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The untold story

Research Activity Report 2011


Table of contents

Message from the CEO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Ten years of cancer research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Cancer Council NSW: a snapshot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Battling cancer of the brain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Separating sport and sponsorship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Hunting for viral links with oesophageal cancer . . . . . . 12 Learning more about Barrett’s oesophagus. . . . . . . . . . 14 Getting the word out about liver cancer. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Gaining new insights from colorectal cancer data . . . . 18 Patterns of pancreatic cancer care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Uncovering the progression of pancreatic cancer . . . . 20 Clearing the way for insights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Finding out more about the unknown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Appendices Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Publications, presentations and posters . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Board and committees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40


Our vision Cancer defeated Our vision will be realised when lives are not cut short nor the quality of life diminished by cancer.

Our Vision Cancer Ca C anc ncer er d defeated effea atte ed

Our Ou O ur vvi ur vision isi sion on w on will ililll be e rrealised e lilise ea s dw se wh when hen llives iivvess a are re n not ot c cut ut sshort ut ho ortt the quality byy ca cancer. nor th no nor he qu ua allit litty of o life lifi e diminished dimi di mini mi nish shed sh e b ed anc cer e.

Our mission

To defeat cancer through engaging the community

Mission Cancer CouncilTo connects and organisations to the cancer ToNSW d defeat ee ef ea at canc ca cancer anc cer e people tthrough hrrou h o gh he engaging ng gag agin ng cause. Together we can build insights into the significance of cancer in our the community tth he co comm mm mun unit ityy lives and contribute our talents towards the vision of cancer defeated. We Cancer Ca C anc ce err C Council ou o unc nciliill NSW NSW c connects on o nn ne ectts pe people eop o lle ea and n o nd organisations rg gan a is isat attiio ons n work across alltoocancers. the can build the he cancer can nce er cause. caus ca u e. Together us Tog oget ethe et he er we ec a b an uiild d iinsights n ig ns ght h s into in nto o tthe he The impact

our and contribute talents ssignificance si gn nififica c nc nce e of of cancer can nce c r in no ur llives ivves a n c nd on ntrrib bu utte ou ourr ta tale le entts off ca cancer defeated. We work across ttowards to owa ward wa r s th the e vi vvision sion o si canc anc ncer err d ee ef ea ate t d. d. W e wo w ork a crros osss cancers. alll c al ca anc cer ework s s. from our together will be visible in changing: The impact will be changing: T e im Th impa p ctt from pa fro om ou ourr wo work rrkk ttogether og o get ethe herr w he illll b e vi vvisible s bl si b e in nc hang ha ngin ng gin ng: g: The cancer patients and carers UUÊ Th he llilives ivve es of es o c ance an er p pa atit en ents tss a nd c arrer a es

UÊ The lives of cancer patients and carers Scientific knowledge UUÊ Sc cie ient n ifific know nt kn now wle edg ge

UÊ Scientific knowledge

Community understanding and behaviour UUÊ Comm Co omm mmun u itty un un nde ers rsta ta and n in ng a an nd be b havi ha viou ou ur

UÊ CommunityUUÊunderstanding and behaviour Society, policy and practice advance cancer control. Soci So oci c et ety, y, p olic ol cy an a nd pr p ac ctitice ce tto o ad a vanc va nce nc e ca anc ncer er c on ntr t ol ol. UÊ Society, policy and practice to advance cancer control. Increasingly, people will work organisations and Incr In c ea cr easi s ng si ngly lyy, pe p ople op le ew ililll wo ork iin n or o gani ga n sa ni atition on ns an a nd lilive vve e iin n which advance control off ca cancer ffamilies fa ami mililil es mi es and and d social so oc cia al settings se ett ttin ings ngs gs w hich hi ch ha dvan dv an nce c tthe h c he ontr on trrol o ancer nc cer e and resources (people, services and are an nd where wh w her ere e re reso so our uc ce es (p pe eo opl ple, e iideas, e, d as de as, se serv rvvic ces a nd d ffunds) u ds un ds)) ar a e developed cancer. d de velo ve lope lo pewill d globally g ob gl obal a lyy and al and d locally loc cal ally to to meet me ee ett tthe he e challenges cha hfamilies alllen enge gess ofand ge c ance an c social ce r r. people work in organisations,

Increasingly, settings which advance the control of cancer and where resources (people, ideas, services and funds) are developed globally and locally to meet the challenges of cancer.

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Message from the CEO

“We are con continuing to work hard to ensure ou our research act activities are closely con connected to the community an and the needs of cancer pat patients and car caregivers.”

Dr Andrew Penman AM Chief Executive Officer

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Message from the CEO In 2011, Cancer Council NSW has again been leading research into major and emerging types of cancer. Our commitment to research stretches across many areas and is dedicated to making a significant contribution to understanding the causes, prevention, treatment and cure of cancer. This Research Activity Report presents just a small snapshot of the exciting work that is being undertaken by groups of dedicated and talented researchers. Their work builds our knowledge about cancer and its causes, and establishes the best ways to translate these findings into actions that will help the lives of people as they face the cancer journey. As the largest non-government funder of cancer research in NSW, Cancer Council NSW is able to drive remarkable discoveries. We invested $16 million into research in 2011, bringing our research investment over the past 10 years to a total in excess of $100 million. To fund this research, we rely on the generosity of our supporters – and we make sure that the largest segment of every donor dollar is committed to research activities. Our strategy focuses on funding world-class, groundbreaking research that covers all aspects of cancer – particularly high-mortality and high-impact cancers, many of which are traditionally underfunded. This strategy is designed to ensure no cancer is ignored. We value independence, forward thinking, courage and collaboration in our researchers both internal and external to Cancer Council. This approach has been rewarded this year with a number of significant breakthroughs. For example, Associate Professor Diona Damian’s research into skin cancer uncovered the potential role of vitamin B3 in preventing skin cancer by helping with DNA repair. This will add another tool to prevent this common cancer in Australians. Another major success was achieved by our internal Cancer Council NSW researchers, who showed that Australia’s Pap smear screening frequency recommendations could safely be changed from two to three years. As a consequence of this work, the prevention of cervical cancer may become a lesser burden for millions of women. Turning research into action While research into cancer is vital, we also need to translate it into action. Cancer Council NSW is committed to using our resources and the results of our funded research activities to initiate changes in cancer policies and practices. Our research into how children are influenced by sport sponsorship from companies marketing unhealthy food and drink products is being used to boost calls for changes in government policy. Similarly, the findings of our collaborative research into the needs of brain and pancreatic cancer patients, their carers and their families

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

are being used as the foundation for the creation of support packages and informational DVDs about these cancers. We have driven new, practical and innovative research into cancers that would otherwise not receive the resources they need (including pancreatic, bowel, liver, brain and oesophageal cancers) through a series of strategic research partnerships across Australia. For example, although brain cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in people below the age of 39, research into this type of cancer attracted only 2.2% of all cancer research funding in NSW in 2004–06. To change this, Cancer Council NSW funded over $4.8 million worth of grants in brain cancer research during 2011 alone, and more than $9 million over the last five years. Looking to the future The rapidly changing world of cancer research means that our strategy must look ahead and anticipate new discoveries. To ensure we support the development of future research breakthroughs, we have made a significant investment in genotype-guided cancer therapy, which we see as having enormous potential for creating new genetic approaches to treating – and potentially preventing – cancer. Other areas which will bring significant benefits in the future are the potential development of our cancer biobank and our large population studies. Both the Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk (CLEAR) Study, conducted by our internal Cancer Research Division, and the 45 and Up Study, conducted in collaboration with the Sax Institute, are likely to deliver invaluable insights into the background lifestyle and genetic factors influencing cancer risk. Every day, 100 people will be diagnosed with cancer. At Cancer Council NSW, we are committed to funding research to make a difference in the fight against all cancers. Thanks to you, we can continue to do so.

