourers to worksites in the newly built suburbs. These vignettes, capturing a scene rarely visible, manage to straddle public and private space. The Monterrey suburbs are a site of growing inequality between the rich and poor, and a dangerous battleground for the drug wars fuelled by the uneven distribution of wealth. The temptation for people living in poverty to engage in the drug trade is great, but the workers riding in the backs of these trucks would rather risk their safety and the chance of traffic violations for the opportunity to make an honest living in a society faced with increasing dishonesty. The pickup truck beds in Cartagena’s photographs appear highly composed, mimicking historically painterly tableaux such as those of medieval altarpieces. The shallow depth of field and framing provided by the trucks’ walls further act to counter the fast-moving and snapshot-like nature of his images. Conceptualized as one layer of a lifelong project, Cartagena’s Carpoolers (2011–12) series makes visible one more space between major points on the urban power grid.

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#haunted_hunted Granville South Entrance Tania Willard CURATED BY

Emily Marston, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University For nearly two decades, the 337 km stretch of the Trans-Canada Highway between Kamloops and Alberta has witnessed major infrastructure upgrades, driven largely by a demand to move more resources, more efficiently. The twinning process, expanding the highway from two lanes to four, brings simultaneous construction and destruction

TANIA WILLARD #HAUNTED_HUNTED, 2014–15 opposite page JON RAFMAN UNKNOWN ROAD, KNOCK KILLUA, WESTMEAD, IRELAND, 2011, 2011 FROM THE SERIES THE NINE EYES OF GOOGLE STREET VIEW

to the lands of the Secwepemc (Shuswap) First Nation. Major land disputes have arisen as highways, hydroelectric dams, and logging developments continue to encroach on ancestral burial sites and existing communities. In response to this persistent intrusion of space, both sacred and lived, Secwepemc artist Tania Willard’s #haunted_hunted series (2014–15) disrupts the unquestioned motives that pave the way for these developments. The two images on display, photographed by Secwepemc artist Aaron Leon, show a figure draped under a sheet of appropriated “native” designs. The first shows the figure occupying, and thus haunting, the landscape. Set against a white backdrop, the second image

demonstrates the figure’s haunting presence in a way that resists common museological frameworks for Indigenous art. Willard’s practice addresses ongoing colonial agendas by actively navigating the shifting ideas of contemporary and traditional as they pertain to cultural politics and aesthetics. Positioned within the framework of BUSH Gallery, a conceptual space for land-based art and action led by Indigenous artists, the #haunted_hunted figure is at the same time mobile and site-specific. The addition of a hashtag suggests the reach of a digital community while remaining rooted in a tangible politics of space.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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Unknown Road Vancouver City Centre Station Jon Rafman CURATED BY

Capture Photography Festival PRESENTED WITH THE PARTICIPATION OF

which captures intriguing scenes documented by the Internet giant—reminds us that the mapping project has expanded to far-flung corners of the world. As attested by Unknown Road, Knock Killua, Westmead, Ireland, 2011 (2011), the interstitial and liminal spaces that diverge from direct routes and busy metropolises are no longer excluded from Google’s all-seeing gaze.

New Documents Google Street View started in 2007 as an experiment in five cities, but Jon Rafman’s series The Nine Eyes of Google Street View—

Positioned atop a vehicle, the Street View camera is a self-directed robotic apparatus programmed to capture its surroundings without concern for composition or

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decisive moment. Mirroring this disregard for photography’s traditional values and utilizing a similarly hegemonic device is Rafman, who, rather than using a camera at all, photographs by taking screengrabs on his computer. His hands’ keystrokes become the subjective anomaly in a highly regulated and utilitarian series of actions. The resulting images are poetic meditations on a system of great control, allowing the viewer to devise their own narratives for the captured subjects, such as this lonesome man on an unknown road.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

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Fruit Tree Olympic Village Station

and Sawyer came together for a short road trip to generate a new body of work.

Matthew Sawyer Ron Tran

Operating against the normative impulse to travel from Point A to Point B in the most efficient manner and with a clear purpose in mind, the artists instead allowed themselves to respond to random opportunities that presented themselves along the way. As in their previous work, this took the form of performative actions and subtle interventions that were carried out and then documented. The humorous and highly enigmatic residue of the performative actions was left in situ to be discovered—or not—by strangers that happen upon it, a gift of sorts from one anonymous source to another.

CURATED BY

Charles H. Scott Gallery “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will take you there.” —Lewis Carroll

Fruit Tree (2017) is a collaboration between artists Ron Tran and Mathew Sawyer. Already friends and with sympathetic art practices, the two had never before collaborated, due in part to the fact that they live on different continents thousands of miles apart, with Tran residing in Vancouver and Sawyer in London. For their Capture installation, Tran

From there, the artwork takes the form of photographic documentation available to a larger viewing audience.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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Chintzware Broadway–City Hall Station Julian Hou CURATED BY

Artspeak Julian Hou’s Chintzware (2017) considers the station lobby as a space of transition. The abstracted form of the steering wheel creates an ornamental repetitive pattern across the windows that’s reminiscent of designs found on textiles and ceramics, from which the title of the work derives. As the light filters through the work, the slight changes within the pattern resemble the function of a camera shutter. Rendered through Photoshop, Chintzware uses the post-production software as a means to replicate and transform the image of the steering wheel into an iconic form. Viewed en masse, the tightly arranged pattern suggests excess or hypermobility. This pattern is intermittently interrupted by ties that bind some of the steering wheels together, nullifying the wheel’s functionality of control, intended direction, and guidance of perpetual motion. These binds suggest a stasis and fixed position, similar to that of the photographer’s perspective from behind the lens. While the transitory nature of the station on the one hand suggests constant movement, the space also functions as a waiting area rather than solely a conduit for outbound travel. A place of shelter, awaiting the arrival of your connecting mode of transport, a meeting point, or simply a place to bide time.

opposite page MATTHEW SAWYER AND RON TRAN FRUIT TREE, 2017 JULIAN HOU CHINTZWARE (INSTALLATION MOCKUP), 2017

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

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Industrioglyphs King Edward Station Stuart McCall Georgia Straight and Capture Photography Festival Canada Line Competition Station During visits to sites of industrial activity, Stuart McCall has been drawn to a recurring curious language of colourful temporary markings inscribed on cement buttresses, building walls, road surfaces, posts, boulders, trees, and the ground. Reminiscent of cuneiform or prehistoric scripts painted onto cave walls, these inscriptions pass a message to some future observer, which presumes an understanding continuum. In a complex, hazardous, and deadlinedriven environment like the modern-day construction site, a simple method of mark making is often the only, and certainly the most expedient, way to pass on information. These markings, in spray paint, chalk, and paint, employ various conventions: geometric representations, coloured symbols, numerals, and abbreviated words. One of their most compelling features is their temporary nature, marking, as they do, the transition between permanence and impermanence. Lasting for months, weeks, or minutes, they indicate action to come. They are then covered, dug up, or otherwise removed from sight. Photography enables the ability to contrast the temporary nature of the markings with the permanence of the resulting structure and the photographic print itself, allowing for interpretation over time.


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

opposite page

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STUART MCCALL INDUSTRIOGLYPHS, INTERSECTION, 2011

A Horse Led to Water Marine Drive Station

FROM THE SERIES INDUSTRIOGLYPHS OWEN MURRAY A HORSE LED TO WATER, 2010

Owen Murray CURATED BY

Megan Jones, School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University Fascinated by anthropology and archaeology, Canadian photographer Owen Murray has spent the last decade documenting cultural heritage projects in Cameroon, Turkmenistan, Oman, and Egypt. With camera to hand like a companion, he employs photojournalist strategies and graphic attention to line and movement to contemplate the cognitive disassociations by which we create abstractions, establish boundaries, and constitute myths. His images slice into a clash, or synchronous dance, between shifting realities that depend upon each other to exist. Remove one, and the other ceases to be. Murray’s photographs subvert the notion of culture “in transition” to create ethnographic narratives of space and time that attend to the “eyeheart-mind” of being present in a moment. For A Horse Led to Water (2010), Murray used manual focus to capture the pleasure of Nubian children in Aswan learning to bath a horse following a day’s work. The unaltered photographic capture of momentary tension between present, past, and future calls up the imaginative cocoon of myth and the affective, embodied connections that shape experiences of place. It hints at a unifying narrative that extends beyond human identity and into our metaphysical relationship with animals, objects, and landscapes.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 1, 2017 – MARCH 2018

Precession of the Feminine Stadium–Chinatown SkyTrain Station

was created while Echeverría was completing the BMW Residency at France’s Nicéphore Niépce House Museum, named after the inventor of photography and dedicated to his medium.

Alinka Echeverría PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and TransLink With her combined training in photography and social anthropology, Alinka Echeverría brings a critical approach to questions of visual representation through her work. Precession of the Feminine (2015), part of a larger series entitled Nicephora,

According to Echeverría, “Precession of the Feminine reconsiders the way in which the images of women have been carried forward through photographic history by way of visual codes and techniques thus entering into the collective (un)consciousness.” The series additionally examines the historically exploitative nature of many anthropological images and representations of women through that lens.

Inspired by Niépce's obsession with fixation and reproduction and referring to the intrinsic links between ceramics and photography, Echeverría visually weaves together found historical and contemporary photographs of women, fusing the images with different vases. The clean museological presentation of the ceramics suggests they should be read as artifacts, yet their vibrantly coloured backdrops and the warped, blown-up imagery implies otherwise. The form of the vase acts as a metaphor for the feminine to reflect upon the ways in which we have been conditioned to read images of women, and how photographers construct them.

ALINKA ECHEVERRÍA PRECESSION OF THE FEMININE, 2015 opposite page KAREN ZALAMEA VITRINE, 2017 SERIES OF 14 PHOTOGRAPHS ON VINYL DIMENSIONS VARIABLE


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

APRIL 1 – 28

Art in Your Neighbourhood Capture’s inaugural Art in Your Neighbourhood project comprises two roving exhibitions concentrated within the borders of the iconic Gastown and South Granville neighbourhoods. These exhibitions take place in the storefronts of different retail spaces, with each participating business showcasing a unique artwork. Residents, shoppers, and those who work in the neighbourhood are able to slowly piece together each exhibition as they encounter the artworks during their daily errands and commutes, with the goal of sparking thoughtful and spontaneous dialogue.

Vitrine South Granville Neighbourhood Karen Zalamea PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and South Granville BIA Created specifically for various storefront windows along South Granville, Vitrine (2017) is a series of photographs in conversation with the possibilities of display. The window serves as a point of departure, functioning as a threshold between interior and exterior spaces and as an aperture that frames our field of vision.

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ARTWORK LOCATIONS (SOUTH TO NORTH)

Selfology, 8-3195 Granville St Suki's, 3157 Granville St Prospera Credit Union, 3058 Granville St Mr. Hobbs Barbershop, 3065 Granville St Diane's Lingerie, 2950 Granville St The Stable House Bistro, 1520 W 13th Ave Eyes on Twelfth, 1485 W 12th Ave Plum Clothing Co., 2799 Granville St BMO Bank of Montreal, 2601 Granville St EQ3, 2556/2526 Granville St 1501 W Broadway Goodge Place, 1521 W 8th Ave Industrial Revolution, 2306 Granville St


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

JOSEPH STAPLES FALUN SERIES (DETAIL), 2016 COLLAGE ON PLEXIGLASS 48” x 96”

Falun Series Gastown Neighbourhood Joseph Staples PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and Gastown BIA Joseph Staples’s ongoing Falun Series (2010–) consists of photo-collages made from a series of images of a single dancer he found years ago, which he has copied into multiples and cut up. Often, collages are made from many different images that are used only once. For the Falun Series, Staples instead investigates if something lasting can be made by returning over and again to one series of images. This is a way to challenge the ephemeral qualities of collage. Each time he goes back to this work, the same issue remains: What else can be made of this one set of photos? These self-imposed boundaries have become a way to test old ways of making, as the work becomes more complex over time. Delicately cut from small prints and blown up for installation, the reproductions for the Art in Your Neighbourhood project are the most ambitious works in the series yet. ARTWORK LOCATIONS (WEST TO EAST)

303 Cambie St Inform Interiors, 97 Water St John Fluevog Shoes, 65 Water St Inform Interiors, 50 Water St lululemon lab, 50 Powell St


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

APRIL 1 – 28

Offshore – Hyundai Patriot Woodward’s Atrium Floor Rui Nunes Woodward’s Atrium 111 West Hastings St Vancouver An extension of his work as an architect, Rui Nunes’s photographic projects focus on urban and industrial landscapes. Each series is generated by systematically documenting examples of specific typologies, spaces, or forms. The act of cataloguing opens the subject to analysis and new interpretation. Examples of his ongoing projects include surveys of London’s brutalist towers, turnof-the-century tenements, parkade rooftops, and ships. Offshore – Hyundai Patriot (2011) is a large-scale photograph of a container ship installed on the floor of the Woodward’s Atrium. At thirty-six feet long, the image invites people to walk on the surface of its “decks” and to look down on the abstract pixelated composition of multicoloured containers from the adjacent spiral staircase. The photograph is part of Nunes’s Offshore series, which catalogues the ships that pass beneath the Lions Gate Bridge into the Port of Vancouver, including chemical tankers, freighters, and cruise ships. The vessels are shot from a unique aerial view. From this vantage point, the ship itself becomes a landscape worthy of exploration, reinforcing Michel Foucault's assertion that "the ship is the heterotopia par excellence," a space outside of our land-bound existence.

RUI NUNES OFFSHORE – HYUNDAI PATRIOT, 2011 INKJET ON VINYL 36’ X 5’8”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

The Telephone Salesman

Heliographic Scale

Matthew Brooks

James Nizam

Capture Photography Festival and the City of New Westminster Public Art Program

UFCW Local 1518 Building 350 Columbia St New Westminster

TELUS Plaza 611 Sixth St New Westminster

Capture Photography Festival and the City of New Westminster Public Art Program invited photographers to submit proposals for a public artwork that considers the theme of “traffic” and its different interpretations, from the physical sense of moving goods, people, and vehicles to the virtual exchange of information through digital services. The installations are sited across two locations in New Westminster.

The Telephone Salesman (2017) presents the viewer with a surreal yet mundane tableau seemingly set in a dated living room. Entirely constructed in the studio from 1960–1970s furniture and objects, the work interrogates the viewer’s sense of the real as they are presented with an ambiguous, disorderly domestic space. Set in the early 1970s, The Telephone Salesman presents a melancholic scene in which a salesman has amassed a mysterious accumulation of rotary phones in his home. Drawing upon a range of references from the histories of photography and film, the image seduces the viewer with a cinematic, psychological portrait of an absent subject.

James Nizam’s public artwork, entitled Heliographic Scale (2017), has been installed as the backdrop of the Telus Building in New Westminster for one full year. On the stave-like tables of an abandoned limestone mine on Texada Island in the Strait of Georgia, a sequence of flashes bursts across the quarried landscape by means of the sun. Utilizing the shiny surface of a stamper plate (used to impress grooves during the production of vinyl records) as a reflecting disk to transmit sunlight toward the camera, Nizam orchestrated an ascending “scale” of star formations, which he has recorded within a panoramic view.

APRIL 1, 2017 – MARCH 31, 2018

Capture New West PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

opposite page MATTHEW BROOKS THE TELEPHONE SALESMAN, 2017 ALUMINUM LIGHTBOX WITH TRANSMOUNTED TRANSPARENCY JAMES NIZAM HELIOGRAPHIC SCALE, 2017


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

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1 877 225 5060 theloden.com DOWNTOWN, VANCOUVER


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

ANNIE BRIARD PARACOSMIC LANDS, 2017 PAULO MAJANO PLANTING TREE—ALEXANDRA ROAD, 2017

FEBRUARY 2017 – JANUARY 2018

FEBRUARY – JULY 2017

FEBRUARY – JULY 2017

Growing and Rising No. 3 Road Art Columns

Paracosmic Lands Aberdeen Column

Reflected City Lansdowne West Column

Lansdowne and Aberdeen Canada Line Stations

Annie Briard

Paulo Majano

There once was a poetic vision theory that proclaimed the eye to contain a small crystal, carefully shaping the light to bring us illumination. This crystalline vision of the world is echoed in landscape transformations. With every glass tower raised into view, light is refracted, reflections multiplied. Paracosmic Lands (2017), created through an approach developed by the artist while in residency on Spain’s Costa de la Luz, invites passersby to reconsider the fixity with which we perceive the world.

These photographs capture views in the City of Richmond from the point of view of a typical passerby, depicting both the detail of the ground beneath their feet and the sky above their heads in a single image. Paulo Majano’s images recreate the fragmented view of nature we observe in an urban setting, where the wide panoramic vistas often associated with the idea of landscape give way to an experience of nature through glimpses and fragments. The artist made these images by capturing a small patch of ground, focusing on the foliage and details of organic forms, while using a mirror to reflect the sky and structures overhead. The contrast between the rigid forms of the humanmade and the exuberance of natural growth speaks to the complex and fragile balance between human activity and the ecosystem that is part of the city.

PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and the City of Richmond Public Art Program For this multi-artist public installation, Capture Photography Festival and the City of New Westminster Public Art Program sought proposals from artists located in British Columbia that consider nature and its relationship to the Lower Mainland region’s urban environment. The artworks of six artists and artist teams were chosen to be installed on the three art columns at Lansdowne and Aberdeen Canada Line Stations for six months each.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017


PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS

FEBRUARY – JULY 2017

AUGUST 2017 – JANUARY 2018

AUGUST 2017 – JANUARY 2018

A Question of Balance Lansdowne East Column

Fragments, Chandelier Lansdowne West Column

Radius Lansdowne East Column

Michael Love

Jeff Downer

Patryk Stasieczek

This series of photographs examines the complexities that Richmond faces in its attempt to balance the needs of population growth and industry against the backdrop of agricultural and natural environments. In addition to the needs of the city’s population and industries, Richmond is home to a unique ecosystem containing many bird and fish habitats. With the neighbouring ocean and the city’s low elevation, global warming is also a growing concern. Richmond is a microcosm of a larger global problem: How do we balance the needs of the population, industries, and ecosystem?

Jeff Downer uses photography to engage with multiple and overlapping histories to comment on life, globalization, integration, and alienation. In Richmond, very disparate, unique, and established communities are being united by a larger urban sprawl, or rather being taken over by it.

This four-panel composition using found materials, collected within a 1 km radius of the column it is installed on, was made within a traditional colour photographic darkroom. The resulting images present the materiality of the region as well as photography through a formalist montage of walks within a radial distance.

AUGUST 2017 – JANUARY 2018

Unnotable Landscapes Aberdeen Column Christina Dixon Woojae Kim Landscape photography is often about expanding horizon and vista lines. We seek beauty in the vastness of nature. While the gaze of admiration embodies our respect for nature, small movements between the boundaries of the human and natural world go unnoticed. We, however, live in the time when our actions and inactions have changed the landscape more than any previous era. A landscape is now about material that we consume, change, digest, forge, and manifest. There are ever-growing piles, in constant flux, moving in and out of the city. They are small monuments and testaments to our growth—physical obstructions of our own sightlines.

Facets of urbanity loom large over this city and come to threaten the future of small communities, the erasure of their histories, and the displacement of their persevering citizens. In many instances, a single vantage point offers several layers of history contiguous to each other, as if the new development is growing naturally from what already exists. For many, new condominium developments are ideal places to live. They are clean, sleek, designed, and manicured homes of which there are thousands. When viewed critically, however, they are formally akin to a Hollywood film set—a flat-screen facsimile for the real thing. This type of development is not new to Richmond, nor the Lower Mainland at large; this sprawl is happening on a global scale as the world’s population continues to grow.

The sourced materials, including decorative grass from a shopping mall, plastic garbage bags, sand, rocks, and earth, contain nonstatistical information that bleed out of policy and permit, which is further decontextualized within the image plane. The objects take up the ideas of waste, development, the decoratively impersonal, and the immediately local. Radius (2017) speaks to the complex identity of the City of Richmond with its many avenues that press against one another like the shadowy forms within the positive, inverted photograms on display. By focusing on the natural, industrial, and urban landscapes around Lulu Island, Stasieczek’s work aims to allow the viewer to contemplate the complex narratives of development through the photographic image.

opposite page clockwise from top left CHRISTINA DIXON AND WOOJAE KIM UNNOTABLE LANDSCAPES, 2017 MICHAEL LOVE A QUESTION OF BALANCE, 2017 JEFF DOWNER FRAGMENTS, CHANDELIER, 2017 PATRYK STASIECZEK RADIUS, 2017

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017


Johan Österholm

The Conquest of Light: A Short History of the Glass Wall From photograph to skyscraper, Johan Österholm traces the evolution of modern architecture

TO HAVE YOUR PORTRAIT TAKEN IN THE EARLY DAYS OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC MEDIUM, you would most likely be led into a room clad with glass windows, something like a modernday greenhouse. The substantial exposure time required by early photosensitive material caused blurring in the image if the subject moved, even ever so slightly. By using daylight and ingenious lighting systems to reflect and focus maximum light on the sitter, the photographer could reduce the amount of time needed for proper exposure. Thus, the glasshouse photography studio, where daylight was made abundant, was born. It didn’t take long after the first portrait studio opened in London in March 1841 for these specially built glasshouses to begin appearing in gardens and on rooftops across the city. These buildings constructed in the pursuit of light are, together with their counterpart, the darkroom, two early examples of when the photographic medium started to have a direct influence on architecture. In fact, to be a serious photographer—amateur or not—in the latter part of the nineteenth century, one had to have one’s own laboratory to prepare and develop photosensitive materials. Because of the precarious nature of said material, domestic houses were architecturally adjusted or altered to fit small darkrooms and laboratories. When designing new buildings, architects from the mid-nineteenth century onward would often include a darkroom in their drawings—a chamber that later could be recognized from the outside by the red-glazed windows that acted as a safelight filter.

opposite page THE INTERIOR OF THE CRYSTAL PALACE IN LONDON DURING THE GREAT EXHIBITION OF 1851. J. MCNEVEN THE FOREIGN DEPARTMENT, VIEWED TOWARDS THE TRANSEPT, 1851 COLOURED LITHOGRAPH © VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON

This early influence of photography on architecture reached its zenith with the Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations in London in May 1851, the first in a series of exhibitions that would later be known as the World’s Fair. Barely a year before the inauguration, the renowned gardener Joseph Paxton won the approval of the Royal Commission with his design for a temporary exhibition hall that had an unprecedented use of cast iron and glass, allowing for all sides of the building to be fully glazed. Construction for what would become known as the Crystal Palace started in July 1850, and, thanks to its modular design, which allowed parts to be manufactured in different locations and then shipped by rail to London, the time it took to build was drastically reduced. Once the iron skeleton was erected in Hyde Park, the glazing was done in a mere seventeen weeks by a team of eighty glazers that used machines conceived by Paxton, allowing them to fix more than 18,000 sheets of glass per week. The translucency of the fully glazed walls and roofs allowed the whole space to be lit by only sunlight. The resulting building had much in common

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with the photographic greenhouses spread around London, but the scale was massive—it used close to 300,000 identical glass panes and ran 564 metres long by 139 metres wide, covering an area of 19 acres. At its tallest, it reached 41 metres—high enough to safely enclose and protect several large elm trees that otherwise would have been felled. The gridlike beam structure of the construction enabled large open exhibitions spaces uninterrupted by columns, allowing for daylight to spread throughout the building in a manner that had never been experienced before. The Crystal Palace came to manifest an emergent architectural style whose precondition was the rise of the machine and the mass production of standardized building material such as cast iron and glass. It was the first magnificently large-scaled example of industrial processes and methods that afterward became key parts of architectural construction practices. Although the Crystal Palace was a building constructed in the Victorian age, its style can be seen as a forebear for functionalism that became prominent the following century. Paxton’s design is an early example of the concept “form follows function”—that is to say, a design centred primarily on carrying the functions and needs of that building.

