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Volume 1, Issue 5. Apr 27-May 11, 2012

Griffin Heights Fights Back Page 11

Will You Be My Black Friend? Page 18

Media Activists Unite!

Photo by Darla Winn

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Happy Spring, Tallahassee!

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Feature

PUTTING ON THE BRAKES Joe Mezzina, owner of Joe’s Bike Shop at Lake Ella, felt the city should have converted one lane of Call Street to a dedicated bike lane, as an alternative to the now defunct Tennessee Street proposal. (Photo by Paul Haney.)

Is biking in Tallahassee a viable mode of transportation? Part 1 of 2

W

ith the collapse of plans to turn lanes of Tennessee Street into bike and bus lanes, we thought it was a good time to examine the condition of bicycling in Tallahassee in general. With 120+ miles of bike lanes, is it really a safe and desired alternative to automotive travel? Villager reporter Paul Haney set out on his bicycle to investigate community feelings about road travel in the city, and to experience the milieu firsthand. By Paul Haney Bicycling in Tallahassee has many faces. Recreational cyclists frequent the well-worn and, as of late, wellmaintained bike trails on the fringes of

town, like Cadillac Trail at Tom Brown Park, the Munson Hills Trail, the Red Bug Trail and the St. Mark’s Trail. On FSU’s campus, cyclists zip around making the student body jealous of their commuting efficiency. On city streets,

/ CapitalCityVillager/ Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5

however, steep climbs, scant bike lanes, and distracted (and sometimes disdainful) drivers make cycling more of a hazard. Some groups are trying to change that. In 2009, The League of American Bicyclists named Tallahassee a “BronzeLevel Bicycle-Friendly Community” largely because of the plan to install a network of paths within the city and improve the trails in rural areas. Capital City Cyclists take a large amount of credit, as their community involvement and two large cycling events each year — the Tour of Southern Rural Vistas and the Spaghetti 100 — made the league’s list of rationales for improving

the city’s rating, along with the fact that 1.3% of Tallahasseeans cycle to work, there are 124 miles of extant bike lanes in Tallahassee, and that the city has looked into alternative transportation innovations and invested in putting bike racks on the Star Metro busses and creating more bike lanes and paths through their Moving Tallahassee: Cars Optional initiative. Even with this new rating, many in Tallahassee just aren’t interested in opting for a bicycle over their car. “Nobody wants to give up their cars around here, at least not enough people to make a difference,” says Nate, an employee at Joe’s Bike Shop on Lake Ella. “There are two things the city needs to do with their bike paths to get people to use them. One, avoiding cars. Two, avoiding hills. And the chief of those is getting the bicycles off the roads with the cars.” It seems until Tallahassee manages to build safe and reliable bicycle lanes or paths, the city will struggle to convince people to get out of their cars and onto their bikes. The Tallahassee Mountain Biking Association, headed up by Scot Benton, takes a hands-on approach to growing a culture of cycling in Tallahassee. The TMBA recently led the Lake Elberta Cleanup, operates the “Florida Youth Shine” Bike Rehab Program, which distributes bicycles to the youths of the city, and frequently runs “glass patrol” to keep paths and sidewalks clear of glass. As well, Benton intends for his volunteer-staffed bike shop, the Bike House on Jackson Bluff Road, to one day become a hostel for cross-country cyclists. “An average college student spends approximately $300 a month on carrelated expenses — or $14,000 in four years — the equivalent of a down payment on a house,” Benton says. “At the end of college, the average four-year student is approximately $35,000 in debt.” By this math, the average student could take on 40% less debt by foregoing an automobile while in college.


“This debt is not good for students, their families, and it certainly has a negative effect on the overall economic climate.” The swelling of student loan debt, Benton says, forces graduates to work too many hours and decreases their quality of life: “People in this situation get depressed, eat too much fast food, and do not get enough rest or exercise.” Promoting cycling in younger generations, it seems, could improve life in a multitude of areas. Along with the health and economic benefits to the individual bike rider, transitioning a population from fossil fuel–burning automobiles to self-propelled vehicles or mass-commuter alternatives has apparent benefits for the environment. Besides, with the rising cost of gasoline, cycling could save big bucks for the community at large and serve to circulate that money back into the economy. Hans van Tol works with the Capital City Cyclists and is a professor at the National High Magnetic Field Lab here in Tallahassee. He comes from the Netherlands, where daily bike commuting is a way of life. In an April 5 article on the CCC website, he writes in support of raising gas taxes to help fund transportation projects that provide alternatives to building new roads: “It does not help that federal gas taxes have not increased since 1993, as opposed to road building costs. … [I]nvestment in bicycle and pedestrian facilities improve real-estate prices, create more jobs, attract tourism, and lead to more dollars spent within the state.” Though a federal gas tax would raise the price of gasoline and further stress a middle class that’s already scraping by, van Tol makes an interesting argument for the benefit of raising the gas tax and encouraging Florida’s citizens to leave their cars at home: “16% of family budgets [go] to transportation. Most of that money leaves the state, as Florida has no significant oil extraction industry, no oil refineries, and very little car manufacturing industry. Giving Floridians more transportation options means more money will be spent

in Florida.” All of these cycling advocates call for a paradigm shift in the way Tallahasseeans perceive cycling. In cities all across Europe, and even in American cities like Portland, Ore. and Santa Barbara, Calif., communities look on bicycling as the preferred mode of transportation. For us in Tallahassee, the push to change viewpoints may come down to a chicken-or-egg question: What comes first, citizens committing to cycling around town, or road safety to draw them out? To answer this question, I made myself the chicken and set out on my daily commute from my apartment near Lake Ella to the Williams Building at FSU. Normally on my rides to campus I head over to Thomasville Road, down Calhoun, and cross Monroe Street on Park. I don’t hit a bike lane until College Avenue, which Greek lifers have appropriated for their loading zone. Other times I wind my way through Frenchtown, but the steep hills there and speeding traffic make bicycling especially nervy. On biketallahassee.com, I find a route to campus across on Tharpe Street, down High, and over on Call that puts me on a bike lane nearly the whole way. If this goes well, I might have a new route to campus. Before I set out, I visit the Florida Department of Transportation website to find the traffic laws for bicyclists. I want to do this thing right. • Wear a helmet if you’re under 16. Well I’m not, but it also says a helmet will protect my head and make me a good role model for the youngsters. I’ll wear one. • Install front and back lights for nighttime. Okay, it may be dark when I get home. • Carry one person at a time. So no handlebar rides. (I wonder, what’s the sensation of getting a handlebar ride on a set of mustache handlebars?) • Keep at least one hand on the handlebars at all times. No problem. I could never ride no-hands anyway. • Do not use a listening device. The MP3 player stays in the backpack.

• Follow all traffic signs and signals. Sigh. Fine. • Do not ride under the influence. Good to know. I’ll leave the flask at home today.