Dr Andrew Penman AM Chief Executive Officer

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Ten years of cancer research

Ten years of cancer research Cancer Council NSW has been at the forefront of cancer research for a decade, with remarkable results. Although cancer remains a major scourge in the community, much has been achieved in the past 10 years when it comes to unlocking its secrets and improving the lives of those affected by it. Statistics show that unmistakable progress has been made in the fight against cancer. While the number of people diagnosed with cancer has crept up over the past 10 years, the number of people dying from cancer has fallen by 13%. Survival rates for almost every cancer have improved, with the 5-year survival rate for stomach cancer increasing by over 30% since the early 1990s. These improvements would not have been accomplished without the breakthroughs made by cancer researchers. Our achievements Over the past 10 years, the research undertaken and funded by Cancer Council NSW has been an important element in achieving improved survival rates. The research teams we have funded have made significant and exciting breakthroughs. Through their dedication and hard work, they have unlocked the secrets of cancer cell immortality, reduced the death rate from leukaemia, and developed a new drug that is now saving the lives of women with ovarian cancer. Our researchers were the first to quantify the significant differences in cancer mortality – particularly from breast cancer – between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Another significant achievement of our funded research in the past 10 years has been the discovery of two new possible cancer treatments targeting the power supply of cancer cells. This work may be able to help with brain and pancreatic cancers, which are currently incurable. We continue to participate in the largest study of healthy ageing in the Southern Hemisphere, with Cancer Council NSW playing a vital role in the 45 and Up Study. Data from this study will potentially be used to create one of the world’s largest biobanks. Research into practice Ensuring research findings are translated into practical actions is an essential part of our work. We are dedicated to funding research that can change real-world outcomes, and to supporting its findings as they are incorporated into clinical and policy practice.

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We have funded a number of clinical trials, evaluations of chemotherapy techniques, and other practical research that has improved the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Our Strategic Research Partnership (STREP) grants are founded on the concept of translational research – research designed to strengthen real-world applications. A major success has been the work of our mathematical modelling team, who documented the impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on future cervical cancer incidence. This research has influenced vaccination and cervical screening policies in Australia, New Zealand, China and the United Kingdom. We have been active in lobbying for changes in tobacco legislation. Based on the results of research into the effects of passive smoking, bans have been implemented on displaying tobacco products in retail outlets, smoking in cars with children, and smoking in playgrounds, hotels and clubs. Each of these research-based activities marks a significant achievement and another success in the continuing fight against cancer. Investment in research over five years ($ million) $20

$15

$10

$16,053,000 $14,379,000

$5

$14,282,000 $12,921,000 $0 2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

$10,712,000


Who we are We are an independent and forward-thinking community of people, where ideas and charity come together to make a difference in the fight against all cancers.

What we do By funding and undertaking world-leading research into prevention strategies and new treatments, as well as providing advocacy and support to those affected by cancer, we are working towards realising the vision of a society where lives are not cut short – nor the quality of lives diminished – by cancer.

Our research By investing in the most promising research, adopting upto-date technologies, rapidly responding to breakthroughs, swiftly dispelling myths, and conducting population-based forecasting to meet future needs in prevention, services, screening and vaccinations, Cancer Council NSW continues to make a real difference in the fight against cancer.

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Cancer Council NSW: a snapshot

Cancer Council NSW: a snapshot Types of research funded in 2011 Causes – 10.1%

Prevention – 6.7%

Detection – 15.7%

Treatment – 30.3%

Survivorship – 5.6%

Fundamental – 22.5%

Model systems – 9.0%

$3,500,000

Investment in strategic priorities

$3,000,000

Pancreatic

Oesophageal

$2,500,000

Liver

Colorectal

Brain $2,000,000 $1,500,500

Cancer research by governments, charities and foundations in Australia was found to be heavily skewed towards the basic science end of the spectrum in a 2003–05 report, with most research into fundamentals (44%), followed by treatment (20%). Cancer Council NSW, by contrast, has consistently funded more practical and translational research as shown on the graph (left).

Cancer Council NSW has a research strategy that supports cancers of poor prognosis and those where the level of funding does not reflect the burden of disease. Our research portfolio demonstrates our commitment to providing mechanisms for discovery in these cancers.

$1,000,000 $500,000

$0 2007

2008

2009

2010

Percentage of research expenditure

2011

Incidence/mortality per 100,000 people 100

12%

10%

8%

90

% of 2007–2011 research expenditure

80

Standardised incidence, Australia 2008

70

Standardised mortality, Australia 2008

60 50

6%

40 4%

30 20

2%

10 0

6

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0%

Investment in cancers compared to their incidence and mortality

Cancer Council NSW has the flexibility to actively respond to new opportunities and needs in research. We monitor trends in cancer incidence and research funding, and engage with consumers, practitioners, researchers and policymakers to provide timely and appropriate support for research.


Publications/presentations

Location of collaborators

70

CERU publications and collaborations

60

Publications

50

Presentations

Our internal research group, the Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit (CERU), is one of the largest public health cancer research operations in Australia, with 40 scientific staff – plus students and volunteers – working with more than 150 collaborators.

40 30 20 10 0 2008

2009

2010

2011

Australia – 122

Asia/South Pacific – 24

Europe – 22

Africa – 20

US/Canada – 17

12.0%

Research by cancer type over five years (2007–2011)

10.0%

% of investment

We aim to drive research in all cancers for all people. Our grants cover both researcher-initiated projects, which are not traditionally priority driven, and Strategic Research Partnership (STREP) grants, which are focused on our priority areas in cancer. This allows us to cover a broad range of cancers, while still investing in priority cancers.

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Our global collaboration and reach

Our research capabilities and reach are also enriched by our international network, with hundreds of collaborations with academics, organisations, networks and communities. Our national and international collaborations enable us to extend our capabilities and accelerate breakthroughs in ways to prevent, diagnose, treat and manage cancer.