Heightened use of plate glass would restore what Le Corbusier called “the law of the sun” and bring mankind into a harmonious relationship with nature.

To look at the Crystal Palace in the light of the boom of photographic studios of the time is to see the building as a studio befitting an empire. It is, in all likelihood, the largest studio for natural light ever built—and during the exhibition period the building and displays were welldocumented, both photographically and through drawings. The grand scale of the building embodied the spirit of British innovation and was made with the camera in mind; the resulting photographs, postcards, and books served as imperial propaganda aimed at showcasing and celebrating the industrial might of the British Empire, with the ultimate goal of proclaiming Britain as a pillar of modern civilization. The Royal Commission even organized the exhibitors in such a way that displays from earlier great empires were the first things visitors would encounter, and thus juxtaposed the Greeks, Egyptians, and Romans with the British. The Crystal Palace became a symbol of the empire in its rising glory. When the Great Exhibition closed on October 11, 1851, the Palace was dismantled and relocated elsewhere in London. It was rebuilt using most of the original components, but also expanded to a larger, quite different incarnation. For eighty years it stood the test of time, until the winter of 1936 when fire took hold in its dry floorboards and consumed the building, melting its hundreds of tons of glass into pools of hot liquid. Even though the building itself is gone, the impact of the Crystal Palace can still be felt, especially through its influence on early and late modern architecture in the twentieth century. In fact, in 1935, just a year prior to the final demise of the Palace, the FrenchSwiss architect Le Corbusier proclaimed glass to be the fundamental material of modern architecture—its primary function being to embrace one of the essential conditions for life: sun and light. Heightened use of plate glass would restore what Le Corbusier called “the law of the sun” and bring mankind into a harmonious relationship with nature. By replacing traditional walls of stone and wood with load-bearing steel columns and reinforced concrete, the once solid wall could instead be made of glass. The slim columns no longer needed to be hidden, but could instead become an intricate part of a building’s aesthetic. What followed was an era dubbed the “Age of Glass,” which embodied both these aesthetic sensibilities— that is, the conquest of light—and the modes of construction used for the Crystal Palace.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

clockwise A LATE-NINETEENTH-CENTURY PLAN FOR A FIRST-FLOOR PHOTO STUDIO. ILLUSTRATION: EDWARD LIVINGSTON WILSON FROM WILSON’S QUARTER CENTURY IN PHOTOGRAPHY, 1887 WILLIAM HENRY FOX TALBOT (FAR RIGHT) AND OTHERS AT THE READING ESTABLISHMENT, A CALOTYPE STUDIO, IN 1846. PHOTO: WILLIAM HENRY FOX TALBOT SCAN OF A SALTED PAPER PRINT THE GLASPALEIS, IN HEERLEN, NETHERLANDS, DESIGNED BY FRITS PEUTZ AND BUILT IN 1935. PHOTO: PAUL VAN GALEN COURTESY OF RIJKSDIENST VOOR HET CULTUREEL ERFGOED

The attention paid to the Crystal Palace in the decades after its destruction helped pave the way for the intense experimentation with glass in architecture in the 1930s and beyond. After the fire consumed the relocated incarnation of the Crystal Palace, Le Corbusier— who normally shunned any historicism in his own work—wrote a tribute to the building, posthumously asserting it as a precedent of the modern architecture of the twentieth century: When, two years ago, I saw the Crystal Palace for the last time, I could not tear my eyes from the spectacle of its triumphant harmony. The lesson was so tremendous that it made me feel how puny our [modern architects’] own attempts still are. But I felt, too, how eminently justifiable and practicable our proposals are, if only they get a chance.1 Of course, as we know, these proposals got a chance. In Vancouver, one example of the International Style championed by Le Corbusier is the Dal Grauer Substation on Burrard Street, designed by the modernist architect Ned Pratt in collaboration with the architectureinspired artist B.C. Binning. When it was completed in 1954, its glass wall,2 in multitudes of shades, let passersby see the inner workings of the substation—much as visitors at the Great Exhibition a full century earlier could marvel at the exhibited machines of their age. In photographs from the substation’s heyday, the building, with its squares and rectangles of different colours, is reminiscent of modernist paintings by Piet Mondrian. With its open structural design and fully glazed facade, it was constructed as a modernist temple that glorified the electrical power produced within. Thus the illumination of the Dal Grauer Substation was partly reversed: at night, the electrical lights shining from within would splash colour onto the street as a testament to the technological advancement of the day—perhaps claiming that the conquest of light had been won once and for all. 1 2

Le Corbusier, ” A Tribute,” Architectural Review, no. 81 (February 1937): 72. Today the glass wall has been replaced with shatterproof Plexiglas, due to several explosions in the decades following the substation’s opening.


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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

ANNE COLLIER EYE #1, 2014


Meredith Preuss

Double Take: An Interview with Anne Collier Festival Director Meredith Preuss discusses appropriation, affect, and cliché with the New York–based artist, whose photographs appear in Inorganic Seductions, an outdoor exhibition on billboards across Vancouver

MEREDITH PREUSS: When thinking about your work in relationship to still life, I almost do a double take. It’s easy to lose yourself in the materials you’ve photographed and forget about their compositional role in the picture. My experience oscillates between looking at an almost forensic documentation and experiencing the drama or narrative of the subject. How does this tension drive your decision-making process? ANNE COLLIER: I’m interested in creating a neutral framework around the objects that I photograph, which often allude to heightened emotional or psychological states. The composition of my photographs is informed by both product photography (advertising) and scientific photography, where there is an attempt to create an objective account of whatever is being depicted. This tension, between the highly subjective nature of the imagery I’m drawn to and the objective nature of its staging, is central to my approach. Though your work treads into the realm of appropriation art, it can offer sensitive insights into the materials you photograph. How do you see yourself in relation to the history of that type of image making? I’ve never really thought of my work as appropriation, which I tend to associate with questioning notions of originality and authorship. In the majority of my work, it is evident that I am making a photograph of an existing object (e.g., an album cover, a magazine, a poster). In this respect my work is perhaps closer to a form of still life photography. I’m ultimately interested in how images circulate and how we subsequently develop very personal, autobiographical, and ideological relationships with them. In this respect aspects of my work could be thought of as a form of self-portraiture. The eye is a recurring motif in your practice and, like much of your work, it highlights the gaze of the camera both past and present, often as a feminist critique. These are urgent things to consider, now more than ever. With that in mind, can you expand on these themes in your work?

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

The eye is a visual cliché, an idea that continues to interest me. The relationship between the eye and the camera/lens is clearly both straightforward and complex, as is the relationship between the act of looking and being looked at. I’ve made a number of works relating to the 1978 film Eyes of Laura Mars, in which Faye Dunaway plays a fashion photographer, that take some of these ideas to an almost hysterical level. This led to other works that consider representations of women in professional photography magazines and journals of the 1970s and ’80s, where women appear as props in relation to the photographic equipment on display. To me, Eye #1, #2, and #3 (2014), which are part of Capture’s Inorganic Seductions outdoor exhibition, are concerned with the authorial eye of the person holding the camera and with the eye as a metaphor for vision and seeing. I’ve read that previous “eye” works are rephotographs of photos you’ve taken yourself. Is that the case here? This series of images incorporates my own photographs of my eyes being held by another person. As such, they might partly be thought of as self-portraits. I’ve always been interested in different forms of self-portraiture, and in my work I am constantly trying to negotiate the idea that something might be somehow both personal and universal. In a time when images are migrating to the screen (of our phones, computers, etc.), I was also thinking about our physical relationship with photographs as objects, as well as about images of people holding photographs, which I tend to associate with an earlier era of photography (e.g., family albums). You’ve previously exhibited a work similar to the one that's in Capture on a billboard, as part of the High Line Art program in New York. How did your way of thinking about your work on billboards and in public space change—or stay the same—this time around? In both New York and Vancouver, the billboards are concerned with our relationship with photographic images. Both feature a photographic image of my eye that has been staged within the “frame” of the billboard and that directly confronts the passerby. I was interested in creating a kind of visual loop between the viewer and the work, hopefully heightening the sensation of both looking and being looked at, a scenario that in today’s polarized political climate might also be read as a somewhat Orwellian gesture.


Exhibitions Feature 051 Selected 057 Open 102


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

clockwise from top left DAWIT L. PETROS UNTITLED (EPILOGUE III), CATANIA, ITALY, 2016 ARCHIVAL COLOUR PIGMENT PRINTS COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND TIWANI CONTEMPORARY, LONDON JACQUELINE HOÀNG NGUYỄN SEIZING HOLD OF A MEMORY AS IT FLASHES UP, 2010 BLIND EMBOSSING EDITION OF 175 PRINTS COURTESY OF THE ARTIST DOCUMENTATION: ANDREAS GODWIN GREG STAATS RECIPROCITY OF THOUGHT, 2014 TONED SILVER PRINT, DIGITAL PRINTS, WAMPUMON DAVEY BOARD, FATHER'S COTTON COIN BAG, GAUCHE ON FOUND PAPER, ARCHIVAL FOTO ON SHELF COURTESY OF THE ARTIST VIKKY ALEXANDER MODEL SUITE (SLIDING DOOR), 2005 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST JANET SLADE, VANCOUVER NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA TREPANIER BAER, CALGARY WILDING CRAN, LOS ANGELES COOPER COLE, TORONTO AND DOWNS & ROSS, NEW YORK


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 – JUNE 18

Song of the Open Road Vikky Alexander Robert Arndt Gerard Byrne Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn Kelly Jazvac Kelly Lycan Niamh O’Malley Dawit L. Petros Greg Staats Lisa Tan Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St Vancouver “You road I enter upon and look around, I believe you are not all that is here, I believe that much unseen is also here. ... I believe you are latent with unseen existences, you are so dear to me.” —Walt Whitman, “Song of the Open Road” (1856)

Taking its title from a poem by Walt Whitman, the Contemporary Art Gallery (CAG) presents a group exhibition as the central feature of this year’s Capture Photography Festival. Work is presented both inside and outside and across all of the gallery’s spaces, embracing a diverse set of conditions and approaches centred in a conceptual understanding of an expanded field of photographic practice that examines notions of what you see is most definitely not what you get.

Bringing together artists from Canada, Eritrea, Ireland, Sweden, and the US, the exhibition includes works that combine thematically to interrogate ideas rooted in photographic histories, engaging ideas such as veracity, recollection, remembrance, belonging, staging, and how the image documents and records these or is evidence of differing realities. Key to the exhibition is Images or shadows of divine things (2005–), an ongoing series by Irish artist Gerard Byrne. Visually rich and intellectually complex, the artist’s work in photography, film, theatre, and multiscreen installation examines the slippage between time and the act of image creation. Presented here, a selection of these black-and-white photographs seems to depict a much earlier period, evoking vernacular photographic idioms of American midcentury photography and thus pointing toward the relationship between time, appearance, and the photographic document. Through a collection of over twenty images, a sense emerges that the series has a certain scale of vision. However, it is more about picturing the historical “conditions” of image making than it is about riffing on an aesthetic. That sense of conditions emerges only once the particularity of the given images is surpassed—that is when it becomes obvious that the specifics of the images are not the point, this realization becoming palpable when a sufficient number of them are grouped together. Robert Arndt’s activities search and reveal the means of accessing culture and his-

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tory through the mediated forms of books, magazines, and the Internet. Made for the exhibition, Remainders, Repeats and Rejects (2017) is characteristic in its investigation of production whereby documentation itself becomes the artwork. Alongside a largescale photograph of the gallery wall on which it sits atop, Arndt’s work collects and conflates personal imagery with found and staged scenarios, highlighting the notion that documentation may be all that is required for an idea to exist and resonate. Recent work by Canadian artist Kelly Lycan includes installations based on Gallery 291, the iconic New York photography gallery opened by Alfred Stieglitz in 1905. These recreations are developed through sourcing images available online, in an attempt to uncover an understanding or experience of the space while drawing on simulations of the photographic illusion of this. Song of the Open Road features a new version of Nearby Nearby, 291 Burlap Walls (2015), composed of a series of images of the walls of Gallery 291 culled from Internet searches. Printed on paper, the work creates a pixelated arena of varicoloured white grounds, where it is as if each image is forensically being drawn from some depths to emerge on the paper’s surface. As a contemporary of artists such as Richard Prince, James Welling, and Sherrie Levine who were active in New York in the early 1980s, Vikky Alexander is often associated with the Pictures Generation. She is best known for work that foregrounds a strong in-


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

opposite page clockwise from top left LISA TAN SUNSETS (STILL), 2012 HD VIDEO WITH SOUND, 22:30 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND GALLERI RIIS KELLY LYCAN NEARBY NEARBY, 291 BURLAP WALLS, 2015

terest in the histories of architecture, design, and fashion, often focusing on locations such as shopping malls, showrooms, and show apartments—sites of desire, aspirations, and ideas of home. The images are often complicated through light, reflections, and refractions and speak of a set of conditions and values embedded in appearances as seen through furnishings and the notional view from the window (here, a large-scale photo mural). Shown outdoors at YaletownRoundhouse Station, Model Suite (Sliding Door) (2005/17) interplays with its architectural surroundings; the station’s glass pavilion lends a further physical and visual layer as we see the daily activity on the street through the work itself. Ambient Advertising (2016), installed across the CAG’s windows, is a reconfigured work by Toronto-based Kelly Jazvac. Salvaged billboard images that she has reframed, manipulated, and cut through, seemingly in reference to a quintessential Canadian landscape, visually envelop the gallery at street level. Taken from contemporary advertising, the imagery appeals to our collective sense of identity through reference to the romantic and awesome natural world that surrounds us while questioning the feeding of desire as driven by contemporary consumer culture. Alongside photographic work in a variety of processes, the exhibition also includes moving-image works. Sunsets (2012), by American artist Lisa Tan, combines literature and various historical and personal references to materially explore the intricate relationship between language, image, and experience. The video, filmed on the threshold between night and day, unfolds like a conversation. Seemingly inconsequential things pop up and take hold: a phone call interrupts, the sun starts to set, a stranger asks a question,

translations are needed. The work narrates Tan’s engagement with enigmatic writers, with histories, technologies, and geographies that she knows, in order to mediate those that she doesn't.

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST DOCUMENTATION: TONI HAFKENSCHEID KELLY JAZVAC AMBIENT ADVERTISING, 2016 SALVAGED BILLBOARD AND VINYL COURTESY OF THE ARTIST GERARD BRYNE

Concerned with issues of visibility and the slippage between a moment and an image, Irish artist Niamh O’Malley investigates the construction and arrangement of time and document as revealed through the moving image. Across two large-scale screens, the silent black-and-white video Glasshouse (2014) unfolds as a lengthy tracking shot. As the camera moves seamlessly from left to right along the glass panes, the natural idyll disappears here and there as the glass becomes more or less opaque. Through this O’Malley draws our attention to the process of looking, the camera seemingly attempting to locate and uncover meaning. Yet as images fragment, blocked by stained and broken glass, such efforts are thwarted, challenging our perception of what it is we are actually viewing and of how the images are constructed. Born in Montreal and currently working in Stockholm, Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn investigates issues of historicity, collectivity, utopian politics, and multiculturalism, often revealing the unnoticed political relevance of seemingly trivial historical anecdotes by shedding light on stories overlooked, hidden, or deemed otherwise insignificant. Seizing Hold of a Memory as It Flashes Up (2010) is a blind embossing using the speech of twelve-year-old Severn Suzuki, daughter of Japanese Canadian science communicator and environmental activist David Suzuki, delivered at the 1992 Earth Summit. Suzuki and members of ECO, the Environmental Children’s Organization, raised the money to travel from Vancouver to Brazil so they

IMAGES OR SHADOWS OF DIVINE THINGS, 2005– SELENIUM-TONED SILVER GELATIN PRINT COURTESY OF THE ARTIST LISSON GALLERY, LONDON; KERLIN GALLERY, DUBLIN AND GALERIE NORDENHAKE, STOCKHOLM


EXHIBITIONS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017


EXHIBITIONS

could attend the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro. Here, Suzuki delivered her speech before 172 representatives of different countries, 108 heads of state, and some 2,400 NGO representatives; 17,000 of the people who attended the parallel NGO Global Forum had consultative status, resulting in a meeting that ultimately led to the Kyoto Protocol. Toronto-based artist Greg Staats engages with what he has termed a “restorative aesthetic,” with particular reference to his Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk) culture. With respect to his relationship with the land and its manifestation in his work, Staats addresses loss—of family, land, culture, and language—through personal and cultural archives and an intellectual and aesthetic interpretation of traditional ceremony. The installation untitled (objects of reciprocal thinking) (2014) combines both works from the beginning of the artist’s reflection of public and private within a Haudenosaunee linguistic and mnemonic continuum linked to place and recent works based on a reciprocal methodology. When at the edge of one’s condolence and within the liminal metaphysical space prior to renewal, there lies a hesitancy to move forward. While external and internal barriers must be over-

come, the process must be completed with the help of others, both as witnesses and holders of the good mind. This ceremonial movement is comparable to moving from the darkness of the forest into the clearing where the light illuminates breath and one’s footing becomes clearer. The MidWinter (renewal) ceremony Gaihwayao:ni:, translated as “encouragement,” employs reciprocal gestures and words, comparable to lifting up the mind after it has dropped down during condolence and/or post-trauma.

met a group of Eritrean migrants, with whom he made Untitled (2016), a collection of images with these individuals holding mirrors or archive materials in visual dialogue with the surrounding landscape. Viewed together, the photographs offer a metaphor-rich articulation of the fluidity of contemporary transnational experiences and attendant issues of cultural negotiation, speaking to how images and objects enable a sense of belonging or retrieval, both public and private.

Chicago-based Canadian Eritean artist Dawit L. Petros similarly reflects through personal and cultural histories on ideas surrounding place making that are centred on a critical rereading of the relationship between African histories and European modernism. The book About the Author’s Journey from Ethiopia to Italy and about the Impressions Made on Him by His Stay in That Country in Tigrinya, by nineteenth-century writer Fesseha Giyorgis, was the first text published in the Tigrinya language (used in present-day Eritrea and Ethiopia). Using this as a guide, Petros undertook the journey from Ethiopia to Italy, his contemporary journey mirroring the historical passage across the Mediterranean Sea as well as the one undertaken by those currently fleeing to safety. When he arrived in Italy, the artist

We acknowledge the generous financial support of the following: Vikky Alexander: Presented in partnership with the Canada Line Public Art Program—IntransitBC Niamh O’Malley: Culture Ireland Greg Staats: The Banff Centre, via a thematic residency program; the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario; and the Canada Council for the Arts/Conseil des arts du Canada Lisa Tan: Iaspis, the Swedish Arts Grants Committee’s International Programme for Visual Artists

oppposite page ROBERT ARNDT PURSUIT, PLUNDER & FLEECE, 2015 COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MACAULAY & CO. FINE ART, VANCOUVER NIAMH O’MALLEY GLASS HOUSE, 2014 DUAL CHANNEL HD VIDEO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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POWERED BY


EXHIBITIONS

Selected Exhibitions Exhibitions in the Selected Program are chosen by jury. 2017 JURY

ON UNTIL MAY 22

Lewis Baltz, Portfolios and Selections from the Collection of Claudia Beck and Andrew Gruft Lewis Baltz and others CURATED BY

Lee Plested Grant Arnold Vancouver Art Gallery Helga Pakasaar Presentation House Gallery

Griffin Art Projects 1174 Welch St North Vancouver

Nigel Prince Contemporary Art Gallery

Lewis Baltz Portfolios is an opportunity to experience the artist’s early work in its intended form, in grids of serialized images. This will be the first solo exhibition of Baltz’s photography in Vancouver. Baltz’s work is presented alongside Selections from the Collection of Claudia Beck and Andrew Gruft, a concise group of works that further explores the stark photographic mode that, along with Baltz, gained attention through the 1975 exhibition New Topographics. Acclaimed for his serial investigations of the industrialized landscape, Lewis Baltz shot the America of the 1970s and ’80s with an objective cool that found its reductive method in the deliberate, formal approach of minimalism. By serializing his images in grids, he was able to achieve a near cinematic experience. This deliberate shift from the individual shot was, at the time, a major innovation in the presentation of photography. Baltz’s art takes serious looking, moving from one small-format image to the next, each as formally charged as the last. Every incident takes digesting before we take on another, the sum accumulating in a complex take on that moment, that site. We are freed from the romantic revelry of the singular image, presented with the multifarious actuality of place.

LEWIS BALTZ NEVADA: ELEMENT #6 (NEW CONSTRUCTION, SHADOW MOUNTAIN), 1977 © THE LEWIS BALTZ TRUST COURTESY OF GALLERY LUISOTTI, SANTA MONICA COLLECTION OF DAVID KNAUS

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

MIGUEL ANGEL RIOS A MORIR ('TIL DEATH), 2003 COURTESY OF GALLERY WENDI NORRIS, SAN FRANCISCO

ON UNTIL APRIL 30

Brink David Bowen Nelmarie du Preez Miguel Angel Rios Stefan Tiefengraber Jacob Tonski CURATED BY

Gordon Duggan Sarah Joyce New Media Gallery Anvil Centre 777 Columbia St New Westminster

New Media Gallery presents Brink, a group exhibition that pivots between control and anarchy. Electronic media and robotic works as well video installations suggest an adagio of fragile equilibriums. There are ambiguous tensions here: between freedom of choice and its repercussions; between what we understand as success, failure, or stasis. Works teeter, circle, and flail in the balance. There is an acute awareness of boundaries and territories. The timing and anticipation of what might happen next; the resolution we hope for (the resolution we fear) leads us to the brink. The artists in Brink work between disciplines. Miguel Angel Rios and Nelmarie du

Preez are represented by lens-based works containing allusions to historic game playing, territorialism, and the search for control. Battles play out on both a grand and human scale, exposing power struggles and symbiotic relationships. Stefan Tiefengraber and David Bowen give us a detached choice or ungovernable aggression; the promise of destruction seems imminent and perhaps even tantalizing: these are strange attractors. In the centre of the exhibition, a work by Jacob Tonski enacts a fragile dance of restraint and perseverance, containing the promise that some inherent and hidden mechanism will hold things up. Yet we foresee each tipping point and the warnings of collapse.


EXHIBITIONS

ON UNTIL APRIL 30

Rock Paper Scissors Cindy Mochizuki CURATED BY

Makiko Hara Nikkei National Museum 6688 Southoaks Cres Burnaby

Rock, Paper, Scissors is a multimedia installation comprising video, animation, radio drama, and sculpture. Upon entering the haunting, mysterious space of K’s restaurant, the viewer is led through an immersive time-travel journey to sites off the shores of Yonago, Japan, to the islands of British Columbia, spanning from the 1900s to the year 2100. The sixty-minute installation invites audiences to experience an immersive trilogy of short stories, with each story bridging a connection between Canada and Japan by way of early Japanese migration and the natural resources of coal, lumber, and iron. Rock, Paper, Scissors imagines the complexity of history through a transpacific, speculative fiction.