I slap on my helmet, sling on my backpack, and pedal out of the driveway. After a scenic ride around the lake, the first difficulty in my commute is crossing from the southeast corner of Tharpe and Monroe to the northwest. Parked at the corner waiting for the walk signal, I can see the bike lane starting on the other side, marked with the bicycling icon. While waiting on the northeast corner, a fellow biker comes bearing down on me from North Monroe, heading south. I nod hello as he passes before seeing his wild eyes, his shirtless tan, salt-and-pepper beard and front basket full of cans, garments and paper bags with unknown contents. He flies by me into the intersection, arresting turning cars, lifts his hand, flicks them off, then keeps sailing south. The mad biking pirate of Tallahassee. Auspicious start, I think. On Tharpe Street, the lane is wide and comfortable, like Kramer adopted this stretch and repainted the lanes. Traffic is sparse on a Wednesday morning at 11:30 (I know, I’m an early riser), and the weather is nice. At Old Bainbridge, the bike lane goes outside the right-turn lane and I remember the cycling law that says stay in lanes marked bicycle lanes unless trying to turn, in which case you should move fully into either the left- or right-turn lane so that motorists can see you clearly. They can surely see me now. I coast to the designated end of the narrow strip, ahead of the stopped cars, almost under the stoplight, and dangle in the intersection like bait on a hook, While cars careen around me, I check my helmet strap. I need to turn left at High Street, but the traffic’s coming and I can’t get over into the left lane. I have to duck right, to the right of the turn lane and use the crosswalk like a regular pedestrian. This is within the law, according to biketallahassee.com, as long as I obey the signals. They also instructed me, when

Paul Rutkovsky, an art professor at FSU, had many such safe journeys when he used to ride his bike to campus. But 10 years ago a student ran a stop sign and struck him with her car, breaking his neck and crushing the bones in his pelvis. “I was preparing to turn, was in the turn lane,” Rutkovsky says. “She came out of that stop sign so fast … I just hit the side of the car and flew over it.” using the sidewalk, to yield and give oral warning to pedestrians. After navigating the crosswalks at Tharpe and High, and maneuvering my way into the bike lane heading south, I notice more traffic and less room between me and the zooming cars. I also notice a steep uphill climb ahead of me. The speed limit on High Street is only 35, but while I’m standing up to pedal in low gear and hearing cars closing in behind me — the sound of their engines raising in volume and pitch to a crescendo just feet to my left — and I’m laboring up the hill, lacking a rearview

Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5/ CapitalCityVillager/


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/ CapitalCityVillager/ Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5

mirror, and wondering, with the minimal oxygen circulating through my brain, if the approaching car sees me in the bike lane or if the driver’s looking down and texting, I swear those cars fly by at 60. The bike lane fizzles out a few hundred feet before Tennessee Street. Coming down the other side of the hill, I grab my brakes and veer onto the sidewalk, ready to give verbal warning to any pedestrians. There are none, and I wait for my walk signal to cross Tennessee Street and its six lanes of traffic. Part of the City’s Moving Tallahassee: Cars Optional initiative is the Transit Alternatives study, which planned on turning the outer lanes of Tennessee Street into bus, bike and right-turnonly traffic for eight months in 2012. Star Metro, which received a $400,000 grant from the federal government for this study, would then gather information that could make the city eligible for more federal funding to go toward building a rail system, revamping the bus system, and expanding bicycle and pedestrian paths, trails, and lanes, thus helping the city transition from its automobile congestion. According to the 2009 West Tennessee Street Transit Corridor Study, converting Tennessee Street from six to four lanes and scheduling busses to arrive every 10 minutes would have a

negligible effect on road congestion, the Level of Service (LOS) grade declining from D to E either way, but the transit service grade would increase from a C to an A, and “pedestrian and cyclist comfort would also increase.” In 2013, the city plans to repave Tennessee Street, most likely impacting traffic much like the current Gaines Street project, but the results of the Transit Alternatives study may have affected how the city rebuilds the major corridor. Now, the Transit Alternatives study, and the possibility for federal funding, is no longer a possibility. According to the agenda of a March 7 special meeting, City Commissioners -- who were hopeful about the project -- shot it down after finding out that Anath Prasad, Secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation, would deny any recommendations, perhaps in response to a community outcry against the study. A March 1 report from WCTV says that businesses on Tennessee Street vehemently opposed the proposition, claiming “Cars optional would mean business optional.” And the FSU student government officially opposed the project. An opinion piece at tomahawknation. com argues that the lane reduction on Tennessee Street would be bad for Seminole football attendance.


Conversely, Capital City Cyclists, the FSU Cycling Club and the League of Women Voters in Tallahassee came out in support of the project. According to the FAQ on talgov.com for the West Tennessee Street Transit Pilot Project, 58 people were hit by vehicles in a five-year span on Tennessee Street between Ocala and North Monroe. In a slideshow on that same website promoting Moving Tallahassee: Cars Optional, the city reports 22 accidents and 14 injuries occurring in bicycle-automobile crashes from 2003– 09 on that same stretch of road, along with 58 reported accidents and 34 injuries in pedestrian–automobile crashes from 2003–10. With these statistics, the whole community agrees that something needs to change to make the city safer for pedestrians and cyclists alike. I regain the bike lane on Call Street south of Tennessee, and soon the crimson arches, manicured flora and brick buildings of FSU appear ahead of me. Where Call meets Stadium, a whole confluence of traffic — drivers, walkers, skateboarders, cyclists — meet at the intersection. Staying true to my commitment to obey all laws, I wait for the cross signal. As I wait, the traffic rumbles by and I stare at a cyclist on the other side of the road going the wrong way in my lane. He comes at me before our signal appears, so that when I see the white walking-man, I’m stymied. I can’t go with this burly bearded biker in my way. As the young man rolls past me, I hear a female voice behind me say, “You need to get on the other side of the road.” I’m grateful for her watchdog attitude but, again without a rearview mirror, I can’t see what she looks like. When we get into school grounds the young woman passes me on the left. Short, brown hair, skinny tires, a Defiance, Ohio patch on her backpack, she proceeds into the university. Back home, I also searched the Internet for cycling regulations on FSU’s campus. I found none, neither at floridastatecycling.com nor at police.fsu. edu, so I assume it’s a free-for-all. Wanting to learn how to navigate the crowd and possibly hear my DIY hero-

ine chasten another misuser of the bike lane, I try to follow her through the streams of students. Fat chance. As soon as we hit heavy foot traffic she shoots off, weaving around people talking on cell phones and looking down at papers. I try to keep up but a blockade of pedestrians brings me to a dead stop and I put my foot down, watching her disappear ahead of me. Eventually I pull up to the Williams building bike rack, concluding a safe but sweaty journey. Paul Rutkovsky, an art professor at FSU, had many such safe journeys when he used to ride his bike to campus. But 10 years ago a student ran a stop sign and struck him with her car, breaking his neck and crushing the bones in his pelvis “I was preparing to turn, was in the turn lane,” Rutkovsky says. “She came out of that stop sign so fast … I just hit the side of the car and flew over it.” “The helmet saved my life, that’s what the neurosurgeon told me,” says Rutkovsky, who strongly encourages all cyclists to wear their helmets. Rutkovsky recovered and now lives with “no small pain,” but says, “To this day, I don’t bicycle in Tallahassee … I just get the shakes when I’m on a bicycle now.” He says the irony is “I’m a lover of the bicycle and I’m horrified [to ride one].” Rutkovsky also says that “It’s so important, to make a viable small city in Tallahassee, you need, instead of more cars, safer, wider lanes,” putting him in the camp with those who call for the promotion of alternative means of transportation in Tallahassee, even with his traumatic experience.

