Page 1

Got Events? Page 20

Volume 1, Issue 13. Nov 2-Nov 15, 2012

District Guides Page 2 & 12

Music Festival Season is here! Page 17

Photographs by Pantechne Studios

A journey to find ‘merica Page 6

An inside peak under the FSU big top / PAGE 10

Is anyone reading this right now?


Midtown District

... is where it’s @!

THE MIX

THE GREY FOX

Melissa & Doug Toys & Games. Fair Trade goods. Vera & Lilly stationery. TheGreyFoxOnline.com | (850) 894-8372 | 206 E. 6th Ave, 32303

MIDTOWN PASS

Sports bar & lounge. Restaurat. Darts and billiards. 30+ screens! MidtownPass.com | (850) 597-1614 | 1019 N. Monroe St., 32303

Hippies Taking Over Krewe to Support Vets (Nov 3)

Krewe de Gras tavern is hosting a 60’s themed Hippie Party on Saturday Nov 3rd to benefit Veterans Village. Local band Harvest Gypsies are headlining, and attendees are encouraged to wear their favorite hippie outfit (or shop at Divas & Devils around the corner to get free cover). Best outfit will win a $50 bar tab. The $5 cover (and a portion of all sales) will be donated to Tallahassee Veterans Village to help local vets get re-established in the community. Doors open at 7pm, Music starts at 9pm. 1304 N. Monroe St., 32303. KreweDeGras.com

Songwriter Series at Mockingbird on Nov 12

3rd AVENUE DRUM SHOP

Repairs & sales of all instruments. Rentals. Recording studios. Lessons. 3rdAveDrumShop.info | (850) 222-7625 | 219 E. 3rd Ave., 32303

Community Gathering in the Park on Nov 3

Mockingbird Cafe is hosting the 2012 Songwriters Series of Midtown. Meet the region’s finest songwriters up close and personal and hear the stories behind their songs. 9-11pm, Mon, Nov 12. (See their ad in this issue for other upcoming events and specials.)

Bring a chair or blanket and head over to Lafayette Park for an afternoon of live music, free food, bounce houses, a hay ride, and fall games on November 3, from 3-6pm. The event is hosted by Four Oaks Community Church.

Black Dog Café Celebrates 15 Years (Nov 4)

To celebrate their 15th birthday, Black Dog Cafe is having a customer potluck and music fest at Lake Ella on Sunday, Nov. 4. Marvin Halleck, Mark Russell, Sharla June, Belmont and Jones, Patrick McKinney, & The New 76ers will perform. Music starts at 11a.m. and goes until around 4. Bring a couple of dollars for Animal Aid too -- they will be collecting donations. For more information, find Black Dog on Facebook. 229 Lake Ella Dr., 32303.

Got neighborhood news? Email us at Tallahassy@gmail.com

850.681.0060

Registered Nurse KREWE DE GRAS MIDTOWN TAVERN

A New Orleans tavern. Daily happy hour. Live music. Weekly specialty nights. KreweDeGras.com | (850) 222-0378 | 1304 N. Monroe St., 32303 / CapitalCityVillager/ Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!

Your SAFETY is our first concern. Quick, gentle, and STERILE. Medical IMPLANT QUALITY Jewelry. Find GREAT specials and discounts at BodyPiercingByBink.com 1733-B North Monroe (at Monroe & Tharpe), 32303


The Front Porch opens where Chez Pierre closed

Midtown District

The Front Porch owner Chad Kittrell (left center) and Managing Partner Marc Bauer cut the ribbon on the newly opened restaurant on Oct 30, flanked by ambassadors of the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce. This new locally-sourced seafood restaurant officially opened on October 30 with a ribbon cutting ceremony. Formerly home to Chez Pierre, an iconic French restaurant, the 1920s Victorian home underwent months of remodeling and the expansion of its wrap-around porch. It now provides space for 300 diners in the pedestrian-friendly center of the Midtown District. The kitchen is under the culinary leadership of Chef Joe Rego,

former winner of Food Network’s cooking show, “Chopped.” The restaurant is a project of Hunter and Harp, the local company behind Hotel Duval, Level 8 Lounge, Le roc Bistro, Alchemy, Midtown Filling Station, and others. The Front Porch hosts a Happy Hour Monday thru Friday from 3-7pm. 1215 Thomasville Rd., 32303. FrontPorchTallahassee.com

A Community Coffee House With A...

WEDNESDAY

FARMER’S MARKET

3-6p.m. every Wednesday. Amazing locally grown produce and goods. It doesn’t get fresher that this!

229 Lake Ella Dr., 32303. (850) 224.2518 SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!/Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ CapitalCityVillager/


FEATURED LISTINGS 21 5) CREPEVINE | 1304 North Monroe Street and those purchasing ads thecrepevine.com | 850-329-6754 receive an enlarged listing, 6) Food Truck Thursday (Weekly live music party) as well as either a LOGO 300 West Tharpe Street | Streetchefs.com | 850-386-2899 or a caricature of your 7) FINNEGAN’S WAKE | 1122 Thomasville Rd business on the map. 21 Facebook.com | 850-222-4225 8) Fuzions Frozen Yogurt | 1870 Thomasville Road fuzionsyogurt.com | 850-201-8822 9) Hopkins Eatery | 1840 North Monroe Street hopkinseatery.com | 850-386-4258 10) Kaye Kendrick Enterprises, LLC | 1606 N. Meridian Rd. kayekendrick.com | 850-509-5927

11) KREWE DE GRAS

| 1304 North Monroe St

Facebook.com | 850-222-0378 12) Skyline Motor Lounge | 1700 N. Monroe St. Suite #19 Facebook.com | 850-254-8533

13) LUCY & LEO’S CUPCAKERY Passion Gallery

Your home for crazy vintage records, apparel, jewelry,posters + more! www.RebornVintage.com | 850-224-BORN

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| 1123 Thomasville Rd lucyandleoscupcakery.com | 850-765-0374 14) Luna’s Italian Food and Deli | 1122 Thomasville Rd lunaitalian.com | 850 421-5862 15) Mickey’s Lakeside Cafe | 1611 N. Monroe Facebook.com | 850-222-9709

16) MID-TOWN FILLING STATION

Rd | midtownfillingstation.com | 850-264-9672 17) Paisley Cafe | | 1123-B Thomasville Rd paisleycafe.com | 850-545-4002

| 1122 Thomasville

18) REDEYE COFFEE | 1122-7 Thomasville Road Facebook.com | 850-425-5701 19) Street Chefs | | 1700 N Monroe St, Ste 11-220 Streetchefs.com | 850-509-3831 20) THE LEON PUB 850-425-4639

(4.25”w x 2.7875”h) Six months of pocket guides, plus: • Bolded listing on map page • 3D Illustration on map (a caricature) • Map will be published in Villager 3 times over six months (15,000 copies total) • Smart-phone/online interactive app.

mockingbirdcafe.com | 850-222-4956

| 1225 N Monroe St

22) THE WINE LOFT | 1240 Thomasville Rd thewinelofttallahassee.net | 850-222-9914 RETAIL/BOUTIQUE

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VISITOR’S GUIDE 21

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28) M&M Monogramming & gifts | 2030-1 Thomasville Rd mmmonogramming.com | 850-514-3148

30) QUARTER MOON

37) Envy Salon | 926 Thomasville Rd envysalonandspa.net | 850-877-8070

34) THE GREY FOX

43) SWEAT THERAPY FITNESS

| 1641 N Monroe St quartermoonimports.com | 850-222-2254 31) Quincie’s Art Jewelry | 1325 Thomasville Rd. quinciehamby.com | 850-222-8411 32) Sweet Patina | 2030-5 Thomasville Rd Facebook.com | 850-727-4834 33) The Bookshelf Tallahassee | 1123 Thomasville Rd. bookshelfandgallery.com | 850-765-0378 | 206 E. 6th Ave. thegreyfoxonline.com | 850-894-8372

35) WAY OUT WEST

| 1212 N Monroe Street wowtally.com | 850-727-8460 28) M&M Monogramming & gifts | 2030-1 Thomasville Rd mmmonogramming.com | 850-514-3148

38) GREEN PERIDOT SALON

| 1122 Thomasville Rd. greenperidot.com | 850-224-1814 39) Haute Headz Salon | 1447 Thomasville Road hauteheadzsalon.com | 850-224-0414 41) Rinse & Repeat Kids’ Salon | 1350 N. Gadsden, St. #B rinseandrepeatkidssalon.com | 850-877-5437 42) Somatic Massage Solutions | 1000 Thomasville Rd somaticmassage.net | 850-445-2670

| 1122 Thomasville Rd sweattherapyfitness.com | 850-222-1781 36) Cabello’s Hair & Nail Studio | 1240 Thomasville Rd cabellostudio.com | 850-575-7529 37) Envy Salon | 926 Thomasville Rd envysalonandspa.net | 850-877-8070

23) 3rd Ave Drum Shop | 219 east 3rd Ave Facebook.com | 850-222-7625 24) Blossoms Flowers | 1200 N. Monroe Street blossomflowers.com | 850-385-7363

25) COLE COUTURE BOUTIQUE

30) QUARTER MOON

| 1240 Thomasville Rd. colecouture.com | 850-553-3327 26) Divas & Devils House of Style | 1300 North Monroe Street divas-devils.com | 850.580.6662 27) Lester & Company Fine Jewelry | 928 North Monroe Street lesterandcompany.com | | 850-224-9000

| 1641 N Monroe St quartermoonimports.com | 850-222-2254 31) Quincie’s Art Jewelry | 1325 Thomasville Rd. quinciehamby.com | 850-222-8411 32) Sweet Patina | 2030-5 Thomasville Rd Facebook.com | 850-727-4834 33) The Bookshelf Tallahassee | 1123 Thomasville Rd. bookshelfandgallery.com | 850-765-0378

38) GREEN PERIDOT SALON

| 1122 Thomasville Rd. greenperidot.com | 850-224-1814 39) Haute Headz Salon | 1447 Thomasville Road hauteheadzsalon.com | 850-224-0414

INSIDE COVER: $375

Inside eighth: $200

| 215 East Sixth Avenue

21) THE MOCKINGBIRD CAFE

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(4.4792”w x 6”h, bleeds to edge) Six months of pocket guides PLUS:

Cider Lodge

Your home for crazy vintage records, apparel, jewelry,posters + more! www.RebornVintage.com | 850-224-BORN

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WELLNESS/BEAUTY

36) Cabello’s Hair & Nail Studio | 1240 Thomasville Rd cabellostudio.com | 850-575-7529

◄SCAN HERE

to visit the digital, smart-phone friendly version of this map, complete with web links. Or visit TALLYVILLAGER.COM

Zip Codes 32303 & 32308

Midtown is where it’s @! Tallahassee’s 18-hour shopping, dining, and entertainment district.

paign through Locally Owned Tallahassee (which Villager is sponsoring along with other media outlets.) This is part of our ongoing efforts to encourage greater support of local businesses and districts, and to help promote

commercial districts as unique destinations. Other maps are in development. For more information, contact Publisher Joe Berg at Tallahassy@gmail. com, or call 850-320-7806.