CINDY MOCHIZUKI ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS (STILL), 2017

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

JESSE WINTER JUNE 21, 2015 “Two teenage boxers square off during one of the regular Sunday street fights in Bukom, an impoverished neighborhood in downtown Accra, Ghana. Boxing is a huge element of the indigenous Ga people's culture, and many young

ON UNTIL APRIL 14

News Photographers Association of Canada Annual Pictures of the Year Nominees

children learn to fight barefoot in the street.�

Group Exhibition CURATED BY

Ric Ernst Ali Ledgerwood Pendulum Gallery HSBC Building 855 West Georgia St Vancouver

The News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) celebrates and champions quality and ethical photography in journalism. Through a variety of efforts, the association challenges its members to better themselves and to continually raise the bar of industry standards. NPAC hosts the annual National Pictures of the Year awards (NPOY) each spring. This event is the largest annual photo contest in Canada and it showcases the best work of its members. It also recognizes the Photojournalist of the Year, Photograph of the Year, and Student Photographer of the Year. The awards competition also serves to provide members with important peer review of their work as well as helping them to stay current with trends and techniques in photojournalism. This has become the largest photojournalism competition, for both still photography and multimedia, in the country. The images represent the finalists for the NPOY and the winners will be announced at the NPOY Gala to be held on Saturday, May 6 in Toronto.


EXHIBITIONS

ON UNTIL MAY 7

Grand Theft Terra Firma David Campion Sandra Shields CURATED BY

Laura Schneider Reach Gallery Museum Abbotsford 32388 Veterans Way Abbotsford

In Grand Theft Terra Firma, artists David Campion and Sandra Shields present a strategy guide to an imaginary video game. Combining installation, text, and photography, the artists reframe the settlement of British Columbia as a complex heist masterminded by criminals in London and played out on the ground by a gang of greedy thieves. Central to the exhibition are largescale, fictionalized portraits that describe the colonial “players” in the heist. Complex photographic vignettes, achieved in collaboration with Stó:lō community members and actors of settler heritage, mimic “screenshots” that recreate key moments in local history.

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The project pushes the national conversation around reconciliation by using satire and humour as entry points into difficult knowledge. Blending fictional characters with elements drawn from historical record, the artists create an ambiguous space where audiences are asked to consider their relationship to destructive colonial practices.

DAVID CAMPION AND SANDRA SHIELDS SURVEY PARTY, 2016 INKJET PRINT 63” x 33”


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

ON UNTIL APRIL 15

radial systems Marian Penner Bancroft CURATED BY

Pantea Haghighi Republic Gallery 3rd Floor, 732 Richards St Vancouver This new body of work is a series of colour photographs and videos depicting organic objects found on or near the ground and in the water, both cultivated and not. The use of a macro lens makes possible both a change in scale and a scrutiny of forms not so readily accessible to the naked eye. Each item photographed is in a state of material flux, a fact apparent in some more than others. The video work attempts an apprehension of activity almost too slow for perception, focusing on ordinary movements: logs drifting, birds flying, garbage burning, and tugboats plying the Fraser River. Venue is not wheelchair accessible.

MARIAN PENNER BANCROFT PARASOL, 2016 C-PRINT 20” x 20” opposite page SCENOCOSME RENCONTRES IMAGINAIRES (INSTALLATION SHOT), 2016 PHOTO: GRÉGORY LASSERRE


EXHIBITIONS

ON UNTIL MAY 7

Rencontres Imaginaires Scenocosme CURATED BY

Alison Rajah Surrey Art Gallery UrbanScreen 13458 107A Ave Surrey Created as a site-specific installation for Surrey Art Gallery’s offsite venue UrbanScreen, Rencontres Imaginaires is a series of interactive behavioural video works. Onsite viewers are invited to insert themselves into the frame to engage in imaginary encounters with “virtual friends”

in real-time through a large-scale projection and interactive kiosk. The prerecorded videos of virtual friends prompt the viewer to react to their gestures. Referencing and recalling the first tricks of early cinema by filmmakers like Georges Méliès over a hundred years ago, this artwork uses techniques of illusion to encourage play in public space. Originating from the Rhône-Alpes region of France, Grégory Lasserre and Anaïs met den Ancxt collaborate under the name Scenocosme. During a residency at the gallery, Scenocosme created new video works, inviting local residents to participate in filming sessions to become virtual friends—creating hand and face behaviours for interaction at UrbanScreen.

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Surrey Art Gallery gratefully acknowledges Creative BC, the Province of British Columbia through the BC Arts Council, and French Consulate Vancouver/ Consulat général de France à Vancouver for their support of this project.


MOMENTS WORTH SHARING

Award-winning catering and event planning for corporate gatherings, parties and weddings since 1979. lazygourmet.ca Captured by: Christie Graham On a DSLR: Nikon D750 Date: 15th August, 2016 Preferred Caterer to the Capture Photography Festival


EXHIBITIONS

MARCH 27 – JUNE 9

MARK MIZGALA SHIFT (NAPKIN HOLDER), 2016

Shift

ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT 26” x 21”

Mark Mizgala Art Rental & Sales 1st Floor Annex, Vancouver Art Gallery 750 Hornby St Vancouver Vancouver photographer Mark Mizgala’s latest body of work, Shift, explores the shifts in attitudes, behaviours, and ideas regarding climate change, conflating plant cuttings and manufactured goods in images that anticipate a future where humanity and nature find greater harmony. The cuttings serve a parallel or complementary function to the human artifacts they interact with: they are united in a common purpose. Nestled into the human world, the cuttings support a camera, lace shoes, or brush hair. We are witnessing a shift in attitudes toward climate change. Polluters and climate change skeptics are losing traction as growing numbers of people acknowledge the reality of global warming. Following from this change in attitudes there has been a shift in behaviour due to the effects of global warming, such as the widespread move to energy-saving products like CFL bulbs and high-efficiency appliances and initiatives such as car-share programs. Mizgala’s photographs imagine a future where nature and humanity exist in harmony and the natural world finds its rightful home alongside the outputs of human production. While we cannot reverse the effects of climate change, we have the opportunity to mitigate it if we work cooperatively. This project was funded with the assistance of a BC Arts Council Grant.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

LUKE POTTER HALLWAY THROUGH DOOR, 2016 COMPOSITE PHOTOGRAPH

MARCH 29 – APRIL 12

Silence in Schools Luke Potter CURATED BY

Daylen Luchsinger Gordon Smith Gallery of Canadian Art, Mezzanine Gallery 2121 Lonsdale Ave North Vancouver Silence in Schools is an ongoing photographic art project that reveals the stillness and silence in an environment generally known to be colourful, bustling, and clamorous. The images depict the physical effect teaching and learning can have on a classroom

environment, and how these spaces feel once vacated by pupils and teachers. Viewers are invited into the empty school environment to experience these spaces as they have been left at the end of the workday. Skewed tables, stacked chairs, littered floors, and discarded equipment all play an intrinsic part in this body of work. The natural world influenced the visual approach of Silence in Schools. Weather phenomena such as fog, mist, and snow bring with them a silence, muting colours and dampening both the visual and aural senses. The images use these elements of desaturated colour and selective focus to conjure the same sense of quiet.


EXHIBITIONS

MARCH 29 – MAY 6

District Victor John Penner CURATED BY

Darrin Morrison OPENING RECEPTION

Tuesday, March 28, 7–9 PM West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St West Vancouver Vancouver’s ever-present natural surroundings have influenced the practice of many artists. In 1976, the curator Joan Lowndes, referring to painter Gordon Smith’s preoccupation with nature-based abstraction, wrote: “west coast artists . . . lived—and still live for the most part—on treed lots far from the city core, working in small studios at home surrounded by some of the most magnificent

VICTOR JOHN PENNER EGRESS, 2016 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT 48” x 60”

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scenery in the world.” Smith and others built modernist homes on Vancouver’s North Shore and integrated art and design into their daily lives. In the 1970s, Victor John Penner grew up in West Vancouver and was exposed to these same conditions, yet his photographs of urban and suburban spaces, all marked by human interaction, create a sense of unease. District, Penner’s mise-en-scène of West Vancouver, offers a counter-perspective through photographs of seemingly discordant scenes. Penner captures the incidental—stairs in a parking lot, an open box of negatives— in his large-format images that invite the viewer to consider how culture is built through experience, events, and myths. The photographs are not intentionally critical, but provoke us to consider what it is about this place that has influenced so many.


EXHIBITIONS

VIKKY ALEXANDER BETWEEN DREAMING & LIVING #10, 1985/2008 C-PRINT 20” x 24”

APRIL 1 – MAY 7

Between Dreaming and Living Vikky Alexander CURATED BY

Brad Chernoff Karen Kolenda OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 2–4 PM Chernoff Fine Art 265 East 2nd Ave Vancouver

Vikky Alexander’s work is characterized by her ongoing consideration of illusion and material desires framed within the language of architecture and design. Since the early 1980s, Alexander has investigated culture’s appropriation and substitution of nature as it is manifest in mass-market interior design items such as photomurals of scenic landscapes, wood veneers, and decorative mirrors. Her work recognizes the artificial as a place for utopian fantasy, a surreal space where the natural is recreated in an improved or even perfected form. Working primarily with photography and installation, Alexander examines how the formal signs of photography, architecture, and interior and graphic design reveal and

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shape meaning in our contemporary culture, bringing to the fore discussions of capitalism, commodification, and desire within the parameters of fantasy and cultural longing. Between Dreaming and Living is a body of work that was originally exhibited in Vancouver in 1985 at Coburg Gallery. The images originated as sandwiched 35 mm colour slides, which were then converted into black-and-white negatives, printed, and framed with a coloured Plexi overlay. In 2008, Alexander revisited these works by making colour Cibachrome prints from the original sandwiched slides. The images combine figure and landscape using both appropriated imagery from magazines and calendars and Alexander’s own landscapes.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 1 – 30

Handsome Rewards Jeff Downer CURATED BY

Kara Hansen OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, March 30, 7–10 PM Duplex Projects 4257 and 4277 Fraser St Vancouver It started when the artist was living in Seattle. The previous tenant of Jeff Downer’s apartment must have done some business with Publishers Clearing House—a marketing company that sends catalogues and subscriptions with sweepstakes, prize-based games, and a lottery draw for which the winners get their photographs taken with six-foot cheques—because catalogues and letters stating Mrs. L was only two steps away from winning $1,000 every week for the rest of her life kept arriving. The artist went to check the mail one evening and found himself flipping through one of PCH’s merchandise catalogues while walking it straight to the recycling bin. The magazine’s claims are what brought it up two flights of stairs and into the apartment. In the months that followed, the mailbox was constantly full of junk. The work of Handsome Rewards is sourced from several of these catalogues. The exhibition and publication Handsome Rewards seeks to frame the varied capacities that photography has in everyday life. Images of highly staged sets with models positioned in front of stark backdrops reveal the commodity in a controlled situation where human presence is fragmented. But more than the sets constructed for the products, it’s the products themselves that make the images so full of meaning. Strange, novel, or voraciously banal, these products lend themselves to deeper reading.

JEFF DOWNER UNTITLED, 2016 TONER PRINT 16” x 20” opposite page DANNY SINGER DELISLE, 2015 ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT 43” x 76"


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 – 29

Detail Mike Bayne Danny Singer CURATED BY

Katharine Mulherin Shane O’Brien OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 2 PM Gallery Jones 1-258 East 1st Ave Vancouver

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Danny Singer and Mike Bayne, both Canadian artists, approach the same subject in very different ways. Danny Singer takes a time-based approach to the representation of habitats on the plains of North America, presenting photo-composites of the mundane with minimal artifice. His large-scale photographs elevate small towns, largely devoid of individual subject matter worth memorializing, through representation that is painterly in scale and aesthetic. Mike Bayne makes very small paintings that read as photographs. The ubiquitous details that exist in the fabric of humans dwelling in proximity to each other are his subject: backyard sheds, strip mall signs, cookiecutter homes.


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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 1 – 28

SHIPS Jenny Walton OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 7–9 PM KEV Studio 2108 East Hastings St Vancouver

SHIPS presents a collection of images inspired by the cargo and container ships that collect in Vancouver Harbour. These ships hailing from China, South Korea, the United States, and Brazil wait under ominous winter skies to empty their containers of electronics and household goods and to refill with Canada’s raw materials. SHIPS is a study of our natural environment and our desires, a balancing act in sustainable stewardship.

JENNY WALTON COSCO, 2012 C-PRINT 50” x 34” opposite page BILL ANDERSON STUDIO, EXTERNAL. INTERNAL, 2017 PHOTOGRAPH WITH ACRYLIC AND PASTELS MOUNTED ON PLYWOOD 72” x 39”


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 – 28

External. Internal. Bill Anderson OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 2–4 PM Winsor Gallery 258 East 1st Ave Vancouver External. Internal. presents a new series of photo-based mixed media constructions regarding the accretions of spontaneous mark making on city exteriors, and how these accumulations move through the particular and into the universal. From feeling to meaning. From external to internal.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

BERYL WOODROW JIM COMPLETING HIS E-BOOK, FROM THE SERIES OF LOVE AND HOME, 2015 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH 13" x 19"

APRIL 3 –17

Of Love and Home Beryl Woodrow CURATED BY

Jim Balderston OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 5:30–7:30 PM Gallery 49 Library Building, Langara College 100 West 49th Ave Vancouver

Of Love and Home is an ongoing photographic series documenting the lives of eightyand ninety-year-old couples who continue to live in their own homes. Using the everyday as the site for this work, Beryl Woodrow explores how these couples maintain their independence and purpose given the inevitable health challenges that come with age. As the project grew, she was inspired to create a record of the couples’ worlds, filled with meaningful pursuits, creativity, and love of home and each other. The artist spent many hours listening to the her subjects’ stories as she document-

ed facets of their lives at home, while also reflecting on cultural assumptions about the elderly. The eight couples Woodrow connected with over four years are her relatives, neighbours, families of friends, and friends of friends. They are middle class, from a wide range of professions, and mentally astute. The resulting series straddles the boundary between portraiture, social documentary, and visual narrative, contemplating the possibilities of what it can mean to be elderly in the twentyfirst century in this country.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 3 – 28

The Great White Urinal Frances Hart D’Emilio CURATED BY

Micaela Mae Kwiatkowski CLOSING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 27, 6–9 PM Hatch Art Gallery 2nd Floor, Student Nest University of British Columbia 6133 Student Union Blvd Vancouver

The Great White Urinal reflects on recent conversations observed by the artist in West Coast news media, on the street, and in academic circles around perceived changes in Vancouver architecture in relation to the political economy. There has been a visceral and uncomfortable shift in the upper-middleclass socioeconomic order of this city, and that shift has been blamed on the current breakneck, boomtown pace of teardowns, renovictions, and a brand-new luxury class. The pace of this building boom, prodded ever onward since the Vancouver 2010 Olympics by gross overvaluation and rapacious realestate speculation, has resulted in the next and youngest generation of the beloved and maligned Vancouver Special architectural style. The images in the exhibition represent houses located in a five-block radius between West 10th and 16th Streets and between Discovery and Sasamat Streets in West Point Grey.

FRANCES HART D’EMILIO URINAL 6, 2016 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 5 – 28

TRACES DIARY Shirley Wiebe CURATED BY

Geoffrey Carr Haruko Okano OPENING RECEPTION

Wednesday, April 5, 6:30–8:30 PM Britannia Art Gallery 1661 Napier St Vancouver

SHIRLEY WIEBE NEIGHBOURS, 2016 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT-BASED INK PHOTOGRAPH AND MIXED MEDIA ON RAG PAPER 8” x 10”

Shirley Wiebe’s photo-based images yield a trace of her nomadic drift through various redevelopment sites in the Lower Mainland. In a sense, her images are a love letter to a rapidly transforming region, a love that doubtless feels unrequited by many who face record-low vacancy rates, rising rents, and renovictions. The pictures divulge something of the artist’s gendered subjectivity—trespassing on places of “men’s work” to convey her embodied encounter with profound and lasting changes to the built environment. It also emerges in supplemental imagery, layering not only media but also the complexity of the artist’s personal perceptions of the seemingly impersonal processes of demolition and redevelopment.

In this overdetermined, conflictual space, Wiebe’s work cannot help but register some measure of urgency, melancholy, and dread. Precariousness, promise, and inevitability haunt each frame. Instead of a contingent patchwork quilt of additions and repairs, the assertive presence of new construction. Rather than a messy, discordant, and vital accretion of pigments and architectural forms, a hygienic orthogonality that inoculates such tatty pasts. Wiebe’s hybrid images combine inherently reproducible photographs with unique extended hand-drawn details using mixed media such as pencil, ink, and watercolour, making each one an original.


EXHIBITIONS

XUEFENG LI LONG TIME NO NEWS OF THE DAUGHTER OF THE COUNTRY, 2015 PIGMENT PRINT 36” x 48”

APRIL 5 – JUNE 5

Journey to the West and Edward Hopper Xuefeng Li CURATED BY

Steven Dragonn Yi Liu OPENING RECEPTION

Wednesday, April 5, 6–9 PM R Space 123 East 8th Ave Vancouver

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In the sixteenth-century Chinese novel Journey to the West, the monk and his party go through a variety of tribulations, complete a great journey, and finally achieve the scriptures and fruition. Here in the farthest west, we are still “learning,” and the monk and his apprentices seem not to have any further news. What are they doing now? The characters of the great American painter Edward Hopper are expressionless, pensive— as if they lead lonely and boring lives. Artist Xuefeng Li borrows Hopper’s schema for his fictional vision of the monk and his apprentices after their journey to the west. The photos were taken in Maershan, an abandoned village thirty kilometres from Shenyang, China. Once a magnificent plan, it has become a broken dream, where abandoned houses look lonely.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

WEISHAN TAN UNTITLED, 2016 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH

APRIL 5 – JUNE 5

Making statues for over-60-year-olds in Shengjing Village Weishan Tan CURATED BY

Steven Dragonn OPENING RECEPTION

Wednesday, April 5, 6–9 PM R Space 123 East 8th Ave Vancouver In Shengjingcun, in China’s Hubei province, more than half of its 639 residents work in other metropolises, while most of its elderly stay in the village. In traditional rural China, a portrait is hung in the home after the death of an elderly person, as a remembrance. However, in Shengjingcun, most of the elderly population does not have any portrait of themselves. Photographer Weishan Tan offered to take portraits of Shengjingcun’s residents over the age of sixty, free of charge, which the artist then printed out and framed for the villagers. When we look at the portraits of these people, we are touched by their faces and the multitude of stories they convey. Tan’s series is mounted in R Space’s outdoor window display area.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 5 – MAY 10

Moonlight Hua Jin OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 7, 6 PM Viridian Gallery 1570 Coal Harbour Quay Vancouver Including a range of formats from largesize prints, to light boxes, to mural installations, to video works, Moonlight features Hua Jin’s new series of work that focuses on the subject of nature. The exhibition invites the viewer to return to nature to reflect upon the idea of the circle of nature, its internal regulation, and its evanescent quality. Interactions between the poles of morning and dusk, light and heavy, fluid and solid, transparent and opaque, moving and motionless is contemplated through imagery of moving rivers, luminous rocks, flying birds, swaying branches, and the rising moon. The works included in Moonlight emanate a glow of mystery, of the poetic and the romantic. Through diverse methods of presentation, the artist explores the connections between photography and other media while simultaneously conjuring an atmosphere of serenity. Moonlight aims to present a contemplative, reflective, and immersive viewing experience where time and space blend and where a sense of longing encounters a sense of connection. Step into a moonlight-tinted world and an experience of serenity—an escape from today’s hectic world.

HUA JIN UNTITLED #1, 2016 LIGHT BOX 20” x 27”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 6 – MAY 20

Elizabeth Zvonar: BAF Residency Exhibition Elizabeth Zvonar CURATED BY

Kate Bellringer OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 7 PM Burrard Arts Foundation 108 East Broadway Vancouver Elizabeth Zvonar makes objects and pictures that think-through metaphor and the metaphysical, often using humour and referencing art history while noticing the discrepancies between the sexes and regressive hierarchical structures. This exhibition presents the works she created while partaking in the BAF Residency Program from January to March 2017. The BAF Residency exists to offer creative support and professional development opportunities to qualified artists. The program is geared toward nurturing creative inspiration and facilitating the production of work outside an artist’s normal environment through the provision of key resources such as studio space, equipment, supplies, and an honorarium. Every residency is crafted to fit the individual artist coming into it, and there are differing and specific goals in mind for each one. The final objective of each residency is to culminate the experience with an exhibition at BAF Gallery.

ELIZABETH ZVONAR SPRINGTIME, 2017


EXHIBITIONS

KUMI OGURO DIVISION, 2014

APRIL 6 – MAY 20

FotoFilmic ’16 Group Exhibition CURATED BY

Bastien Desfriches Doria Virginie Lamarche OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 7 PM Burrard Arts Foundation 108 East Broadway Vancouver

Presenting thirty promising analogue and film-based photographers from ten countries through as many single works, FotoFilmic ’16 pictures a unique worldview of contemporary photography’s material practices. The exhibition’s underlying vision frames a defining moment and transitionary occupation of film-based photography and its rich lineage of physical craft and recording methods in the context of today’s global digital culture. Running contrary to the common but largely unfounded notion that a fundamental technological contradiction exists between digital and material photography, FotoFilmic ’16 shifts focus to photographers’ practices and how materiality may inform and sometimes define their end work. According to FotoFilmic, this is an important reversal in understanding film and analogue photographic culture today.

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Following a six-month shortlisting process, Virginie Lamarche and Bastien Desfriches Doria selected ninety photographers from around the world. The FotoFilmic ’16 exhibition was then juried last summer by renowned San Francisco photographer Todd Hido, Vancouver Biennale president Barrie Mowatt, SF Camerawork director Heather Snider, Photo Book Melbourne and Unless You Will magazine founder Heidi Romano, and London’s Photographers' Gallery senior curator Karen McQuaid. The FotoFilmic ’16 exhibition first opened in November 2016 in Santa Monica, California, before travelling to Melbourne, Australia, and finally returning home to Vancouver, British Columbia.


AIR CANADA ENROUTE AND / ET

M A G E N TA F L A S H F O R WA R D PRESENT A SPECIALLY COMMISSIONED SERIES BY PHOTOGRAPHER / PRÉSENTENT UNE SÉRIE ORIGINALE DU PHOTOGRAPHE

RYAN WALKER

O P EN IN G / VERN ISSAG E A P R IL 26 , 6 – 9 P. M . LE 26 AVRI L 18 H – 21 H E X HIB ITI O N / EXPOSITI O N A P R IL 24 –30 D U 24 AU 30 AVRI L

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL BRINGS OVER 100 EXHIBITIONS, EVENTS AND PUBLIC ART INSTALL ATIONS TO THE METRO VANCOUVER ARE A, FROM APRIL 1 TO 28. / DU 1 er AU 28 AVRIL, LE CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL ACCUEILLE PLUS DE 100 EXPOSITIONS, ÉVÉNEMENTS ET INSTALLATIONS ARTISTIQUES DANS LE GRAND VANCOUVER.