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Battling cancer of the brain

“The beginning be months mon nths are the part – it’s easyy pa long term. the lon just shatters It ju st s life.” yourr lif

Justin was diagnose diagnosed with brain cancer in July went to hospital, the surgeon, last year. A After he we originally booked him Dr Jonathon Jonatho on Parkinson, Parkins surgery in for a surg gery in four fou days time. But after Justin watching J ustin for a few minutes, he changed “I’m his mind: “I I’m taking him now, we’re going to tomorrow. He can’t wait”. operate tom morrow. H surgery, After the su urgery, Justin Jus couldn’t write, read, talk But or walk. Bu ut thanks to t an incredibly supportive team his friends, he’s just got his medical tea am and hi licence driver’s lice ence again and is about to start what hopefully will hopefu lly be his last round of chemotherapy. His advice to anyone else in the same situation? “Just keep fighting, and a stay positive.” Justin and d Wendy and Survivor a nd carer

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Battling cancer of the brain Project: Dynamin inhibitors as new anti-cancer drugs for brain cancer Brain cancer is extremely difficult to treat, with no significant improvement in survival rates in more than two decades. A new drug treatment, which works by interfering with cancer cell division, has reduced mouse brain tumours by more than 80%, with limited apparent side effects. Researchers hope this new drug will perform better than existing chemotherapy drugs and have fewer adverse effects. Brain cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in people below the age of 39, and it accounts for more than 30% of cancer deaths in children under the age of 10. The most common, lethal and difficult-to-treat type of brain tumour is glioblastoma. A key characteristic of this deadly cancer is its rapid growth, as the cancer cells divide and spread faster than normal cells. This rapid growth is what many cancer drugs aim to target and is the reason many patients treated for cancer lose their hair (as hair follicles are some of the fastestgrowing cells in the body). With no significant improvement in survival rates for patients with this type of brain cancer in almost two decades, researchers at the Children’s Medical Research Institute have been working on an enzyme (dynamin) that cells use to help them divide and grow. Although there are three types of this enzyme, the research group is concentrating on ways of inhibiting dynamin-2. This could possibly prevent cancer cells from multiplying, as researchers have shown that dynamin-2 inhibitors not only stop the cancer from dividing, but also actually cause cell death if the cells try to divide. These dynamin-2 inhibitors are predicted to not affect normal cells that are not dividing, and may be more effective and have fewer side effects than existing chemotherapeutic drugs.

What we achieved this year In 2010, researchers identified a drug that successfully reduced tumour size in a mouse model of brain cancer. This year, they have attempted to understand exactly why it worked. Exhaustive analysis found that the drug stimulated cell death in cells that contain low amounts of a protein that prevents cell death, which led to suggestions that the drug might work better when used in combination with other chemotherapy drugs to increase its effectiveness and improve patient outcomes. Encouraging studies conducted on mice have also suggested that the drug has limited side effects. During 2011, the researchers developed several second-generation compounds based on the original drug. These compounds were found to be equally effective at blocking dynamin-2 function in cells, but have enhanced cell-killing properties and are predicted to have improved drug characteristics (including the ability to enter the brain) compared to current brain cancer treatments. Future activities Future research will aim to confirm that dynamin inhibitors are suited to being used as drugs for brain cancer treatment, as they are better able to kill cancer cells and have few side effects. It is expected these dynamin inhibitors will be tested in clinical trials and used in human cancer treatment. Cancer Council NSW is continuing to support this exciting research, and awarded the research team another grant in 2011.

What impact will it have? Current chemotherapy drugs to treat glioblastoma (a type of brain cancer) do not actually increase long-term survival rates, so new targets and strategies are required to treat this devastating cancer. This research project may lead to the development of novel small-molecule dynamin inhibitors that have the potential to be used alone, or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, for the treatment of glioblastoma. Over the long term, this project may lead to the identification of a dynamin-inhibitor compound that can be pursued for testing in clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma.

Lead researcher: Dr Megan Chircop, Biomedical Researcher, Children’s Medical Research Institute, Westmead.

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Separating sport and sponsorship

Separating sport and sponsorship Project: Food and drink company sponsorship of children: publicity or philanthropy? Being overweight or obese increases the risk of developing bowel, pancreatic, endometrium, kidney, breast and oesophageal cancers. Cancer Council NSW aims to prevent obesity through multiple approaches, including providing education on healthy food choices and improving access to healthy food. However, the promotion of unhealthy foods undermines efforts to improve nutrition. Cancer Council NSW is investigating the extent of unhealthy food sponsorship in children’s sport, one of the ways that this type of food is promoted to children. The research also assesses the influence this sponsorship has on children’s food choices, and considers alternatives. With a quarter of Australian children currently overweight or obese, it is important to help parents in their quest to raise healthy children and to lift awareness of the links between cancer and obesity. This is particularly important because the eating habits children develop while young stay with them for life.

Currently, Australia has no regulations limiting the marketing of unhealthy food and drink products through sports sponsorship. This is despite recommendations from the World Health Organisation for such marketing restrictions in settings where children gather, including sporting activities.

Although there are numerous causes of childhood obesity, exposure to high levels of unhealthy food marketing is one factor affecting the food and drinks children favour, pester their parents to buy, and consume.

Studying sport sponsorship

Extensive research indicates that, in general, children are exposed to high levels of food marketing, most of which is for unhealthy food and drinks containing large amounts of fat, sugar and/or salt. This occurs through television advertisements during children’s programs; on-pack promotions for competitions and giveaways; billboards; advertisements in children’s magazines; and online and interactive games on food manufacturers’ websites. Increasingly, sport sponsorship is being used for promotion of food and drink products aimed at children, either through financial or in-kind assistance. Although such sponsorship may be an important funding source for sport, this type of branding and promotional activity by the manufacturers of unhealthy food and drinks can undermine the health-promoting goals of sport. Corporate sponsorship is designed to help build a connection between the sponsoring company’s products and the sporting event, which encourages children’s positive feelings and attitudes towards sport to be transferred to the marketed products. This can then influence children’s product purchases.

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To provide more information and clear data on this important issue, a three-year research project in conjunction with the Prevention Research Collaboration at the University of Sydney examined food and drink company sponsorship of children’s sport in NSW. An Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Grant funded this important work. The study measured the extent of children’s exposure to food marketing in the sports most popular with children (see chart). It examined the views of parents and sporting club officials about the influence of unhealthy food company sponsorship on children, and investigated whether they would support alternative funding arrangements for sport. The research team also studied the impact of unhealthy food sponsorship on children’s food purchases and preferences. This work represents the first international study to comprehensively investigate the extent of unhealthy food sponsorship in children’s sport and to assess the influence this type of sponsorship has on children’s food choices and purchases. In the future, the results could influence government policy.


The responses gathered during the research project provided much-needed empirical evidence to support the notion of government intervention to reduce children’s exposure to food marketing through sporting clubs. The research team also explored a range of policy options to support the development of health-promoting sports clubs that could reduce children’s exposure to unhealthy food marketing. What we achieved this year During this project, the research team produced seven journal publications and one summary report related to food and drink company sponsorship of children’s sport and the promotion of health and nutrition through sport. Of these, four were published in 2011, the final year of the project. In addition, telephone surveys were carried out with 825 parents in 2011, to investigate the relationship between unhealthy food, drink and alcohol sponsorship and both children’s and elite sport. Around one-quarter of parents reported at least ‘sometimes’ being pestered by their child to buy a food or drink product from a company that sponsored their favourite elite sports team or their own local club. More than half of parents (60%) were ‘very’ concerned about unhealthy food and drink companies sponsoring children’s sports clubs.

were either ‘very’ or ‘a little’ cool (59%), exciting (50%) and fun (51%). One-third of children reported that they ‘often’ or ‘sometimes’ bought or asked their parents to buy sponsors’ products. In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 companies and other funding bodies in 2011, to determine the level of support for an alternative healthy sports club program based around the goal of reducing children’s exposure to unhealthy food sponsorship and to address other health-promoting behaviours. Such a program was found to have a high level of interest from corporate and philanthropic organisations and is currently being considered for further piloting. Healthy vs. less healthy food and drink sponsorship of children’s sport By age of club members Mostly younger

An online survey of 243 children was also conducted in 2011. Respondents were asked if they could recall sponsors of their favourite elite athlete, sports team or sporting event. Questions were then raised in regard to what they thought about these companies and if sponsorship affected the products they bought and ate. More than half of children thought elite sport sponsors

Mixed age

Mostly older 0

20

40

60

80

100

Proportion of sponsors (%) less healthy healthy

What impact will it have? This is the first international study to comprehensively investigate the extent of unhealthy food sponsorship in children’s sport and to assess the influence of this type of sponsorship on children’s food choices and purchases. The project findings have provided much-needed, detailed evidence to support government intervention to reduce children’s exposure to food marketing through sporting clubs. Researchers expect the results of the project will drive major change in the sponsorship of children’s sports.