There was a time not that long ago when Tennessee and Monroe Streets were the heart of Tallahassee. With no interstate until 1975, everyone traveled to town on Florida’s tourist highway, U.S. 27, and the path was defined by locally owned businesses, run by unique people and sometimes very colorful characters. Skyline Motor Lounge pays tribute to some of those special places, people, and a time when Tallahassee took things a bit slower.

OPEN TUES-SAT at 4:30. 1700-19 N. Monroe Street, 32303 (850) 254-8533 | Find us on Facebook. / CapitalCityVillager/ Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!

Featuring ARTISAN WINES AND SPARKLING BEVERAGES, CRAFT BEERS, AND HAND-CRAFTED CHEESES. In the Lake Ella Publix Shopping Center, formerly Lee’s Wine Bar.

ON DECK:

4

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StarMetro Bus Stop (Routes 5, 12, 18)

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• Bolded listing on map page • 3D Illustration on map (a caricature) • Map will be published in Villager 3 times over six months(15,000 copies total) • Smart-phone/online interactive app.

Through our partnership with the Midtown Merchants Association, all current association members will be automatically added to the listings and located on the map, and enhanced listings and advertisements start at $75. (Space reservations and payment must be received by November 16.) The publish date of the maps -- Friday, Nov. 30 -- is also the date of Villager’s Shop Local Holiday Guide, and the launch of a local business holiday cam-

Your home for crazy vintage records, apparel, jewelry,posters + more! www.RebornVintage.com | 850-224-BORN

and ONE FREE QUARTER PAGE AD IN VILLAGER to do with as you please. A $60 value. Must be used in six months.

• The map will also be available online in a smart-phone friendly map-app, which will be promoted in Villager issues over the course of the six months.

Pigtails

  Public Restrooms

WELCOME TO MIDTOWN!

• The map and listings (excluding the advertisements) will be published three times over those six months in Villager issues (at least 5,000 copies per issue.)

1122 Thomasville Rd

2) BELLA BELLA | 123 East fifth Ave bellabellatallahassee.com | 850-412-1114 3) Big Easy Snowballs | 1700 N Monroe St bigeasysnowballs.com | 850-329-6010 4) The Front Porch | 1215 Thomasville Rd frontporchtallahassee.com | 850-222-0936

ruck Fridays with

Facebook.com | 850-222-4225

BACK COVER: $425

• 4,000 printed copies will be distributed throughout the next six months, and will be made available to all of Villager’s 70+ distribution locations in the district. It will also be available at all area hotels and points of entry, and made available at select local businesses outside of the district that also carry Villager issues.

RESTAURANT/BAR 1) 5TH AVE TAP ROOM |

ULL 0

M

• From a pocket-sized 4x6 inches, the map folds out to a full color, glossy 12x18 inches.

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(4.4792”w x 6”h, bleeds to edge) Six months of pocket guides PLUS:

On Friday, November 30, Villager will publish the first-ever Midtown Visitor’s Map, a folding pocket-sized guide to the district, its businesses and its offerings. Working in partnership with the Midtown Merchants Association, this map will be distributed for six months, and space for listings and enhanced advertisements is limited. About the map:

) es PLUS:

idtown is Tallahassee’s thriving 18-hour district for dining, lounging, partying, shopping, and playing! Hundreds of restaurants, cafes, boutiques, bars, nightclubs, and unique shops and services create Midtown’s casual, urban atmosphere that draws regular visitors from throughout the city and across the region. The district, which covers approximately three square miles (and two zip codes), borders downtown Tallahassee to the north, and is only minutes from I-10 exits and local hotels. The Midtown Merchants Association represents many of these local businesses, and advocates for greater support of local businesses -- drivers of both healthy local economies and unique local culture. So step out, explore what Tallahassee has to offer, and help support our growing community. We’ll see you in Midtown!

• Bolded listing on map page • 3D Illustration on map (a caricature) • Map will be published in Villager 3 times over six months(15,000 copies total) • Smart-phone/online interactive app.

Villager Publishing Midtown Walking Map, Space Limited

age ricature) er 3 times ies total) tive app.

Midtown District


Get Involved with Villager CONTRIBUTE:

• Villager is always accepting portfolios and samples for those who want to be a part of our mission. Email us.

SUBMIT INFO:

• Email us your press releases and news! • Join the ‘Villager Events Calendar’ group on Facebook. Post your events for all members to see, and they will automatically be added to our printed calendar, and considered for content.

FOLLOW US:

• Search Facebook for ‘Capital City Villager’ and like us. • Get and post local events at the ‘Villager Events Calendar’ Facebook group. • Get our e-mail blasts by signing up at TallyVillager.com. Receive special offers and information, updates about Villager, and other important information.

ADVERTISE:

• Ads starting as low as $25 each • 5,000 FREE copies every other week, at more than 270 locations throughout the county (at local businesses, not gas

stations and street boxes.) • Email or call us for more information, or visit TallyVillager.com for current specials.

DISTRIBUTE:

• Shoot us an email at Tallahassy@ gmai.com to offer FREE Villager’s to your customers (they’ll thank you for it.) There is no cost involved.

TELL ‘EM WHERE YOU SAW ‘EM:

• Did you respond to an ad you saw in Villager? Or a listing in the calendar? Or a story you read? Let people know where you learned about them so they ca be sure to stay in touch with us!

STIR THE POT:

(850) 320-7806 Tallahassy@Gmail.com TallyVillager.com

Joe Berg Publisher

Natalie Minish Associate Publisher

• Like something you see in Villager? Or better yet, hate something passionately? Write us a letter to the editor by email to Tallahassy@gmail.com

Contributors: Villager is produced with the help of more than 100 contributors -- writers and artists of every persuasion -- who share our vision for a more vibrant and thriving Tallahassee community.

SPREAD THE WORD:

• Is there a location closer to your house that would be more convenient for you? Why not ask a local business you support if they would carry Villager?

About Us:

Villager is a free, independent and locally owned publication for arts, culture and news in Tallahassee. We publish every other Friday and are free to readers and distributors, supported solely by our advertisers -- many of whom are small, local businesses. Our goal is to bring all of Tallahassee together in one place. You can learn more about our mission and history online at TallyVillager.com

READ ONLINE:

• Read our electronic e-reader version of Villager online at TallyVillager.com (or sign up to receive email blasts and we’ll send it right to your inbox when a new issue is ready.)

We are only one force for progress in Tallahassee, but we are proud to be the force that advocates...

Copyright, 2012 Views expressed do not necessarily represent the views of Villager.

Advertising Inquiries: Joe Berg at Tallahassy@gmail.com or 850.320.7806 Letters to the Editor: Letters of relevance to Villager content should be addressed to Tallahhassy@Gmail.com, and must include your full name and phone number for confirmation (although this information will not be published.)

SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!/Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ CapitalCityVillager/


Gone Looking For America: What did you find?

W

e’ll be glad on Tuesday when this seemingly perpetual election cycle is over, and while we’re glad that America has taken the opportunity to debate ideas and policy, at some point the country will have to get back to actually exercising ideas and policy. And while we love a good political saga as much as (if not more than) the rest, what could we say about any of the races in this election that hasn’t already been said. But when contributor extraordinaire Paul Haney returned from his summer trip across America, he brought with him this on-point essay that takes a step back from the biting political divisiveness, pauses for some perspective, and searches for what it is that really unites us all anymore. And it’s just in time for election day. Story & photos by Paul Haney This past summer, after earning a Master’s in Literature from FSU, I purchased a 45-day Amtrak rail pass with the intention of setting out on the rails to look for America. I made a travel-writing project out of my quest, maintaining during the trip a blog of ramblings, musings, pictures, videos and postcards and promising a comprehensive essay at the end enumerating what exactly I found. With this idea I set up a crowd-funding campaign on Indiegogo.com and cobbled together almost $3,000 from friends,

family, professors, acquaintances and strangers. These funds, plus some leftover student loan money, propelled me to the furthest corners of the contiguous United States, thrust me into homeland cultures foreign to myself, and carried me home again. Like Kerouac and Cassady before me, like characters from Dylan’s and Simon’s songs, I went to look for America. To the best of my knowledge and memory, this is what I found: I found not one monolithic America, but a plenitude of smaller Americas, distinct pockets where landforms influence the inhabitants as much as the cultural heritage. The professors of liberty in New England who trace their roots so easily back to the colonial era. The outdoorsmen of Michigan, Utah and Colorado whose states offer veritable pleasure palaces for the active. The Blackfoot Indians straying from the rolling auburn plains of their reservation to the only saloon in East Glacier, Montana. The international seaport of Seattle with her Pike Place Market serving every craft and cuisine of the Pacific Rim. Progressive Portland, where bicycles rule the road and local business thrives. The immense Bay Area of California sifting her people into their proper places — the urbanites of The City, intellectuals of Berkeley, business travelers of Emeryville. The friendliest folk in the forgotten corner of middle America, Kansas City, MO, whose landscape gives them nothing to brag about. Texas with her wide city sprawls, her wide toothy grins, her wide commitment to the second amendment. The delta land of NOLA and her tourist economy, her perpetual party. Americans react to the landscapes, cultures, and climates surrounding them. They preserve tradition while simultaneously modernizing their inheritance. I found a country racing to keep up with a modernizing and digitizing world. No other issue stretches the seams between generations like the rise of digital

/ CapitalCityVillager/ Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!