C A P T U R E P H O T O F E S T. C O M

FE ATU R ED I M AGE F ROM RYAN WAL K ER’S 2014 S ERI ES “ CAL IFOR NI A D R EAM” / IM AG E DE L A S ÉRI E « CAL I FO R N I A D R EAM » ( 2 0 14 ) DE RYA N WA L K ER

T H I S O P E N S PAC E: T H E P L AYG R O U N D 4 3 4 C O L U M B I A S T. , VA N C O U V E R


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 7 – MAY 13

Rehearsal for a Synthetic Theatre Tom Richardson CURATED BY

Daniel Jefferies

FIELD Contemporary presents Rehearsal for a Synthetic Theatre, a solo exhibition by Tom Richardson. Richardson’s practice draws from cinematic and video game narrative conventions to reflect upon current events and the dissemination of violence. In this exhibition, a newly made animated film is presented in conjunction with a sculptural apparatus and new 2D and 3D works.

OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 7–10 PM FIELD Contemporary 17 West Broadway Vancouver

The display of objects and images in the exhibition points to intermingled histories and the slippage of time. Using state-ofthe-art video game technology used for US military applications, Richardson places

global politics into the material he uses to create his cinematically infused work. His film references events from T. E. Lawrence’s autobiography Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1922) and its cinematic adaptation, Lawrence of Arabia (1962), to create a contemporary refraction of historical events. This touchstone remains ever relevant as the fallout from the Western powers' failure to heed the advice of Lawrence and the conflicting promises of the Sykes-Picot Agreement can be traced forward to both the rise of Wahhabism and the ongoing conflict in the Middle East we see today.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 6 – MAY 13

Hastings: A Second Look Gabor Gasztonyi CURATED BY

Judith Copland OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 6–10 PM Gabor Gasztonyi Studio & Gallery 730 12th St New Westminster After the completion of the book A Room in the City (Anvil Press, 2010), which reveals a six-year journey into the hotel rooms of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, Gabor Gasztonyi has continued to photograph and work in the area for another six years, finding new images that reflect the often difficult and contradictory beauty of the people and the places they live. The artist looked for people who he had met and photographed for the original book, only to find many are no longer with us. The ones who are still here have aged and in some ways mellowed, realizing the importance of continuing their lives, often as couples in new relationships helping each other out. The exhibition features images from this project from 2006 to 2016, many of which have not been exhibited before.

opposite page TOM RICHARDSON REHEARSAL FOR A SYNTHETIC THEATRE, 2017 VIDEO STILL GABOR GASZTONYI CHAIN MAN, 2006 ARCHIVAL PRINT 16” x 20”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

MONIQUE MOTUT-FIRTH INSERT BOLD NEW CHANGE, 2015 INKJET PRINT, DIBOND MOUNT 30” x 39” opposite page VILHELM SUNDIN (2016 LIND PRIZE WINNER) MOON, 2014 HD VIDEO, SINGLE-SCREEN PROJECTION IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

APRIL 7 – MAY 14

CONSUMED Monique Motut-Firth CURATED BY

Sarvenaz Amanat OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 7–9 PM Gallery 1515 1515 West 7th Ave Vancouver

Monique Motut-Firth’s meticulously composed works are created through a process of clipping images and diagrams from found magazine collections, which she deconstructs and reconfigures into new iconographies. Motut-Firth creates compositions that build on the history of collage and explore the language and role of technical images. In her work, photographic materials are transformed into structures, then into pixels, and finally into singular printed-paper images. Colour and line speak from within the images to reveal possible hybrid visualizations and new trajectories of meaning. The artist’s “scrap-systems” are at once chaotic yet organized, limitless yet confined. A tension is created as discarded and forgotten images

of consumer products are transformed into unique contemporary pieces. Using her scissors to mine vast archives, consumed by the act of cutting countless images, Motut-Firth navigates an overwhelming and endless abyss of advertisements and print media—an undeniable physical manifestation of the excess of capitalist culture. With incessant global marketing, extreme consumerism, and the plentiful accumulation of products, society is clearly adopting increasingly materialistic values that ultimately distract from more meaningful intrinsic ones. Motut-Firth’s work considers the tendency to slip into a passive viewing position and sheds light on the perils of images in mass media.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 7 – 28

The Lind Prize Group Exhibition OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 7, 7 PM Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave North Vancouver

Presentation House Gallery is proud to present the second annual Philip B. Lind Emerging Artist Prize exhibition. The prize has been established to support emerging artists working with photography, film, and video and reflects Presentation House Gallery’s long history of nurturing new talent among the province’s visual artists. Each year, post-secondary visual arts instructors are invited to nominate a student enrolled in a BFA or a MFA program in British Columbia. Shortlisted students have their work exhibited as part of the Lind Prize exhibition, and the winner is awarded $5,000

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toward the production of a new work to be displayed at the future Polygon Gallery. This year’s jury comprises artist Stan Douglas and curators Grant Arnold (Vancouver Art Gallery) and Helga Pakasaar (Presentation House Gallery). The Philip B. Lind Emerging Artist Prize is made possible through a generous donation from Rogers Communications to honour Phil Lind’s commitment to the company over forty years. Venue is not wheelchair accessible.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 8 – MAY 6 OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 8, 2–4 PM Equinox Gallery 525 Great Northern Way Vancouver

Modern Colour

Gordon Smith: Photo Works

Marten Elder: New Works

Gordon Smith

Marten Elder

Gordon Smith is a key figure in contemporary Canadian art. Since the 1950s, he has worked continuously to expand the dialogue between abstraction and representation while always pushing the traditional limits of painting. More recently, inspired by visual elements in his studio, Smith has taken photographic imagery and reworked the surface using acrylic paint and collaged elements. In relation to the images that lie beneath (or on top of, depending on the piece), these painted gestures generate a host of meaningful associations between the lyricism of abstraction and the reality of representation.

Marten Elder’s photographs offer a reconsideration of the way that images are captured in light of digital and technological developments. No longer satisfied by using the digital camera to replicate the look of colour film, which was in itself an attempt to approximate human vision, Elder uses the distinct characteristics of the digital camera to capture and process visual information in a new way. Working from the understanding that digital photography is more closely related to computers than traditional emulsion-based film processes, Elder’s photographs employ the conceptual idea of the camera and computer as a window through which images are seen, processed, and understood. Seen through the lens of digital photography and imaging, his practice works to reshape the relationship between photography, technology, and perceptual experience.

Fred Herzog Modern Colour presents a selection of new photographs by acclaimed street photographer Fred Herzog. Herzog has been taking street photographs in colour since 1953, creating an extensive body of early colour street photography unmatched elsewhere. In the words of photography critic David Campany: “Few other bodies of photography in the history of the medium have come close to the richness of Herzog’s extended city portrait.” Nearly all of Herzog’s work was produced using Kodachrome, a colour slide film notoriously difficult to work with in a spontaneous fashion. As a result, he remained virtually unknown as a photographer until 2005, when printing technology allowed him to make archival pigment prints that matched the exceptional colour and intensity of the original Kodachrome slides.


EXHIBITIONS

MARTEN ELDER PR 70, 2016 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT ON FIBRE-BASED PAPER 32” x 24” COURTESY OF EQUINOX GALLERY, VANCOUVER GORDON SMITH UNTITLED (5), 2012 ACRYLIC ON PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER 13” x 11.25” COURTESY OF EQUINOX GALLERY, VANCOUVER opposite page FRED HERZOG KFC, 1968 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT COURTESY OF EQUINOX GALLERY, VANCOUVER

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 9 – JUNE 25

The Fraser, Living River

MICHAEL BEDNAR HEART OF A TUG, 2016 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH opposite page VICTORIA KON

Michael Bednar

I : CONTACT 31, 2016 LASER PRINT ON MATTE PAPER 8” X 10”

CURATED BY

Nan Capogna OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 8, 8:30–10 PM Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate Richmond Michael Bednar’s photographic work The Fraser, Living River explores the historical and ecological significance of British Columbia’s longest river. Commencing documentation at the headwaters at the Continental Divide and continuing to the river’s terminus at the Pacific Ocean, Bednar examines this ecologically diverse river that flows through eleven of BC’s fourteen biogeoclimatic zones. Central to the project is Bednar’s framing of the Fraser as a working river. His images highlight its history and continued importance to First Nations communities and include the development of industries such as logging, shipping, fishing, and tourism. The City of Richmond, located on Lulu Island at the mouth of the Fraser River, is home to numerous industries presently lining its riverbanks. The Fraser, Living River is presented in partnership with Richmond Public Art and mounted on Richmond Art Gallery’s windows facing Minoru Boulevard.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 10 – JUNE 2

I, Volume 1 Victoria Kon

Based on Victoria Kon’s artist book I, which incorporates elements of photography and design, the exhibition I, Volume 1 features 8” x 10” photographs that also appear in the book.

CURATED BY

Tamla Mah OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 21, 3–6 pm Art Beatus (Vancouver) Consultancy Ltd. 108-808 Nelson St Vancouver

According to Kon, the photographs are informed by the form of the book itself. Each page has an evenly spaced set of eyes photographed from a single subject. To remove possible anthropological or racial connotations, each set of eyes was printed on nonsensical coloured pages, the bright hues of which also play against the banality of the white-space style of design. The

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concept was inspired by the artist’s fear of human interaction and eye contact. For the project, the photographer met the eyes of each subject mediated through the lens of a film camera. The resulting evidence is archived through the handmade artist’s book, where the personal experience of the artist is also made available. Published by the artist, the book is produced in conjunction with Publication Studios Vancouver and is available for viewing and purchase for the duration of the exhibition.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 21 – MAY 12

REBEKAH HO 16 CRANES, 2014

Sediment

FILM PHOTOGRAPHY 11” x 17''

Rebekah Ho CURATED BY

Whitney Brennan OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 21, 8–11 PM Gam Gallery 110 East Hastings St Vancouver Going through memories is a fragile and chaotic experience that can create meaning without questioning. This series of film photos explores personal moments and the rabbit hole of nostalgia. Moments of transience, contemplation, and reverie appear suspended, inviting only glimpses into intimate memories.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 21 – MAY 28

There, There Naveen Naqvi CURATED BY

Sirish Rao Alex Waber OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 21, 7–9 PM Remington Gallery 108 East Hastings St Vancouver

The work included in There, There moves back and forth between the artist’s two homes: her birthplace, Karachi, and her city of residence, Vancouver. All images were made in 120 mm and 35 mm film over the course of 2015 and 2016. Photographing in Vancouver is part of Naveen Naqvi’s day-to-day, as she tries to find a sense of belonging in this city. The images of Karachi were made on Naqvi’s last visit there, one made for a family emergency, after her mother was diagnosed with stage 4 cancer. It was an intense period of distress and insomnia, but also love. Between hospital visits and time with family, in an attempt to find control, she photographed.

The series’ title, There, There, expresses spatial and temporal distance, speaks of dreamscapes, and also does its work as a phrase of consolation. Like many people in today's world, the artist has experienced at different stages of her life movement from one place to another. With it has come the loss of relationships, objects, spaces, and, indeed, lives, as each move has resulted in the end of one life and the beginning of another.


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 22 – JUNE 17

opposite page NAVEEN NAQVI

Miss Solitude

UNTITLED, 2016 FROM THE SERIES THERE, THERE 35 MM FILM

Birthe Piontek

8” x 10” BIRTHE PIONTEK MISS SOLITUDE (INSTALLATION SHOT), 2017

CURATED BY

FROM THE SERIES MISS SOLITUDE

Kimberly Phillips OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 21, 7 PM Access Gallery 222 East Georgia St Vancouver The German-born, Vancouver-based artist Birthe Piontek has gained attention in recent years for her evocative photographic still life and portraiture, which often cleverly challenges our assumptions about intimacy, subjectivity, and mortality. Found photographs and objects have long played an important role in Piontek’s work, but until recently, their arrangement has always resulted in a photographed image. The solo exhibition Miss Solitude marks a decisive shift in the artist’s practice, presenting viewers with a series of new work comprised entirely of assemblages and installations. Through manipulations of vintage prints, embellished household objects, hair, textiles, and footwear, Piontek considers the photograph as fetish and talisman, and investigates its role as assistive device in both the fabrication and disavowal of femininity, memory, and desire.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 22 – MAY 27

Under Vancouver 1972–1982 Greg Girard OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 22, 2–4 PM Monte Clark Gallery 105-525 Great Northern Way Vancouver To coincide with the launch of Greg Girard’s new book Under Vancouver 1972–1982, published by the Magenta Foundation, Monte Clark Gallery presents an exhibition of photographs featured in the book. Greg Girard’s photographs of Vancouver from the 1970s and early 1980s show us the city’s

final days as a port town at the end of the railway line. Soon after Vancouver began to be noticed by the wider world (Expo 86 is generally agreed on as the pivotal moment), the city began refashioning itself as an urban resort on nature’s doorstep and attracting attention as a destination for real estate investment. At that time, long before post-9/11 security concerns sealed off the working waterfront from the city, many of Vancouver’s downtown and east side streets ended at the waterfront, an area filled with commercial fishing docks, cargo terminals, and bars and cafés for waterfront workers and sailors. Pawn-shop windows downtown displayed outboard motors, chainsaws, and fishing gear. Wandering these streets and living in cheap hotels, Girard photographed the workaday (and night) world of the city where he grew up.

GREG GIRARD EMPTY SIGN, 1982 ARCHIVAL PIGMENT PRINT 28” x 38” COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MONTE CLARK GALLERY opposite page CAROL SAWYER I ATTEMPT FROM LOVE’S SICKNESS TO FLY, IN VAIN (DETAIL), 2017 HD VIDEO


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 22 – MAY 20

I attempt from love’s sickness to fly, in vain Carol Sawyer CURATED BY

Pantea Haghighi

I attempt from love’s sickness to fly, in vain is an exhibition of video and photographs based on a performance of the aria of the same title, written by the English baroque composer Henry Purcell. The work explores a number of seemingly opposite concepts: theatricality/realism, period/contemporary, fragment/whole, youth/age, health/sickness, and so on.

OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 22, 2–4 PM Republic Gallery 3rd Floor, 732 Richards St Vancouver

The video is set in a large ballroom with a proscenium arch stage at one end. A costumed, bewigged singer and viola di gamba player perform the aria, dance, rest, and perform the aria again—caught in a repeating loop complicated by the aria’s da capo structure, which could theoretically cycle endlessly.

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The visual language used to construct the video builds on the textual, musical, emotional, and metaphorical complexity of the aria and performance. Multiple channels of video are combined to make one panoramic image, resulting in distortions and repetitions in the architectural space, which contribute to a sense that both the physical and metaphorical spaces described are shifting and unstable. The artist gratefully acknowledges the BC Arts Council, the Canada Council for the Arts, and Richard Metzger at Inspired Cinema for their support of this project. Venue is not wheelchair accessible.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 29

Within This Space . . . Your Haunting: A Composition of Dissonant Memory Anise Makvandi OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 29, 9 sharp–11 PM Interurban Gallery 1 East Hastings St Vancouver So often we isolate the process from the medium, limiting our observation to a selected fragment of the whole. What if the medium and the process became interchangeable? Like a memory, the photographic print is just one part of the collective sum. Where, then, do we store this archive of existence? Our lived experiences can be recollected through immaterial impressions. The senses have the capability of producing visceral experiences by recalling a lived moment. What was once experienced through the tangibility of the present now lays dormant; a desire for what once was. But where do we locate this space of impressions, this gap of fleeting memories, this haunting space of dreams? We are the active vessels for the latent past—a past that can feel the remembering. While awake, we are an unfolding compilation of memory’s continuum.

ANISE MAKVANDI ONCE WE WERE, 2016 SCAN OF 35 MM NEGATIVE

This exhibition is an exploration of the architecture and processes of the darkroom, and how they bring to light the vulnerability of a developing photograph and the parallels it draws to the human condition. The memories we compose, bring to life, and recall are found in an intangible space.


FRIDAY APRIL 28TH

BEAUMONT STUDIOS - GRAND HALL 326 W 5TH AVE 6:30 7:00 8:30 10:00 TICKETS

DOORS OPEN DINNER (FOOD TRUCK EDITION) SLIDESHOW SOCIAL $35 AT EVENTBRITE PRESENTED BY SLIDELUCK VANCOUVER | CAPIC VANCOUVER | PART OF CAPTUREFEST 2017

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Open Exhibitions Exhibitions in the Open Program answered an open call for shows in diverse spaces across Greater Vancouver.

ON UNTIL MAY 15

The Errand and the Epiphany Jessie McNeil Burnaby Art Gallery Offsite McGill Public Library 4595 Albert St, Burnaby In her figurative street-scene collages, Jessie McNeil takes the perspective of the flâneuse—the keen-eyed observer, contemplating the ever-evolving nature of urban culture, signification, and memory. Featuring everyday studies of environment and wonders, the works reflect on how built spaces impact participation in public life. McNeil’s meticulous collage making, based on her photographs of city dwellers, recommunicates the light and texture found in the streets, capturing moments when the miraculous and fleeting is confused with, or transformed from, ubiquity.

ON UNTIL MAY 8

ON UNTIL FALL 2017

Cities in Flux

Picture Window

Carolina de la Cajiga

Emily Neufeld

RECEPTION

Saturday, April 8, 2–4 PM District Library Gallery, Main Library 1277 Lynn Valley Rd, North Vancouver Sometimes it feels as though every time you turn around, a new high-rise has sprung up. A skyline in constant flux. Cranes and construction workers dancing a carefully choreographed ballet. Honking and beeping signalling our “progress.” City planners are limited by deadlines, mountains, and money, but artists are free to do what developers can only dream of—move, reshape, and multiply buildings. Cities in Flux celebrates the people who carry the weight of expansion on their backs, juxtaposed with a complete disregard for reality in urban design.

The WALL 700 Hamilton St, Vancouver The outdoor installation Picture Window features two photos of a home taken before its demolition. Homes are repositories for our memories, and as they are renovated and changed, our memories of them are also overwritten. How well do our memories survive as we are continually displaced and our homes dismantled? The stripe painted throughout this image is a found pattern from the home’s kitchen. At the same time, it is the line of gaze from outside into a bedroom. From embodiment to habitation, the life of a home is both an extension of the body and a microcosm of society at large.

MARCH 29 – APRIL 4 ON UNTIL APRIL 30

Carrefour de la DiverCité (Crossroads of DiverCity) Denis Bouvier Pierre Grenier Le Centre culturel francophone de Vancouver 1551 W 7th Ave, Vancouver Crossroads of DiverCity comprises the work of two artists illustrating the changing dynamics of Vancouver’s streets and the incredible changes happening in the streets of Syria. Denis Bouvier’s photos demonstrate how documentary photography captures the metamorphosis of Vancouver since 2010, while Pierre Grenier’s 2009 series presents Syria and its children before the civil war.

The Canadians Carlos M. Bonmatí OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, March 30, 7–10 PM Beaumont Studios and Gallery 316 W 5th Ave, Vancouver For a European recently arrived to the city, as the artist is, Vancouver is a rich cultural mix, at times seeming like most American cosmopolitan cities, while at others feeling like the most relaxed natural place. Stopping in the middle of this complex city can make one realize how the situations, places, and people interact in unique and dazzling ways to transform into something entirely common.


EXHIBITIONS

clockwise from top left JESSIE MCNEIL

CAROLINA DE LA CAJIGA

BUS STOP (TARTU) II, 2016

BLUE GREEN WORKER, 2014

MIXED MEDIA COLLAGE ON PAPER

ARCHIVAL PAPER (FACEMOUNTED, MANIPLUATED)

12.5” x 13” x 0.25”

30” x 30”

CARLOS M. BONMATI

EMILY NEUFELD

THE CANADIANS 05, 2016

PICTURE WINDOW, 2016

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH

BILLBOARD

17" x 11"

30’ x 40’

PIERRE GRENIER DAMASCUS, SYRIA, 2009 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPH

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

clockwise from top left JUDI ANGEL

GOYA NGAN AND EVE MACGREGOR

KENNEDY CENTRE, WASHINGTON D.C., 2014

STILL LIFE, 2016

PHOTO MOUNTED ON ALUMINUM DIBOND

ARCHIVAL INKJET 19” x 26”

ALEX WABER FAILPOINT 15, 2015 C-PRINT, 22” x 33” BARBARA COLE FALLING THROUGH TIME, 2016 FROM THE SERIES FALLING THROUGH TIME C-PRINT FACE-MOUNTED TO PLEXIGLAS 48” x 48”

CHRISTOPHER JAMES GUY FLOW I, 2011


EXHIBITIONS

MARCH 30 – APRIL 30

APRIL 1 – 30

APRIL 1 – 15

Eye Lines

photo / poem / poem / photo

Falling through Time

Judi Angel

Eve MacGregor Goya Ngan

Barbara Cole

OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, March 30, 7–9 PM Sidney and Gertrude Zack Gallery 950 W 41st Ave, Vancouver A leading line influences and directs the viewer’s gaze through the photograph, building a narrative while taking the imagination on a journey. Bold or implied, direct or curved, the leading line invites us to ask: Where are we? Where are we going? How do we get there? Who or what exists beyond this frame? The world is awash in individual stories that become framed into uncomplicated images, with a line to guide the eye.

MARCH 30 – APRIL 27

OPENING RECEPTION OPENING RECEPTION

Sunday, April 2, 3–5 PM Artistry Coffee Shop 2959 W 4th Ave, Vancouver photo / poem / poem / photo is an ongoing collaborative dialogue between photographer Goya Ngan and poet Eve MacGregor. Similar to a drawn-out game of telephone, the project explores how the starting point for a hand-off-style collaboration affects the movement of a project. In two interwoven streams, one initiated by a poem and one by a photo, the artists create and then respond to one another on a weekly basis. The project is an experiment in interdisciplinary communication, with the viewer given a private glance into the conversation.

Double Exposure: Photography // Poetry

Saturday, April 1, 2–4 PM Bau-Xi Gallery 3045 Granville St, Vancouver Barbara Cole’s latest series, Falling through Time, is a complex arrangement of past and present. The project began twenty years ago, when, while travelling, the artist became enamored with the whimsical spaces of England’s gardens. Decades later, the artist returned to her English garden series, using it as background to her captivating underwater portraits. The result is a visual study of time in which personal and mythical histories—refracted through the water’s surface—layer to create dynamic, ethereal scenes with an editorial edge.

APRIL 1 – 24 APRIL 1 – 30

Group Exhibition

Failpoint

OPENING RECEPTION

Alex Waber

Thursday, March 30, 7–9 PM Turnbull Gallery South Surrey Arts Centre 14601 20th Ave, Surrey

Arts Umbrella (Surrey) N116-15850 26th Ave, Surrey

Abstracts of Nature Christopher James Guy

As an interdisciplinary platform, Double Exposure celebrates and explores the potential synergy between two enduring art forms—photography and poetry—and generates opportunities for the connection and growth of talented community-based artists and writers. Double Exposure includes a juried photography exhibition, poetry and photo challenges, a reading by poet Cecily Nicholson, and an award ceremony on the last day.

Inspired by commercial photography, surveillance technologies, and experimental sound performance, Alex Waber’s Failpoint project examines the camera’s ability to see. Through strategic underexposure, the artist “fails” at taking a photograph and instead recovers the image in post-production. The resulting picture is made of digital noise, in which new patterns and textures emerge. Some “fail points” are unrecognizable, others take on an almost vintage aesthetic, and both ultimately reduce the world to a unique mood and texture.