Lead researcher: Bridget Kelly, PhD candidate, Prevention Research Collaboration, University of Sydney Co-researchers: Louise Baur, University of Sydney; Adrian Bauman, University of Sydney; Lesley King, University of Sydney; Kathy Chapman, Cancer Council NSW; and Ben Smith, Monash University

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Hunting for viral links with oesophageal cancer

“Biobanks allow researchers to answer critical questions much easier, faster and cheaper than before.”

“We wanted to find out whether certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) caused oesophageal cancer but soon realised that we needed around 5,000 specimens to prove our point. Our own small biobank had only 1,500 blood specimens, so we contacted our colleagues with biobanks across the world and managed to gather a total of 5,000 serum samples from Australia, South Africa, Iran, China, Western Europe and Brazil. “All these studies added up to 55 years’ worth of data collection. By collaborating with these biobanks, we will be able to answer this question started from q qu estion in three th hree years. If we had starte scratch, would scra sc ratc tch, h, it wo ould have taken tak aken en each of us 55 achieve years to oa chieve the same aims.” aims.” Professor Freddy Associate Pr rofessor Fr Fre eddy Sitas Cancer Research Division, Director, Can ncer Res esearch Divisi Cancer Council Counc cil NSW NSW

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Hunting for viral links with oesophageal cancer Project: The InterSCOPE Study and oesophageal cancer Oesophageal cancer is a rapidly fatal and neglected cancer in Australia, despite being the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Researchers know that lifestyle activities, including smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol, are the main causes of this cancer. The InterSCOPE Study, a collaboration between investigators in nine countries, is investigating the possible links between the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and oesophageal cancer. The aim of the InterSCOPE Study is to identify whether certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) are likely to cause oesophageal cancer, particularly of the squamous cell type. HPV causes several squamous cell cancers, mainly of the cervix (hence the HPV vaccine, which prevents cervical cancer), but also in other genital sites and parts of the oral cavity. Smoking and alcohol are the main causes ofthis cancer, but researchers have also discovered inconsistencies in different parts of the world. These inconsistencies have led to a number of past investigations into diet, mouldy maize and the role of HPV. The results, however, have been inconclusive. Animal strains of HPV cause cancer of the oesophagus in cows and other animals, so if a relationship can be identified in humans, the impact of the HPV vaccine would be far more wide-ranging than originally thought. Preliminary evidence from this study suggests that HPV does not cause oesophageal cancer in the majority of cases, but there will not be a definitive answer until the research is complete. To make a convincing statement about any causal relationship, researchers recognised that they needed first to combine data from a large number of studies. By pooling and comparing data from many different countries and searching for trends consistent across all locations, it would be possible to determine whether HPV could be increasing the risk of oesophageal cancer. Over the past three years, the research team approached international researchers who have conducted studies on oesophageal cancer – from

Australia, China, South Africa, Brazil, Poland, Russia, Romania, the Czech Republic and Iran. Leading institutes such as the US National Cancer Institute, the World Health Organisation International Agency for Research on Cancer, the Queensland Institute for Medical Research, the German Cancer Research Centre and the South African National Health Laboratory Service have all collaborated to expand the size of the investigation, making it the largest of its kind in the world. About 4,000 people with and without oesophageal cancer were compared. This would have taken about 55 years if anyone were to start this study from scratch. Extensive data from each research site were forwarded to Cancer Council NSW for analysis. Blood results were combined with the data and compared (after adjusting for important lifestyle factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption) to provide a more definitive answer about any relationship. What we achieved this year The results of the InterSCOPE Study were published in the prestigious Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The paper noted a possible (weak) association between HPV and oesophageal cancer, but only for certain forms of the HPV virus. The researchers are now continuing work with their German colleagues in trying to detect the HPV virus in about 90 stored tumour biopsy samples. These were selected from people who had a blood profile suggesting a better chance of finding the presence of the virus and establishing a causal link.

What impact will it have? The study is designed to provide a clear picture of a link between HPV and oesophageal cancer, to inform future HPV vaccine programs. Research into the link between HPV and oesophageal cancer has been conducted since 1982, and until now, studies have been inconclusive. Thanks to the level of international collaboration, this is the most comprehensive study yet of the connection between these two conditions, and is in a position to finally deliver an authoritative answer.

Lead researcher: Associate Professor Freddy Sitas, Director, Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council NSW

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Learning more about Barrett’s oesophagus

Learning more about Barrett’s oesophagus Project: PROBE-NET – investigating the link between Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal cancer Barrett’s oesophagus is a potential precursor for adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (a type of oesophageal cancer), and is a condition caused by acid reflux from the gut. Given the increased risk of oesophageal cancer among patients with Barrett’s oesophagus, researchers are seeking a reliable method to identify which patients with this condition will develop oesophageal cancer, so that earlier – and more effective – treatment for this deadly disease can be offered. Oesophageal cancer research has been poorly funded relative to its impact on the Australian community, with only 2.7% of cancer funding in 2004–06 dedicated to researching this fatal disease. As the number of people with adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus is rapidly increasing in Australia, Cancer Council NSW is providing additional funding for research into this cancer and has listed it as one of the organisation’s top five research priorities. Patients with this cancer type face a poor prognosis and invasive treatment, pointing to the significant need for new approaches and more detailed information. A large volume of clinical research shows that before being diagnosed with oesophageal cancer, most patients suffer from Barrett’s oesophagus, a problem generally caused by acid reflux from the gut. Approximately 12% of Australians experience reflux symptoms at least once a week, and more than 10% of these patients have Barrett’s oesophagus. Another potent risk factor is obesity, with recent research suggesting that patients suffering both obesity and frequent acid reflux have markedly increased risks of developing both Barrett’s oesophagus and oesophageal cancer. There are long-term data to show that the number of patients being diagnosed with these conditions is increasing each year, almost certainly due to the rising prevalence of reflux and obesity in our community. As there is currently no way of predicting which patients will progress from Barrett’s oesophagus to oesophageal cancer, except by invasive endoscopic biopsy, most patients have advanced tumours by the time they are diagnosed. This means that the treatment options are limited and mortality rates are extremely high, with median survival now less than one year after diagnosis.