A street festival in Portland, OR, described by some as a place where 20year-olds go to retire. media: computer literacy, smart phones and texting, e-readers and the decline of print. People on the train and throughout the cities expressed misgivings over losing the world of paper, ink, and longterm attention spans (have you, reader, even read this far?). Meanwhile, I cued up my smart phone a dozen times a day to steer myself, via foot, bus, subway, bike, or car, in the most efficient manner to my destination. Sometimes I didn’t even have a destination, only a sense that I wanted, say, a coffee shop with Wi-Fi, or a New Orleans po’boy. I’d pull up the navigation app, press the microphone icon, say what I wanted, and all around my exact location on the map a cluster of results would appear. With a smart phone, if you can afford the data, travel is easy. I can’t remember a time I had to ask for directions. I found an America searching for a new direction in the debate over gun control. The shootings in Aurora happened in week three of my eight-week trip and spurred a national conversation. Those international travelers I hung out with in Seattle couldn’t fathom how a man could stockpile all those weapons legally while many Americans, including our Seattle tour guide and the Houstonite I met on the train to NOLA, used the Batman shootings to demonstrate that more

Americans need to arm themselves and protect our communities from their lunatic members. I found a host of Americans puffed up with pride over their home towns. Never did I detrain to a local telling me, “Might as well get back on the train. Nothing happening here.” Americans love their cities, love what they’ve built, are proud of the history and heritage, museums and monuments, music and cuisine. We are a proud people, I found, proud of what we’ve built here and what we’ve accomplished worldwide in terms of foreign relations. On home soil, American pride takes the form of political dissent. We know that our government does not operate with an efficiency commensurate with citizens as resourceful and demanding as ourselves. It seems most Americans — from the Atlantic to the Pacific to Texas — agree that the media obfuscates the real center of American politics, that a vote for the right or the left is a vote for the same big money that landed us in this current down economy, that corporations are not people nor should we consider them so. Americans, especially in this election year, feel helpless to the grips of Big Business and voiceless before the Great Political Machine. >>>


<<< Cont’d from previous page There’s a real sense of desperation out there. Folks can’t believe how many jobs have been shipped overseas, how little a B.A. means these days. Young people are torn between struggling at a vocation that allows them to express themselves and opting for a job in business and industry where individuality is squashed but paychecks and benefits guaranteed. Of course, older generations want the youth to take the easy route, go for the security, pay ourselves into Medicare and Social Security even though those programs probably won’t be around when we go to retire. But the youth shouts back, “What did you do with our jobs? Where have you sent our opportunities? Why should I contribute to a cause — The Cause — that isn’t mine?” I can’t help but politicize my journey. All over the country, people on the train insisted on talking politics: with me, with each other, with themselves. However, the political winds must change, and ours is only one day’s condition in the weather patterns of polemics. Such is the transitory nature of America and her people. Constantly changing, evolving. But there must be some permanent aspects of the country to suss out, some eternal truths I discovered on my trip. A more measurable America resides in steadfast clusters of music. We are a people who perform, who go to our instruments, who experiment with and express through sound. Folk and Americana, blues and jazz survive and blend into new forms, sometimes synthesized forms, even while the music industry does its best to commercialize, capitalize, and corporatize American music. There will always exist undercurrents of traditional and innovative music, original compositions played live by those who understand the power of performance, the ability for music to interpret and color experience. I saw it in the subways of NYC, the streets of Portland, the bars of Austin. American music remains on the move. Meanwhile a craft beer revolution is happening across the nation. Some cities have more than others, but every city wants a good craft brewery to ply their

people. I went to the Oregon Brewer’s Festival with Pat in Portland and waded among thousands of hop heads high on suds. Then I went to Colorado where craft breweries are a point of pride. And these beers get shipped all across the nation. No longer must we drink the watered-down pilsners of the nation’s leading distributors, but choice is at hand — IPAs, stouts, red ales, wheats — and our funds go toward artisan brewers, their employees and their families, who take pride in what we drink. It really is a good time to be a beer drinker in America, despite what less beer-enthused portions of the population might think. And those detractors from good-time indulgence are plentiful. Salt Lake City’s alcohol laws are so convoluted that I had a half-dozen residents explain them to me and still don’t fully understand. 3.2% max at the grocery. 4% from a tap. At some establishments you must buy a full meal if you want to drink, though bottled beer comes strong, cheap, and local. It’s a religious thing, of course, and America is a decidedly religious country. Mormons and Protestants, Catholics and Baptists, the sects come in great numbers with manifold variations in their beliefs. Perhaps our strength lies in our faith, in our resiliency, in our belief in God’s great design. We are, of course, as the Pilgrims believed, the City on a Hill, the shining example of exceptionalism (notice I didn’t say acceptionalism) for the world to see. Some of us also believe in an impending apocalypse as forecasted in the book of Revelations, disavow scientifically approved theories like evolution and global warming, and punish the land for its brazenness to appear more beautiful than ourselves who flounder in our father’s image. America certainly is a beautiful land. She holds river valleys and mountain ranges, deserts and rain forests, grassy plains and aqua-blue shorelines spotted with islands. The train will haul you along each of these landforms so you can see it for

yourself and realize the diverse artistry of geological movements in North America. I think Americans overlook, or purposely ignore, the wealth of our landscape. Every American, before traveling to Europe, should set out to view the national parks, the small communities built into gargantuan landmasses, the large cities of America jutting upward and sprawling outward to rival those cities we came from generations ago, and the oceans and mountains we traversed to get here. The story of the American landscape is the story of our people; the history of our train lines is the history of our heritage. While on this journey, as it must be with every journey, I set out not only to find America, but to find something of myself, something more than the 28year-old with a college transcript littered with literature courses, a vague sense of spirituality, an admiration for Carl Sagan, a 5-handicap. I found kinship, from not only the friends who put me up (or put up with me) along the way, but from those who helped me prepare, who donated to my campaign, who wished me well and urged me along. Now I challenge you, reader: get out there and look for your own America. Travel by train, car or bus; walk, hike or

An homage to Willie Nelson in Austin, TX. bicycle. Let’s canvas this continent with our inquisitive eyes, leave our preconceptions behind, and immerse ourselves in the myriad lifestyles spread across our country. If enough of us went to see for ourselves, we might just enter an era of understanding and begin to bridge the deep wound of America’s political divide.

On the street in New Hampshire. SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!/Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ CapitalCityVillager/


Angela Durant Turner, Ed.S., NCC

Mental Health Counseling 3201 Shamrock Street South, #103, 32309 850.545.8463 | AngelaDTurner.com

Helping individuals, families, couples and groups achieve positive, sustainable and desired change in their lives!

Headshots for Charity by Photog Icon Mickey Adair Renowned local photographer Mickey Adair is offering discounted headshots to interested persons as a fundraiser for local charity. And sessions have been extended to include the first three Thursdays and Fridays in November. Bookings for a 15 minute session and payment are arranged online, for a cost of $35 dollars. During the sessions, Adair photographs each person in three poses, each pose with and without a soft focus, for a total of six shots (which are burned to a disk before you leave.) And 40% of your session fee is donated to the current charity.

Perry Bible Fellowship

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A treasure trove of awesome...this is my favorite shop to buy dresses, jewelry, ... decor, and cute stuff!â&#x20AC;? - Hanaka A. on Yelp

You WILL find the gift she loves... In the Cottages at Lake Ella. QuarterMoonImports.com / CapitalCityVillager/ Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!

Through the November dates, the sessions benefit the Legal Aid Foundation of the Tallahassee Bar Association, and are being held at the Leon County Courthouse. Over the course of his career, Adair has taken portraits of many cultural icons, including Coretta Scott King, Ray Charles, Rosa Parks, Salman Rushdie, Steven King, John Updike, B.B. King, Kurt Vonnegut, Carl Sagan, and Mohamed Ali among many others. To see samples of his work, and for more information, visit AvailableLightPhoto.com.

By Nicholas Gurewitch | PBFComics.com


Mortal Challenges for Terror of Tallahassee Last year Villager discussed the potential gentrification of the seasonal thrill, Terror of Tallahassee, North Florida’s largest haunted house, due to the need for apartments and parking in “College Town.” According to Kurt Kuersteiner, the creative mind and manager behind the haunted house, it looks like the Haunt, full of ghosts, ghouls, vampires, and other undead creatures, is going to — pun intended — live to see another day. This is not the first time that the Haunt has tread such murky waters; in fact, Kuersteiner’s first haunted endeavor, The Mystery Playhouse of Terror, was sold back in 2002. Despite this setback, he persisted in seeking out a new location and ultimately settled on renting the current location on Gaines Street (ironically enough, he bought out another haunted house). Though the Haunt is only open for select nights in October and November, Kuersteiner puts a lot of work into the Haunt year-round to keep it spruced up and clean for the next Halloween season. “I go in every week,” Kuersteiner says, “but I also work on it at home, dreaming up new illusions and ideas.” The amount of effort that goes into such a small local business is astonishing. The Haunt plays — again, pun intended — like a community theater in that volunteers come as many nights as they can during the season to put on their best performance by scaring, and

coincidentally scarring, the masses. In fact, the volunteers do it for their love of the Haunt, not for money, not for résumé building, and not for free giveaways, such as T-shirts and bumper stickers. Instead, they do it because they know it is a special place that has lasting memories, but is ephemeral, something that doesn’t last forever, and they want to make the most of that experience, just like the patrons of the Haunt every year. Kuersteiner mentions that the Haunt does not like to ask for donations because “[the Haunt] likes to earn its money, even the donations.” He even says that they “currently have an offer for any rich benefactor to require their heirs to survive a full night in our haunted house or else leave their share of the estate to [the Haunt].” Despite being the only haunted house in America to offer this ultimatum, so far, there have been no takers. Though the biggest night for the haunted house is Halloween, of course, the Haunt offers special coupons and events for other days to encourage patrons to attend on the less busy nights. The last night of the Haunt’s season this year is Saturday, November 3, 2012, and it is a special night because it is the annual “Lights Out Night.” On this night, all the lights are turned off, and brave souls are encouraged to venture solo through the Haunt, armed with nothing but a glow stick, if they dare. If they make it through the entire Haunt, pa-

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(Photo by Clark Eldredge.) trons receive a certificate of completion suitable for framing. Remember, though the Haunt seems to be sticking — again, another pun — around, its days are numbered, so the opportunity to experience both the normal version of the Haunt and the “Lights Out Night” version of the Haunt will not last forever.

And between The Mystery Playhouse of Terror and Terror of Tallahassee, this is the 13th season for Kuersteiner in the haunted house business, just to intensify the Haunt even more, especially for its 13th year. Kuersteiner, on the future of the haunt, says, “Every town has something unique that people look back on and remember fondly when it’s gone … It’s something special that people who didn’t visit regret missing … Our haunt days are numbered because we’re so close to campus.” The near future is not so bad, it seems. At least, according to Kuersteiner, it looks like “[the Haunt] will be okay for next year, but beyond that is uncertain.” What patrons see in the Haunt is enigmatic; what lies ahead for the future of the Haunt is enigmatic, and all the mystery just makes the haunted perspective a little spookier.