Photos by Darla Winn

Part 2 of this series will continue in our next issue and online at TallyVillager.com

Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5/ CapitalCityVillager/


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By Denise Vickers-Leon To simply say that Simon Bevis knows something about farming would be an understatement. After farming in Alabama for 10 years, Bevis brought his eagerness, knowledge and even tractor to Tallahassee to spread the word about the benefits of organic production. With his vision firmly planted, Bevis took a leadership role in developing the Tallahassee Sustainability Group. Comprised mostly of students from FSU, FAMU and TCC, the group partnered with the Salvation Army to establish the Community Gardens, which was then turned over solely to Bevis’ group last summer. “Facebook is our primary source of communication to the public and we need funding to progress,” said Bevis. Another major project is the collaboration with the Ghazvini Center for Learning to operate a sustainability unit there, teaching the students about farming and ecology. The group has centralized their operations on Lake Bradford Road — which once was a strip mall and is the present home of the Salvation Army — into a virtual field of dreams. It’s hard to miss the swaying sunflowers and three-foot collard greens among other produce. Not to be overlooked is the chicken coop made out of chicken wire and recycled water bottles, complete with baby chicks donated by a local farmer who had them

left over from Easter without a place to house them. On hand for the ribbon-cutting ceremonies on April 21 included City Commissioner Akin Akinyemi, County Commissioner John Dailey and Salvation Army Captain Julio Da Silva. “I think we can get this thing going with the amount of people here today. It’s small now but has the potential to grow. I’ve been interested in gardening for over three years. It tastes better,” said Travis Rountree, a student at Fairview middle School. Besides offering a space for community farmers to grow produce (preferably organic) for sale, the group will have a community kitchen where people can come to can their own food, a tool coop, a learning center, a café, as well as a place to make their own compost and offer the outside of the buildings as a canvas for local artists to practice their artistic skills. The property will be pedestrian and bike-friendly. Community farmers can adopt growing plots for $20.00. “I just feel that a food movement like this is needed not in just Tallahassee but in the world. Projects like this will show the community how we can eliminate the need for trucks bringing in our food. We need more people with a passion for this type of venture,” said Heather Henderson, a 21-year-old student at FSU. Bevis and his group are rooted in their quest to spread the word about the benefits of organic farming.


Neighborhood Beat

Griffin Heights fights to come back

Rudy Ferguson Sr. and congregants of New Birth Tabernacle of Praise (Photo by Denise Vickers-Leon) By Denise Vickers-Leon If anyone were to ask most citizens of Tallahassee and surrounding counties if they knew where the Griffin Heights/ Springfield Community was located, more often than not the answer would be “no.” However, were it asked where Tallahassee’s biggest drug and crime area is, the answer most often heard would be “Alabama Street.” They are one in the same. It has become the mission of one of the area’s pastors and his congregation -- along with federal and local law enforcement agencies --to bring “neighbor” back to the “hood”. Rudy Ferguson Sr. is pastor of New Birth Tabernacle of Praise, a church in the heart of what became a crime and violence infested neighborhood perpetuated by a thriving open-air drug market. Ferguson and the majority of his congregation were either born, raised or have other close ties to the community, and all have in some way been affected by its downfall. They took their mission for a community comeback to the One Voice Coalition, the Griffin Heights Neighborhood Association and the United Parents Positive Action Coalition (UPPAC) to form the Griffin heights Revitalization

Project. Now that phase one of Operation See Change -- a six month collaborative, undercover effort between local and federal law enforcement agencies which thus far has led to fourteen felony arrests --has been launched, the church and the Griffin Heights Neighborhood Association are organizing the implementation of rehabilitation and revitalization. Although optimistic and hopeful, no one taking on the challenge of turning the community around is looking through rose-colored glasses. They realize that just as it took time for the foundation of the community to crack, it will take more time, a greater commitment, and open communication between all parties to resurface more than just the streets. To try and rid the neighborhood of the drug market as well as the crime and violence associated with it is an important step, but the bigger obstacle is to calm the fears of residents. The elderly are afraid to sit on their porches. People aren’t able to utilize John G. Riley Park, which the city dedicated to them. Parents are afraid to let their children walk by themselves to schools located just down the street from their homes.

The grip of fear has tightly seized this neighborhood for so long that the tasks to alleviate it may seem daunting or even futile to some, but those campaigning for the cause are determined to show that positive change is attainable. Phase two of Operation See Change, “Building on the Promises of the Future”, kicked off with a Communitywide Town Hall Meeting on January 26, at New Birth Tabernacle of Praise to a

To try and rid the neighborhood of the drug market as well as the crime and violence associated with it is an important step, but the bigger obstacle is to calm the fears of residents.

packed house. Speakers on hand to address the residents’ concerns included Pamela C, Marsh; U.S. Attorney, Dennis M. Jones; Chief of Police and Willie Meggs; State Attorney. All three expressed the same sentiment, that law officials need the cooperation of the community as a whole to work with and alongside them in order for the project to be successful. On any given Sunday at New Birth Tabernacle of Praise, 1200 Harlem Street, what can clearly be heard through the raised windows are songs of redemption and restoration – an effort to provide inspiration inside and outside the congregation that will hopefully get the community enthusiastic and optimistic about positive change. But while change has been slow, the group remains steadfast and consistent in their efforts. A community block party to be held in June.

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READER SKETCHES

The following is a submission to our Fiction in 500 Words Challenge, an ongoing series. Read submission guidelines and terms online at TallyVillager.com, and email you submissions to Tallahassy@Gmail.com (subject line: “500 Word Challenge.”)

By Talise Jager-Sumner

The old porch that grandma used to sit on sagged, sagged like a hammock on a tropical beach. The gray shingles were jumping from the rooftop like popping popcorn kernels. The stained glass windows flew from their frames like baby birds jumping from their nest. The windows landed on the hazel brown grass. The flames licked affectionately like a puppy at the dopey front door. The old gray paint was alive with light again as the fire brought it into its welcoming arms. Like a hamster the flames came out from under the dopey front door and crawled out onto the porch and started to run around. I watched and giggled at the circus of fire animals playing in my house. Those fire circus animals continued to play in the house and the house continued to get smaller and smaller. The cute animals were having a little too much fun and it was going to ruin Grandma’s house. There was nothing I could do except watch as the animals played. Watching I feel as if maybe I should be playing with them. I took a few steps towards the fire circus. The fire lion broke down the front door and came bounding out onto the porch. The

scurrying hamsters hurried away as the lion opened his mouth. He let out a roar and the flames shot ten feet up into the air. The roof was being devoured by the lion’s roar. The sight was beautiful and graceful, like the lion. Calls came from behind me, screams echoed, breaking the beautiful noise of the fire circus. Looking back those kids screamed at the sight and yelled insults at me. The blue and red lights of an intruding cop car came into view and the red of a speeding fire truck hurried towards me. Tears claimed my eyes and my vision blurred. I let out my own roar, hoping it would be like the lion’s. But no flames lifted high into the air. I looked at the house, crying and the lion stood there. He motioned for me to join him. If I joined him I could be one with the fire. I could be powerful and strong and nothing could stand in my way once I was with the fire. I staggered to the flaming steps and the lion let out a roar that sent the flames running out to me. They consumed my hair and my clothes. The heat of the fire felt amazing and as it burned my skin I smiled and laughed as the roof collapsed and the rubble flew at me.

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Arts & Culture

EXIT INTERVIEW: Steve Macqueen part-time fundraiser. That’s it. My management role was to run everything: I booked the acts, made sure production people had the tech requirements, drove artists to and from airports and hotels, wrote the programs and brochures, managed memberships, worked with the Ticket Office, walked the front of the house at every show, dealt with backstage dramas, as needed....all of it.

