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laura ellen bacon


Inundation Laura Ellen Bacon An immersive, abstract installation in willow, especially devised for Ruthin Craft Centre. 2 August – 21 September 2014


Inundation Laura Ellen Bacon An immersive, abstract installation in willow, especially devised for Ruthin Craft Centre. 2 August – 21 September 2014


Stand in the midst of a huge, flowing mass of swelling forms, ripples and surges. Smell the enduring scent of the natural material; watch the shadows describe new waves upon the walls. Material pours in, to the point where the space is full, responding both to the existing architecture and to the flow of visitors. Using the precise language of a highly particular making skill to engulf the gallery, Laura Ellen Bacon manipulates and ties thousands of rods of willow, their inherent tension tethered by knotting, their potential for spring and movement still apparent. Mass is created by multiple human-scale gestures, a new architectural structure in a natural material. The work, in its quiet immensity and transparency, also refers to recent extreme flooding, in North Wales and in the Somerset Levels, where the willow for this work was grown. Having caused great destruction and hardship, the waters eventually receded in time for the annual willow harvest. A memory of the event, however, is embodied in the material. Laura says: “In recent months, the willow I’ve received from Somerset has held trace markings left from the receding waterline of the recent floods. This fascinating, temporary trace on each stem has given me vivid, imaginary images of the thousands of willow stems standing stoutly in the flood water, waiting quietly for the threatening water levels to drop. Throughout the whole period of flooding and amid all the alarm and anxiety, the willow was standing, still and quiet; I can imagine how cloudy and cold the water was, how immensely crushed the ground below must have been, how the daylight would be mirrored brilliantly between the willow stems.” Responding to this observation within the installation, the artist has applied colour to recreate the tide-line of the flood, establishing a new level, the memory-mark of inundation. Laura Ellen Bacon has exhibited widely since 2001, including exhibitions and events such as ‘Collect’ at London’s Saatchi Gallery and Jerwood Contemporary Makers 2010. Her sculptural forms are found in both interior and landscape settings, which have included Chatsworth, Blackwell in the Lake District and New Art Centre in Wiltshire. Her studio is in Derbyshire. Sara Roberts, curator


Stand in the midst of a huge, flowing mass of swelling forms, ripples and surges. Smell the enduring scent of the natural material; watch the shadows describe new waves upon the walls. Material pours in, to the point where the space is full, responding both to the existing architecture and to the flow of visitors. Using the precise language of a highly particular making skill to engulf the gallery, Laura Ellen Bacon manipulates and ties thousands of rods of willow, their inherent tension tethered by knotting, their potential for spring and movement still apparent. Mass is created by multiple human-scale gestures, a new architectural structure in a natural material. The work, in its quiet immensity and transparency, also refers to recent extreme flooding, in North Wales and in the Somerset Levels, where the willow for this work was grown. Having caused great destruction and hardship, the waters eventually receded in time for the annual willow harvest. A memory of the event, however, is embodied in the material. Laura says: “In recent months, the willow I’ve received from Somerset has held trace markings left from the receding waterline of the recent floods. This fascinating, temporary trace on each stem has given me vivid, imaginary images of the thousands of willow stems standing stoutly in the flood water, waiting quietly for the threatening water levels to drop. Throughout the whole period of flooding and amid all the alarm and anxiety, the willow was standing, still and quiet; I can imagine how cloudy and cold the water was, how immensely crushed the ground below must have been, how the daylight would be mirrored brilliantly between the willow stems.” Responding to this observation within the installation, the artist has applied colour to recreate the tide-line of the flood, establishing a new level, the memory-mark of inundation. Laura Ellen Bacon has exhibited widely since 2001, including exhibitions and events such as ‘Collect’ at London’s Saatchi Gallery and Jerwood Contemporary Makers 2010. Her sculptural forms are found in both interior and landscape settings, which have included Chatsworth, Blackwell in the Lake District and New Art Centre in Wiltshire. Her studio is in Derbyshire. Sara Roberts, curator


Laura Ellen Bacon created this site specific installation over a period of two weeks, with assistance from… Kate Jordan, Ellie Jones-Hughes, Millie Louise Wellington, Rose Hiles, Nia Shaw, Connie Parr and Elisha Walkden-Williams. This project was made possible with special funding from the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. Ruthin Craft Centre would like to thank Laura Ellen Bacon and Sara Roberts; Dewi Tannatt Lloyd, Nia Roberts, Bethan Hughes; and the Arts Council of Wales. Published by Ruthin Craft Centre The Centre for the Applied Arts Text © The Authors 2014 ISBN 978-1-905865-66-6 Installation photography: Dewi Tannatt Lloyd Translation: Nia Roberts Design: Lawn, Liverpool Print: Team Impression, Leeds Ruthin Craft Centre is revenue funded by the Arts Council of Wales and is part of Denbighshire County Council. Available in a Welsh Language version.


Laura Ellen Bacon created this site specific installation over a period of two weeks, with assistance from… Kate Jordan, Ellie Jones-Hughes, Millie Louise Wellington, Rose Hiles, Nia Shaw, Connie Parr and Elisha Walkden-Williams. This project was made possible with special funding from the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. Ruthin Craft Centre would like to thank Laura Ellen Bacon and Sara Roberts; Dewi Tannatt Lloyd, Nia Roberts, Bethan Hughes; and the Arts Council of Wales. Published by Ruthin Craft Centre The Centre for the Applied Arts Text © The Authors 2014 ISBN 978-1-905865-66-6 Installation photography: Dewi Tannatt Lloyd Translation: Nia Roberts Design: Lawn, Liverpool Print: Team Impression, Leeds Ruthin Craft Centre is revenue funded by the Arts Council of Wales and is part of Denbighshire County Council. Available in a Welsh Language version.


laura ellen bacon

Profile for Canolfan Grefft Rhuthun / Ruthin Craft Centre

Laura Ellen Bacon – English  

Laura Ellen Bacon – English  

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