Locally Owned prepares holiday campaign, recruiting new members Locally Owned Tallahassee, the city’s independent business alliance, is gearing up for a Shop Local Holiday Campaign that will launch at the end of November, and the group is also reaching out to locally owned businesses to increase its membership rolls. The organization recently announced several new initiatives aimed at growing support of the local business culture. These include: creating a new 5-year campaign to replace “Sassy Squirrel”, which has been the group’s mascot for several years; Achieving 50% awareness of the campaign among the Leon County population in two years; Increasing the membership to 500 businesses within two years, with 150 by the end of this year; and launching a saturating holiday campaign for the end of 2012, asking consumers to consider local options for a portion of their holiday gift spending. The campaign will involve both a

ground and social media strategy, as well as a public relations effort. Capital city Villager, among other media outlets involved, is sponsoring this campaign with full page ads and extensive coverage of local business during the holidays. [Full disclosure: The publisher of Villager is also President of Locally Owned Tallahassee.] The organization is entirely supported by membership dues, and the organization has reduced its membership costs to acquire more members (while at the same time increasing benefits.) Dues are now $35 for an individual per year, or $48 for a “brick and mortar” retail location, with additional categories for presenting sponsors. The organization is also seeking volunteers to help plan and execute the holiday campaign. For information, or to volunteer, email LocallyOwnedTallahassee@gmail.com or call Villager at 850.320.7806.

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FSU Circus’s Overlooked Act Story by David Moody Photos by Pantechne Studios It’s a late October Wednesday, and I can’t practice my routine. There are three rings under the FSU Flying Circus tent, and all of them are currently in use. The aerial acts — trapeze, cloud swing — are prepping for Halloween’s “Haunted Harvest” shows (Nov. 1–Nov. 3). I am part of “Bike for Five,” an act in which I ride Speed Racer — a modified red cruiser bicycle — in slow, consistent circles while four lithe performers pile on the bike in formations reminiscent of cheerleader poses. These three rings are the only locations we are allowed to practice, but flyers get priority; we can’t interrupt despite the fact that this is our scheduled time. While we stand around performing dry runs of poses, Kristen Wiertzema looks longingly to the ring and the flyers overhead. In this circus

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hierarchy, we are at ground level. Practice is what we need. FSU’s Flying High Circus has been around since 1947, but we have not. This is my first year — really my first month — as performer-in-training. Co-performers Allie Hetherington and Ariel Painter are the same. TommieRae Lovett and Kristen are circus sophomores, but we don’t know Bike for Five. This act was retired a few years back, but now due to an excess of applicants the act has returned. I didn’t think juggling — scheduling, pins or otherwise — would be part of performance, but scheduling conflicts are common at the circus. Tent space is limited, yet each act needs a few hours per week to learn maneuvers. A paper hangs on the bulletin board inside the main building showing which act is in which ring at which time. It is densely packed with names. Conflicts like the ones between Bike for Five and the fly-


ers will ease after this weekend’s shows, but there are still our internal schedule conflicts: Ariel has Fencing club, Allie and Kristen have jobs, TommieRae is in two acts, I am a graduate teacher, and all of us take course work. Since the tent is closed on weekends, for now the 30minute block on Thursday afternoons is the only time we meet with a ring to ourselves. Unlike the aerial act, ours won’t go live until the April shows, but the first round of act assessments are in late November. Until then we have less than ten scheduled practice hours before the first assessment, ten hours to learn how to pile five people on a moving bike and not fall over, wobble or stop smiling. On assessment day, Director Chad Mathews will watch each act display its skill. If the troupe shows promise, they keep practicing for another assessment in February. Pass both assessments and the show is yours. Fail either and it’s the door. Until then, practice and practice. When the ring is ours I grab the bike

from behind the juggling storage cabinet while the others roll up the two-inch cushion that lines the ring, exposing a slight circular groove worn into the concrete over the years. I start pedaling, and Kristen, in a smooth motion, jumps on the bike. I call “HUP” and she’s on my shoulders. The bicycle wobbles and for a moment the cycle’s circles start to shrink. I adjust, smooth the circles, and can feel the performer behind my head relax her abs. Still, with every loop she has to duck the rope rigging that hangs along ringside, and the circle I maintain runs too close to the rolled-up mat. Both will be gone on performance day, but for now we dodge obstacles. I feel about as skilled as a bear on a bicycle in some Russian circus, but I have one up on bears: I’m learning how to juggle. Stay tuned to this space as David Moody takes us through the development of his team’s act between now and when it (hopefully) debuts in April.

YOU’LL SCREAM!!

Lofty Pursuits has Ice Cream!

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THE ALL SAINTS ALMANAC A section for Tallahassee’s thriving arts & culture community.

NEW BUSINESSES, NEW CONSTRUCTION New Businesses Filling In All Saints

The city built it, and the businesses have come. Despite the continual presence of construction in multiple areas of the district, several new businesses have opened their door in the last couple of months alone. And they have brought with them greater options and offerings. The largest is the re-envisioning of The Engine Room and The Far Side as the new Side Bar Theater and Crepevine Restaurant (respectively.) Side Bar has been hosting a varied assortment of shows, and many are watching curiously to see how it comes to define itself. And Crepevine seems poised support the development of the area as a more vibrant 18-hour district, providing breakfast and lunch, and keeping late hours to cater to students and partiers in the area. (It also boasts two semi-private conference rooms and free wi-fi.) Just on the other side of that parking lot, Cool Cow Ice Cream opened its doors over the summer, occupying the other half of the Fat Sandwich building. Down the stretch, the room adjoining Bread And Roses Coop (which previously housed Fermentation Market before it moved up the street to become Cider Lodge) is now home to Wild Greens Community Café – formerly The Marinated Mushroom on Capital Circle NE. As part of its charm, Wild Greens is quaintly intimate, with only a handful of tables inside and two tables outside. But don’t let the smaller space fool you -- the menu is anything

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but short, with a wide selection of fancy offerings for lunch or dinner (like the fruit and goat cheese salad with a balsamic reduction and pecans.) (Note that serving times vary depending on the day, so call ahead or see their website -- TheMarinatedMushroom.com) Around the corner and up the street, The Grain Restaurant has opened its doors directly next to Fermentation Lounge, offering individual pizzas, specialty soups and sandwiches, and $2 tacos. The Grain also serves lunch, and then takes a break before dinner. But it is also open late to serve the party goers in the area. And back out to Gaines Street, we hear tale of a pizza parlor (like, real authentic New York pizza) going in next to St. Michael’s Pub. Meanwhile, Tasty Eats in the red caboose in Railroad Square – while not a new business to the area – has constructed an awning over the outdoor seating and stage area worth noting. Previous inhabitants of this space seem to have always been at the whim of the elements – when a little bit of wind or rain can clear out the beer garden and there simply is not much space inside. But this new addition gives Tasty Eats some protection from the elements, and also a more defined ambiance at the picnic tables.

Less Construction Here, More Construction There

Construction vehicles, traffic cones, and “business entrance” signs remain a sign of the times here – and of growing development. While the now familiar Gaines Street con-


struction continues to the west of Railroad Ave., there are two other road projects under way in the district. To the south of the Gaines/Macomb Street intersection on Railroad Ave (in front of All Saints Café), intermittent construction has the lanes shifting through different traffic cone configurations regularly, while at the same time the city is upgrading the sewage system elsewhere in the neighborhood (currently under All Saints Street, the road that houses Fermentation Lounge et al.) These upgrades are more limited in scope that the all-out redesign of Gaines Street, and construction appears to be moving at a steady pace. But detours through the side streets are regularly changing. Then, over in Railroad Square, the city is also working on the roads and infrastructure, currently near the back in front of Athena’s Garden, Loud Voice Books, and others. (Complaints were aired on Facebook by local shop owners at the beginning of construction, with claims that the city had not provided the promised “business entrance” signs, or enough warning and communication to minimize impact on the effected businesses, but those issues seem to have been rectified.) A new back entrance to the art park is also being constructed, and shop owners have expressed mixed feelings about this development to Villager. Meanwhile, commercial and property development continues to define Madison Street between Railroad Ave. And Woodward Ave. Until only the past several months, this stretch was a largely neglected side road defined by aged industrial buildings and warehouses. Now, construction continues to move along with the College Town development on the west end, while condominiums and apartment complexes replace many of the former industrial sites. These new residences will add an entirely new population to the district’s makeup, and their tenants – mostly students – are sure to have an effect on the neighborhood’s personality as well. So expect a few detour signs and road cones when you visit All Saints. But don’t

All Saints District

OLDE FIELDS CLOTHING COMPANY

Locally made, eclectic styles, original jewelry, vintage living room and records. OldeFieldsClothing.com | (850) 425-2785 | 519 W. Gaines, 32301

Construction in Railroad Square (taken two weeks ago). Some business owners expressed aggravations with the city’s initial coordination of the project, though issues seem to have been resolved. let them keep you away.

New Stop Signs

LOUD VOICE BOOKS

New & used books of all kinds. Tues-Sun, 11a-7p/ LoudVoiceBooks.com | (850) 577-0034 | 675 Industrial Dr. 32310

If you’re familiar with the sometimes narrow side roads of All Saints, just south of Gaines Street, keep your eyes open when you go back to visit: new stop signs have been added at several intersections to help break the speed of some heavy footed drivers, and to help ease several blind corners.

New All Saints Sign Toppers

The All Saints District Community Association -- in an effort to create a greater sense of place in the district (which includes not just Gaines Street, but also the quiet side roads to the South as well as roads to the north) -- has manufactured and posted new toppers on stop signs and road signs throughout the area. The toppers are made of dark metal, with the familiar saint-like image from the district’s official logo cut out of the center.