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Because the likelihood of developing new and more effective therapies appears remote, new ways to reduce the burden of this cancer are essential. The current methods for assessing the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma are time consuming, and require taking samples with an endoscope and then conducting laboratory analysis. Finding genomic markers Some of the most promising research in this area is being undertaken by Professor David Whiteman from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research and co-investigators from St Vincent’s Hospital (Sydney), Flinders University (Adelaide) and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Melbourne). They are currently investigating genes and markers which might predict oesophageal cancer. These research groups form part of the PROBENET (Progression of Barrett’s Esophagus to Cancer Network) consortium, which was created in collaboration with Cancer Council NSW. This consortium is trying to find new ways to identify people at high risk of developing oesophageal cancer, and to formulate new testing methodologies and translate them into clinical practice. The team is using a variety of research techniques – including epidemiology, cell biology and integrated genomic analysis – to distinguish between the cases of Barrett’s oesophagus which will become oesophageal cancer and those which will not. Potentially, this research will provide an opportunity to improve clinicians’ ability to diagnose likely oesophageal cancer patients, which will allow them to institute earlier treatment programs and offer patients a better chance of survival.


What we achieved this year Since being awarded a Cancer Council NSW Strategic Research Partnership (STREP) grant of $1.4 million in 2006, the researchers and clinicians involved in the PROBE-NET consortium have been working to combine the existing activities of the network’s independent research groups into a coordinated national program. This year, the researchers have made substantial progress in advancing their multi-site research program. They have now recruited 689 patients and collected more than 4,424 tissue samples, which will form a major component of the project’s growing, clinically annotated tissue collection. This tissue collection will eventually be among the largest of its type in the world, creating an invaluable resource for cancer researchers. Few groups worldwide have the samples, skills and facilities to find new tests for Barrett’s oesophagus, so by bringing together the four leading research groups in Australia in this area,

the project has a unique opportunity to advance knowledge and practice in oesophageal cancer. During 2011, the PROBE-NET investigators and students have co-authored research articles and written further research papers on Barrett’s oesophagus–related topics. Several of these articles are now under review. The research network into oesophageal cancer has also expanded, with new collaborators joining from Westmead Hospital, Greenslopes Hospital (Brisbane), Nepean Hospital and The Alfred Hospital (Melbourne). Future activities In the coming year, the PROBE-NET consortium will be continuing its research. The group anticipates that during the remaining two years of the STREP grant, another ten scientific papers will be published. Its researchers have created a list of key priorities and they will be seeking to access additional funding to enable the multi-site program to grow.

Oesophageal cancer rates in Australia Rate per 100,000 people 10

8

6

4

83 19 84 19 85 19 86 19 87 19 88 19 89 19 90 19 91 19 92 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 97 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03 20 04 20 05 20 06 20 07

19

19

82

2

Mortality – males

Incidence – males

Mortality – females

Incidence – females

What impact will it have? Potentially, this research will provide an opportunity to improve clinicians’ ability to predict which patients are at highest risk of oesophageal cancer, allowing doctors to institute earlier treatment programs and offer patients a better chance of survival. The research includes a number of exciting areas of investigation, including the genetic mutations associated with oesophageal cancer, testing of new methods of diagnosis using lymph nodes, and trials of new cancer treatments.

Lead researcher: Professor David Whiteman, Queensland Institute of Medical Research

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Getting the word out about liver cancer

“They showed show my case to a world-leading world-lead liver expert, exper and she said that th she had never ne seen anything anyth like it.”

“In 2002, they discovered a malignant tumour in my liver. Thankfully, I had a brilliant surgeon and he was able to get it out – I didn’t require chemotherapy or radiation, which was amazing. But in 2010, my blood tests revealed that I was at risk of developing another malignant tumour. They sent me for a scan, and in the meantime, my tumour marker count was going up to 65, and then it was 90. “I went to see an endocrinologist, who said that my vitamin D was dangerously low and made me take vitamin D tablets. When I had my next tumour marker test, they rang me at work, which they never ever did. And the secretary said, ‘June, we want you to know what your reading was’. I thought, ‘Oh no, it’s going to be 200 or something’, and I‘m hanging on to a table at work. And she said, ‘It’s four’. “I had tears running down my face. I had myself dead, preparing for the funeral, and she said, ‘It’s can’tt believe it, and we wanted to It s four, we can ring ri ng yyou o straight away’.” ou June and nd Greg Survivor Surv viv ivor and carer

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Getting the word out about liver cancer Project: ‘B Positive’ Program – preventing liver cancer through optimising hepatitis B diagnosis and treatment Liver cancer is relatively uncommon in Australia, but it is one of the top five cancers among Asian Australians. Cancer Council NSW has developed the ‘B Positive’ Program to identify and improve the management of patients with chronic hepatitis B – to help reduce the number that go on to develop liver cancer. In NSW, residents born in Vietnam, Hong Kong, Macau, Korea, Indonesia and China are 6 to 12 times more likely to develop liver cancer than non-Indigenous Australian-born individuals. As up to 80% of liver cancer in some communities is caused by chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection, a program that prevents the progression to liver cancer can have a very significant public health impact. Early CHB detection and regular follow-up can halve the number of liver cancer cases and related deaths in this group. The ‘B Positive’ Program provides health information to affected communities to encourage screening, and supports local general practitioners to identify and manage their patients with CHB. The ‘B Positive’ Registry was established to provide population-level data on the clinical characteristics of patients with CHB infection. What we achieved this year Patient recruitment rates have trebled in 2011, and 10 more general practitioners have joined the program. The ‘B Positive’ Registry interim data analysis highlighted the multicultural face of CHB infection in south-west Sydney, with 44% of participants born in Vietnam, 20% in China, 21% in other Asian countries and 11% in the Pacific Islands. As diabetes, obesity and high cholesterol levels were recorded in 14–29% of registry participants, the program is working in collaboration with the Macarthur Division of

General Practice to integrate CHB management into general practitioners’ chronic disease–management plans for these patients. Our new research in 2011 spanned a broad number of fields. The researchers studied the barriers to liver cancer prevention and control; compared the cost of treating liver cancer between countries; and highlighted the need for a continuing medical education program for general practitioners about hepatitis B diagnosis and management. Community and professional development work Through a University of Sydney grant, the researchers are developing a course teaching medical students about health disparities, using hepatitis B case studies. They are also delivering educational programs to general practitioners on hepatitis B diagnosis and management, in collaboration with the Australasian Society of HIV Medicine. The ‘B Positive’ team has developed a multilingual hepatitis B ‘travelling library’ resource for community-based organisations and local libraries, to raise community awareness of hepatitis B and liver cancer; and has provided information sessions in collaboration with Fairfield City and the Cabramatta Library.

What impact will it have? It is estimated that 185,000 people are living with chronic hepatitis B in Australia, but approximately one-third of them remain undiagnosed. Late diagnosis is a major contributor to hepatitis B–related liver cancer. The ‘B Positive’ Program is based on economic modelling suggesting that guidelinebased management of chronic hepatitis B is more cost-effective than liver cancer screening, and can halve the number of deaths from liver failure and liver cancer.