Steve Macqueen with Joan Rivers in February. On August 1, 2007, Steve Macqueen took the helm as Director of FSU’s Seven Days of Opening Nights festival. And it was announced earlier this month that he would be leaving that post shortly for a new position as the Artistic Director for the Flynn Center for Performing Arts in Burlington, Vermont. So we thought it would be a good time for an exit interview with this much-loved community member. And we wish him well in his next endeavor. Villager: How would you describe the condition of the festival when you took it over? And what condition do you feel you are leaving it in? Steve Macqueen: 7 Days has always been popular in the community, so it isn’t like I inherited some broken-down shell or anything like that. In fact, the 2007 season I inherited from my predecessor was a record-breaker for attendance and revenue. But there was some sense of isolation. Campus relationships weren’t doing well, for instance. And it was known that Ruby Diamond was going to be shut down (I was told for one year; it was, of course, two). What we did NOT foresee was the economic collapse shortly after

my arrival, which led to the complete termination of my FSU funding (FSU had contributed six-figures’ [sic] worth to every season prior to 2009) and to Seven Days being self-sufficient. So a little more than a year after my arrival, I went from well-funded gigs in Ruby Diamond to scratching out an existence in various rooms around town. Rugged couple of years. Also, our audience was older than it had to be. We weren’t appealing to students. Like, at all. When I started, students were 4% of our audience. And this is at a university. This year it was 17%, which is better. Villager: What was your exact role in 7DON? Were you hand-selecting the acts, or working with a team? What was your management role? SM: I am the only full-time employee of Seven Days, so I was responsible for all of it. I did all the negotiation and selection of acts, although I took a lot of input from faculty, who tended to know what was best for students. My team was a part-time College of Music student who changed each year (all of them were GREAT, by the way) and a

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Villager: The festival grew in leaps and bounds, and might now be better titled 3 Months of Opening Nights. How did it evolve so rapidly? SM: I always wanted the festival to be the festival, but I also wanted things happening year-round. Part of it was selfish -- I live to put on these shows; everything else is a desk job. S o when I am basically doing fun work for two weeks and less-fun work for 50, that’s no good. Plus, I think Tallahassee can not only handle more culture, but wants it. The problem is that I got my festival dates in Ruby Diamond, but after that, I had to stand in line and beg [for] dates like everyone else. The College of Music runs my two favorite venues (Diamond and Opperman) and they are both huge and busy. They’ve been extremely accommodating and wonderful with schedules, but sometimes there just aren’t any dates! So in that sense, each season is organic because you can’t really plan those non-February dates. But it was definitely a plan to get stuff going outside February.

Villager: 7DON has accomplished a lot besides just bringing cultural and artistic voices to Tallahassee. I feel it has helped to bring FSU into the Leon County community, and community members into FSU’s world -- where there has always been a perceived boundary. Call it an “academic curtain” maybe. And 7DON has created a lineup of regional draws that have elevated the cultural offerings of the university as a whole,

and the community. Would you agree with that assessment, and what do you think the greatest impact of 7DON has been? SM: Well, THANK YOU because that is one of the main functions of 7 Days. It’s supposed to be that place where community and university intersect, then appreciate and enjoy each other. Part of the trick there is to be eclectic (sometimes schizophrenic) and balance purely academic offerings with more popular stuff. That’s something everyone thinks they can do, by the way. Also, I am proud of the fact that 7 Days worked with FAMU for three consecutive years and pulled off a trio of really fabulous performances at Lee Hall. Plus, TCC has been one of our strongest supporters from day one, so you’ve got all three institutions of higher learning collaborating...a rarity. Villager: Celebrities can sometimes bring more to the table than is in the contract, either in personality or other aspects. Any horror stories? (Feel free to tell a story without naming any names!) SM: Tons. I got a phone call from the IRS on the day of an artist’s show telling me that he owed back taxes and that they would be coming to confiscate his check. One artist refused to stay in a hotel, insisting that he sleep on a couch in the dressing room upon his arrival at 5 a.m. on Sunday morning (ugh). We had to borrow a VP’s couch to put down there. He then woke up and hung out backstage ALL DAY, driving everyone nearly insane prior to his departure at 11 p.m.

Villager: What was the most ridiculous contract Rider that you have seen in your tenure? I worked an event elsewhere some time ago where the performer wanted two limes in the dressing room, cut into thirds. And then proceeded to throw a fit when they weren’t cut so


evenly. Anything like that? SM: I learned long ago to read the riders before you sign the contract, or at the very least to vet the rider well in advance of the performer’s arrival. If you’re a little prepared, you avoid the heartache. My mother taught me that throwing away food is a sin, so I am hypersensitive to people who demand way too much food. If it’s a super-crazy rider and there’s no flexibility, I just don’t do it. Villager: And large events come with lots of logistics, which can always go awry. Were there any “disaster events”, where the plane was late, the microphones weren’t working, and the auditorium air conditioner was broken? SM: Not too many, surprisingly. And, of course, people should never know, right? One of the two rules of show business is “never let ‘em see you sweat.” Shawn Colvin landed late in Atlanta, missed her connecting flight, and called me from the airport to tell me she’d be driving there for the 8 p.m. show. She called at 4:30. I made a couple of calls and was fortunate enough to have the Sarah Mac Band step in as an unannounced opening act, and they were great. Shawn arrived while they were onstage. No one was the wiser. Villager: Have we missed anything? SM: I’m really happy with the educational end of the festival, which is what I think sets it apart. We’ve always had great master classes at the university level -- what writer wouldn’t want to hear what Salman Rushdie has to say; what dancer [wouldn’t] be thrilled to get a lesson from the Mark Morris Dance Group -- but we’ve really started to connect at the K-12 level, too. Last year alone we had the Ahn Trio, Soweto Gospel Choir and Carolina Chocolate Drops do fabulous programs in the schools, and that’s something that I hope continues. I also really want to thank Tallahassee for coming out and supporting Seven Days. My second go-round in Tallahassee has been fabulous and I will miss it. And thanks for letting me talk about it.

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Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5/ CapitalCityVillager/15


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NOTES FROM

Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra Director of Patron Services/ Office Manager (Deadline: May 6) The Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra seeks a dynamic, highly committed Director of Patron Services/Office Manager to perform a wide range of duties pertaining to ticketing and office management and act as lead operations manager for the annual Young People’s Concert and Southwood Pops in the Park. To request a full list of duties and complete job description, please send an email to TSO Executive Director Mandy Sauer at director@tallahasseesymphony.org. A cover letter, resume and writing sample are due by Monday, May 6.

Models Wanted for Breast Cancer Awareness Project

Persons who have been touched by breast cancer are wanted to model for a collage poster to debut in October as part of a breast cancer awareness project. Models will be covered in tasteful body paint and professionally photographed. For more info contact Karen Mercer at 273-8660.

These listings are a small sampling from COCA’s Weekly E-Mail Blast, a free e-mail newsletter for cultural organizations and amateur and professional artists, musicians, writers, dancers, actors, and creative people in all disciplines. To receive the complete COCA weekly e-mail, sign up at www.cocanet. org. COCA’s mission is to serve as a catalyst for development and support of arts and culture in Florida’s capital region.”

Classical Guitarist Wanted to Play Art Opening (June 1)

A classical guitarist(s) is wanted to play a First Friday art opening at Tallahassee City Hall on June 1 for up to two hours. This is an unpaid gig, but the performer will receive exposure as part of the show opening (name on posters and any ads). You may hand out promotional materials if you have them. If interested please email townshow@talgov.com and put “Guitarist” in the subject line and contact information in the body of email.