Got neighborhood news? Email us at Tallahassy@gmail.com

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All Saints District

The All Saints Rundown Mickee Faust’s Annual “Punk’n Chuck’n” (Nov 4)

THE SHARING TREE

Creative reuse for arts & education. A warehouse of creative supplies. TheSharingTreeFL.org | (850) 264-4035 | 617 Industrial Dr, 32310

ATHENA’S GARDEN

Alternative gifts, herbal emporium, clothing/decor and more! Facebook.com | (850) 391-9496 | 659 Industrial Dr, 32310

Waste not, want not, and have some fun doing it. Join Mickee Faust’s 18th Annual Punk’n Chuck’n pumpkin toss to properly dispose of your Halloween Jack O’ Lantern. This event is designed so that all have a fair shot at winning: pumpkins are judged as art, then the throw is scored (with weight of the pumpkin figured in). And finally, as a theater group they’d like a little drama and song afterwards. A Pumpkin King and Queen will also be crowned, from among the participants. The $2.00 suggested donation goes to the Mickee Faust Clubhouse’s efforts to bring the theater experience to everyone in the community. Sunday, Nov. 4 at 2pm. 623 McDonnell Dr., 32310. MickeeFaust.com

Funky Flea Market and Fall Fever Festival (Nov 17)

TASTY EATS BEER GARDEN & RESTAURANT Vietnamese & American delites. VEGAN DISHES! Special events. Facebook.com | (850) 597-9051 | 602 Industrial Dr, 32310 (the caboose)

AVANT GARB VINTAGE

Vintage frocks, jewelry, LP’s, gifts & more! Sunglasses and accessories! Facebook.com/AvantGarb | (850) 514-4272 | 522 W. Gaines St., 32301 14/ CapitalCityVillager/ Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!

It’s time for the annual Fall Fever Festival at Railroad Square, which will also include the Funky Flea Market outside of The Other Side Vintage. Vendors will be selling everything from vintage and new furniture, to handmade jewelry and art, to vintage and new clothing for girls and guys, to tools and kitchen ware. Plus take a stroll around the and check out the other locally owned shops and galleries. November 17 from 12-5pm.

COSMIC CAT COMICS

[It is $10 to vend. You can sign up online at TheOtherSideVintage.com, or stop by the store at 607McDonnell Dr., 32310.]

All Saints Day Fest at Hop Yard (Nov 3)

The All Saints Hop Yard – a newer venue to the All Saints neighborhood located by behind the historic Coca Cola warehouse on All Saints Street -- will be hosting this all-day festival on November 3 from 11am to 1am. Craft beer and artisan wine will be available, and the venue’s stage will be hosting seven local bands. Then the show closes out with featured band Flannel Church at 9pm -- all the way from New Orleans with their funky rhythm and blues. And after the stage show, a late night acoustic jam session by the fire. Full day tickets are $10 (available ahead of time at the bar, or at the gate on the day of the event). A portion of the ticket sales will go to support the All Saints District Community Association. Gates open at 11am, and the first 50 people get a free wish lantern that will be released at the end of the night. 453 All Saints Street, 32301. AllSaintsHopYard.com

Buy 1, Get 1 half off: trade paperbacks, graphic novels, art books. cosmiccatcomics.com | (850) 224-5554 | 625 Industrial Dr. 32310


All Saints District

From Beans to Brick-And-Mortar: A biz diary By Bob Williamson My name’s Bob and I’m all about food. It’s become something of an obsession over the years. Specifically, the process. Watching something transform from its humble origins into something new and breathtaking. Take chocolate, for example. Many of us, here in Tallassee, have never seen a cacao bean, much less a cacao tree. These regal and Dr. Seuss-esque trees form pods directly on the trunk at all stages of growth. (Seriously, Google it.) Each pod is filled with beans that after fermentation look like shriveled almonds. And they reek of must and vinegar. So how do you make chocolate from this unlikely source? What physical and chemical changes occur that take this humble and yet so alien-looking bean into the rich and complex chocolate goodness we crave? I had to know. So this summer I created SRSLY chocolate. SRSLY chocolate started as an experiment in the kitchen. I’d fallen in love with Mexican confections over the summer. Real, fun, traditional Mexican foodways. Camotes, alegrías, cajeta … and some really rustic drinking chocolate tablets. Making this elegant and comforting chocolate from store-bought cacao nibs was an epiphany. All of the elements that mean something to me in food (tradition, technique, science, flavor) appeared to me by joining in on this thousands of years–old tradition that is

still vibrantly alive across Mexico and cacao’s vast homeland of Mesoamerica, Central America and the Amazon Basin. From this fascination with everything chocolate, SRSLY chocolate appeared at the Lake Ella Growers Market. Last summer, Florida joined the roster of a number of other states by enacting a Cottage Food Act. The bill allows anyone with limited sales ($15k or less) to sell lowrisk foods directly to the public without a license or permit. While there’s a lot left to be done, it’s a step in the right direction for Florida’s food system and for would-be entrepreneurs, like myself. Cottage Food acts as a testing ground and springboard for food businesses in their startup phase. Now is the crucial moment when SRSLY chocolate is taken out of the incubator, goes through an exhaustive permitting and licensing process, and begins to offer a locally produced chocolate bar to the Big Bend. This is no small undertaking. Participating in your local economy is crucial to fostering a strong engaged community. Nearly every decision you make has

LOVE CHILD BOUTIQUE: MOVING SALE Handpicked clothing, accessories, & more! Everything on sale!!! On Facebook.com | (850) 294-7021 | 1007 Commercial Dr. 32310

a much greater impact than one knows or sometimes is willing to admit. And as a businessperson these decisions present themselves everywhere from your suppliers (Fair Trade/Organic or Hershey’s) to where to buy office paper (Office Depot or Target Copy). The ripples that emerge from how you choose to

run your business spread everywhere. These decisions do much more than define you; they play a significant role in our community and help determine the path that Tallahassee will take. I hope you join me and other local businesses as we take this journey.

THE OTHER SIDE VINTAGE

A retro bizarre! Tally’s largest vintage warehouse. COSTUMES & MORE! TheOtherSideVintage.com | (850) 224-6666 | 607 McDonnell Dr, 32310 SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!/Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ CapitalCityVillager/15


All Saints District

Seven Deadly Sounds By Tracy horenbein

NOW OPEN IN ALL SAINTS! • FREE WI-FI • PRIVATE STUDY ROOMS • LATE NIGHT HOURS • SPECIALTY COFFEES Corner of Raiload Avenue & Gaines Street. 809 Railroad Ave, 32310

TheCrepevine.com | (850) 765-8470 | Follow us on Facebook.

Have you tried your first Crêpe?

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Deciding what venues to experience is not the only choice local music lovers get to make. An even greater amount of options awaits when considering the artists creating the music. There really is something out there to satisfy everyone, no matter how mainstream or niche your taste in music is. The following seven artists are a good example of the diversity in genres that coexist within our city. Catching a live performance from any one of them is highly recommended. If you can’t make it out to a show, they all have music online available for download.

Aircraft

Music to accompany the tropical vacation in your head. ht tp://aircraf t.bandcamp.com/album/jeff-bridges-over-troubled-waterabridged

Carnivores at Grace

Fans of complex, progressive metal will enjoy. http://carnivoresatgrace.bandcamp. com/album/without-virtue

Samsquanch

Acoustic sounds for those late nights at the moonshine distillery. http://samsquanchyeah.bandcamp. com/album/ocelot-of-problems

Tourist

Heartfelt harmonies to soothe the weary traveler.   http://tourist2.bandcamp.com/album/the-briefcase-ep

Vintage Tux

Fresh flows for them that knows. http://vintagetux.bandcamp.com/album/hood-stories

Webcam Teens

Hardcore punk soundtrack for those who see the fnords. http://webcamteens.bandcamp.com/ album/redlined-ep

Woset

If Oregon and Eno had a love child, it would sound like this. http://woset.bandcamp.com/album/ limens


All Saints District

Sneaking Up on the Spirit of The Suwannee

Local. Fresh. Open Late.

In the heart of the All Saints District, next door to Fermentation Lounge.

Tornado Rider performs at Mag Fest last week. By Paul Haney and Aimee Synder In just 90 minutes by car from Tallahassee, you can get to one of the premier music festival venues in the country. Drive east down I-10 to exit 83, go north for another seven miles into Live Oak, FL, and arrive at the Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park and Campground back among the sandy pine and oak forest. You’ll find a natural amphitheater and access to the tannic waters of the Suwannee River, bat houses and country stores, endless campsites and — depending on the week — a merry, ad-hoc community of colorful festival-goers, each with an ear for good music and a penchant for a good time. Throughout the year, The Spirit of the Suwannee (SoS) hosts a lineup of music festivals, each with its own personality. Wanee goes on in the spring and features the Allman Brothers plus nearly every side project and spinoff thereof. Bear Creek Music & Arts Festival happens in the fall and touts itself as the home of

funk and soul music. MagnoliaFest and Springfest, grounded in bluegrass and folk music respectively, are the elder statesmen of the SoS festival queue, although their musical eclecticism defies such narrow classification. When added together, the sum of the musical acts that come through the SoS comprises as high a level of musicianship as can be found at any venue in America. But to say that the SoS brings in the best music isn’t entirely accurate because, to be sure, the park itself brings the best out of the musicians. This October, the Villager sent us to get the scoop on MagnoliaFest — or Magfest — and immerse ourselves in the music, camping, and camaraderie. Bonnie Raitt headlined the festival, performing her soulful ballads and funky blues numbers Saturday night on the meadow stage after Jacksonville’s J.J. Grey and Mofro had played their own set and primed the crowd. On the same stage the night before, the Chris Robinson Brotherhood (of Black Crowes fame)

MENU SAMPLES: HUMMUS & PITA CHIPS | $6.50 Homemade garbanzo bean hummus with freshly baked pita bread. IRISH NACHOS | $6.50 Slow cooked potato slices with bacon, tomato, and cheddar cheese. BUTTERNUT BISQUE | $4 Creamy butternut squash bisque with mild spices. CHICKEN TACOS | $2 Soft corn tortilla with chicken, spring mix, tomato and onion (or with pork.) CHIPOTLE CHICKEN SANDWICH | $7 Roasted chicken with chipotle cream cheese, lettuce, diced tomatoes and caramelized onions on a ciabatta roll.

BBQ PORK SLIDER | $3 Slow-cooked hand pulled barbecue pork on a ciabatta roll. CHICKEN, SAUSAGE OR VEGGIE QUESADILLA | $7 Chipotle cream cheese, caramelized onions and green peppers, with a choice of chicken, sausage or extra veggies. HOUSE PIZZA | $7.50 10” With Bradley’s Country Sausage, roasted red peppers, onions, and green peppers. WHITE PIZZA | $8 10” with olive oil and garlic base, chicken, provolone, and feta cheese.