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Cartems Donuterie 534 W Pender St., Vancouver Abstracts of Nature is a graphic exploration into the endless wonders of the natural world. With a penchant for subtle and beautiful imagery, Christopher James Guy takes the viewer on a journey through familiar subject matter while simultaneously creating what he refers to as “perceptive distortion.” The resulting works are often mistakenly assumed to be composited from multiple images. This meditative collection is intended to serve as a reminder to explore the natural world with an expanded awareness, in awe of light itself.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 1 – 30

APRIL 1 – 15

APRIL 1 – 27

The Best of BC: Professional Photographers of Canada Juried Salon

The Eye of Rob Straight

Revelations

Rob Straight

Tomas Jirku

Group Exhibition

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 6–10 PM Horizon Gallery Rear-295 E 2nd Ave, Vancouver

Saturday, April 1, 6 PM Interurban Gallery 1 E Hastings St, Vancouver

A selection from the life's work of photographer Rob Straight, from the 1970s to today.

Light is energy. We take for granted that our reality exists only in visible light, yet just beyond that spectrum is infrared, a realm where life is particularly active. There is an inexplicable energy that radiates from even the harshest environments where life is able to cling. Tomas Jirku uses an infraredsensitive camera to capture this realm and to present it in context with visible light. The striking disparity in energy just outside human perception hints at how many invisible processes there may be if we explore deeper.

Saturday, April 1, 3–7 PM Creative Coworkers B1-343 Railway St, Vancouver How do professional photographers already at the top of their game push themselves even higher? One thing BC members of the Professional Photographers of Canada do each year is compete. The Best of BC exhibition features the most creative, most cutting-edge, and finest technically executed photographs from the annual Image Competition. From architecture and portraiture to fine art, this exhibition showcases the passion and diverse talents of PPOC-BC members.

APRIL 1 – 28

APRIL 1 – MAY 14

Man and His World Brian C. Cyr Rob Gilbert Brendan Meadows Scott Pownall OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 6, 7–10 PM Ice Box Gallery 321 Railway St, Vancouver

wide open Group Exhibition

Four photographers offer their interpretations of the world they inhabit—its spirituality, beauty, and power.

APRIL 1 – 17

Celebrating 15 Years of Care in Pictures & Words Rennie Brown Clive Camm

OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 7–10 PM Goldmoss Satellite 1338 Franklin St, Vancouver Six contemporary art photographers converge for wide open, an exhibition of diverse media, experience, and subject matter. Each artist has produced new works reflecting the exhibition title.

OPENING RECEPTION

APRIL 1 – 28

Out of Studio

Thursday, April 6, 6–8 PM Jim Pattison Pavilion, VGH 899 W 12th Ave, Vancouver

Torrie Groening Listel Hotel 1300 Robson St, Vancouver Staged still life compositions of travel studios, real and fabricated, use the artist’s tools and artworks as props, inviting the viewer to step into the artist's view: a setting to prepare for contemplation and to rise to the occasion of work. Presented in partnership with Art Rental & Sales at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

Health care is about people. Vancouver Coastal Health is celebrating fifteen years of progress, passion, and patient-centred care by featuring some of the incredible health professionals who have been with the organization since the beginning. Photographers Clive Camm and Rennie Brown have creatively captured twenty-four portraits of these “humans of health care”—from surgeons to secretaries—in their working environments. Each behind-the-scenes photo is accompanied by a short story.


EXHIBITIONS

clockwise ­from top left GRANT WITHERS

TORRIE GROENING

WELL SEASONED, 2016

THE EXPANSIVIST'S VIEW (WEST VANCOUVER), 2014

IN THE BEST OF BC SCOTT POWNALL LITAL MAROM

CEREMONIAL PREPARATION, 2014

SILENCE, 2016 IN wide open

ROB STRAIGHT WINDRIDGE KIDS, 1974

TOMAS JIRKU MOUNT MATIER REVELATION, 2016

RENNIE BROWN TELMA, 2016

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At Beau Photo, we’ve seen many changes over the years, but our commitment to all things photographic continues.

rGratification P Retro 40 oj e c t Instavnt .

An Exhibition of Instant Images April 4th to May 7th, 2017 Opening Reception: April 5th, 2017. Location: Science World - Aurizon Atrium

Cameras • Film • Digital Lighting • Rentals • Advice Beau Photo Supplies 1520 W. 6th Ave Vancouver, BC 604 734 7771

Beau Photo is a local independent shop, providing personalized service that can’t be found online. Come by or give us a call, we can help you out.

Open late on Thursdays until 7pm! www.beauphoto.com

beau1520 Beau Photo @beauphotostore


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

clockwise ­from top left CHRISTINE GERMANO

S. J. THOMPSON

AFTERMATH, 2016

POINT ELLICE BRIDGE DISASTER, VICTORIA, BC, 1896

PHOTOGRAPH

SILVER GELATIN PRINT

40” x 28”

7.25” x 9” IN EARLY VIEWS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

BEN OWENS BOUNDARY, 2016

THOMAS EIGEL BELU 0035130 IE3482, 2011

JOHN DEAN

LAMBDA PRINT UNDER ACRYLIC

TRIBECA, NYC, II, 2015

IN GERMAN HAUS

PHOTOGRAPH 36” x 22.5”

DAVID BARBOUR UNTITLED, 2016


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 1 – 30

APRIL 1 – 28

APRIL 1 – 29

Wonder LAND

Tuesday in New York

The Observer Effect

Christine Germano

John Dean

David Barbour James Clare Scott MacEachern

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

Sunday, April 2, 4–6 PM Little Mountain Gallery 195 E 26th Ave, Vancouver

Saturday, April 1, 2 PM Masters Gallery 2245 Granville St, Vancouver

Wonder LAND is a photography project that reflects the effects of climate change in the Arctic and Small Island Developing States. These geographically distant societies share characteristics of vulnerability and resilience and are among the first to feel the effects of climate change. The project illustrates the ethical dimension of climate change and also shows that the people of these regions are not helpless victims but have a strong desire to see their cultures and communities survive and thrive.

Tuesday in New York is a search for subject matter that simultaneously floats between absolute realism and the fringes of abstraction. For this series, John Dean analyzes fire escapes, giving definition to foreground and background in a compression of details and texture that assemble into facades and divide into repetitions. He composes the picture plane into a limited set of motifs, including metal staircases and their partnered shadows, allowing the barest evidence to remind the viewer that these are dwellings where people live in a major city.

OPENING RECEPTION

Monday, April 3, 5:30 PM Moat Gallery, Main Branch VPL 350 W Georgia St, Vancouver Quantum theory has demonstrated that the universe (and everything in it) is characterized only by probabilities that can be interpreted as purely subjective—that is, they refer to what we observe. The act of observing denotes a consciousness unique to each observer, regardless of whether that observer is (in this case) an artist, the subject (animate or inanimate) being observed, or a viewer in a gallery. Three photographers explore the concept of the observer effect as it applies to their work.

APRIL 1 – 28

German Haus: Kunstwerk und Fotografie / Art and Photography

APRIL 1 – 28

Early Views of British Columbia: 1870–1900

Athlete. Exposed.

Group Exhibition

Ben Owens

APRIL 1 – 6

Group Exhibition OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, March 30, 6–8 PM LUMAS Gallery 305 Water St, Vancouver Germany has a long and distinguished tradition in the visual arts and continues to develop as a cultural centre for contemporary and innovative photographic art. Founded in Berlin, LUMAS Gallery has provided a platform to celebrate photography as a fine art for over ten years, with German artists at the forefront of the portfolio. German Haus presents a selection of these artists as ambassadors of the LUMAS portfolio and representatives of the influence of German artists on the development of photography as a fine art.

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 2 PM Masters Gallery 2245 Granville St, Vancouver

Saturday, April 1, 3–6 PM The Playground 434 Columbia St, Vancouver

Early Views of British Columbia: 1870–1900 comprises historical photographs of British Columbia, focusing on both the urbanization of major settlements such as Victoria and Vancouver and the landscape of villages throughout the province. The exhibition provides a snapshot of early BC through its architecture and infrastructure. Photographers include S. J. Thompson, William Notman, Charles Macmunn, Richard Maynard, Emily Ferryman, and Bailey & Neelands.

Inspired by Giorgio Armani’s recent Emotions of the Athletic Body photographic exhibition, Athlete. Exposed. is a unique portrait collection exploring and celebrating the athletic condition beyond the superficial idea of the human physique.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 1 – 16

APRIL 1 – 18

APRIL 4 – MAY 25

Shared Approach

Inspiring Preservation: An Alternate Perspective

A timeless silence

Group Exhibition

Nancy Silva Grifé Desirée Patterson

OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 8, 5 PM Remington Gallery 108 E Hastings St, Vancouver Arts Umbrella and Remington Gallery come together again for a group exhibition that involves both mentor and student. Shared Approach examines how format and space affect the intentions of the photographer. Using combined experiences, the artists and students constructed an experiential environment exploring the relationships between individuals, materials, and processes. The resulting exhibition asks the viewer to reflect, listen, and sit with the perspectives of our youth in finding their own voices.

APRIL 1 – 3

OPENING RECEPTION OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 12–5 PM Van Dop Gallery 421 Richmond St, New West

Wednesday, April 5, 7 PM Main Street Brewing 261 E 7th Ave, Vancouver

Inspiring Preservation communicates humanity's reliance on and the degradation of our environment through lens-based, digitally collaged compositions. The exhibition features work from multiple series exploring varying perspectives of industrialized environments and figurative embodiment.

A timeless silence brings the spectator into a world of ancestral landscapes. The exhibition comprises a series of pre-Columbian urban complexes photographed in Mexico over the past seven years. Having visited these places since a young age, the artist’s work portrays her spatial experiences, revealing a subtle convergence of past and present.

APRIL 2 – 30

APRIL 4 – 25

Street Images of the American Public

Project Instant V4.0: RetroGratification

Sarah Stonehocker

Group Exhibition

Space in Bird Dan Jackson OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 1, 7 PM Studio 730 730 Richards St, Vancouver Dan Jackson's ninth solo exhibition offers a frank and humorous look at the role photography plays in abstract art. After observing the behaviour of finches, Jackson began to explore how colours interact, swoop, and flit about in the same manner. This personal project became an exploration of how photographers use colour and abstraction and whether or not a subject is integral to the medium.

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

Sunday, April 9, 8 PM Benny’s Café 2505 W Broadway, Vancouver

Wednesday, April 5, 6–8 PM Science World at Telus World of Science 1455 Quebec St, Vancouver

This black-and-white series was taken in Las Vegas on November 7, 2016—one day prior to the Trump-Clinton election.

Since its introduction in 1948, instant film has brought convenience to the world of photography. Today, people are fascinated with all things retro, evidenced in technology that focuses on making things appear as though from an earlier time. RetroGratification illustrates the importance and meaning of instant photography—regardless of the era, instant photos manage to feel authentically retro. What better conduit to the warm fuzzy feeling of nostalgia than using instant film to record present moments. The exhibition’s range of subject matter emphasizes the diversity of photographers using instant film today.

APRIL 2 – JUNE 30

Exchanging Glances: Images of 2 Cultures Brian Noppè Miguel Schmitt Queen Elizabeth Theatre 605 Hamilton St, Vancouver Two artists exchange glances between their cities: Florianópolis, Brazil, and Vancouver, Canada. Providing insight into these nations, the exhibition also explores the timeless principle of interpretation by astonishment.


EXHIBITIONS

clockwise from top left DESIRÉE PATTERSON

DAN JACKSON

ENRACINE III, 2016

GLOBAL FINCH, 2016

SARAH STONEHOCKER

MIGUEL SCHMITT

ELECTION #5, 2016

2015

NANCY SILVA GRIFÉ MITLA, 2015

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

clockwise ­from top left STEVE DYNIE

RUILAN KING

ZOOM, 2017

UNTITLED, 2016

INKJET PRINT MOUNTED TO ALUMINUM

IN IN CIRCULATION

18” x 36” RODRIGO SARRAT-CAVE KIKU HAWKES

RIVERSIDE, 2016

404 HEATLEY STREET, 1982–2015, 2016

DIGITAL PRINT

PHOTOGRAPHY (INSTALLATION DETAIL)

30” x 40”

10" x 26" MIKE MCNEELEY ADINA SHORE

DIGNITY, 2016

MICHAEL EDMOND CROCKER / CARVER, 2017

IN HOPE IN SHADOWS

ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINT 37” x 17” IN EVERYONE HAS A STORY


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 5 – 16

APRIL 7 – MAY 12

APRIL 8 – 22

Unforgiving Surf

Hope in Shadows: Portraits of Our Community

Full Spectrum

Steve Dynie Group Exhibition OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 8, 7–11 PM Beaumont Studios and Gallery 316 W 5th Ave, Vancouver The forces of nature can be rough, relentless—and humbling. Yet for a surfer, a breaking wave can be a fully immersive, quasi-religious experience. Unforgiving Surf explores that extended moment when a surfer fuses with a wave and takes on a more iconic stature. Catching a big wave at the wrong moment can slam a surfer down into the blackest depths. But catching it at the right moment can lead to glory. Steve Dynie’s photographs capture surfers who are hanging on, just barely, to that glorious edge.

OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 7, 7 PM HiVE: Sweet Social Impact 210-128 W Hastings St, Vancouver Every year, Megaphone magazine and Hope in Shadows calendars are sold by about 150 people, who are experiencing poverty or homelessness. The sales provide meaningful employment and connections to different communities. The images in this exhibition were selected from Megaphone’s fourteenth annual calendar photography contest, open to the hardworking vendors located in Vancouver and Victoria. Framed prints are available for sale, with all proceeds going to support the incredible work Megaphone does.

APRIL 7 – 28

Spin

APRIL 7 – 28

Ross den Otter Kiku Hawkes

Group Exhibition

Michael Agrios Rod Sarrat-Cave Ron Smid Linda Vermeulen OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 8, 2–4 PM Petley Jones Gallery 1554 W 6th Ave, Vancouver Full Spectrum delves into the versatility of four contemporary photographers and their unique approaches to their medium.

APRIL 8 – MAY 13

Everyone Has a Story Group Exhibition OPENING RECEPTION

Saturday, April 8, 7–10 PM Stir Coffee House 101-5085 48th Ave, Delta

In Circulation

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 7, 6–9 PM AMP Studios 800 Keefer St, Vancouver

Thursday, April 6, 6–8 PM School for the Contemporary Arts, SFU 149 W Hastings St, Vancouver

For some decades, Ross den Otter and Kiku Hawkes have been documenting Strathcona’s architecture. This collaborative installation integrates their older images with current ones, siting the area’s ethnically and economically diverse past within the context of its current iteration. Within a landscape of local, found materials, photographs rotate at varying speeds, subtly incorporating notions of time and space. Images become a sculptural element.

In Circulation proposes the university as a public site for the deconstruction and reconstruction of knowledge. Post-secondary study results in the development of new modes of seeing and relating to one another, and as we question our modes of thinking and perception, we find new modes of organization and production. In Circulation includes photographic interventions throughout the School for the Contemporary Arts. This arrangement is one of multiple perspectives that expose the participating artists’ movement through time, the university, and their (un)shared experiences therein.

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In today’s world, we move at warp speed. Our lives are busier, moving more quickly, and constantly stimulated by technology. Past the chaos, within each person lies a story. Moments, memories, and events that make us human. We need to slow down, ask questions, and take the time to listen. Each conversation makes us a little richer as human beings. The camera is a tool to help tell a story, to capture a moment and encourage us to stay a while, to talk, and to listen.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 12 – 23

APRIL 15 – MAY 6

APRIL 18 – MAY 13

The Lost Vancouver: An Art Deco Tour

Allegory

Last Night

Kenneth Gillespie Julie Prescott

Robert Earnest

Simon Desrochers Mathieu Persan

OPENING RECEPTION OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

Tuesday, April 11, 6:30–11 PM Space 552 Clark Dr, Vancouver This exhibition around art deco architecture and design in Vancouver draws a parallel between the work of British Columbian photographer Simon Desrochers and its interpretation by Parisian illustrator Mathieu Persan. The Lost Vancouver also raises questions about the place and the future of the arts, and their necessity in the development of Vancouver.

Thursday, April 13, 7 PM Deer Lake Gallery 6584 Deer Lake Ave, Burnaby Allegory has been used widely throughout history in all forms of art, largely because it illustrates complex ideas and concepts in ways that are comprehensible or striking to its viewers, readers, or listeners. The two artists of Allegory have a commonality in how they establish a link between a landscape’s reality and its hidden meaning, or allegory, as imagined by its conceiver. However, each artist challenges the subject from a completely different perspective.

Thursday, April 20, 6–8 PM Pendulum Gallery, HSBC Building 885 W Georgia St, Vancouver In 2012, a car accident interrupted the working life of professional photographer Robert Earnest and led to an extended period of late night wanderings for rehabilitation. These wanderings—mostly in the early dawn, after nighttime revelers, but before early morning workers—led to a series of evocative photographs of urban and urban-edge spaces. Suffused with theatricality, these images reflect an in-between time, neither day nor night, in which buildings, objects, and light take on anthropomorphic qualities in the absence of human activity.

APRIL 13 – 27

I will not shoot any more Polaroid pictures

Crystalline

Chris Gallagher

Robert Charles

OPENING RECEPTION

OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 13, 8–10 PM Artform Gallery 1885 Clark Dr, Vancouver

Thursday, April 20, 7–10 PM Beaumont Studios and Gallery 316 W 5th Ave, Vancouver

The Polaroid pictures in this exhibition were altered shortly after they were taken based on what they depict; they have been shot, sewn, sawed, crushed, and burned. Asking what happens if one interacts physically rather than purely virtually with an image, this literal trompe l’oeil strategy seems to confirm that a photograph is always about something rather than being something. The artist has returned these altered Polaroid objects to the virtual through creating inkjet prints on canvas.

Everything with a perfect echoing silence buried under a crisp sheet of bright white. Shimmering, sparkling crystalline, reflecting the sunlight, almost blinding . . . and the bitter bite of winter air slicing through your every breath. Robert Charles is always looking to catch an out-of-the-ordinary perspective or angle to express his interpretation of the world, fuelled by a need to find the uncommon in the everyday. The artist’s ability to create dramatic compositions using natural light combined with negative space makes each scene uniquely intimate and dramatic, throwing the typical restrictive rules of photographic composition to the wind.

APRIL 18 – 30 APRIL 20 – 24

Alcoves Brendan Meadows OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, April 20, 7–11 PM Salt Studio 110-950 Powell St, Vancouver Alcoves, an exhibition of black-and-white photographs by Brendan Meadows, presents images from recent travels to Iceland, focusing on landscapes in remote regions of the country marked by natural and human endeavour. The final artworks are realized as single and diptych gold-toned lith prints produced by Bob Carnie in Toronto.


EXHIBITIONS

clockwise ­from top left ROBERT EARNEST

BRENDAN MEADOWS

ALMA 08/09/12, 2013

UNTITLED (DETTIFOSS #4), 2016

C-PRINT

GOLD-TONED LITH PRINT 20” x 20”

KENNETH GILLESPIE PILING PATTERNS, 2015

CHRIS GALLAGHER I WILL NOT SHOOT ANYMORE POLAROID PICTURES, 2016

ROBERT CHARLES

INKJET ON CANVAS

FLOE EDGE, 2012

42.1” x 50”

FINE ART ARCHIVAL PAPER 7" x 11"

SIMON DES ROCHERS CITY HALL, 2016

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

clockwise ­from top left HIVES FOR HUMANITY

MICKEY MEADS

INSTAGRAM POST

ALTER, 2016

IN SOCIAL STORIES

ARCHIVAL INKJET 20” x 30”

SEAN ALWARD CLINKER, 2016

ALINA SENCHENKO

CYANOTYPE, CLAY AND ACRYLIC RESIN ON CANVAS

CHERKASSKY 4, 2016

18.5” x 24”

35 MM FILM 4” x 6”

RENA DEL PIEVE GOBBI TWO HANDS ON PINK, 2016

RYAN WALKER

PHOTO TRANSFER ON SILK

CALIFORNIA DREAM, 2014

16” x 20” IN PALIMPTEXTS


EXHIBITIONS

APRIL 21 – 23 & 27 – 30

APRIL 21 – 23

APRIL 26 – 30

Palimptexts: Invisibilization and Acts of Surfacing

Social Stories: Exploring Storytelling, Documentary and Social Innovation

Ryan Walker for Air Canada enRoute

Group Exhibition

Ryan Walker Group Exhibition

OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 21, 7 PM The ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St, Vancouver Palimptexts presents aspects of our culture that are unacknowledged and invisibilized. Rena del Pieve Gobbi transfers sensual gestures to silk to create photographs that are metaphors for healing from sexual trauma. Utilizing multimedia, Karen Moe and Michael Maclean address the complicity between violence waged against the Mexican people and drug consumption in postindustrial nations. Printing onto clothing and domestic textiles, Bobbi Sue Smith documents the violence of unacknowledged experiences at Vancouver’s margins. Janet Sadel combines photography and text depicting the convoluted messages of our media-saturated environment.

APRIL 21 – 28

What It Could Have Been

OPENING RECEPTION OPENING RECEPTION

Friday, April 21, 6:30–9 PM Yukon Studio 204-2075 Yukon St, Vancouver Photography produced and shared using mobile devices has become a prevalent force for telling stories. Social Stories explores how groups within Vancouver use social media to engage with both their communities and the wider city community whose support they need to maintain, as well as how this form of image making and storytelling acts in the documentary tradition.

Wednesday, April 26, 6–9 PM Thisopenspace: The Playground 434 Columbia St, Vancouver Magenta Foundation and Air Canada enRoute Magazine present a specially commissioned series by Toronto-based photographer Ryan Walker. Hosted by thisopenspace

APRIL 27 – MAY 27

Liquid Mountains Sean Alward

APRIL 25 – MAY 5

OPENING RECEPTION

Spiritual Pilgrimage

Thursday, April 27, 7–10 PM Wil Aballe Art Projects 688 E Hastings St, Vancouver

Roshanak Amini Sylvana dAngelo Ryan Ming Alina Senchenko

Mickey Meads

OPENING RECEPTION

Buckerfields 240 Northern St, Vancouver

Tuesday, April 25, 7–10 PM VABF Studio 2-236 E Pender St, Vancouver

Mickey Meads’s practice has evolved from printmaking and analogue photography to the use of digital media, with each medium demanding careful attention to processes that shape the final result. This set of steps provides the time and distance to meticulously control how those images may be perceived and interpreted. Through the artist’s imposition of colour and layering, a shallow perspective is created—directing the audience to view the work as a illusionistic abstraction, and not just a reference to a “sight,” ultimately disrupting assumptions about the “truth” of photography.

Spiritual Pilgrimage is a website and publication comprised of digital photography compiled through online submissions. A pilgrimage is typically a search of spiritual significance, often a journey to a location important to one’s faith. For this project, artists from Zine Club and Print Ready examine a metaphorical journey into their own rituals, daily lives, and spiritual experiences. Images are curated from a live folder and feed the project website, where photographs are randomly formatted for publication. On-demand prints are available at zineclub.org and images are on view at the VABF Studio.