2012 Seven Hills Writing Contest (Deadline: August 31)

The Tallahassee Writers Association is accepting submissions for its 2012 Seven Hills contest. Submissions may be short stories up to 2500 words, creative nonfiction, children’s chapter books, or 500-word flash fiction. Submissions will be made online through Submishmash at www.sevenhillsreview.submishmash.com/submit.

PROOFREADING Pay-what-you-like (or don’t) proofreading for FINALS WEEK! “I just love proofreading. Really.” - Adam Bois Have your papers reviewed at BOISproofreading.com BOISproofreading@gmail.com *Highly recommended by Capital City Villager.

16/ CapitalCityVillager/ Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5


COMMENTARY: The Media Doctors

Media Activists Unite! : Invasion of the Critical Media Scholars By Andy Opel and Jennifer Proffitt From May 10 through May 12, 2012, The School of Communication will be hosting the Union for Democratic Communication Conference at Florida State University. The UDC is an organization of communication researchers, journalists, media producers, policy analysts, academics and activists dedicated to the critical study of the c o m mu n i c a t i o n s establishment, the production and distribution of democratically controlled and produced media, and the development of democratic communications systems. UDC encourages critical perspectives in communication theory, media production, and the study of popular culture. This year, over 100 media scholars from around the globe will gather in Tallahassee to present research on the current state of our media system and share creative work that challenges the banality of corporate media. The conference will include two major presentations that are free and open to the public. The first will be a keynote lecture from writer, filmmaker and associate professor Joel Bakan, who will speak on Friday, May 11 from 8 to 10pm in the Turnbull Center at FSU. Bakan is known for his award-winning documentary, The Corporation, and his presentation is titled “Good Corp, Bad Corp: Social Responsibility and the Breaking of Democracy.” Bakan’s latest book, Childhood Under Siege: How Big Business Targets Children (Free Press, 2011), is a biting indictment of regulatory rollbacks that now allow corporations to pedal toxic media products to the most vulnerable

In our society. Bakan argues, “Computer game designers craft techniques to titillate children with sex and violence, while social media developers infiltrate and shape children’s social and emotional

worlds to compel them to spend more and more monetizable time online.” In preparation for this lecture, FSU will be hosting a free screening of his film The Corporation on Thursday May 10 from 3:30 to 6pm at the Center for Global Engagement on the FSU campus. The second keynote speech that is free and open to the public is “Towards a Political Economy of Social Movement Media” by Southern Illinois University Professor John Downing. Professor Downing is the author of numerous books, most recently editing The Encyclopedia of Social Movement Media (Sage, 2011 — full disclosure: Andy Opel contributed the section on Low Power FM in the United States). Downing is internationally recognized as a leading scholar on media and social movements — helping grassroots organizations gain access to media tools and develop effective communication strategies to get their messages out. Professor Downing will be receiving the 2012 Dallas Smythe Award at the

conference for his continued service to the field of media and critical communication scholarship. This gathering of media scholars is intended to confront a media system that has been taken over by large corporate interests. When Ben Bagdikian first published his warning about the dangers of concentrated ownership in the media industries in the book, Media Monopoly (Beacon Press, 1983), 50 corporations owned the major media outlets in the US. Today, with the book in its seventh edition, we are now confronted by a mediascape where five corporations own all the major radio stations, television networks, cable TV networks, newspapers, film studios, music labels, book publishers and (“major” deleted as it was mentioned at the top of the list, although there is some small potential that it could be misread with this correction) Internet sites. As we witness the effects of the Citizens United decision on our presidential election, the poisonous influence of homogenous news and entertainment pervades our public sphere, constraining our abilities to discuss and deliberate the significant issues of the day. The corporate takeover of our media is directly linked to the corporate takeover of our democracy. Fortunately, the scholars at the UDC conference are hard at work concocting an intellectual stew of theory and practice, direct action and public participation, a blistering critique aimed at the corrupt political economy of a failing system. FSU, The School of Communication, and Tallahassee welcome them to the capital city.

As we witness the effects of the Citizens United decision on our presidential election, the poisonous influence of homogenous news and entertainment pervades our public sphere, constraining our abilities to discuss and deliberate the significant issues of the day. The corporate takeover of our media is directly linked to the corporate takeover of our democracy.

Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5/ CapitalCityVillager/17


COMMENTARY: Winning The Human Race

Will You Be My Black Friend? By Louise Reid Ritchie I recently read an article on GQ.com titled, “Will You Be My Black Friend?” It was by a white guy who hosted a party and noticed that, as he put it, “Jesus Christ, there are a lot of white people in this room.” So he advertised in Craigslist for a black buddy. His reality is almost as strange as my fiction. Several years ago, I wrote and performed in what was considered a revolutionary sketch for Mickee Faust, the local “community theater for the weird” that is renowned for satire that pries open minds. My sketch, “Plantation Angel,” was inspired by my experiences being one of the few black people in Tallahassee who hangs out with the city’s progressive community. In the sketch, a white lesbian couple, who live in the planned Community of Loving Souls, realize they need a black friend after a Loving Souls child mistakes a black New Leaf employee for a candy bar and bites him. So, Justice and Sunflower pray for a black woman friend who will be the “chocolate icing” on their cake by joining them in vegetarian potlucks and contra dancing. And she must make sweet potato pies like Justice’s childhood mammy — I mean nanny — made. When Plantation Angel provides them with Kizzy — a black woman angel who does all of those things — Justice and Sunflower reject Kizzy because she looks too white. They demand a black friend “like Michelle Obama.” The sketch ends with Justice and Sunflower gasping in horror when the angels’ parting shot is, “If you want black friends, go to the south side of Tallahassee.” The sketch was a satirical description of experiences with Tallahassee area’s intentional communities — the verdant places where groups collectively

created enclaves in which the residents share a collective vision of neighborliness and shared values. I have been so warmly welcomed in those communities that I joke that unlike most parts of this country, if one of my sons were walking in one of those communities carrying an ice tea and bag of Skittles, he’d be more at risk of being invited to a potluck than he would be at risk of being shot. Many of the people in such communities view themselves as being liberals who love racial diversity, and would love to have more friends of color if only they had that opportunity. It’s just bad luck, in their view, that their communities are almost as white as if the Klan, not white liberals, had planned them. I don’t buy that nor do I pin it on fate when I happen to be some of my white liberal friends’ only black friend here. More than one-third of Tallahassee residents are black. People who live surrounded only by people of their race are choosing that kind of life. Enjoying racial diversity isn’t a priority for them. I know that there are some people who choose to live in our intentional communities on the outskirts of Tallahassee because they want a more rural than urban experience, not because they are trying to avoid black people. Some people in such communities make extra efforts to include opportunities for racial diversity in their lives. For instance, I know a white intentional community family who attends a predominantly black church because they want their child to experience racial diversity. I also know a white intentional community resident who opens her home for meditation to anyone who’s interested, even letting strangers spend the night. Still, don’t understand how some other white liberals — in intentional communities and elsewhere — who con-