Open Tuesday - Saturday, Lunch: 11am-2pm. Dinner: 5pm-midnight + 112 All Saints Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301

TheGrainRestaurant.com | (850) 320-6176

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Live Music pumped their mellow, intricate rock and roll out into the grassy field with masses of stars shining overhead, each one a note in the cosmic sheet music of the sky. On Thursday night at the amphitheater, the SoS’s iconic stage down in a hollow with tiered wooden steps, copious hammocks, and a canopy overhead, a band that takes the music of the stars quite literally played to a large weeknight crowd: The Mickey Hart Band (MHB), whose new album Mysterium Tremendum actually turns light waves from the early cosmos into sound waves and builds rhythms and songs around them. 30-year percussionist for the Grateful Dead Mickey Hart — occupier of the offbeat, resident of music’s empty spaces — wielded his drumsticks like pickaxes around his circular setup as he led his heavy-hitting band, including Widespread Panic’s Dave Schools, through rhythm-laden soundscapes from which traditionally structured songs seemed to spin out like galaxies from supernovae. Vocalist Crystal Monee Hall, a young black woman with a powerful voice, threatened to steal the show as she belted out old Dead tunes and new MHB numbers alike. Sometimes it happens at a festival that a band way down on the bill, lacking the notoriety of the headliners, draws an inordinate amount of attention and, for an afternoon, steals the show. At this Magfest that band was Tornado Rider, a three-piece from Oakland, Calif. blending bluegrass and classical, punk and jam. They grabbed the lion’s share of the attention with their showmanship, their wild getups like the elf’s cap, and psychedelic spandex worn by lead singer and electric cellist Rushad Eggleston, and songs like “Fluffy Arabian Cat Disease” and “Mr. Bnenkyfoof.” The audience laughed, jigged and applauded, and the audience swelled out from the barn stage, a third outdoor stage, with children cheering all around. The fourth stage is indoors with a barand-grill setup where Gators and Seminoles gathered to watch their teams on Saturday afternoon. But we were too

busy with the music to worry about the football. One of our favorite moments of Magfest 2012 was when Rushad Eggleston asked the crowd if they were ready to have a party. “Sometimes a party doesn’t want you to have it,” he said, then slinked across the stage in his elf gear. “Sometimes you have to sneak up on it. This is how you sneak up on a party.” Better you sneak up on it, we figured, than it sneak up on you. Beyond Tornado Rider’s sets, Eggleston seemed to sneak onstage (in more modest clothing) during various other performances. He was there on acoustic cello during the Friday night jam, led by the members of the Del McCroury Band minus Del, who had delivered an authentic dose of bluegrass to the amphitheater earlier that night, taking requests from the audience and honoring them in his distinctive high-nasal, nearyodel croon. Another musical superstar, Emmylou Harris, who had headlined the amphitheater that night, sang a song for the late-night jam, and just minutes later we saw her luxury tour bus sneaking out of the park. It also happens sometimes that a show will sneak up on you. Each time we tried to tear away from the Chris Robinson Brotherhood to head to the Friday night jam, the band pulled us back in with screaming guitar licks, howling keyboards, and irresistible musical interplay. Since the festival, CRB has snuck into heavy rotation on my iPod. And sometimes you’ll want to sneak back to camp in the middle of the headliner’s set. Not that Bonnie Raitt wasn’t great — she was — but with so much music on tap over the four days, and with the necessities of eating and sleeping still in play, you’d be mad to think you could see all of every show. And if you did manage to see everything, you’d no doubt be missing something else. We had missed most of Paul Barrere and Fred Tackett’s set earlier on Saturday because of these scheduling vagaries. But remarkably, after Bonnie finished in the meadow, those two members of Little Feat led the Saturday night

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jam in the amphitheater, and we were treated to an impromptu performance of Little Feat jams with an all-star band behind. “Spanish Moon.” “Dixie Chicken.” “Down on the Farm.” For those 90 minutes, all was well in the world. Good vibes and serendipity flow in abundance around the SoS, especially during Magfest. Neighbors in tents, popups, and R.V.s not only swap stories, but share beers and seats around warm fires. Back in the campgrounds, professional and amateur musicians play live bluegrass for patrons till the dawn. With so much kindness and stimulation, you’ll feel as if the demands of your daily life don’t even exist. This feeling is mitigated only by the conspicuous presence of the Suwannee County Sherriff’s Department, and the security staff of orange-shirted locals who at times blatantly mock the more eccentric patrons. But hey, we can take it. If you like concerts, camping, or parties, you’ll enjoy a festival at the SoS. If you like all three, then I don’t have to tell you, because you’ve surely already been.

Upcoming Music Festivals Worth Checking Out Spirit of the Suwannee Music Park 3076 95th Drive Live Oak, Florida 32060 www.musicliveshere.com Bear Creek Music & Art Festival November 8–11, 2012 Aura Music Festival Feb 15–17, 2013

Suwannee Springfest March 21–24, 2013

Wanee April 18–20, 2013

Suwannee River Jam May 1–4, 2013 MagnoliaFest October 17–20, 2013

Don’t forget… Clothes for ALL climates. Temperatures can vary 40+ degrees in places like North Florida. Baby Wipes. Shower queues can be long (and showers can be cold). Or, just bathe in the river! Costumes and accessories. The funkier, the better. Extra phone battery or a car charger. Reception can be spotty, but better to be safe than sorry. Head lamp or flashlight. Walking back to camp at 2am can be treacherous for yourself and for the people whose tent you trip over because you can’t find your own in the dark! Water, water, water. WATER. And healthy food options, if you don’t want to pay out the you-know-what for festival vending. Hand sanitizer. Don’t expect the porto-johns to have a sink. On that note, toilet paper is also a brilliant idea. Earplugs. Blasting out your hearing now will certainly make listening to music in the future much less enjoyable. Supportive shoes. You’re going to be standing and walking — all day, every day. If you’re not, you’re not doing it right. Camping chairs. If you don’t mind lugging them around, they can be lifesaving after days of standing, whether you leave them at the campsite or bring them into the music areas. Basic first aid. Because you don’t want to go hunting down the First Aid Tent for a band-aid and miss out on all the fun.


Artist 411: Band Agreements By Sebastien Delisle, Esq. You started out jamming in your parent’s garage. Time went on, you opened for some local bands in a couple venues around town, and then, all of a sudden, someone wants to sign you to a record label. What’s the first thing you do? Hit the bar! The second thing? Write a band agreement. Few bands take the time to hammer out the important details of their relationship up front–that is, before they start making money. Once a band starts to achieve any kind of success, it is critical for the band members to discuss the following questions with an entertainment attorney and sign an agreement to avoid band breakups, bad feelings, and lawsuits.

1. Who owns the copyright?

Copyright is what allows you, as a band, to own the song and get paid. Unless you’re a one-person act, the issue of copyright ownership can be tricky. Who wrote the lyrics? Who wrote the melody? Who came up with the awesome bass line? Can the songwriter take his song to another band? These are just a few of the copyright questions that should be addressed in multi-member bands.

2. How does the band make decisions?

When your band becomes successful, there are complicated decisions to be made. What if two record labels offer you a record deal? What if the lead singer wants to hire his deadbeat brother as the band manager? Your band needs to have a system for voting on important decisions that affect the band’s future.

3. What happens if a band member leaves or dies?

Death wishes aside, sometimes a band member wants to quit or refuses to carry their load. If the lead singer quits the band, do they still get paid when the band plays a song they were famous for performing? What if the band is in debt when someone quits—do they still need to pay their share of the losses? If a band member dies, who receives their share of the royalty payments? Can the band fire a member for any reason? While its easy to hope that none of these negative events will occur, the band must have a mechanism for dealing with the unfortunate realities of business.

There are many ways to deal with this scenario, but having people be confused when they’re trying to buy your album shouldn’t be one of them.

5. What happens if the band breaks up?

If it can happen to The Beatles, it can happen to your band too. Eventually, you may reach a point where you want to stop creating and performing as a band. Several issues arise here, including what happens to your songs and recordings and how your royalties get paid after the band dissolves. It’s best to set forth these contingencies before it becomes a reality to avoid a messy breakup. This is just the tip of the iceberg. Imagine your band as a company: there are many members and business activities, and as many potential situations as

Live Music

possible should be addressed at the outset. Every band is different, so a custom agreement is essential—a band should avoid using a template band agreement to save money initially, because it will end up costing much more in the future. Though a band agreement may seem cumbersome, remember that it truly is the first step to your band’s success!

Sebastien Delisle, Esq., is a partner at Bright Spark Legal -- a small firm dedicated to the legal needs of small businesses, with specialization in the arts, entertainment, and technology. This column, which will appear in alternating issues of Villager, is meant to provide general information, and should not be construed as individual legal advice. More information can be found at BrightSparkLegal.com

4. Who owns the name of the band?

Yes, this can be an issue. What happens if two out of four punk band members disagree on the band’s direction, and start an folk band with the same name?

SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!/Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ CapitalCityVillager/19


NIGHTLIFE EVENTS Date

Thru

Submit free event listings online at TALLYVILLAGER.COM

Starts

Title

Venue

Info

Address

09:00 PM

Karaoke

Episodes

find us on facebook

2122 W Pensacola St

010:30 PM

Booze and Brains Trivia with Hank

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com 1225 N Monroe St

RECURRING Mondays

Tuesdays

Wednesdays

Live Trivia with Jonny Ray

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

2810 Sharer Rd

08:00 PM

Mondays on the Mic

Tally Peace Market (in RRSQ)

find us on facebook

1007 Commercial Dr

05:00 PM

Hospitality Night

Waterworks

www.waterworkstallahassee.com

1133 Thomasville Rd

07:30 PM

Trivia Night with John France and his Orchestra Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

325 N Bronough St

010:00 PM

All You Can Smoke Tuesdays

Caffe Shisha & Hookah Lounge

www.cafeshisha.us

1416 W Tennessee St

09:00 PM

Throwback Tuesdays! 50’s to Present Day

Episodes

find us on facebook

2122 W Pensacola St

09:00 PM

Karaoke Night

Midtown Pass

www.midtownpass.com

1019 N Monroe St

Karaoke

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

2810 Sharer Rd

Comedy Night

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

325 N Bronough St

Bomber Babe Night

Bomb Shelter

www.barnaclebills.com

1830 North Monroe St

09:00 PM

Little Black Dress Night @ L8

Hotel Duval Level 8

www.hotelduval.com

415 N Monroe St

05:30 PM

Girls Night Out

Krewe de Gras

find us on facebook

1304-B N Monroe St

Whiskey Wednesday

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com 1225 N Monroe St

08:00 PM

DJ and Free Bowling

Pockets Pool and Pub

www.pocketspoolandpub.com

2810 Sharer Rd

05:00 PM

Happy Hour Open Mic Night

Tasty Eats Beer Garden

find us on facebook

602 Industrial Dr

08:00 PM

Open Mic

The Warehouse

www.openmikes.org

706 W Gaines St

08:00 PM

The BOOC Band

B Sharp’s Jazz Club

www.b-sharps.com

648 W Brevard St

09:30 PM

Karaoke with DJ Shower

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

325 N Bronough St

010:00 PM

Aural Thursdays ~ Electronica

Episodes

find us on facebook

2122 W Pensacola St

06:00 PM

Food Truck Thursday with Live Music!