Lead researcher: Dr Monica Robotin, Medical Director, Cancer Council NSW, and Senior Lecturer in Public Health, University of Sydney Research team: Mamta Porwal, Debbie Nguyen, Yumi Patton – Cancer Council NSW; Melanie Kansil, Cathedral St Partners; Dr Khoo Chee, Macarthur Division of General Practice; Dr Miriam Levy, Liverpool Hospital; and Professor Jacob George, Storr Liver Unit and University of Sydney

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Colorectal and pancreatic cancer

Gaining new insights from colorectal cancer data Project: Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit colorectal cancer initiatives Colorectal cancer, the second most common cancer in NSW, accounted for 13% of all new cancers and cancer deaths in the state in 2008. Obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet all place people at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer. Cancer Council NSW is working on several projects aimed at better understanding key aspects of this significant cancer. One in 10 men and one in 15 women will develop colorectal cancer by the age of 85. In light of the high number of people that develop this cancer, Cancer Council NSW’s Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit worked on a number of epidemiological research projects related to colorectal cancer during 2011. The first of these described general practitioner involvement in the referral process for this disease. Professor Dianne O’Connell and David Goldsbury, in collaboration with researchers from the University of New South Wales and the University of Sydney led by Professor Mark Harris, analysed in detail the referral pathways for NSW residents diagnosed with colorectal cancer. The research team also linked the treatment data collected in the population-based NSW Colorectal Cancer Care Survey with death records to provide data on longer-term survival outcomes for people diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Two papers were written describing the results of this study and these are currently undergoing peer review. The first describes the impact on patient survival of receiving treatment according to recommendations in the National Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention, Early Detection and Management of Colorectal Cancer. The second analysis describes the association between surgeon specialisation and outcomes (including disease recurrence and survival) for people diagnosed with rectal cancer in NSW.

The internationally recognised expertise of Cancer Council NSW’s modelling team (led by Associate Professor Karen Canfell) in relation to cervical cancer is now being used to evaluate various options for colorectal cancer prevention. Using a simulation modelling approach, the research team is assessing short- and long-term outcomes, and reviewing the cost-effectiveness of various scenarios of colorectal cancer screening. Large-scale population studies Another project in this area is using colorectal cancer data from the 45 and Up Study. This is the largest study on ageing in the Southern Hemisphere (with over 267,000 participants aged 45 and over) and is partially funded by Cancer Council NSW. Colorectal cancer data from the study are being used by a research team from Charles Sturt University, led by Dr Marianne Weber from Cancer Council NSW, to investigate the use of screening services in regional and rural NSW. This work aims to ascertain the educational programs required to encourage better use of the available screening services. Cancer Council NSW’s ongoing Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk (CLEAR) Study (see page 22), now has 741 participants with colorectal cancer. This participant group is now large enough to begin epidemiological analysis on genetic, lifestyle and environmental risk factors related to colorectal cancer, and this work will begin later in the year.

What impact will it have? Colorectal cancer is one of the key cancers affecting the NSW population, and the research projects being undertaken by Cancer Council NSW and our collaborators will provide valuable insights into a variety of areas. These include better understanding of referral pathways, the impact of different clinical management approaches, and the cost-effectiveness of various screening scenarios. In addition, the investigation into the use of colorectal screening services in regional and rural NSW is likely to have a significant impact. If the study shows there is a lower uptake of colorectal screening in non-urban areas, work will be undertaken to improve educational programs about screening in these localities.

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Patterns of pancreatic cancer care Project: Pancreatic Patterns of Care Study With no effective treatment for pancreatic cancer, patient care is an important component of this cancer’s profile. The Pancreatic Patterns of Care Study is examining the care of NSW and Queensland pancreatic cancer patients. It explores their supportive care needs and the impact this devastating disease has on the quality of life for patients. Little is known about the patterns of care used by clinicians with patients suffering from pancreatic cancer. The Pancreatic Patterns of Care Study, funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, is the most comprehensive Australian research to investigate the variations in the patterns of care and the survivorship experiences of patients with pancreatic cancer. It is only by identifying current practice patterns and the unmet needs of patients with pancreatic cancer that there will be any improvement in the delivery of ‘best practice’ care for all pancreatic cancer patients. Pancreatic cancer patients have the worst survival rate for cancer patients in Australia. This is caused by a number of factors, and has created a unique situation in terms of available treatments, patterns of care, supportive care needs and quality of life. Currently, there is only scant information available on this area, so findings from the study will help with the development of clinical management guidelines for Australian pancreatic cancer patients. The results will also enable researchers to develop programs designed to target modifiable factors and specific clinical issues.

It is hoped that additional financial support will become available, so that this valuable information resource can be used to address a variety of other significant questions about pancreatic cancer, such as an assessment of the costs and benefits of the different management practices used with pancreatic cancer patients. What we achieved this year The identification of pancreatic cancer cases at the NSW Central Cancer Registry has progressed, with more than 860 patients identified for the study so far. Approval to extract treatment data from patients’ medical records has been obtained from 50 hospitals and cancer centres, with 600 patient charts reviewed to date. In addition, Cancer Council NSW is providing $2.5 million over 5 years to the International Cancer Genome Consortium Project, which is studying the genetic changes associated with 50 types of cancer. Australia is part of the consortium mapping the pancreatic cancer genome.

What impact will it have? The data collected during this project will contribute to the development of a world-class information resource on pancreatic cancer patient care. Information gathered during the study will assist with the development of detailed disease-management guidelines for clinicians. These guidelines should help to improve the care of pancreatic cancer patients around Australia.

Lead researchers: Associate Professor Rachel Neale, Senior Research Fellow, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, University of Queensland; and Professor Dianne O’Connell, Senior Epidemiologist, Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit, Cancer Council NSW

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Uncovering the progression of pancreatic cancer

“The main risk “ for pancreatic cancer is just bad luck. Most of them develop for reasons we don’t understand yet.”

“I’m a specialist pancreatic surgeon at Bankstown Hospital, and I also research pancreatic cancer at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research. Pancreatic cancer is a devastating illness. Most of the symptoms are very vague, like a constant feeling of having an upset stomach, and it’s very difficult to diagnose early. “The only chance of a cure is surgery that only a fifth of patients are suitable for. However, we are making progress – some pancreatic cancer surgeries used to have a mortality rate of 20–25%, and it’s now down to around 3–4%. Australia at the of pa pancreatic cancer us a a is sa e forefront oe o o research, rese re sear arch c , and I’m proud to be part p of the team sequencing pancreatic pancreatic cancer as Australia’s contribution on to the International Internation Cancer Genome Geno ome Consortium.” Biankin Professor Andrew Biank Cancer Research, Garvan Head, Pancreatic Can Medical Research Institute of Medica