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Liquid Mountains is a series of hybrid photograph-paintings investigating material metamorphosis and the fabrication of history along the Fraser River. The photographic components are cyanotypes (solar blueprints) from locations related to the transformation of the natural world into economic “resources,” including a former brick factory, an abandoned fur-trading post, and a salmon cannery. The painted components are composed of clay that comes from these same sites, referencing deep time and non-human agents of transformation.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017


Helen Wong

The Great White Heist: An Interview with Sandra Shields and David Campion The artist duo speak with Helen Wong about their history-excavating exhibition at the Reach

MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES HAVE THE POWER TO SHARE COLLECTIVE HISTORIES. They are capable of transporting viewers to the past, in turn shedding light on the present. This provides the opportunity—and the responsibility—for cultural institutions to deconstruct dominant narratives to challenge and question our existing cultural preconceptions. In a sociopolitical context, art has the power to address themes and topics in a way that surpasses what a history book can do. Sandra Shields and David Campion take on this challenge in their exhibition Grand Theft Terra Firma at the Reach Gallery Museum. They’ve repurposed the popular video game Grand Theft Auto and presented it in the form of a strategy guide, drawing on the game’s themes of violence, possession, and theft to bring attention to a history that involves all Canadians: the colonization of this land and its effect on Indigenous populations. “Gaming became an interesting vehicle in communicating this complicated and freighted history,” Shields says. “It is both playful and pointed in speaking about that history—a history that has been pushed in the closet.” Canada’s history of colonization and its continued impact on Indigenous communities is a subject that has often been treaded upon lightly and one addressed primarily by Indigenous artists. Shields is of Canadian descent and Campion was born in Britain, so how can they begin to approach the settlement of Indigenous land from colonial backgrounds?

opposite page DAVID CAMPION AND SANDRA SHIELDS THE PIONEER, 2014 INKJET PRINT 45” x 70”

Laura Schneider, director of the Reach, explains that the exhibition “challenges the notion that subject matter that pertains to Indigenous people is exclusively Indigenous terrain.” She goes on to argue that “we share a common history from the moment of contact, and our biggest hurdle [in the show] is to ask audiences to think differently about the collective responsibility that we, as Canadians, have in developing a critical understanding of this subject matter. This is Indigenous and settler history—it is everyone’s history.” This statement proves extremely powerful when asking viewers to acknowledge their own place in the narrative. Shields adds that the “very founding of our country involves a deliberate blindness. It makes it complicated to unpack the realities on the ground and the actual dynamics of this history. It is quite buried under an emotionally charged narrative.”

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

opposite page DAVID CAMPION AND SANDRA SHIELDS SURVEYOR’S CHAIN, 2015 INKJET PRINT 33” x 33”

Grand Theft Terra Firma involves a combination of photographic and literary work that turns the colonial narrative on its head. Campion and Shields’s exhibition reframes the history of the Fraser Valley as a heist masterminded from the desk of the Colonial Secretary in London. The works mimic screenshots from an imaginary game in order to represent key moments in history. “The typical colonial narrative is that Europeans brought civilization and progress to the wild and savage,” says Campion. “However, Grand Theft Terra Firma disrupts this by displaying a gang of racist thieves who stole the land from the Stó:lō community.” Ongoing collaboration and involvement from the Stó:lō community was integral in the creation of the exhibition. After moving to the Fraser Valley, Shields and Campion began to have regular contact with Stó:lō leaders and knowledge keepers, including them in conversations surrounding the relevance, form, intellectual framework, and execution of the exhibition. “The entire installation is a means of unsettling the historical narrative that has been in place for a hundred and fifty years. The game narrative plays with the moral fulcrum that we usually use in these kinds of narratives,” Shields says. Grand Theft Terra Firma attests to the power of storytelling, becoming a tool through which narratives can be consumed and understood. Through their challenge to traditional modes of representation, Shields and Campion effectively question the narrative of Canada’s disturbingly celebratory colonial history. “David and Sandra are creating an anchor practice and modelling a way in which settler artists can get involved in rethinking this history,” Schneider says. Similar to how parents drill into children’s heads to say “please and thank you” or how educators teach their students the ABCs, this shift in narrative must be reiterated again and again in order to actively subvert the dominant narrative. “It is absolutely necessary that these subjects are covered not just by Indigenous artists. It is our shared story, and in order to evolve our relationship, we need to work it out together,” Campion says. Grand Theft Terra Firma not only challenges the ways in which settler populations address colonialism, it also suggests how we can change our approach to our shared history with Indigenous communities to create a new collective identity—one that is open, inclusive, and welcoming. That is to say, we must acknowledge our common ground, a land we all stand on. Grand Theft Terra Firma is on until May 7, 2017, at the Reach Gallery Museum in Abbotsford. See page 61.


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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017


Benjamin Willems

How to Value a Book Object Poet and essayist Benjamin Willems considers our relationship to art in printed form

BECAUSE THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF BILLIONS OF PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS WORLD, let’s say that the preliminary value of a photo is very little. Someone might say that one photo has a greater base value than other photos because it was developed in a chemical bath, or because the photo’s creator “knows what they are doing.” But I’d say no, that’s not true. There have been many photos developed by hand, and dipping photos in wet stuff can be more passionless than documenting the neighbourhood cat with your iPhone. There is this catalogue called Western Blue Rampage that contains photodocumentation of a sculpture with the same name by the Vancouver artist Carole Itter. It is photocopied pages and pasted-in notes held together in a duotang, which I found one time hidden in the archives of the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver. More “literal” documentation of the sculpture exists online, but it is less insightful and less beautiful than this copy of a copy of a photocopy. The handwritten notes are fun and forlorn. There is value in the lack of image clarity and the lack of typographical clarity and the lack of general detail. There is a scrappiness to the sculpture being documented, and a matching scrappiness to how the occasional researcher, twenty-six years later, understands the sculpture. The creator chose the publication medium carefully, anticipating that nothing would be lost in translation. It’s a good thing that we don’t actually evaluate the meaninglessness of the photos that we consume. We would be so much more tired, for there are so many photos. My professional, passionate photographer friends create some of the most vacuous photos I have ever seen. You have seen these photos, too. Your Instagram feed features a lot of smiling people that give you very little to think about. @yourfriend kicking sand at @yourfriendsfriend at dusk. A guy playing some guitar in front of ten thousand people. Et cetera. When I am face down in an artist publication like Western Blue Rampage, or your own favourite photo book, the one that only exists one hundred or one thousand times on this earth, its contents are the same amount of scarce that your friends’ Instagram photos are; they might be seen by one hundred or one thousand people over time. Each photo is of so little value to most other people, who have so many other photos to view.

ARTIST'S BOOK PUBLISHED TO ACCOMPANY CAROLE ITTER’S EXHIBITION WESTERN BLUE RAMPAGE AT THE CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY, VANCOUVER, IN 1990

With this knowledge floating somewhere above the both of us, the publication’s creator confronts me. They produced a book object for me specifically, at least as long as I am holding it. I am indebted to this creator, who considered me interesting and wanted to show me something that was worthy of so much of their attention. They ask carefully for my thoughtfulness and approval.

127


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Thurs Sept 28 Opening Night Party

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Events Vancouver Photo Book Fair 130 Capture Speaker Series 132 Films 134 Talks 134 Tours 137 Workshops 138 Community 141


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

APRIL 21 – 23

Vancouver Photo Book Fair MEMBERS PREVIEW*

Friday, April 21, 7–10 PM HOURS

Saturday, April 22, 11 AM–6 PM Sunday, April 23, 11 AM–6 PM Western Front 303 East 8th Ave Vancouver Free and open to the public The Vancouver Photo Book Fair surveys one of photography’s earliest forms of dissemination—the photo book—demonstrating how this vital form continues to evolve, push the conventions of artists’ books, and carry photography into new contexts. Free and open to the public, the Vancouver Photo Book Fair is Vancouver’s first art book fair dedicated to artists whose bookmaking practices incorporate or intersect with photography and lens-based art. The multi-day event encompasses an engaging program and a variety of local and international artists, collectives, and publishers. The Vancouver Photo Book Fair is organized in partnership with the Vancouver Art Book Fair, the longest-running international art book fair in Canada, which takes place every October at the Vancouver Art Gallery.

*The Members' Preview is for Members of Capture, Vancouver Art Book Fair, and the Western Front. Capture memberships will be available at the door for $10, or guests may purchase both Capture and VABF memberships for $20 (a savings of $10).

EXHIBITORS Barbara Strigel is a Vancouver-based photographer and book artist. She produces one-of-a-kind, hand-constructed books, as well as editioned books that are explorations of how we experience place. Circular Script is a Vancouver-based artist collective that publishes printed matter and photo-based books. With varying individual practices, members produce narrative and conceptual projects that explore current issues as well as personal and experimental experiences. David Crompton is a visual artist whose work has been screened and exhibited internationally. He has published two photography-based artist’s books, Where I’m From (2013) and Common (2014), and has additional work forthcoming in 2017. Douglas Williams’s publications create narrative in light, shadow, and form. Photography integrates his studies and interests in art, language, architecture, theatre, wilderness, and travel.

Geist is the Canadian magazine of ideas and culture with a focus on fresh interactions between words and images. It publishes photo essays, street photography, vernacular photography, and other forms. Gerri York’s photographic, portfolio publications are recreations of archival print postcards from the 1940s, layered with photograms to evoke a spectral presence. Greystone Books is a publisher of fine nonfiction books, pairing striking photography with stories about nature and the environment, travel and adventure, current issues, sports, and personal passions.

PHOTO: HIKARU HAYASHI


EVENTS

Hotam Press publishes Hotam and Poser, two artist’s book series using the magazine format. Each book is a self-contained project exploring ideas and forms, produced by the artist Ho Tam.

Tenant Books is an independent publisher that creates limitededition books, camera manuals, and objects focusing on the media of 35 mm point-and-shoot photography.

Jaz Halloran is a Vancouver-based graphic designer who creates identities, websites, artists’ books, magazines, zines, and print ephemera. His projects explore image-making, identity, and communication within visual culture.

Trevor Van den Eijnden is a visual artist who works in photography and the photographic through objects, images, and bookworks. His work focuses on light and aesthetics as salves for dark subject matter.

Michael Love is an artist, curator, and educator living in Vancouver. Much of his work focuses on the legacy of the Cold War conflict and how it continues to resonate.

Tungsten Shadows is a collaboration between Sir Real (Alan Harvey) and Gallaxie (Chris Gallagher) that produces slide shows, performance and media events, and the large photographic series Santa.

New Documents is a Vancouver and Los Angeles–based art book publisher. New photo books include Ruth van Beek: The Cast, Jon Rafman: Nine Eyes, and Seth Fluker and Sheila Heti: Seth and Sheila Stayed Behind.

Vancouver Art Book Fair is a non-profit organization dedicated to establishing Vancouver as a centre for artists’ publishing. In addition to an annual international book fair, it produces various curatorial and publishing projects on local and global platforms.

Papersafe is a biannual publication dedicated to analogue photography and relevant discourse. Each issue covers a single subject through photographs and writing, with edition sizes of less than 100.

Zefan Sramek is a multidisciplinary artist and musician whose work incorporates photography, illustration, and printing on themes of manmade landscapes, psychosocial phenomena, and the relationships between the two.

Peripheral Review is a publication of critical and alternative art exhibition reviews based in Vancouver and Toronto, with a goal of enabling access for both emerging and established writers.

Zine Club is a group of international artists engaging both print and digital platforms. Recent projects include the conceptual photography publication Spiritual Pilgrimage and print works East/ West, Summer Studio, and Agree to Disagree.

Presentation House Gallery exhibits and disseminates photography and media art, emphasizing contemporary Canadian work within a context of historical and international art. It produces national and international tours of exhibitions, publications, public events, and art education programs.

TALKS & WORKSHOPS

Print Ready is an exhibition series that promotes the work of artists experimenting with self-publishing zines and books.

Saturday, April 22 & Sunday, April 23 James Black Gallery 144 East 6th Ave Vancouver

Quality Street Editions is a group of Vancouver-based artists, designers, photographers, and thinkers who are united by their production of printed matter.

Details of the weekend program, featuring workshops and talks on photography, artists’ books, and publishing, are listed at: capturephotofest.com/vancouver-photo-book-fair

Seth Fluker is a Toronto-based photographer who has self-published numerous books. Most recently, his book Before Things Change was featured in the Barbican exhibition Strange & Familiar, curated by Martin Parr.

We regret that the Grand Luxe at the Western Front and James Black Gallery are not wheelchair accessible.

Soi Fischer Editions publishes artists’ books and multiples related to the exhibition program of Soi Fischer, a consulting firm that serves private and public arts organizations in Vancouver and Toronto.

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

ALEX MORRISON UTOPIA OR OBLIVION, 2011 INKJET PRINT

APRIL 4

APRIL 18

Alex Morrison

Digesting Architecture: The Built World and the Photograph

49.2" x 37.3" IN CONVERSATION WITH

Christos Dikeakos Ema Peter

Capture Speaker Series Tuesdays at 6 PM Doors at 5 PM

Brussels-based Canadian artist Alex Morrison discusses Brand New Era Social Club (2017), his major public art commission on the facade of the Dal Grauer Substation on Burrard Street, and other aspects of his diverse practice, in conversation with photographer Christos Dikeakos.

APRIL 11

Alinka Echeverría Inform Interiors 50 Water St Vancouver Free and open to the public Space is limited; RSVP required Email: info@informinteriors.com PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP BY

Capture Photography Festival and Inform Interiors

British Mexican photographer Alinka Echeverría provides insight into her diverse anthropology-influenced practice, which, in her own words, “reconsider[s] the way in which the images of women have been carried forward through photographic history by way of visual codes and techniques.” This includes her recent series Nicephora, installed at the Stadium–Chinatown SkyTrain Station until 2018.

IN CONVERSATION WITH

Mark Busse We mostly know famous architecture not through direct experience, but through images made by architectural photographers like Ema Peter. In conversation with Mark Busse of HCMA Architecture + Design, Peter discusses the constructed nature of architectural photos, the symbiotic relationship between buildings and photography, and how image capture affects design. She also shares technical insights and experiences from her award-winning career. Developed in partnership with IDS Vancouver

APRIL 25

Allegory, Conversion, Camera Lucida Shep Steiner Art historian and critic Shep Steiner suggests that we need to re-evaluate popular understandings of Roland Barthes’s influential and much-quoted text Camera Lucida. He posits Barthes’s book has largely escaped capture by its best and closest interpreters because they have not fully comprehended the problem that photography poses for memory. In this lecture, Steiner explores Camera Lucida as an example of classical allegory that defies modernity’s prohibition against futurity. Through a close reading of the text, he weighs the photograph’s negative effect on memory against its life-affirming qualities and offers an updated interpretation of the punctum.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Films Sat, Apr 1 | 2 PM

Barbara Cole Bau-Xi Gallery 3045 Granville St, Vancouver FREE

Barbara Cole talks about her latest series, Falling through Time (p. 105), a twenty-year project.

Sat, Apr 1 | 2 PM

Cindy Mochizuki Nikkei National Museum 6688 Southoaks Cres, Burnaby FREE

Cindy Mochizuki discusses her immersive, time-travelling installation Rock, Paper, Scissors (p. 59) with curator Makiko Hara. clockwise from top left

Thu, Apr 6 | 9 PM

PEDRO E. GUERRERO:

Pedro E. Guerrero: A Photographer's Journey

A PHOTOGRAPHER'S

BROADCAST ON

JOURNEY

The Knowledge Network

JEFF WALL:

Using his outsider’s eye to

PHOTOGRAPHING AFRICA

IN ORDER TO MAKE A PICTURE

On-Demand Streaming Along with the three previous films, the photography documentaries listed below are available to stream during Capture Photography Festival at Knowledge.ca:

produce insightful portraits of important modernist architecture, Pedro E. Guerrero, a Mexican American born in segregated Mesa, Arizona, became one of the most sought-after photographers of the Mad Men era—yet his poignant story is largely unknown.

Mon, Apr 3 | 9 PM

Jeff Wall: In Order to Make a Picture

Thu, Apr 13 | 9 pm

BROADCAST ON

BROADCAST ON

The Knowledge Network

The Knowledge Network

Director Lu Nelson provides an

Photographer and film director Harry

insider’s look at the work and

Hook, who grew up in the Sudan and

process of world-renowned

Kenya, has been documenting life

Photographing Africa

Vancouver photographer Jeff Wall,

in Africa for the past forty years. He

creating an intimate portrait of the

ventures out to isolated communities

artist in the studio and on location

and encounters people living with

in the process of making two works:

one foot firmly rooted in a rich

Spring Snow and Woman Covered

cultural past but who also embrace

with a Tray.

contemporary Africa.

Sat, Apr 1 | 4–4:30 PM

How to Buy and Make Great Photographs Creative Coworkers B1-343 Railway St, Vancouver FREE

PPOC-BC Photographer of the Year (p. 106) Anna Beaudry leads

• Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning • Annie Leibovitz: Life through a Lens • Ansel Adams • Bill Cunningham New York • C.D. Hoy: Portraits from the Frontier • Chasing Ice • Chasing Wild Horses • Finding Vivian Maier • Foncie's Photos • Mugshot • Nothing on Earth • Snapshot: Fred Herzog • Time Zero: The Last Year of Polaroid Film

this discussion on how to recognize great photography amid the daily bombardment of advertising, social media, and TV images.

Sun, Apr 2 | 1–2 PM

Jenny Walton KEV Studio 2108 E Hastings St, Vancouver FREE

Jenny Walton discusses her exhibition SHIPS (p. 74), which documents the vessels of Vancouver Harbour.


EVENTS

Talks Sun, Apr 2 | 3 PM

Sun, Apr 9 | 2 PM

Wed, Apr 19 | 7–8.30 PM

Sat, Apr 22 | 2–4 PM

Panel Discussion: Lewis Baltz

Hua Jin

Shirley Wiebe

Viridian Gallery 1570 Coal Hbr Quay, Vancouver

Britannia Art Gallery 1661 Napier St, Vancouver

Greg Girard: Book Launch and Signing

FREE

FREE

Shirley Wiebe and curator Geoffrey

Griffin Art Projects 1174 Welch St, North Vancouver

Monte Clark Gallery 105-525 Great Northern Way, Vancouver

FREE

Hua Jin talks about her previous

Collector Claudia Beck, artist

and upcoming projects, including

Carr discuss the ideas in TRACES

FREE

Christos Dikeakos, and gallerist

Moonlight (p. 81). Followed by a Q&A.

DIARY (p. 78), and share further

Greg Girard launches his new photo

images from Wiebe’s series.

Theresa Luisotti present from their own research about their individual

Tue, Apr 11 | 7 PM

interest in and relationship to

Mark Mizgala

the work of Lewis Baltz (p. 57). A conversation will follow, moderated

Art Rental & Sales 750 Hornby St, Vancouver

by Griffin Art Projects director

Mark Mizgala discusses his latest

Lee Plested.

body of work, Shift (p. 65), which

book with the Magenta Foundation, Under Vancouver 1972–1982 (p. 98).

Wed, Apr 19 & Tue, Apr 25 | 7:30–9 PM

Alan Jacques: Evolution of a Photographer

Sat, Apr 22 | 2 PM

Monique Motut-Firth Gallery 1515 1515 W 7th Ave, Vancouver

explores the shifts in popular

HR MacMillan Space Centre 1100 Chestnut St, Vancouver

Sun, Apr 2 | 3–5 PM

attitudes toward climate change.

FREE

Eve MacGregor and Goya Ngan: Discussion and Reading

Alan Jacques reflects on his 49-year

her art practice and shares her

Thu, Apr 13 | 5–7 PM

career through his images, from

perspective on the history of collage,

James Nizam

shooting lions in the Serengeti to

images in mass media, and her

Artistry Coffee Shop 2959 W 4th Ave, Vancouver

Anvil Centre 777 Columbia St, New West

bowling teams in Cranbrook, and

exhibition Consumed (p. 88).

Sat, Apr 22 | 4 PM

FREE

Monique Motut-Firth talks about

how he has used the challenge of

FREE

James Nizam talks about his

Parkinson’s disease as a catalyst for

The artist and poet briefly describe

photographic practice, including his

creative expression.

Luce Lebart

their transdisciplinary project

photomural at TELUS Plaza (p. 34).

Thu, Apr 20 | 6 PM

Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave, N Van

(p. 105), read some poetry, and share observations from their collaborative

Sat, Apr 15 | 2 PM

process.

Julie Prescott

Sun, Apr 9 | 1–3 PM

Deer Lake Gallery 6584 Deer Lake Ave, Burnaby

Henri Robideau and Phillip Chin: The Art of Photography

Alex Waber

FREE

Arts Umbrella (Surrey) N116-15850 26th Ave, Surrey

Acclaimed photography curator,

FREE

discusses curating photography. She

historian, and writer Luce Lebart

FREE

Photographer and Arts Umbrella

was the director and curator of the

Julie Prescott provides insight into

instructor Alex Waber discusses his

French Society of Photography in

how she approaches landscape and

practice and ongoing series Failpoint

Paris before being appointed the first

Shadbolt Centre for the Arts 6450 Deer Lake Ave, Burnaby

allegory in her art (p. 118).

(p. 105).

director of the Canadian Photography

FREE

Sat, Apr 15 | 2 PM

Thu, Apr 20 | 6 PM

publications include Les Silences

Henri Robideau delivers the lecture

Victor John Penner

Group Discussion on Place and Art with Emily Neufeld

d’Atget, A Burden of Proof, and Mold

“My 50th Year in Photography,” followed by a tintype photography demonstration by Phillip Chin.

Institute in Ottawa. Her recent

West Vancouver Museum 680 17th St, West Vancouver FREE

Victor John Penner reveals more

The WALL (at CBC Plaza) 700 Hamilton St, Vancouver

about his series District (p. 67), which

FREE

documents his hometown of West

Emily Neufeld, whose work Picture

Vancouver.

Window is currently installed on the WALL (p. 102), hosts an informal discussion about housing in Vancouver and the responsibility of art and artists to the public.

135

Is Beautiful.


DISTRICT

Victor John Penner / District *Based on a true story

Curated by Darrin Morrison March 29 to May 6 / 2017 Reception / March 28 / 7 to 9 p.m. Artist Talk / April 15 / 2 p.m. West Vancouver Museum 680 17th Street, West Vancouver westvancouvermuseum.ca

*

Egress, 2016 archival pigment print 48 in x 60 in


EVENTS

Talks

Tours

Sun, Apr 23 & 30 | 12–3 PM

Thu, Apr 6 | 12:15–12:45 PM

Sun, Apr 9 | 3 PM

Karen Moe, Rena del Pieve Gobbi, and Janet Sadel

Song of the Open Road: Exhibition Tour

Song of the Open Road: Tour in Spanish

Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St, Vancouver

Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St, Vancouver

ARC Gallery 2701 Powell St, Vancouver

FREE

FREE

FREE

Join CAG visitor assistant Maddy

Join artist Guadalupe Martinez

The three artists (p. 121) each

Tranter for a midday tour of the

for a tour of the Capture Feature

discuss a different aspect of how art

Capture Feature Exhibition (p. 51).

Exhibition (p. 51) in Spanish.

can function, including its ability to facilitate PTSD healing, dismantle

Sat, Apr 8 | 1:30 PM

Wed, Apr 12 | 6 PM

hierarchies, and subvert media

Karen Zalamea: Outdoor Exhibition Tour

In Circulation: Exhibition Tour

1501 W Broadway, Vancouver

School for the Contemporary Arts, SFU 149 W Hastings St, Vancouver

violence.