Food Truck Hub

www.streetchefs.com

300 W Tharpe St.

08:00 PM

Karaoke Night

Po’ Boys Creole Cafe

www.poboys.com

1425 Village Square Blvd

010:00 PM

Open House Conspiracy

The Warehouse

(850) 222-6188

706 W Gaines St

09:00 PM

Science Salon

Waterworks

www.waterworkstallahassee.com

1133 Thomasville Rd

09:00 PM

Open Mic Night!

What ? Cafe

www.whatcafe.com

1940 N Monroe St #76

07:00 PM

Food Truck Round Up: with live music

All Saints Hop Yard

www.allsaintshopyard.com

453 All Saints St

08:00 PM

Friday Night Jazz

B Sharp’s Jazz Club

www.b-sharps.com

648 W Brevard St

08:00 PM

Scrabble Night

Black Dog Cafe

find us on facebook

229 Lake Ella Dr

09:00 PM

Thursdays

Fridays till 12/14 & Satu

& Sat Saturdays

98145.452

98145.452

98145.452

98145.452

05:00 PM

Gay Night

Club Rehab

find us on facebook

926 W Tharpe

09:00 PM

Live Jazz!

Hifi Jazz Cafe

www.hifijazzcafe.com

1617 S Adams St

05:00 PM

Wine Down

Hotel Duval Level 8

www.hotelduval.com

415 N Monroe St

08:30 PM

Phillip Solomon Stewart & the Palace Band

Nefetari’s (Amen-Ra)

www.kingpent.com

812 S Macomb St

till 11:30 PM Ladies Night

Tally Peace Market (in RRSQ)

find us on facebook

1007 Commercial Dr

010:00 PM

Stetsons On The Moon

The Moon

www.222moon.com

E Lafayette St

010:00 PM

DJ and Dancing

Waterworks

www.waterworkstallahassee.com

1133 Thomasville Rd

08:00 PM

Sing Sing Karaoke

What ? Cafe

www.whatcafe.com

1940 N Monroe St #76

010:00 PM

Karaoke Dance Party

AJ Sports Bar and Grill

www.ajsportsbar.net

1800 W Tennessee St

09:00 PM

Live Jazz!

Hifi Jazz Cafe

www.hifijazzcafe.com

1617 S Adams St

08:00 PM

DJ Gummy Bear

Midtown Pass

www.midtownpass.com

1019 N Monroe St

010:00 PM

Out & Out LGBTQA Party

Paradigm

find us on facebook

115 W College Ave

20/ CapitalCityVillager/ Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!


010:35 PM

Port Au Peace

Tally Peace Market (in RRSQ)

find us on facebook

06:30 PM

Live Acoustic Music

The Marinated Mushroom

www.themarinatedmushroom.com 2746 Capital Circle

Walker Paramore

Black Dog Cafe

find us on facebook

229 Lake Ella Dr

04:00 PM

Reggae Sundays

Hotel Duval Level 8

www.hotelduval.com

415 N Monroe St

09:00 PM

Sunday Sunday Sunday... Every NFL Game

Midtown Pass

www.midtownpass.com

1019 N Monroe St

11/2/12

08:00 PM

First Friday w “Bruised Grass” Southern Funk...

Athena’s Garden

www.athenasgarden.net

641-B McDonnell Dr

11/2/12

08:30 PM

Reverend Raven & Chain Smoking Alter Boys

Bradfordville Blues Club

www.bradfordvilleblues.com

7152 Moses Lane

05:00 PM

First Friday At the Lounge

Fermentation Lounge

www.fermentationlounge.com

113 All Saints St

06:00 PM

Go Radio/Paradise Fears/Stages and Stereos/tba The Side Bar

find us on facebook

809 Railroad Ave

Sundays

1007 Commercial Dr

NOV 2 - NOV 12

11/2/12

Ea. 1st Fri

11/2/12 11/3/12

010:00 PM

Live Music and Trash Cinema Night

Bird’s Aphrodisiac Oyster Shack

www.birdsoystershack.com

325 N Bronough St

11/3/12

Ea. 1st Sat

02:00 PM

Big Poppa and The Shuffle Brothers

Bradfordville Blues Club

www.bradfordvilleblues.com

7152 Moses Lane

11/3/12

010:00 PM

Fifteen Band Benefit

Bradfordville Blues Club

www.bradfordvilleblues.com

7152 Moses Lane

07:00 PM

Hippy Party benefitting The Tall. Veterans Village Krewe de Gras

find us on facebook

1304-B N Monroe St

11/3/12

07:30 PM

Elvis Wade Concert fundraiser

The Moon

www.222moon.com

E Lafayette St

11/3/12

06:00 PM

Gonzo featuring the M Machine

The Side Bar

find us on facebook

809 Railroad Ave

11/4/12

010:00 PM

Cherub/Machines are People Too/Toxey Ashmore The Side Bar

find us on facebook

809 Railroad Ave

11/6/12

07:00 PM

Bluegrass Jam Hosted by Kevin Robertson

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com 1225 N Monroe St

11/8/12

08:30 PM

Deerhoof

FSU Club Down Under

www.clubdownunder.org

FSU Oglesby Union

11/9/12

07:00 PM

Victor Goines Plays B Sharps

B Sharp’s Jazz Club

www.b-sharps.com

648 W Brevard St

11/10/12

08:30 PM

Harper & Midwest Kind

Bradfordville Blues Club

www.bradfordvilleblues.com

7152 Moses Lane

11/11/12

Ea. 2nd Sun 07:00 PM

The Ned Devines

Finnegan’s Wake

find us on facebook

1122 Thomasville Rd

11/11/12

08:00 PM

Passafire featuring Trial By Stone & Sidereal

The Side Bar

find us on facebook

809 Railroad Ave

11/12/12

2nd Mondays 09:00 PM

2012 Songwriter Series of Midtown

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com 1225 N Monroe St

11/3/12

11/4/12

THE

GREEN DOOR STUDIO presents...

The Perils of Plein Aire Painting

Fine Arts on commission (850) 878-0412

Senior citizens, check out art opportunities at the Tallahassee Senior Center

SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!/Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ CapitalCityVillager/21


Hodge Podge Date

Thru

Starts

Title

Submit free event listings online at TALLYVILLAGER.COM Category Venue

Info

Address

Museum Hrs Artistic Representations of Florida 500 Years

Exhibit

Capitol Gallery

www.florida-arts.org

400 S Monroe St

Various

Rescue 3D

IMAX

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

200 S Duval St

3rd Sats 11:00 AM

Kids Free Film Day

Family

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

200 S Duval St

12/15/12 Library Hrs

Her-Story: Phenomenal Women of Color

History

FAMU Black Archives

www.famu.edu

FAMU Carnegie Library

12/31/12 10:00 AM

History Exhibits

2100 W Tennessee St

RECURRING Ongoing 4/30/13 1/1/13

Exhibit

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

11/4/12

Museum Hrs 31st Annual Capital City Quilt Show

Craft

Museum of Florida History

www.museumoffloridahistory.com 2100 W Tennessee St

11/18/12

10:00 AM

The Power of A Greater Vision

Exhibit

Riley House Museum

www.rileymuseum.org

419 E Jefferson St

11/18/12

03:30 PM

6 Weeks of West African Dance! Fall Session

Dance

Soul Vegetarian Restaurant

find us on facebook

1205 S Adams St

11/15/12

Libr Hrs

Dali on Tour

Exhibit

TCC Library

www.tcc.fl.edu

444 Appleyard Dr

12/6/12

12:30 PM

Things Overlap Over Time

Exhibit

TCC Turner Auditorium

www.tcc.fl.edu

444 Appleyard Dr

11/2/12

Varies

Thomasville Enter. Fd 75th Ann Exhibition

Exhibit

Thomasville Center for the Arts www.thomasvillearts.org

600 E Washington St

Downtown City Tours

History

Tours in Tallahassee

www.toursintallahassee.com

Greater Tallahassee

Various

French, Spanish, German Language Classes

Lessons

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

1400 N Monroe St

06:00 PM

Capital City Runners - Weekly Group Run

Sports/Rec 1866 Thomasville Rd 32303

www.capcityrunners.com

07:30 PM

Tallahassee Ballroom Dance w/ DJ

Dance

www.floridalegionpost13.org

229 Lake Ella Dr

03:00 PM

Headshots for Tallahassee-Area Non-Profits

Fundraiser Mickey Adair

info@availablelightphoto.com

565 E Tennesseee St

06:00 PM

Edible Garden Club

Hobby

The pavilion at Winthrop Park

find us on facebook

1601 Mitchell Ave

9:00 AM

Watercolor Class

Workshop

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

1400 N Monroe St

07:00 PM

Tallahasse Swing Band

Dance

American Legion

www.floridalegionpost13.org

229 Lake Ella Dr

08:30 PM

Tango Tuesdays

Dance

Fifth Avenue Tap Room

tangotallahassee.com

1122 Thomasville Rd

06:00 PM

Guitar Workshop

Workshop

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

1400 N Monroe St

08:00 PM

FSU Literary Readings

Literature

The Warehouse

(850) 222-6188

706 W Gaines St

6:30 AM

Crochet / Knitting Meet

Hobby

What ? Cafe

www.whatcafe.com

1940 N Monroe St #76

06:30 PM

Sue Boyd Country Dance Lessons

Dance

American Legion

www.floridalegionpost13.org

229 Lake Ella Dr

06:00 PM

Hip Hop Dance Instruction

Lessons

Center for Creative Release

(850) 559-2885

122 E Third Ave

06:30 PM

Worship & Bible Study

Spiritual

Florida A&M University Worship www.fmworship.com

2439 Basswood Ln

03:00 PM

Lafayette Street Organic Growers’ Market

Market

Video 21

on google plus

1449 E Lafayette St

07:00 PM

Writer’s Workshop

Workshop

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

1400 N Monroe St

06:30 PM

Higher Ground Beginners Road Ride

Sports/Rec Higher Ground

www.cccyclists.org

3185 Capital Circle NE

011:00 PM

Salsa Dancing

Dance

Margo’s

find us on facebook

451 W Gaines St

05:30 PM

Ballroom/Swing Dance Lessons

Dance

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

1400 N Monroe St

12:00 PM

Tallahassee Chess Club

Hobby

Black Dog Cafe

tallahasseechess.com

229 Lake Ella Dr

9:00 AM

Downtown MarketPlace

Festival

Parks on Park Ave / Monroe St www.tallahasseedowntown.com

117 E Park Ave

04:00 PM

Ukulele jam session - open session for all levels

Music

Finnegan’s Wake

find us on facebook

1122 Thomasville Rd

Halloween Extravaganza

Circus

FSU Flying High Circus

www.circus.fsu.edu

269 Chieftan Way

Fine Arts Exhibits

Exhibit

North Florida Fairgrounds

850-877-7587

441 Paul Russell Rd

12/21/12 Various Mondays thru Fri

& Tue Tuesdays & Thur

Wed.