18/ CapitalCityVillager/ Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5

sider themselves welcoming to people of all races, can live in worlds that are virtually 100 percent white. Don’t they ever get bored being around people who are so much like themselves? Don’t they ever feel impelled to dive into a more diverse world? When I taught at FAMU, even though the university has many white faculty members, I noticed that few of them bothered to go to FAMU’s football games or attend its theatrical and dance productions. The audiences at both types of events were virtually all white. Neither FAMU’s world-renowned marching band nor its excellent theater and programs attracted many white audience members. I’ve taken to scanning my white friends’ Facebooks to see how diverse their friendships are. In many cases, even though my friends are well traveled and live in areas with sizeable black populations, their only black Facebook friend is me. If you’re reading this and realizing that you need to broaden the diversity in your life, here’s some advice: Jump out of your comfort zone! If you’re religious, have the courage to visit a predominantly black church, participate in the service, and introduce yourself. Do not whip out your camera

and photograph the worshippers. I am not being facetious. In New York, white people pay to be bussed around to Harlem’s black churches on Easter Sunday so they can gawk at and take pictures of the worshippers! If you like dance or drumming — as a participant or audience member — check out the African Dance and Drum Festival that will be at Tallahassee Community College June 7–9. You needn’t be black or skilled at dancing or drumming to participate. Follow the plantation angels’ advice: Go to the south side of town. At places like Soul Vegetarian and Champion’s Chicken and Waffles you can find food that — as one of my white friends from Mississippi would say — is so good that you’d “slap your mamma for seconds.” At FAMU’s Black Archives, you can explore one of the country’s largest repositories of black historical records. At Hi Fi Jazz Café, you can enjoy music that will make your feet tap. Go, and have the courage to talk to the people you meet in those places. Trust me: These suggestions would work better than advertising for black friends on Craigslist. Louise Reid Ritchie, Ph.D. is a peace activist and diversity consultant.


Nightlife

A little go-go, a little darkness at Blue Mondays By Allie Marini Where do you go in Tallahassee if you love to dance, but aren’t into Top 40 dance music and want to avoid the crush of students on The Strip? Where do you go if your sensibilities run more to Siouxsie and The Cure, to find your own place to sit back with a drink, watch the show and hit the dance floor in your own way? The answer, of course, is Blue Mondays at Rehab, hosted by Darque Disko Productions every Monday night, 10pm–2am at Club Rehab. Club Rehab has a colorful past, having once been the location of Tallahassee’s signature Brothers nightclub. Renovated and reopened as Rehab in 2011, the (Photo by Strixx Photography) space features two bars, an open dance floor, attached Irish pub Pug stincts and a Black-Hearted (hyphenMahone’s and a covered outdoor patio ated as an adjective; if you have the area, giving patrons not one but three official name offhand, check to make places to unwind and enjoy the evening sure it matches, but of course it’s not a on their own terms. big deal) Valentine’s Day. On nights that Blue Monday, produced and organized a planned theme hasn’t been scheduled, by members of the legendary darkwave patrons are encouraged to dress in (and Tallahassee native) band The their finest club wear or to join the GoCrüxshadows, is a celebration of the Go dancers in a rotating “color theme” darker side of the dance floor. Local that’s announced on the Blue Monday turntablists DJ Arkitekt and DJ Rogue Facebook page. spin the very best of darkwave, EBM, Performances range from chogoth and industrial tunes, keeping your reographed dance routines to burboots stomping and your fists pumping lesque shows, and the Blue Ladies for four solid hours each Monday. Go-Go Dancers provide ample eye The request list fills up quickly, so candy on the boxes. $5 cover charge come early to make sure that you hear and drink specials all night will keep your song played before the night reachyour steel-toes tapping and your es its end. Themed events and perforcorset spinning. How does it feel? mances are scheduled and organized by the Blue Ladies Go-Go Troupe, so make sure to find Blue Mondays on Facebook Blue Mondays at Club to find out about weekly themes, schedRehab uled events and performances. Recent themes have included Doctor 926 W. Tharpe St. Who, “Talk Nerdy to Me”, Animal Inwww.darquedisko.com

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Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5/ CapitalCityVillager/19


NIGHTLIFE EVENTS dates

end dates

times

Submit free event listings online at TALLYVILLAGER.COM

title

venue

url

Phucked Up Fridays

AJ Sports Bar and Grill

www.ajsportsbar.net

Fri, Apr 27 Ea. Fri Ea. Fri

07:00 PM

Food Truck Friday with Live Music

All Saints Hop Yard

www.allsaintshopyard.com

Ea. Fri

08:30 PM

Phillip Solomon Stewart & the Palace Band

Amen-Ra

www.kingpent.com

Live Band

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

08:00 PM

Yamadeo

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

010:00 PM

Ryan Burdette - Justine Blazer

Bullwinkles

www.bullwinklessaloon.net

Various

Pink Floyd Digital Dome Shows

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

Ea. Fri

Gay Night! ~ Dance Music

Club Rehab

find us on facebook

Continuing

Happy Hour till 8

Krewe de Gras

find us on facebook

07:00 PM

Student Battle of the Bands

Lincoln High School Fine Arts

(850)487-2110

06:00 PM

Grisha Goryachev in Concert

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

07:00 PM

Mean Mary

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com

09:00 PM

RaeF/Manual Lounge/Philospiders/Great Beer w/David Flash

Tooth House

find us on facebook

DJ Night

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

010:00 PM

Stetsons On The Moon

The Moon

www.222moon.com

010:00 PM

Wanderfoot - Trial by Stone

The Warehouse

(850) 222-6188

06:00 PM

Zach Bartholomew Trio

University Center Club

www.clubcorp.com

Ea. Fri, Sat

010:00 PM

DJ and Dancing

Waterworks

www.waterworkstallahassee.com

Ea. Fri

08:00 PM

Sing Sing Karaoke

What ? Cafe

www.whatcafe.com

Ea. Sat

010:00 PM

Karaoke Dance Party

AJ Sports Bar and Grill

www.ajsportsbar.net

08:00 PM

The Beltane Ball w/ Acme Rhythm & Blues

American Legion

www.floridalegionpost13.org

010:00 PM

Live Music and Trash Cinema Night

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

08:00 PM

Diddley Squat

Bradfordville Blues Club

www.bradfordvilleblues.com

08:00 PM

Star City Meltdown

Club Episodes (formerly club Jade)

find us on facebook

010:30 PM

Bella and the Band

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com

010:30 PM

Spring Break 82 w/ Baet

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com

08:00 PM

“With Strings Attached” Tallahassee Symphony Orch.

Ruby Diamond Auditorium

www.tallahasseesymphony.org

Ea. Sat

010:00 PM

Out & Out LGBTQA Party

Paradigm

find us on facebook

Ea. Sat

010:00 PM

Grown Folks Night

The Moon

www.222moon.com

09:30 PM

Trial by Stone w/ Wanderfoot

The Warehouse

(850) 222-6188

Sunday Funday

AJ Sports Bar and Grill

www.ajsportsbar.net

06:00 PM

Backlash @ Peace In The Park

Railroad Square Art Park

www.thesharingtreefl.org

06:30 PM

Terror Pigeon Dance Revolt & The Backpockets

Shark Tank

find us on facebook

08:00 PM

Bassnectar

The Moon

www.222moon.com

Jungo! a bingo type game

Waterworks

www.waterworkstallahassee.com

Krank it Up!