Thu, Apr 27 | 7 PM

FREE BUT RSVP REQUIRED. EMAIL:

Birthe Piontek and Marguerite Pigeon

Join Karen Zalamea on a walking

FREE

tour of her outdoor exhibition

Learn more about the artworks

rsvp@capturephotofest.com

Access Gallery 222 East Georgia St, Vancouver

(p. 31), displayed on the storefront

featured in this multi-sited exhibition

FREE

windows of businesses around

at Simon Fraser University (p. 117).

Join photographer Birthe Piontek

the South Granville BIA. Post-tour

and writer Marguerite Pigeon to

reception at the Stable House Bistro.

Thu, Apr 13 | 6:50 PM

edition folio comprising images

Sun, Apr 9, 16 & 23 | 2–4 PM

from Piontek’s Miss Solitude series,

On and Off the Road: Canada Line Project Curator Tour

Joseph Staples: Outdoor Exhibition Tour

celebrate the launch of a limited

excerpts of found text, and original writings by Pigeon. Followed by a conversation with Access director/ curator Kimberly Phillips.

Capture Photography Festival Office 305 Cambie St, Vancouver

Waterfront Station 601 W Cordova St, Vancouver

rsvp@capturephotofest.com

FREE BUT RSVP REQUIRED. EMAIL:

Join a walking tour of Joseph

FREE BUT RSVP REQUIRED. EMAIL:

Sun, Apr 23 | 3 PM

Song of the Open Road: Tour in Mandarin Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St, Vancouver

rsvp@capturephotofest.com

Staples’s outdoor exhibition (p. 32),

FREE

Join one of three different curator-led

displayed on the storefront windows

Join artist Tommy Ting for a tour of

tours of the Canada Line Public Art

of businesses around the Gastown

the Capture Feature Exhibition (p. 51)

Project: On and Off the Road (p. 22).

BIA. Post-tour reception at lululemon

in Mandarin.

Meet at 2 pm sharp in the lobby of

lab. (Accessibility limited)

Waterfront Station, near the top of

Sun, Apr 30 | 3 PM

the stairs of the Canada Line.

Song of the Open Road: Exhibition Tour Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St, Vancouver FREE

Join CAG visitor coordinator Jocelyn Statia for a tour of the Capture JOSEPH STAPLES

Feature Exhibition (p. 51).

FALUN SERIES, 2010– INSTALLATION MOCKUP ALAN JACQUES: EVOLUTION OF A PHOTOGRAPHER ALAN JACQUES FRANK’S CABARET, 1972

137


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Workshops CUT, PASTE, ACTION! WITH ARTSTARTS I.AM.WE TITO OHEP A, 2016

Sat, Apr 1 & 8 | 10 AM–2 PM

Sat, Apr 22 | 7:30 PM

Sun, Apr 23 | 12–4 PM

Sat, Apr 29 | 12–3 PM

From the Darkroom to the Internet: Alternative Ways of Making and Sharing Photographs

I.AM.WE

Rock, Paper, Scissors: Sunday Family Corner

Song of the Open Road: Family Day

Nikkei National Museum 6688 Southoaks Cres, Burnaby

Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson St, Vancouver

Check Capture website for venue location TICKETS $22

Capture Photography Festival Office 305 Cambie St, Vancouver

In this participative workshop,

FREE

FREE

Tito Ohep uses abstract photography

In one of the trilogies of Rock, Paper,

The CAG invites all ages to drop-in for

as a vehicle for expressing various

Scissors (p. 59), a 200-foot giant who

a short exhibition tour (p. 51) and free

FREE BUT REGISTER BY MAR 24. EMAIL:

experiments in philosophy and

cuts holes into time and space is

art-making activities.

rsvp@capturephotofest.com

identity. Colours and movement

projected onto a blank wall. Kids

Artist Kate Henderson leads this

direct the eye of the viewer to their

of all ages are invited to create their

Sun, Apr 30 | 11 AM & 1 PM

two-day workshop for ages 15–18.

meditative contemplation of the

own giants in artist Cindy Mochizuki’s

Cut, Paste, Action!

In session 1, participants will explore

subconscious and superconscious.

organic style.

River Market at Westminster Quay 810 Quayside Dr, New West

early forms of photography. Session 2 jumps ahead in time to consider

Sun, Apr 23 | 10 AM–2 PM

Sat, Apr 29 | 11 AM & 1 PM

FREE

how photography is used by artists

Let's Photo Zine

Cut, Paste, Action!

See Apr 29 event description.

today, including digital techniques.

James Black Gallery 144 E 6th Ave, Vancouver

ArtStarts Gallery 808 Richards St, Vancouver

Prints made in this session can be used in the Apr 23 "Let's Photo Zine"

FREE BUT REGISTER BY APR 14. EMAIL:

FREE

workshop. (Space limited; venue not

rsvp@capturephotofest.com

Families (ages 5+) are introduced

wheelchair accessible)

This workshop for youth aged 15–18

to artworks that investigate human

introduces participants to the history

form, movement, and gesture. The

and concept of the photo book as an

first half of the workshop focuses on

art form and mode of documentation.

Eadweard Muybridge and his studies

Led by artist Julia Dahee Hong,

of motion in the human body and

participants will collaborate to

the second on Hannah Höch and her

design, layout, and produce a

use of found images. Families will

collectively authored photo book.

capture their own bodies in motion

The workshop will engender passion

and then cut and paste these images

for photography and book making

along with found photographs into

and equip young, emerging artists

layered collages.

with skills that provide increased agency in their creative practices. (Space limited; venue not wheelchair accessible)


90

points


Achieving New Heights

As Air Canada strengthens its position as a global, customer-focused organization, our airline is aiming higher and reaching further to represent the spirit of our great nation. Our new livery is a powerful visual representationof our pride, values, and bold objective to fly among the world’s best, and a testament to our commitment to enhanced service, professionalism and rigorous attention to detail.


EVENTS

Community Sun, Apr 2, 9, 23 & 30 | 2–3 PM

Scavenger Photo Hunt

Sat, Apr 22 & Sun, Apr 23 | 12 PM onward

FREE BUT REGISTRATION REQUIRED AT:

Crabtown Pachinko Pagoda

nathaliedls.com

Confederation Park, Burnaby

Queen Elizabeth Park, Vancouver

Hone your camera skills with a fun

FREE

scavenger photo hunt. Photographer

Crabtown Pachinko Pagoda is a

Nathalie De Los Santos will give tips

participatory pop-up constructed

and tricks for both phone and camera

on the right-of-way for the Kinder

photography, and then participants

Morgan Pipeline expansion. Five

have 30 minutes to complete the

interlocked, backlit pachinko

challenge. The fastest person will

machines create a temporary

receive a prize, and everyone can

photography pagoda, engaging

submit photos for the People’s

viewers in a situation of chance while

Choice Award. [Weather permitting]

challenging them to consider the context of the surrounding location,

Sat, Apr 1 | 12–6 PM

Wed, Apr 19 | 7–9 PM

its present space, and its proposed

Festival Launch

Pandora’s Collective: Music, Art, Poetry, and Dance in the Gallery

future use.

Contemporary Art Gallery 555 Nelson Street, Vancouver

Wed, Apr 26 | 6–9 PM

Magenta Foundation: Award Reception

of the Feature Exhibition at the CAG,

Sidney and Gertrude Zack Gallery 950 W 41st Ave, Vancouver

with food and drink, plus artists in

FREE

attendance from 4–6 pm.

Poets recite verse they have written

FREE

in response to Eye Lines by Judi

The Magenta Foundation announces

FREE

Capture kicks off with the opening

thisopenspace: The Playground 434 Columbia St, Vancouver

Sat, Apr 1 | 12–4 PM

Angel (p. 105). For the open mic

the Flash Forward Emerging Artist

Photographer-Assisted Selfies: Portrait Sessions

portion, audience members can write

Project Grant and the Bright Spark

and then read poems related to the

Award winners, plus a reception and

Pink Monkey Studios 830 Union St, Vancouver

exhibition.

FREE

Fri, Apr 21 | 7 PM

presented by Magenta Foundation

Journeys to the Edge: Bitter Sweet

and Air Canada enRoute Magazine

The public is invited to become part of a photographic study on actions, rights, and responsibilities. Photographer Ross den Otter will

Stretch Yoga Studio 180 E Pender St, Vancouver

conduct all the steps of the portrait

TICKETS $20

sessions—except for triggering

Journeys to the Edge presents their

the camera’s shutter. By asking

third multimedia event that combines

the subject to operate the shutter,

live narration with photography and

questions of ownership, copyright,

video. In Bitter Sweet, journalist

and responsibilities are questioned.

Roberta Staley and photographer Tallulah expose the effects of Coca Cola and Pepsi on the health of vulnerable populations in Canada and the developing world. Followed by a photojournalism slideshow and Q&A.

SCAVENGER PHOTO HUNT NATHALIE DE LOS SANTOS BEAM, 2016

141

the launch of the exhibition Ryan Walker for Air Canada enRoute (p. 121),

and hosted by thisopenspace.


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Community Thu, Apr 27 | 7–9 PM

Fri, Apr 28 | 7 PM

Double Exposure: Award Ceremony

The Lind Prize Announcement and Capture Festival Closing Event

Turnbull Gallery, South Surrey Arts Centre 14601 20th Ave, Surrey FREE

Winners are announced in

Presentation House Gallery 333 Chesterfield Ave, North Vancouver

Double Exposure’s (p. 105) five photo

FREE

categories—Action/Movement,

The winner of the second annual

Seascape/Water, Cityscape/

Philip B. Lind Emerging Artist Prize

Architecture, Social Commentary,

(p. 89) is announced and Capture

and Animals—and Cecily Nicholson

celebrates the final day of the 2017

gives a poetry reading.

Festival.

Fri, Apr 28 | 6.30 PM–LATE

Sat, Apr 29 | 11 AM–6 PM

Slideluck IV

BoomBoom PhotoRoom

Beaumont Studios and Gallery 316 W 5th Ave, Vancouver

truth and beauty gallery 698 W 16th Ave, Vancouver

TICKETS $15 EARLY BIRD;

SUGGESTED DONATION $20

$20 ADVANCE; $25 ON DOOR

Presenting the BoomBoom

Slideshow + Potluck = Slideluck—

PhotoRoom: a gigantic walk-in photo

a juried slideshow exhibition of lens-

booth. Portraits are by donation

based work featuring approximately

of $20 or box of diapers, with

20 artists, traditionally in conjunction

proceeds going to From the Bottom

with a potluck dinner. Vancouver's

Up Foundation, a non-profit that

fourth Slideluck, however, will be

distributes diapers to local families

a "food truck" edition, with a big

in need. The theme is "Bring Your

after-party with DJs and dancing.

Best," with guests invited to bring any favourite object or person to be

Fri, Apr 28, | 8–9 PM

photographed with. Pop down for a

Rencontres Imaginaires: Onsite Event

photo, stay for the music and beer!

UrbanScreen 13458 107A Ave, Surrey FREE

Local youth premiere their new digital artworks. Attendees are invited to interact with the

Sat, Apr 29 | 12–4 PM

PhotographerAssisted Selfies: Viewing and Discussion Pink Monkey Studios 830 Union St, Vancouver

installation Rencontres Imaginaires

FREE

by Scenocosme (p. 63) following

The “photographer-assisted selfies”

these screenings.

taken during Ross den Otter’s April 1 event are displayed and become the subject of a dialogue on photographic ownership and rights.

JOURNEYS TO THE EDGE: BITTER SWEET TALLULAH BITTER SWEET FAMILY, 2014


W E A C T I VAT E F U T U R E -T H I N K I N G BUSINESSES.

P R O U D C R E AT I V E PA R T N E R

V I E W T H E W O R K AT

60 4 620 9994

OF CAPTURE PHOTO GR APHY

S T U D I O PA L M S . C O M

@ S T U D I O PA L M S

F E S T I VA L S I N C E 2 013 .


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

CALENDAR

Featured Tue, Mar 28 7–9 PM OPENING Thu, Mar 30 6–8 PM OPENING 7–10 PM OPENING 7–9 PM OPENING 7–10 PM OPENING 7–9 PM OPENING Sat, Apr 1 10 AM–2 PM WORKSHOP 12-6 PM LAUNCH 12–4 PM COMMUNITY 12–5 PM OPENING 2–4 PM OPENING/TALK 2 PM OPENING 2–4 PM OPENING 2 PM OPENING 2–4 PM OPENING 2 PM TALK 3–6 PM OPENING 3–7 PM OPENING 4–4:30 PM TALK 6 PM OPENING 7 PM OPENING 7–10 PM OPENING 7–9 PM OPENING Sun, Apr 2 1–2 PM TALK 2–3 PM COMMUNITY 3–5 PM OPENING/READING 3 PM TALK 4–6 PM OPENING Mon, Apr 3 5:30 PM OPENING 9 PM FILM Tue, Apr 4 6 PM SPEAKER SERIES Wed, Apr 5 6–8 PM OPENING 6–9 PM OPENING 6:30–8:30 PM OPENING 7 PM OPENING Thu, Apr 6 12:15–12:45 PM TOUR 5:30–7:30 PM OPENING 6–8 PM OPENING 6–10 PM OPENING 6–8 PM OPENING 6 PM OPENING 6–10 PM OPENING 7 PM OPENING 7–10 PM OPENING 7–9 PM OPENING 7–10 PM OPENING 9 PM FILM Fri, Apr 7 6–9 PM OPENING 6 PM OPENING

Victor John Penner: District Group Exh.: German Haus Carlos M. Bonmatí: The Canadians Group Exh.: Double Exposure Jeff Downer: Handsome Rewards Judi Angel: Eye Lines From the Darkroom to the Internet Capture Festival & Feat. Exhibition Launch Photographer-Assisted Selfies Desirée Patterson: Inspiring Preservation Barbara Cole: Falling through Time Bayne/Singer: Detail Bill Anderson: External. Internal. John Dean & Early Views of BC Vikky Alexander: Between Dreaming… Cindy Mochizuki Ben Owens: Athlete. Exposed. Group Exh.: The Best of BC How to Buy and Make Great Photographs Tomas Jirku: Revelations Dan Jackson: Space in Bird Group Exh.: wide open Jenny Walton: SHIPS Jenny Walton Scavenger Photo Hunt MacGregor/Ngan: photo / poem Panel Discussion: Lewis Baltz Christine Germano: Wonder LAND Group Exh.: The Observer Effect Jeff Wall: In Order to Make a Picture Alex Morrison & Christos Dikeakos Group Exh.: Project Instant V4.0 Weishan Tan & Xuefeng Li Shirley Wiebe: TRACES DIARY Nancy Silva Grifé: A timeless silence Song of the Open Road: Exhibition Tour Beryl Woodrow: Of Love and Home Clive/Brown: Celebrating 15 Years of Care Gabor Gasztonyi: Hastings Group Exh.: In Circulation Group Exh.: NPAC Annual Pictures Rob Straight: The Eye of Rob Straight Elizabeth Zvonar & FotoFilmic '16 Group Exh.: Man and His World Monique Motut-Firth: CONSUMED Tom Richardson: Rehearsal P. E. Guerrero: A Photographer's Journey Hawkes/den Otter: Spin Hua Jin: Moonlight

Selected

Open

West Vancouver Museum p067 LUMAS Gallery p111 Beaumont Studios and Gallery p102 Turnbull Gallery p105 Duplex Projects p070 Sidney & Gertrude Zack Gallery p105 Capture Office p138 Contemporary Art Gallery p009 Pink Monkey Studios p141 Van Dop Gallery p112 Bau-Xi Gallery p105 Gallery Jones p071 Winsor Gallery p075 Masters Gallery p111 Chernoff Fine Art p069 Nikkei National Museum p134 The Playground p111 Creative Coworkers p106 Creative Coworkers p134 Interurban Gallery p106 Studio 730 p112 Goldmoss Satellite p106 KEV Studio p074 KEV Studio p134 Queen Elizabeth Park p141 Artistry Coffee Shop p105 Griffin Art Projects p135 Little Mountain Gallery p111 Moat Gallery p111 Knowledge Network p134 Inform Interiors p132 Science World p112 R Space p079/080 Britannia Art Gallery p078 Main Street Brewing p112 Contemporary Art Gallery p137 Gallery 49 p076 Jim Pattison Pavilion p106 Gasztonyi Studio p087 School for the Cont. Arts SFU p117 Pendulum Gallery p060 Horizon Gallery p106 Burrard Arts Foundation p082/083 Ice Box Gallery p106 Gallery 1515 p088 Field Contemporary p086 Knowledge Network p134 AMP Studios p117 Viridian Gallery p081


SEE EXHIBITIONS OR EVENTS PAGE FOR VENUE ADDRESS

Fri, Apr 7 7 PM 7 PM Sat, Apr 8 1:30 PM 2–4 PM 2–4 PM 2–4 PM 5 PM 7 PM 7–11 PM 8:30–10 PM Sun, Apr 9 1–3 PM 2–3 PM 2 PM 2–4 PM 3 PM 8 PM Tue, Apr 11 6 PM 6:30–11 PM 7 PM Wed, Apr 12 6 PM Thu, Apr 13 5–7 PM 6:50 PM 7 PM 8–10 PM 9 PM Sat, Apr 15 2 PM 2 PM Sun, Apr 16 2–4 PM Tue, Apr 18 6 PM Wed, Apr 19 7–9 PM 7–8.30 PM 7:30–9 PM Thu, Apr 20 6–8 PM 6 PM 6 PM 7–11 PM 7–10 PM Fri, Apr 21 3–6 PM 6:30–9 PM 7 PM 7–10 PM 7 PM 7 PM 7–9 PM 8–11 PM Sat, Apr 22 11 AM–6 PM 12 PM– 2–4 PM 2–4 PM

Hope in Shadows: Portraits HiVE p117 Group Exh.: The Lind Prize Presentation House p089 TOUR Karen Zalamea: Outdoor Exhibition Tour 1501 W Broadway, Vancouver p137 OPENING Group Exh.: Full Spectrum Petley Jones Gallery p117 OPENING Herzog, Smith & Elder Equinox Gallery p090 RECEPTION Carolina de la Cajiga: Cities District Library Gallery p102 OPENING Group Exh.: Shared Approach Remington Gallery p112 OPENING Group Exh.: Everyone Has a Story Stir Coffee House p117 OPENING Steve Dynie: Unforgiving Surf Beaumont Studios and Gallery p117 OPENING Michael Bednar: The Fraser Richmond Art Gallery p092 TALK Robideau/Chin: The Art of Photography Shadbolt Centre for the Arts p135 COMMUNITY Scavenger Photo Hunt Queen Elizabeth Park p141 TALK Hua Jin Viridian Gallery p135 TOUR Canada Line Curator Tour Waterfront Station p137 TOUR Song of the Open Road: Tour in Spanish Contemporary Art Gallery p137 OPENING Sarah Stonehocker: Street Images Benny’s Café p112 SPEAKER SERIES Alinka EcheverrÍa Inform Interiors p132 OPENING Desrochers/Persan: The Lost Vancouver Space p118 TALK Mark Mizgala Art Rental & Sales p135 TOUR In Circulation: Exhibition Tour School for the Cont. Arts SFU p137 TALK James Nizam Anvil Centre p135 TOUR Joseph Staples: Outdoor Exhibition Tour Capture Office p137 OPENING Gillespie/Prescott: ALLEGORY Deer Lake Gallery p118 OPENING Chris Gallagher: I will not shoot Artform Gallery p118 FILM Photographing Africa Knowledge Network p134 TALK Julie Prescott Deer Lake Gallery p135 TALK Victor John Penner West Vancouver Museum p135 TOUR Canada Line Curator Tour Waterfront Station p137 SPEAKER SERIES Digesting Architecture: Ema Peter Inform Interiors p132 COMMUNITY Pandora’s Collective Sidney & Gertrude Zack Gallery p141 TALK Shirley Wiebe Britannia Art Gallery p135 TALK Alan Jacques: Evolution of a Photographer HR MacMillan Space Centre p135 OPENING Robert Earnest: Last Night Pendulum Gallery p118 TALK Alex Waber Arts Umbrella (Surrey) p135 TALK Emily Neufeld: Place and Art The WALL (at CBC Plaza) p135 OPENING Brendan Meadows: Alcoves Salt Studio p118 OPENING Robert Charles: Crystalline Beaumont Studios and Gallery p118 OPENING Victoria Kon: I, Volume 1 Art Beatus p093 OPENING Group Exh.: Social Stories Yukon Studio p121 COMMUNITY Journeys to the Edge: Bitter Sweet Stretch Yoga Studio p141 COMMUNITY Vancouver Photo Book Fair: Member Preview Western Front p130 OPENING Birthe Piontek: Miss Solitude Access Gallery p097 OPENING Group Exh.: Palimptexts The ARC Gallery p121 OPENING Naveen Naqvi: There, There Remington Gallery p096 OPENING Rebekah Ho: Sediment Gam Gallery p095 COMMUNITY Vancouver Photo Book Fair Western Front p130 COMMUNITY Crabtown Pachinko Pagoda Confederation Park p141 OPENING Carol Sawyer: I attempt Republic Gallery p099 OPENING/SIGNING Greg Girard: Under Vancouver 1972–1982 Monte Clark Gallery p098/135 OPENING OPENING

145


Sat, Apr 22 2 PM TALK 4 PM TALK 7:30 PM WORKSHOP Sun, Apr 23 10 AM–2 PM WORKSHOP 11 AM–6 PM COMMUNITY 12 PM– COMMUNITY 12–3 PM TALK 12–4 PM WORKSHOP 2–3 PM COMMUNITY 2–4 PM TOUR 3 PM TOUR Tue, Apr 25 6 PM SPEAKER SERIES 7–10 PM OPENING 7:30–9 PM TALK Wed, Apr 26 6–9 PM OPENING/EVENT Thu, Apr 27 6–9 PM CLOSING 7–9 PM COMMUNITY 7 PM TALK 7–10 PM OPENING Fri, Apr 28 6.30 PM–late COMMUNITY 7 PM COMMUNITY 8–9 PM COMMUNITY Sat, Apr 29 11 AM, 1 PM WORKSHOP 11 AM–6 PM COMMUNITY 12–4 PM COMMUNITY 3 PM WORKSHOP 9–11 PM OPENING Sun, Apr 30 11 AM, 1 PM WORKSHOP 12–3 PM TALK 2–3 PM COMMUNITY 3 PM TOUR

Monique Motut-Firth Luce Lebart I.AM.WE Let's Photo Zine Vancouver Photo Book Fair Crabtown Pachinko Pagoda Moe/del Pieve Gobbi/Sadel Sunday Family Corner Scavenger Photo Hunt Canada Line Curator Tour Song of the Open Road: Tour in Mandarin Allegory, Conversion, Camera Lucida Group Exh.: Spiritual Pilgrimage Alan Jacques: Evolution of a Photographer Ryan Walker & Magenta Awards Frances Hart D'Emilio: Great White Urinal Double Exposure Awards Birthe Piontek and Marguerite Pigeon Sean Alward: Liquid Mountains Slideluck IV Lind Prize Announcement & Festival Close Rencontres Imaginaires: Onsite Event Cut, Paste, Action! BoomBoom PhotoRoom Selfies: Viewing & Discussion Song of the Open Road: Family Day Anise Makvandi: Within This Space Cut, Paste, Action! Moe/del Pieve Gobbi/Sadel Scavenger Photo Hunt Song of the Open Road: Exhibition Tour