Thursdays Fridays & Sat Saturdays Sundays

American Legion

NOV 2 - NOV 15 11/1/12

11/3/12

11/1/12

11/12/12

11/1/12

11/30/12 drop-off anytmPeas in a Pod, for Big Bend

Food Drive The Market District

www.themarketdistricttallahassee. Timberlane Rd / Market St

11/2/12

11/4/12

Various

Under African Skies

Cinema

All Saints Cinema

www.tallahasseefilms.com

918 1/2 Railroad Ave

11/2/12

11/11/12

Various

Summer and Smoke

Theatre

FSU Lab Theatre

www.tickets.fsu.edu

502 S Copeland St

08:00 PM

Caroline Hong plays Bach’s Goldberg

Concert

FSU Opperman Music Hall

www.music.fsu.edu

Kuersteiner Music Bld

11/2/12

08:00 PM

11/2/12

11/4/12

Various

Orpheus in the Underworld

Opera

Ruby Diamond Concert Hall

www.music.fsu.edu

Westcott Bld FSU Campus

11/2/12

11/3/12

011:55 PM

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Cinema

FSU Student Life Building

www.movies.fsu.edu

133 S Wildwood Dr

22/ CapitalCityVillager/ Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!


11/2/2012 11/3/12

10:00 AM

Greek Food Festival

Festival

Holy Mother Greek Orthodox Ch www.hmog.org/festival

1645 Phillips Rd

11/2/12

Various

Title Wave Book Sale

Sale

Leon County Public Library

www.leoncountylibrary.org

200 W Park Ave

05:00 PM

Film Societies 48-HR Film Contest

Film

Mary Brogan Museum

www.thebrogan.org

350 South Duval St

11/4/12

11/2/12 11/2/12

1st Fri

06:00 PM

Co+op Cafe Night

Music

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

1235 Apalachee Pkwy

11/2/12

1st Fri

06:00 PM

1st Friday @ Railroad Square Art Park

Festival

Railroad Square Art Park

communityatrailroadsquare.org

567 Industrial Dr

11/2/12

12/14/12 06:00 PM

“Men About Town” photo-journalist

Exhibit

SAC, Visual Arts Gallery

www.southsideartscomplex.org

2525 S Monroe St

11/3/12

1st Sat

10:00 AM

Free Planetarium Show

Science

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

200 S Duval St

11/3/12

02:00 PM

Japanese Koto Music Concert

Concert

FSU Center for Global Engmt

cge.fsu.edu

110 S Woodward Ave

11/3/12

03:00 PM

Midtown Community Gathering

Social

Lafayette Park

find us on facebook

501 Ingleside Ave

11/3/12

11:00 AM

South East Yo-Yo contest

Contest

Lofty Pursuits

www.loftypursuits.com

1415 Timberlane Rd #410

11/3/12

10:00 AM

Blacksmithing for Beginners

Workshop

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

2100 W Tennessee St

11/3/12

06:30 PM

Dance With The Soul: poetry, music’n dance

Party

Namaste Yoga

www.namaste-tallahassee.com

1369 E Lafayette St

11/3/12

01:00 PM

Seasonal Gardening: Raw Foods fr the Garden

Workshop

Salvation Army Garden

transition.tallahassee@gmail.com 2131 Jackson Bluff Rd

11/3/12

01:00 PM

Book signing with Darryl Bollinger

Signing

The Bookshelf Midtown

www.bookshelfandgallery.com

1123 Thomasville Rd

10:00 AM

Puppies in the Pool

Rec/Sports Trousdell Aquatic Center

www.talgov.com

298 John Knox Rd

11:00 AM

Black Dog Cafe’s 15th Anniversary Party

Festival

Black Dog Cafe

tallahasseechess.com

229 Lake Ella Dr

02:00 PM

Swing Dancing in Market Square

Festival

Lofty Pursuits

www.loftypursuits.com

1415 Timberlane Rd #410

02:00 PM

Refuge Presentation Series

Lecture

St. Marks Refuge

(850) 925-6121

1255 Lighthouse Rd

11/4/12

02:00 PM

Mickee Faust Punk’n Chuck’n (Pumpkin Toss)

Theatre

The Mickee Faust Club

www.mickeefaust.com

623 McDonnell Dr

11/6/12

07:45 PM

Mindfulness Series: Fr Difficulty To Opportunity

Lecture

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

1235 Apalachee Pkwy

11/7/12

07:45 PM

Body In Balance Equals Pain Relief

Lecture

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

1235 Apalachee Pkwy

07:45 PM

Make Your Own Kimchee

Lecture

New Leaf Market

www.newleafmarket.coop

1235 Apalachee Pkwy

all day

Bear Creek Music Festival

Festival

Suwannee Music Park

www.suwanneespringfest.com

Live Oak

PFLAG Tallahassee Monthly Meeting

Family

St. John’s Episcopal Church

www.pflag-tallahassee.org

211 N Monroe St

11/3/12

1st Sat

11/4/12

11/4/12 11/4/12 11/4/12

1st Sun

11/8/12 11/8/12

11/11/12

11/8/12

2nd Thurs 06:00 PM

11/8/12

11:00 AM

Tots on Trails

Lecture

St. Marks Refuge

850-925-6121

1255 Lighthouse Rd

11/8/12

11/11/12

all day

V89 25th Birthday Bash and Reunion 89.7FM

Party

WVFS Tallahassee

850-644-1837

All Over Tallahassee

11/9/12

11/11/12

Various

Las Acacias

Cinema

All Saints Cinema

www.tallahasseefilms.com

918 1/2 Railroad Ave

11/9/12

11/18/12

Various

Next to Normal by Theatre A La Carte

Theatre

Tallahassee Little Theatre

www.tallahasseelittletheatre.org

1861 Thomasville Rd

11/9/12

Ea. 2nd Fri07:30 PM

Contra Dance

Dance

Tallahassee Senior Center

www.talgov.com/seniors

1400 N Monroe St

11/9/12

11/12/12

08:00 PM

“The Changeling” Resurgens Theatre Comp.

Theatre

The Warehouse

(850) 222-6188

706 W Gaines St

11/9/12

11/18/12

Various

Annie

Theatre

Young Actors Theatre

www.youngactorstheatre.com

609 Glenview Dr

11/10/12

2nd Sat

98145.452

98145.452 98145.452

98145.452

98145.452

11/10/12

22nd Annual AIDS Walk and 5k/10k Run

Benefit

Big Bend Cares

www.bigbendcares.org

Southwood

11/10/12

2nd Sats 10:00 AM

8:00 AM

Saturday Space Mission

Family

Challenger Learning Center

www.challengertlh.com

200 S Duval St

11/10/12

2nd Sats 06:00 PM

Second Saturdays in Historic Apalachicola

MatureLivingHistoric Apalachicola Main St

www.historicapalachicola.com

86 Water St

11/10/12

2nd & 4th 06:45 PM

Tallahassee Apple User Group

Hobby

Imax Theatre

www.tapple.org

200 S Duval St

11/10/12

2nd Sats 11:00 AM

2nd Saturday Family Program

Family

Museum of Florida History

www.museumoffloridahistory.com 500 S Bronough St

11/10/12

9:00 AM

St. Marks Photo Club

Photography St. Marks Refuge

850-925-6121

1255 Lighthouse Rd

11/10/12

9:00 AM

Artisans in the Garden

Gardening Tallahassee Nurseries

www.tallahasseenurseries.com

2911 Thomasville Rd

11/10/12

08:30 PM

Mike Epps

Comedy

Civic Ctr

www.tlccc.org

505 W Pensacola St

11/10/12

03:00 PM

Joshilyn Jackson Signing/Talk

Reading

The Bookshelf Midtown

www.bookshelfandgallery.com

1123 Thomasville Rd

11/11/12

04:00 PM

Poetry for the Pantry

Reading

621 Gallery

www.621gallery.org

621 Industrial Dr

11/11/12

10:00 AM

Sketch and Etch: Textures, Chemicals on Metal

Workshop

Athena’s Garden, FSGS

www.athenasgarden.net

641-B McDonnell Dr

11/11/12

2nd Suns 11:00 AM

Archaeology Lab Tours

History

Mission San Luis

www.missionsanluis.org

2100 W Tennessee St

11/12/12

09:00 PM

2012 Songwriter Series of Midtown

Workshop

Mockingbird Cafe

www.mockingbirdtallahassee.com 1225 N Monroe St

11/15/12

3rd Thurs 06:00 PM

Tallahasse Writer’s Association

Workshop

American Legion

twaonline.org

229 Lake Ella Dr.

11/15/12

11/18/12

The Monster Under the Bed

Theatre

FSU Fallon Theatre

www.theatre.fsu.edu

540 W Call St

Various

SHOP LOCAL! PLAY LOCAL! LIVE LOCAL!/Nov 2, 2012/ vol. 1 iss. 13/ CapitalCityVillager/23


22nd ANNUAL AIDS WALK & 5K/10K RUN

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10TH SOUTHWOOD REGISTRATION STARTS AT 8:00 AM RUN/WALK STARTS AT 9:00 AM

BIGBENDCARESAIDSWALK.ORG (850) 656-2437

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT BIG BEND CARES

Capital City Villager :: Volume 1, Issue 12 :: Fri. November 2, 2012  

Continuing our mission to encourage greater support of local arts, culture and sall business, we cover the FSU Circus from the inside, dig i...

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