Fermentation Lounge

www.fermentationlounge.com

Ea. Fri, Sat

Ea. Fri, Sat Ea. Fri

Sat, Apr 28

Ea. Sat

Sun, Apr 29 Ea. Sun

Ea. Sun Mon, Apr 30 05:00 PM 20/ CapitalCityVillager/ Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5


Ea. Mon

010:30 PM

Booze and Brains Trivia with Hank

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com

06:00 PM

Mimi and The HearnDogs

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com

Live Trivia with Jonny Ray

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

Flippin’ Tuesday

AJ Sports Bar and Grill

www.ajsportsbar.net

Trivia Night with John France and his Orchestra

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

Ea. Tues

Bar Wars

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

Ea. Tues

Karaoke-$2 Specials

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

05:00 PM

Hospitality Night

Waterworks

www.waterworkstallahassee.com

Ea. Wed

010:30 PM

Big Contest Wednesday

AJ Sports Bar and Grill

www.ajsportsbar.net

Ea. Wed

09:00 PM

Comedy Night

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

Bomber Babe Night

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

Little Black Dress Night @ L8

Hotel Duval

www.hotelduval.com/

College Night Drink Specials, DJ, and Free Bowling 8-10

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

Ea. Mon Tues, May 1 Ea. Tues Ea. Tues

Ea. Mon

07:30 PM

Wed, May 2

Ea. Wed Ea. Wed

09:00 PM

Ea. Wed Ea. Wed

010:00 PM

College Night

The Moon

www.222moon.com

Ea. Wed

08:00 PM

Open Mic

The Warehouse

www.openmikes.org/listings/warehouse

Ea. Thurs

09:30 PM

Karaoke with DJ Shower

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

Ea. Thurs

College Night

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

Ea. Thurs

Lady’s Night

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

Thu, May 3

Ea. Thur

010:00 PM

Open House Conspiracy

The Warehouse

(850) 222-6188

Ea. Thur

09:00 PM

Science Salon

Waterworks

www.waterworkstallahassee.com

Ea. Thur

09:00 PM

Open Mic Night!

What ? Cafe

www.whatcafe.com

09:00 PM

The Winter Sounds - The Popheads

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

05:00 PM

First Friday At the Lounge

Fermentation Lounge

www.fermentationlounge.com

5/4/12

06:00 PM

DUMPSTER LORDS First Friday w/ Micheal Regina

Renditions, An Art Space

RenditionsArt@comcast.net

5/5/12

09:30 PM

Stone Street w/ Shoes And Laces

Club Rehab

find us on facebook

5/5/12

12:00 AM

Common Zenz at Cinco de Mayo

El Jalisco

www.commonzenz.com

5/5/12

04:30 PM

Kentucky Derby Gala

Tallahassee Car Museum

www.leonarc.com/

5/5/12

07:00 PM

The PBR Live Presents: Cinco de Mayo Celebration

Paperback Rack

www.paperbackrack.tumblr.com

5/6/12

07:30 PM

Anthony Hamilton

Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center

www.tlccc.org

5/7/12

010:00 PM

The Return of Mundazed

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

5/10/12

010:30 PM

Chilled Monkey Brains w/ Nothing In The Dark

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com

5/11/2012

08:00 PM

WTF Wiser Than Fools

5th Ave Taproom

find us on facebook

5/11/12

09:30 PM

The Sean Chambers Band

Bradfordville Blues Club

www.bradfordvilleblues.com

5/11/12

08:00 PM

Midtown Idol to Benefit the Senior Center

Krewe de Gras

find us on facebook

5/12/12

08:00 PM

Moonshine Dirt Reunion - Pinchbottle

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

5/12/12

08:00 PM

Swingin Harpoon

Bradfordville Blues Club

www.bradfordvilleblues.com

5/12/12

08:30 PM

It’s a Trap w/ Midnight Matinee & Solid Gold Thunder

Club Rehab

find us on facebook

07:00 PM

The Ned Devines

Finnegan’s Wake

find us on facebook

07:00 PM

Coheed and Cambria

Coliseum

find us on facebook

May 4 - 15 5/4/12 5/4/12

5/13/12 5/15/12

Ea. 1st Fri

Ea. 2nd Sun

Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5/ CapitalCityVillager/21


HODGE-PODGE EVENTS Date

Thru

Submit free event listings online at TALLYVILLAGER.COM

Title

Category

Times

Venue

Contact

To The Arctic 3D

Cinema

Various

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

J-School Journals ~ FAMU Journalism mini film festival

Cinema

07:00 PM

Charles Winter Wood Theatre

(850)412-5389

Ea. Fri, Sat

Salsa Dancing

Dance

011:00 PM

Margo’s

find us on facebook

Ea. Fri

Contra Dance

Dance

07:30 PM

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

Ea. Fri

Lunch at College (corner College n’ Adams)

Eats

11:00 AM

Street Chefs

www.streetchefs.com

12:00 AM

Creative Tallahassee 2012

Exhibit

8:00 AM

City Hall Gallery

www.cocanet.org/city-hall

12:00 AM

Girl Scouting in the Sunshine State: Celebrating 100 Years

Exhibit

Museum

Florida Historic Capitol Museum

www.flhistoriccapitol.gov

12:00 AM

25th Annual Mahaska Whitley Student Exhibition

Exhibit

Gallery

LeMoyne Center for the Visual Arts

www.lemolyne.org

12:00 AM

Exhibits at Mission San Luis

Exhibit

10:00 AM

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

12:00 AM

Tallahassee’s Knott House

Exhibit

Museum Hours

Museum of Florida History

www.museumoffloridahistory.com

12:00 AM

Signature Art Gallery Welcomes New Artists

Exhibit

Gallery

Signature Art Gallery

www.signatureartgallery.com

12:00 AM

Golden Age of Jazz

Exhibit

Museum

Tallahassee Museum

www.tallahasseemuseum.org

12:00 AM

Jack Adams, Boston Georgia’s Native Son

Exhibit

06:00 PM

The Accidental Gallery

(256) 653-7506

Pay It Forward Fish Fry

Fundraiser

05:00 PM

Kleman Plaza

www.bigbendhc.org

Ea. Fri

Free Wine Tasting

MatureLiving

05:30 PM

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

12:00 AM

9 to 5: The Musical

Theatre

Various

Lincoln High School Fine Arts

(850)488-8187

12:00 AM

“The Best Little Whore House in Texas”

Theatre

08:00 PM

Tallahassee Little Theatre

www.tallahasseelittletheatre.org

Ea. Fri

Free (donation) Class

Workshop

05:30 PM

Namaste Yoga

www.namaste-tallahassee.com

Miners Hymns

Cinema

Various

All Saints Cinema

www.tallahasseefilms.com

Custom Knife Show

Exhibit

8:00 AM

Panhandle Pioneer Settlement

www.panhandlepioneer.org

Black Powder Musket Firings

Family

11-12PM

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

March for Babies ~ March of Dimes Walk

Family

9:00 AM

Tallahassee Community College Campus

www.marchforbabies.org/

Ea. Sat

2012 National Poster Art Competition for Children

Family

02:00 PM

The Dream Cottage (Downtown Tallahassee)

www.daretodreamyoungirls.com

12:00 AM

22nd Annual Carrabelle Riverfront Festival

Festival

11:00 AM

Carrabelle Riverfront

www.carrabelleriverfrontfestival.com

Ea. Sat

Downtown MarketPlace Tallahassee

Festival

9:00 AM

Monroe St at Park Avenue Downtown

www.tallahasseedowntown.com

Jazz’n for Autism Fundraiser

Fundraiser

07:00 PM

The Moon

www.hallemartinfoundation.org

Free Beer Tasting

MatureLiving

04:30 PM

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

Sisters of the South ~ Steel Magnolias

Performance

07:30 PM

Goodwood Museum & Gardens

www.tallahasseeballet.org

So You Wanna Run a Food Truck?