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Uncovering the progression of pancreatic cancer Project: Desmoplasia in pancreatic cancer: role of pancreatic stellate cells in cancer progression Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of death in Australia, with most patients dying within a few months of diagnosis. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiation have only limited benefit. Due to the unsuccessful nature of existing treatments which focus on the tumour cells, researchers are now examining the role played by the surrounding pancreatic stellate cells in the progression of this deadly disease. Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in men and women in western societies, and it has a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. The poor prognosis of this disease is largely due to how it invades local tissues early and spreads far throughout the body. As this cancer often presents at an advanced stage, only 10–20% of patients are suitable for surgical treatment. Chemotherapy drugs also have little if any success. With the treatment and outcome of pancreatic cancer not changing in more than 30 years, there is an urgent need for novel approaches to dealing with this disease. In the past, the main research focus for pancreatic cancer has been on the tumour cells. In this study, researchers are examining the surrounding tissues in pancreatic cancer progression, and the stromal/desmoplastic cells which serve the cancer and help it to grow and spread. The identification of the cells responsible for this – pancreatic stellate cells – suggests that they influence local growth and distant spread of pancreatic cancer. An improved understanding of the specific mechanisms involved in this interaction will help to create new ways to interrupt cancer development. What we achieved this year

accompany cancer cells when they move through the body and that these cells are more likely to migrate when in the presence of cancer cells. Researchers treated mice with pancreatic cancer with an antibody that they thought may help prevent cancer cells communicating with healthy cells. This drug prevented a growth factor called HGF (which is produced by pancreatic stellate cells) from binding with pancreatic cancer cells. This significantly inhibited the spread of the cancer cells, reducing the size of the tumours. This result proved growth factors play a role in mediating the interaction between tumour cells and the pancreatic stellate cells known to facilitate cancer progression. It also indicated pancreatic stellate cells help tumours to grow blood vessels, which are vital for continued tumour survival. The research team is continuing detailed examinations of the link between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells. They are planning further investigations within the growing field of cancer genetics to determine whether treatments can be personalised. Every cancer is different and it is unlikely that a single drug will work perfectly for every patient, so by determining the exact characteristics of a tumour, clinicians may be able to develop more tailored treatments.

In 2011, the researchers built on their important discovery that human pancreatic stellate cells

What impact will it have? The research team has determined that pancreatic cancer cells use the normal cells around them to help them spread throughout the body. An improved understanding of the specific mechanisms involved in this interaction will enable researchers to develop new ways to interrupt cancer development that do not involve the same sorts of largely ineffective treatments currently being used. The new treatments may be less damaging to the body, as they will be specifically targeted at the particular cancer. The findings from this project may also be applicable to other cancers with similar prominent cellular elements, such as cancers of the breast and prostate.

Lead researcher: Professor Minoti Apte, Director, Pancreatic Research Group, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Clearing the way for insights

Clearing the way for insights Project: Cancer Council NSW’s CLEAR Study Excessive sun exposure, smoking, alcohol and obesity are lifestyle factors which lead to over one-third of all cancers. The Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk (CLEAR) Study is recruiting people with cancer, and their partners, to take part in a groundbreaking research project. The study aims to develop the most comprehensive database ever compiled on the lifestyle and genetic factors influencing cancer in the NSW community. Having such a database will enable scientists to rapidly understand how genes discovered in the laboratory affect real-life risks in the population. A cancer diagnosis can be a life-changing experience, with more than 36,000 people in NSW receiving this distressing news each year. The Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk (CLEAR) Study is designed to develop a rapidly accessible bank of comprehensive information on the lifestyle and genetic factors that influence cancer in the NSW community. The CLEAR Study will compare people who have been diagnosed with cancer with those who have not had cancer at all. The study is expected to lead to a much better understanding of the causes of many cancer types and will therefore provide invaluable information for both prevention and treatment. Participants in the study each complete an extensive questionnaire, covering a wide range of factors including migration, ethnicity, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking, occupation, screening behaviour, certain dietary patterns and reproductive history. Collecting this detailed information is vital to understanding the lifestyle and genetic factors influencing cancer risk. Participants are also invited to contribute blood samples for storage in a biological repository (our cancer biobank). The size of the population group in NSW, together with the diversity of lifestyles and cultural backgrounds, provides a large and unique population to study – and this is expected to provide meaningful answers about the causes of cancer, and how these vary in different cultural groups. It will enable valuable insights into which gene/environment interactions are important, and whether they differ between various groups within the NSW community.

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A valuable repository of data After all the analytical processes have been completed, the data, together with the blood samples stored in our cancer biobank, will be made available to the international research community. CLEAR data and samples will be released in annual stages, starting in 2013. The information from the study will be highly valuable to cancer researchers. In time, it will represent one of the largest repositories of this type of data available to researchers anywhere in the world. The data collected so far covers many more people than previously studied in Australia. When participant numbers reach 10,000, results for cancers of the bowel, prostate, breast, lung, melanoma and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma will be available in large enough numbers to study. When participation reaches 25,000, sufficient information will be available to assess the effects of the various genetic and lifestyle factors on the risk of developing rarer cancers such as liver, thyroid, ovarian and pancreatic cancers. Data collected from people with less common cancers may be included in collaborative studies with other research groups to help contribute to more rapid research outcomes.


What we achieved this year Recently, the number of people participating in the information-gathering process for the CLEAR Study reached approximately 7,000. Collaboration is an indispensable component of the CLEAR Study – two of the five chief investigators are from institutions outside Cancer Council NSW. Fifteen hospitals and clinical cancer registries, twenty collaborators, ten study staff and two advisers along with the chief investigators have been involved in collecting and processing the information from the study’s many participants. In preparation for analysis to commence, the CLEAR Study will be requesting linkage of its data with the Central Cancer Registry in order to confirm diagnoses and dates of diagnosis of participants. The study researchers are preparing for release

of blood specimens for selected cancer research projects, and it is important that the verification of the quality of the specimens stored in our cancer biobank (which now holds over 200,000 samples of blood from various studies) is guaranteed. A Biobank Stability Study is also well underway. This study will check the effects of time and temperature on the stability of blood samples collected according to the study protocols. The huge distances the blood samples must travel in NSW, and the variety of weather conditions under which they are collected, stored and transported, can make it challenging to maintain the same conditions for each sample. Unfortunately, there is very little literature available on stability of markers in bloods (biomarkers) collected for epidemiological purposes, so further investigation is needed in this area.

Cancer types collected in the CLEAR Study Cancer type Breast Bowel and other digestive organs Prostate Blood-related cancers Uterus and ovary Melanoma and other skin Lung Bladder and kidney Mouth and pharynx Thyroid and other glands Eye, brain and central nervous system Mesothelial and soft tissue Bone and articular cartilage Ill-defined and unspecified cancers Total cases People without cancer Total enrolled participants

Male 6 577 907 235 0 157 109 104 111 27 41 26 23 17

Female 1,455 426 0 219 324 166 140 62 42 109 29 30 14 18

Total 1,461 1,003 907 454 324 323 249 166 153 136 70 56 37 35

2,340 771 3,111

3,034 855 3,889

5,374 1,626 7,000

Figures as at April 2012. Of these cases, 75% have provided blood samples.

What impact will it have? In time, the CLEAR Study will represent one of the largest repositories of its type available to researchers anywhere in the world. The outcomes from analyses of CLEAR data will inform public health decisions about how best to prevent cancer. Its detailed lifestyle information will also provide a better understanding of the multifactorial causes of cancer in NSW. The CLEAR Study will also support better decision-making and prediction of outcomes for governments and key health organisations.