For the most up-to-date event listings, please visit capturephotofest.com/events

147

Selected

Open

Gallery 1515 p135 Presentation House Gallery p135 Venue TBD p138 James Black Gallery p138 Western Front p130 Confederation Park p141 ARC Gallery p137 Nikkei National Museum p138 Queen Elizabeth Park p141 Waterfront Station p137 Contemporary Art Gallery p137 Inform Interiors p132 VABF Studio p121 HR MacMillan Space Centre p135 The Playground p121/141 Hatch Art Gallery p077 Turnbull Gallery p142 Access Gallery p137 Wil Aballe Art Projects p121 Beaumont Studios and Gallery p142 Presentation House Gallery p142 UrbanScreen p142 ArtStarts Gallery p138 truth and beauty gallery p142 Pink Monkey Studios p142 Contemporary Art Gallery p138 Interurban Gallery p100 River Market at New West p138 ARC Gallery p137 Queen Elizabeth Park p141 Contemporary Art Gallery p137

CALENDAR

Featured

CALENDAR CONTINUED


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ST

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CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

31

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SkyTrain Stations 01 Waterfront 02 Granville South 03 Vancouver City Centre 04 Olympic Village 05 Broadway–City Hall 06 King Edward 07 Marine Drive 08 Aberdeen 09 Lansdowne 10 Stadium–Chinatown

Canada Line Canada Line Canada Line Canada Line Canada Line Canada Line Canada Line Canada Line Canada Line Expo Line

p023 p024 p025 p026 p027 p028 p029 p037 p037 p030

11 Access Gallery 12 Art Beatus 13 Art Rental & Sales 14 BC Hydro Dal Grauer 15 Britannia Art Gallery 16 Burrard Arts Fdn 17 Chernoff Fine Art 18 Cont. Art Gallery 19 Duplex Projects 20 Equinox Gallery 21 Field Contemporary 22 Gabor Gasztonyi 23 Gallery 49 24 Gallery 1515

222 E Georgia St, Van p097 108-808 Nelson St, Van p093 VAG, 750 Hornby St, Van p065 944 Burrard St, Van p015 1661 Napier St, Van p078 108 E Broadway, Van p082/083 265 E 2nd Ave, Van p069 555 Nelson St, Van p051 4257 & 4277 Fraser St, Van p070 525 Gr Northern Wy, Van p090 17 W Broadway, Van p086 730 12th St, New West p087 100 W 49th Ave, Van p076 1515 W 7th Ave, Van p088

21


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32 ST E C O R D O VA

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39

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16

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FO R

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BU

RN

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38

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43

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35

Featured and Selected Exhibition Galleries 25 Gallery Jones 26 Gam Gallery 27 Gordon Smith Gallery 28 Griffin Art Projects 29 Hatch Art Gallery 30 Inform Interiors 31 Interurban Gallery 32 KEV Studio 33 Monte Clark Gallery 34 New Media Gallery 35 Nikkei Museum 36 Pendulum Gallery 37 Presentation House 38 Reach Gallery

1-258 E 1st Ave, Van 110 E Hastings St, Van 2121 Lonsdale Ave, N Van 1174 Welch St, N Van 6133 Student Union Blvd, Van 50 Water St, Van 1 E Hastings St, Van 2108 E Hastings St, Van 105-525 Gr Northern Wy, Van 777 Columbia St, New West 6688 Southoaks Cres, Bby 885 W Georgia St, Van 333 Chesterfield Ave, N Van 32388 Veterans Wy, Abbtsfd

149

p071 p095 p066 p057 p077 p132 p100 p074 p098 p058 p059 p060 p089 p061

39 Remington Gallery 108 E Hastings, Van p096 40 Republic Gallery 3rd F, 732 Richards St, Van p062/099 41 Richmond Art Gallery 7700 Minoru Gate, Rchmnd p092 42 R Space 123 E 8th Ave, Van p079/080 43 Surrey UrbanScreen 13458 107A Ave, Srry p063 44 TELUS Plaza 611 Sixth St, New West p034 45 UFCW 1518 Bldg 350 Columbia St, New West p034 46 Viridian Gallery 1570 Coal Harbour Qy, Van p081 47 West Van Museum 680 17th St, W Van p067 48 Western Front 303 E 8th Ave, Van p130 49 Winsor Gallery 258 E 1st Ave, Van p075 50 Woodward's Atrium 111 W Hastings St, Van p033


MICHAEL SNOW NEWFOUNDLANDINGS MAY 5 – JULY 22, 2017 OPENING RECEPTION AND RELEASE PARTY FOR PREFIX PHOTO 35: FRIDAY, MAY 5 FROM 7 TO 10 PM THIS EXHIBITION IS CURATED BY SCOTT McLEOD AND PRESENTED AS A PRIMARY EXHIBITION OF THE SCOTIABANK CONTACT PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL.

MICHAEL SNOW, STILL FROM CONDENSATION: A COVE STORY, 2008. COURTESY THE ARTIST.

Prefix gratefully acknowledges the assistance of the City of Toronto through the Toronto Arts Council, the Ontario Arts Council and the Canada Council for the Arts.

SUBSCRIBE TO PREFIX PHOTO MAGAZINE

Prefix Institute of Contemporary Art Suite 124, Box 124 401 Richmond Street West Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5V 3A8 T 416.591.0357 F 416.591.0358 info@prefix.ca www.prefix.ca Photo Magazine. Visual, Audio and Surround Art Galleries. Reference Library. Small Press. Travelling Shows.


151

The Playground Presentation House Queen Elizabeth Theatre R Space Reach Gallery Remington Gallery Republic Gallery Richmond Art Gallery Salt Studio School for Cont. Arts Science World S & G Zack Gallery Space Stir Coffee House Studio 730 Surrey UrbanScreen Turnbull Gallery VABF Studio Van Dop Gallery Viridian Gallery The WALL West Van Museum Wil Aballe Art Projects Winsor Gallery Woodward's Atrium Yukon Studio

434 Columbia St, Van p111/121 333 Chesterfield Ave, N Van p089 650 Hamilton St, Van p112 123 E 8th Ave, Van p079/080 32388 Veterans Way, Abbtsfd p061 108 E Hastings, Van p096/112 3rd F, 732 Richards St, Van p062/099 7700 Minoru Gate, Rchmd p092 110-950 Powell St, Van p118 SFU, 149 W Hastings St, Van p117 1455 Quebec St, Van p112 950 W 41st Ave, Van p105 552 Clark Drive, Van p118 101-5085 48th Ave, Delta p117 730 Richards St, Van p112 13458 107A Ave, Srry p063 14601 20th Ave, Srry p105 2-236 E Pender St, Van p121 421 Richmond St, New West p112 1570 Coal Harbour Quay, Van p081 700 Hamilton St, Van p102 680 17th St, West Van p067 688 E Hastings St, Van p121 258 E 1st Ave, Van p075 111 West Hastings St, Van p033 204-2075 Yukon St, Van p121

Artist Index Michael Agrios Vikky Alexander Sean Alward Roshanak Amini Bill Anderson Judi Angel Robert Arndt Lewis Baltz Marian Penner Bancroft David Barbour Mike Bayne Michael Bednar Hendrik Beune Dieter Blum Carlos M. Bonmatí Davin Boutang Denis Bouvier David Bowen Annie Briard Dirk Brommel Matthew Brooks

p117 p051/069 p121 p121 p075 p105 p051 p057/135 p062 p111 p071 p092 p117 p111 p102 p117 p102 p058 p037 p111 p034

GALLERY INDEX

Access Gallery 222 E Georgia St, Van p097 AMP Studios 800 Keefer St, Van p117 ARC Gallery 1701 Powell St, Van p121 Art Beatus 108-808 Nelson St, Van p093 Art Rental & Sales VAG, 750 Hornby St, Van p065 Artform Gallery 1885 Clark Drive, Van p118 Artistry Coffee Shop 2959 W 4th Ave, Vanc p105 Arts Umbrella (Surrey) N116-15850 26th Ave, Srry p105 Bau-Xi Gallery 3045 Granville St, Van p105 Beaumont Studios 316 W 5th Ave, Van p102/117/118 Benny's Café 2505 W Broadway, Van p112 Britannia Art Gallery 1661 Napier St, Van p078 Buckerfields 240 Northern St, Van p121 Burnaby Offsite 4595 Albert St, Bby p102 Burrard Arts Foundation 108 E Broadway, Van p082/083 Cartems Donuts 534 W Pender St., Van p105 Chernoff Fine Art 265 E 2nd Ave, Van p069 Cont. Art Gallery 555 Nelson St, Van p051 Creative Coworkers B1-343 Railway St, Van p106 Deer Lake Gallery 6584 Deer Lake Ave, Bby p118 District Library Gallery 1277 Lynn Valley Rd, N Van p102 Duplex Projects 4257 & 4277 Fraser St, Van p070 Equinox Gallery 525 Gr Northern Wy, Van p090 Field Contemporary 17 W Broadway, Van p086 Gabor Gasztonyi Gallery 730 12th St, New West p087 Gallery 49 100 W 49th Ave, Van p076 Gallery 1515 1515 W 7th Ave, Van p088 Gallery Jones 1-258 E 1st Ave, Van p071 Gam Gallery 110 E Hastings St, Van p095 Goldmoss Satellite 1338 Franklin St, Van p106 Gordon Smith Gallery 2121 Lonsdale Ave, North Van p066 Griffin Art Projects 1174 Welch St, North Van p057 Hatch Art Gallery 6133 Student Union Blvd, Van p077 HiVE 210-128 W Hastings St, Van p117 Horizon Gallery 295 E 2nd Ave, Rear, Van p106 Ice Box Gallery 321 Railway St, Van p106 Interurban Gallery 1 E Hastings St, Van p100/106 Jim Pattison Pavilion 899 W 12th Ave, Van p106 KEV Studio 2108 E Hastings St, Van p074 Le Centre Francoph. 1551 W 7th Ave, Van p102 Little Mountain Gallery 195 E 26th Ave, Van p111 Listel Hotel 1300 Robson St, Van p106 LUMAS Gallery 305 Water St, Van p111 Main Street Brewing 261 E 7th Ave, Van p112 Masters Gallery 2245 Granville St, Van p111 Moat Gallery VPL, 350 W Georgia St, Van p111 Monte Clark Gallery 105-525 Gr Northern Wy, Van p098 New Media Gallery 777 Columbia St, New West p058 Nikkei Museum 6688 Southoaks Cres, Bby p059 Pendulum Gallery 885 W Georgia St, Van p060/118 Petley Jones Gallery 1554 W 6th Ave, Van p117


ARTIST INDEX

CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Rennie Brown p106 Gerard Byrne p051 Clive Camm p106 David Campion p061/123 Alejandro Cartagena p023 Robert Charles p118 Barb Choit p017 James Clare p111 Barbara Cole p105/134 Anne Collier p017/047 Ronan Considine p117 Zach Copland p117 Brian C. Cyr p106 Sylvana dAngelo p121 Carolina de la Cajiga p102 John Dean p111 Rena del Pieve Gobbi p121/137 Ross den Otter p117/141/142 David Deocera p117 Simon Desrochers p118 Christina Dixon p039 Delisle Doucet p117 Jeff Downer p039/070 Nelmarie du Preez p058 Jonathan Dy p106 Steve Dynie p117 Robert Earnest p118 Alinka Echeverría p030/132 Thomas Eigel p111 Martin Elder p090 Chris Gallagher p118 Tyler Garnham p117 Gabor Gasztonyi p087 Christine Germano p111 Rob Gilbert p106 Kenneth Gillespie p118 Greg Girard p098/135 Pierre Grenier p102 Nancy Silva Grifé p112 Torrie Groening p106 Christopher James Guy p105 Frances Hart D'Emilio p077 Kiku Hawkes p117 Ted Hawryluk p117 Fred Herzog p090 Rebekah Ho p095 Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn p051 Julian Hou p027 Beatrice Hug p111 Derek Hunter p106 Mira Hunter p106

Dan Jackson Kelly Jazvac Tomas Jirku Hua Jin Annette Kelm Woojae Kim Victoria Kon Evan Lee Xuefeng Li Michael Love Robert Lowe Kelly Lycan Scott MacEachern Eve MacGregor Michael Maclean Paulo Majano Anise Makvandi Lital Marom Stuart McCall Mike McNeeley Jessie McNeil Brendan Meadows Mickey Meads Kurt Menzie Ryan Ming Mark Mizgala Cindy Mochizuki Karen Moe Alex Morrison Monique Motut-Firth Owen Murray Naveen Naqvi Emily Neufeld Teresa Ng Goya Ngan James Nizam Brian Noppè Rui Nunes Niamh O'Malley Ben Owens Adrienne Parsons Desirée Patterson Werner Pawlok Spike Peachy Rick Pelletier Victor John Penner Mathieu Persan Ema Peter Dawit L. Petros Birthe Piontek Luke Potter

p112 p051 p106 p081/135 p017 p039 p093 p017 p079 p039 p117 p051 p111 p105/135 p121 p037 p100 p106 p028 p117 p102 p106/118 p121 p117 p121 p065/135 p059/134 p121/137 p015/132 p088/135 p029 p096 p102/135 p117 p105/135 p034/135 p112 p033 p051 p111 p117 p112 p111 p117 p117 p067/135 p118 p132 p051 p097/137 p066

Scott Pownall Julie Prescott Jon Rafman Tom Richardson Miguel Angel Rios Bon Roberts Janet Sadel Rod Sarrat-Cave Carole Sawyer Matthew Sawyer Scenocosme Miguel Schmitt Stephen Scott Alina Senchenko Sandra Shields Adina Shore Danny Singer Ron Smid Bobbi Sue Smith Gordon Smith Greg Staats Joseph Staples Patryk Stasieczek Sarah Stonehocker Rob Straight Priscillia Tait Lisa Tan Weishan Tan Nicolas Teichrob Peter Thompson Stefan Tiefengraber Jacob Tonski Ron Tran Page Turner Linda Vermeulen Alex Waber Ryan Walker Jenny Walton Shirley Wiebe Sabine Wild Tania Willard Beryl Woodrow Karen Zalamea Elizabeth Zvonar

p106 p118/135 p025 p086 p058 p106 p121/137 p117 p099 p026 p063/142 p112 p117 p121 p061/123 p117 p071 p117 p121 p090 p051 p032/137 p039 p112 p106 p117 p051 p080 p106 p117 p058 p058 p026 p117 p117 p105/135 p121 p074/134 p078/135 p111 p024 p076 p031/137 p082


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April Thompson

Reflections on the City of Glass Critic and curator April Thompson takes the temperature of Vancouver’s contemporary photography scene

VANCOUVER IS A CITY POSITIONED ON THE EDGE, AS BOTH THE DESTINATION AND THE origin. It functions as the terminus to the transcontinental railway and as an open coastal port of departure to major international trade. This geographical positioning has affixed a sense of boundless possibility to Vancouver, attracting monikers like “The Entrepreneurial City” and “the Frontier City.”1 In the artistic imaging of Vancouver, in which photography has been key, representations have reflected this place as both small-town local and big-town global. In the 1950s, Fred Herzog captured the parochial North American feel of Vancouver’s streets on weekends or at night. By 1967, this insular image was superseded by a connection to bigger things, as in Fred Schiffer’s photographs of the modernist architecture designed by Arthur Erickson and Geoffrey Massey scattered across West Vancouver. Just two years later, the street-scan photographs of Christos Dikeakos captured the city at a vulnerable moment in its transformation from local township to rapidly developed urban enclave. Placed in connection to one another, these photographs are evidence that Vancouver has long occupied a precarious state of flux. In this unstable condition of being simultaneously local and global, a terminal and a gateway, this city has engendered a heightened ability among many artists to perceive qualities of duality and illusion. Photo-based artists who have spent time in Vancouver are particularly adept at penetrating and scrutinizing these messy composites of place. It would be foolish to project a shared local component to photography here, since global capitalism is a system that eradicates or else manufactures “genius loci.” What is undeniable, however, is that a majority of contemporary photographic experiments happening in Vancouver, while materially and formally diverse, share a robust criticality toward constructed vision and projected image. Artists are interrogating how the modalities of layering and opacity are at work in the city around them, in both its histories and its present. In James Nizam’s work, this emerges through architectural collages, which use the sculptural components of photography to upend our assumptions about two-dimensional pictorial space. Evan Lee’s recent series Fugazi (2016) investigates cubic zirconia, a mineral known for its deceptive diamond-like appearance. His enlarged scans expose what we normally perceive as an optically flawless crystalline form to be a cacophony of fractured colours and shapes. Karen Zalamea’s photographic examination of place creates a circuit between image, device, and land. For They are lost as soon as they are made (2015–), the artist captured the Reykjavik

155


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

FRED SCHIFFER VIEWS FROM THE ANTON RESIDENCE (ERICKSON AND MASSEY), 1967 COURTESY OF THE JEWISH MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, L.22679

landscape through a hand-crafted lens fabricated from frozen local water. Sara Cwynar’s photography investigates how the layering of images can create simulations of the real within our current accelerated image culture. Her Kitsch Encyclopedia (2014) presents a taxonomy of everyday materials (e.g., fake flowers, touristic souvenirs) to expose how arbitrary objects and imagery are imbued with the greater weight of social signifiers, collective desires, and ratified behaviours. Contemporary artists with strong photographic practices who have created art within the spaces of Vancouver are aware of the gaps between the city’s image and its realities, its local components and its global outlook. Their experience of Vancouver’s duality, as both starting point and end point, is translated into critical works that question the fidelity between appearance and substance and the role that photography can play in exposing it.

1 The “Entrepreneurial City” is a term used in Tim Hall and Phil Hubbard’s 1996 article “The Entrepreneurial City: New Urban Politics, New Urban Geographies?,” in which they name Vancouver as an example of a “growth machine,” referring to the city’s economic rise in the 1960s and ’70s. The artist Ian Wallace has called cities like Vancouver “frontier cities,” due to their transnational outlook and increasingly global development embedded in urban landscape (personal correspondence, March 2016).


Jaclyn Arndt

Explore: Photography + Architecture Capture rounds up exhibitions and events that explore the intersections between photography and architecture

Vancouver may be best known internationally for two things: its contributions to contemporary photography and its obsession with real estate. It’s unsurprising, then, that the built environment appears repeatedly in the work of the city’s photographic artists. But the relationship between photography and architecture far predates Vancouver’s construction boom, reaching back to the origins of photography itself. The oldest existing negative, taken by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1835, depicts the latticed window of an abbey, and Eugène Atget famously spent three decades in the early 1900s capturing the architecture of Paris. Vancouver photographer Greg Girard continues this tradition in his exhibition and photo book Under Vancouver 1972–1982 (p. 98 & 135), which tracks the city's makeover from port town to “resort city.” Shirley Wiebe (p. 78 & 135) and Frances Hart D’Emilio (p. 77) have likewise turned their cameras to Vancouver's ever-changing face, the former tracking sites of redevelopment themselves and the latter undertaking a hunt for the successor to the equally beloved and maligned Vancouver Special. The line of influence pushes in both directions, with photography greatly impacting the practice of architecture, as Johan Österholm explores in his essay “The Conquest of Light” (p. 41). Not only did photography influence modern architecture’s preferred materials, but the growing ubiquity of professional architectural photography, by the likes of Pedro E. Guerrero (p. 134) and Ema Peter (p. 132) and printed in magazines such as Architectural Review (in print since 1869), turned architects’ attention to how buildings would look not only in the flesh, but in the photos that would make them famous. But photography mediates our relationship to not only architectural showpieces but also those buildings that are nameless. American photographer Lewis Baltz (p. 57 & 135), through his detached and austere images of America’s industrial parks, requires viewers to reconsider blandly familiar architecture from an anthropological—yet paradoxically affective—distance. Moving the interrelated practices of building design and photography in an entirely new direction is Brussels-based artist Alex Morrison. For Brand New Era Social Club (p. 15), he has taken the design tools of the architect and repurposed them for photography, challenging and expanding accepted definitions of the medium. Though it is certainly true that the buildings we encounter via photography and the ones we actually enter into are two very different things, as is our relationship to them, the built world and photography remain vitally joined. “We might even go so far as to say,” explains art critic David Campany, “that the cultural value of buildings is what we call ‘architecture’ and that it is inseparable from photography.” As the artists in Capture 2017 attest, the subject of architecture continues to be as generative for today’s photographers as for the very first.

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Reflecting thematically upon the fragmented nature of Vancouver’s story as a city, Alex Morrison’s Brand New Era Social Club, drawn from his site-specific work for the Dal Grauer Substation, comments on both digital and analogue forms of representation and their importance in the construction of past narratives and contemporary reality. The room that appears in the image is a three-

dimensional rendering that combines photocollage with Morrison’s amateur digital drawing skills, which has been framed and cropped to the artist’s liking. This act of selecting a frame from a larger reality (or virtual reality, in this case) mimics that of making a photograph, but speaks directly to the constructed nature of many of the images circulating today, especially those emerging from the real estate or industrial design worlds. Though outside of the traditional definition of photography (whereby photo = light and graphia = writing or inscription), Morrison’s work suggests that this definition no longer reflects the medium’s current conditions.

To purchase, email info@capturephotofest.com or visit https://squareup.com/store/capturephotofest/

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EDITIONS

Alex Morrison Brand New Era Social Club, 2017 pigment print on bamboo paper 21”x 17” Courtesy of the artist Edition of 40 $250


CAPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL APRIL 2017

Steffanie Ling

Personal Grey Standard Writer and critic Steffanie Ling responds to a photo from the archives The placards of early Lower Mainland photographers read: Versed in flattering dreariness. Best greys guaranteed. For two pictures possibly hewn together by early experimental impulses, we simply require a penchant for contradiction. It doesn’t invite contemplation (only unfruitful neck pain). Still though, it flaunts the boldness of the composition’s bisect. The severe landscape, bearing marks of dingy modernization, awash in the melancholy of greyscale. Yet, these greys might belie sadness for some.

PHILIP TIMMS TWO FRASER RIVER VIEWS, 190– COURTESY OF THE VANCOUVER PUBLIC LIBRARY, 7107

As an art critic, the German novelist Robert Walser once wrote of an autumnal forest painting: “You involuntarily put your hands in your pocket when you look at it, since it so wonderfully communicates its wintry nature.” The strength of this picture translates coldness. As a storyteller, Walser also wrote about a Painter (a mouthpiece for the writer’s aesthetic predilections) who waxed about his love of winter because of its profound lack of colour: “I love everything that is moist, cold, and colourless” and “Gray has always been one of my favourite colors, one of the most refined and sweetest, and to my delight, it is everywhere in these mountains. Even green looks gray here: the fir trees!” The Painter claimed to see colour where there is none, and referred to nature as a Countess he is slave to, detailing their fraught but devoted romance. In looking at pictures, we find or invent logics for our appreciation. Often we are more compelled to appreciate than to criticize, and we end up talking about other things.


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Celebrating creative expression and human potential Just as in business, we value innovative and outstanding performance in the arts and are proud to support the Capture Photography Festival. We applaud those that work to make their vision a reality, in the ash of an eye or across the entirety of a lifetime.

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Capture Magazine 2017  

The 2017 Capture Magazine is the official guide to the fourth annual Capture Photography Festival (April 1–28) in Vancouver, Canada.

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