Workshop

11:00 AM

All Saints Hop Yard

www.allsaintshopyard.com

Grisha Goryachev in Concert

98145.452

03:00 PM

St. John’s Episcopal Church

www.sevenhillsconcerts.com

Peace in the Park

98145.452

12:00 PM

Shops & Studios at Railroad Square

www.peaceinthepark.info

Ukulele jam session - open session for all levels

Hobbies

04:00 PM

Finnegan’s Wake

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End of Semester Party-Potluck-Cruiser Rollout!

98145.452

06:00 PM

Lake Elberta Park

find us on facebook

Ea. Mon

Capital City Runners - Weekly Group Run

Hobbies

06:00 PM

1866 Thomasville Road 32303

www.capcityrunners.com

Ea. Mon

Tallahassee Ballroom Dance w/ DJ

Dance

07:30 PM

American Legion

www.floridalegionpost13.org

“Coastal Life” Art by Linda Clark

Exhibit

Bali-Hi Trading Company

www.balihi.us

“The Human Form”

Exhibit

10:00 AM

Jefferson Arts Gallery

www.jeffersonartsgallery.com

Ea. Mon, Tue

Headshots for Tallahassee-Area Non-Profits

Fundraiser

03:00 PM

Mickey Adair

info@availablelightphoto.com

Ea. Mon

Colonial Crafts for Children

Workshop

12:00 PM

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

Fri. Apr 27

Sat. Apr 28 12:00 AM Ea. Sat

Ea. Sat

Sun., Apr 29

Ea. Sun Mon. Apr 30

22/ CapitalCityVillager/ Apr 25, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 5


Tue. May 1 Ea. Tues

Tango Tuesdays ~ Argentine Tango Society

Dance

08:30 PM

5th Avenue Tap Room

tangotallahassee.com

Ea. Tues

Tallahasse Swing Band

Dance

07:00 PM

American Legion

www.floridalegionpost13.org

Ea. Tue, Wed

Lunch at Boulevard Park (By Turlington Bld on Gaines St)

Eats

11:00 AM

Street Chefs

www.streetchefs.com

Ea. Tues

Crochet / Knitting Meet

Hobbies

6:30 AM

What ? Cafe

www.whatcafe.com

Mindfulness, Meditation and the Body

Lecture

07:45 PM

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

FSU Literary Readings

Lecture

08:00 PM

The Warehouse

(850) 222-6188

Ea. Wed

Sue Boyd Country Dance Lessons

Dance

06:30 PM

American Legion

www.floridalegionpost13.org

Ea. Wed

Worship & Bible Study

MatureLiving

06:30 PM

Florida A&M University Worsihp

www.fmworship.com

Ea. Thurs

Food Truck Thursday

Eats

06:00 PM

Street Chefs

www.streetchefs.com

12:00 AM

America’s Great Plein Air Paint-out

Festival

Port St Joe Marina

www.pleinairfl.com

Ea. Thurs

Capital Chordsmen Barbershop Chorus rehearsals: Join us!

Hobbies

07:00 PM

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.capitalchordsmen.org

Vegetables From The Sea

Lecture

07:45 PM

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

Ea. Thurs

Writer’s Workshop

Workshop

07:00 PM

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

12:00 AM

La Fee (The Fairy)

Cinema

Various

All Saints Cinema

www.tallahasseefilms.com

Ea. 1st Fri

Street Chefs - First Friday

Eats

11:00 AM

Railroad Square Art Park

www.streetchefs.com

Ea. 1st Fri

1st Friday @ Railroad Square Art Park

Festival

06:00 PM

Railroad Square Art Park

www.communityatrailroadsquare.org

Pops in the Park at Southwood

Family

07:00 PM

Southwood Central Park Lake

www.southwood.me

Trevor de Mayo

Festival

05:00 PM

Fermentation Lounge

www.fermentationlounge.com

QuincyFest Blues and BBQ 2012

Festival

10:00 AM

Main Street Quincy

www.quincyfest.net

38th Anniversary Celebration

Festival

8:00 AM

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

Kidsfest

Festival

10:00 AM

North Florida Fairgrounds

www.northfloridafair.com

Free Planetarium Show

Hobbies

10:00 AM

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

Rapunzel by The Tallahassee Ballet

Performance

Ruby Diamond Auditorium

www.tallahasseeballet.org

12:00 AM

World Ballet Inc. presents World of Rock

Theatre

Various

Lee Hall Auditorium

www.worldballetinc.com

Ea. 1st Sat

Blacksmithing for Beginners

Workshop

10:00 AM

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

Chair Yoga

Workshop

11:30 AM

Namaste Yoga

www.namaste-tallahassee.com

12:00 AM

The Art Student League Graduating Group Exhibition

Exhibit

01:00 PM

621 Gallery

www.621gallery.org

12:00 AM

“Domestic Arrangements”, Kimberly Witham

Exhibit

01:00 PM

621 Gallery

www.621gallery.org

Tallahassee Youth Orchestras

98145.452

03:00 PM

Opperman Music Hall

tyodirector@gmail.com

Refuge Series presents The Fungus Amongus

Lecture

02:00 PM

St. Marks Refuge

(850) 925-6121

Tallahassee Roller Girls

98145.452

01:00 PM

Tallahassee Skate Inn

www.tallyrg.com

Eat Healthy, Live Longer

98145.452

07:45 PM

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

Ea. Tues Wed. May 2

Thu. May 3

Fri, May 4

Sat. May 5

12:00 AM Ea. 1st Sat

Sun, May 6

Ea. 1st Sun May 7 - 13 5/7/12 5/9/12

Posture, Core and More

98145.452

07:45 PM

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

5/10/12

Ea. 2nd Thur

PFLAG Tallahassee Monthly Meeting

Family

06:00 PM

St. John’s Episcopal Church

www.pflag-tallahassee.org

5/11/12

12:00 AM

Bullhead

Cinema

Various

All Saints Cinema

www.tallahasseefilms.com

10th Annual Florida Wine Festival

98145.452

07:00 PM

Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science

www.thebrogan.org

5/11/12 5/12/12

2nd Saturday Family Program

Family

11:00 AM

Museum of Florida History

www.museumoffloridahistory.com

5/12/12

Ea. 2nd Sat

Drive In Double Feature - Theater of Blood n’ Black Lace

98145.452

Dusk

All Saints Hop Yard

www.allsaintshopyard.com

5/12/12

Ships, Sailors, and Shipwrecks of the Civil War

98145.452

9:00 AM

Museum of Florida History

www.museumoffloridahistory.com

5/12/12

Ea. 2nd Sat

Saturday Space Mission!

Family

10:00 AM

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

5/12/12

Ea. 2nd Sat

Second Saturdays in Historic Apalachicola

Festival

06:00 PM

Historic Apalachicola Main Street

www.historicapalachicola.com


NED EVETT

Glass Neck Fretless Guitar Pioneer

Listen at NedEvett.com

Sat. May 5th $5. Gate at 7:00 Show at 9:00 sharp. Behind the historic Coca-Cola building on All Saints Street. AllSaintsHopYard.com.

Capital City Villager :: Volume 1, Issue 5 :: Wed. Apr 27, 2012  

Our latest edition, available at more than 250 locations throughout Tallahassee, and in this convenient e-reader.

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