Lead researcher: Associate Professor Freddy Sitas, Director, Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council NSW

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Finding out more about the unknown

Finding out more about the unknown Project: Research into the experiences and the support and information needs of people affected by cancer of unknown primary Cancer Council NSW is conducting research to better understand the unique experiences and unmet support and information needs of people affected by cancer of unknown primary (CUP). The information gained from this research is being used to develop a suite of multimedia support and information resources. Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a group of cancers characterised by evidence of metastatic disease where the location of the primary cancer cannot be identified, despite appropriate investigation. There are nearly 3,000 new cases of CUP diagnosed each year in Australia, and in NSW, this cancer accounts for approximately 4% of cancer diagnoses and 8% of cancer death. Unfortunately, survival rates are generally poor. Although CUP is the eighth most common cancer type in Australia, there are still significant knowledge gaps about this cancer. This lack of knowledge extends to the impact of this diagnosis on patients, their carers and their families. The aims of Cancer Council NSW’s Multimedia Cancer Support project for CUP are to research the experiences and the support and information needs of people with a diagnosis of CUP, their carers and their family members. The research will improve our understanding of how people with CUP are diagnosed and cared for; their symptoms, quality of life and psychosocial needs; the needs of their carers and their families; and how doctors and people with CUP communicate with each other. The findings of this work are being used to develop better support and information resources for people affected by a diagnosis of CUP.

What we have achieved this year Throughout 2011, researchers have been undertaking the following aspects of the project: UÊ Clinician surveys (research into the information provided by medical oncologists to patients and family members/carers about the diagnosis and various treatment options) UÊ Patient/family/carer surveys (research into the patients’ and family members’/carers’ experiences, including how they learned about their diagnosis; what they understand about CUP; what they understand about the purpose of treatment; what they understand about various treatment options; whether they experienced any distress associated with learning about their diagnosis and making treatment decisions; and whether they felt they were able to access adequate information and emotional support) UÊ Development of a suite of multimedia information and support resources, including: – Understanding Cancer of Unknown Primary booklet – Dedicated CUP webpage within Cancer Council NSW’s website – Video resources with information about CUP and standard treatments.

What impact will it have? This research project has yielded rich information about the unique experiences of people affected by CUP and has provided valuable insights into the impact of this diagnosis and how best to support these patients, and their families and/or carers. By developing a multimedia information and support program, patients and their families and/or carers affected by CUP will be able to access more facts about the cancer and more support, to gain a greater understanding about the illness and its likely impact on their lives, regardless of where they live. Gathering detailed information from patients about their needs will ensure support materials are targeted to address the issues identified as important by those affected by CUP. Research team: Gillian Batt, Cancer Information and Support Services, Cancer Council NSW, is the principal investigator. Cancer Council NSW’s CUP project team is Amelia Beaumont and Helen Gooden [with previous contributions by Angela Pearce and Melissa Pigot]. Research partners: Professor Sanchia Aranda, Cancer Institute NSW; Ms Jane Barrett, consumer representative; Ms Nadine Hackl, Cancer Institute NSW; Dr Chris Karapetis,Flinders Medical Centre, South Australia; Dr Sylvie Lambert, University of Newcastle; Dr Monica Robotin, Cancer Council NSW; Associate Professor Penelope Schofield, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria; Professor Martin Tattersall, University of Sydney; Dr Anna Ugalde, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria; and Dr Claire Vajdic, University of New South Wales 24


Appendices

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Staff

Staff Office of the CEO Dr Andrew Penman AM Chief Executive Officer Angela Aston Manager, Office of the CEO Antonia Dykes Executive Assistant

Research Strategy Catherine Holliday, BN, GDipNutr, MHSc, MHP Head, Research Strategy Kate Whittaker, BHlth Research Governance Officer Sam Thorp, BCom/BSc(Hons) Research Communication and Community Engagement Officer Jane Bennett Volunteer

‘B Positive’ Program Dr Monica Robotin, MBBS, FRACS, MBA, MIH, MAppEpid Medical Director Mamta Porwal, BHMS, MPH Project Coordinator ‘B Positive’ Yumi Patton, MBiostat Research Assistant Debbie Nguyen Hepatitis B Community Educator

Dr Marianne Weber, BA(Hons), PhD Research Fellow Dr Xue Qin Yu, MPH, PhD Research Fellow Megan Smith, BE, MPH(Merit) Program Manager Rajah Supramaniam, BSc, MPH(Hons) Program Manager Dr Michael Caruana, BSc, DPhil Post-doctoral Research Fellow Visalini Nair-Shalliker, BSc(Hons), MSc, MPH, PhD Post-doctoral Research Fellow Dr Jufang Shi, MD, MPH, PhD Post-doctoral Research Fellow Kate Simms, BSc(Hons), PhD Post-doctoral Research Fellow Dr Louiza Velentzis, BSc(Hons), MSc, PhD Post-doctoral Research Fellow Statisticians Albert Bang, BCom Sam Egger, BSc, MBiostat Alison Gibberd, BSc(Hons), MStats David Goldsbury, BSc(Hons), MPH(Merit) Qingwei Luo, BSc, MAppStats Project Coordinators Katie Armstrong, BAppSc(HIM) Kate Blacker, BSc(Nurs)

Cancer Research Division A/Prof Freddy Sitas, BSc, MSc(Med), DPhil Director, Cancer Research Division Naomi Crain, BA, AdvDipFamTh Executive Assistant to Director Kate Christian, BSc Operations Manager Prof Dianne O’Connell, BMaths(Hons 1), PhD Unit Manager and Senior Epidemiologist A/Prof Karen Canfell, BE(Hons), DPhil Senior Research Fellow Dr Carolyn Nickson, BA, GDipEpidBiostats, PhD Research Fellow Dr David Smith, BA, MPH, PhD Research Fellow

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Leighna Carmichael, BA, MSc Jessica Darlington-Brown, BSc(Population Health), MPH Alicia Delgado, BA, MSW(Hons) (maternity leave) Verity Hodgkinson, BSc, MSciMan Suzanne Hughes, BSc(Hons), MNutrDiet Clare Kahn, BMus(Hons), MMus(Perf) Michael Revius, BSc Jenny Rodger, BA(Hons), MSc Leonardo Simonella, BA, MPH(Hons) Cat Van Kemenade, MSc(HumMovSc), MPH


Data Manager

Postgraduate Students

Johnson Yuan, BSc, BEd(Teach)

Nayyereh Aminisani, BSc(Nurs), MSc(Epid), (PhD candidate)

Research Programmers Jie Bin Lew, BSc(Bioinformatics)

Yoon-Jung Kang, BA, MPH(Hons), (PhD candidate)

Robert Walker, BSc

Qingwei Luo, BSc, MAppStats, (PhD candidate)

Ming Xu, BEng(Mech)(Biomed), BMedSci Lab Manager

Usha Salagame, BSc(Microbiol), PostgradCertBioinformatics, MSc(Biotech), (PhD candidate)

Janis Jansons, BSc, MSc

Leonardo Simonella, BA, MPH, (PhD candidate)

Aboriginal Community Liaison OfďŹ cer

Maria Albania, BSc/BEd, (MBiostats candidate)

Veronica Saunders

Albert Bang, BCom, (MBiostats candidate)

Senior Research Assistants

May Chiew, BPharm, (MPH(Professional Practice) candidate)

Christina Christou, BHS, MPH, DipNat Kristie Weir, BSc(Population Health) Laboratory Research Assistants

Jie Bin Lew, BSc(Bioinformatics), (MPH candidate) Simon Willcox, BCom(Marketing), (MPH(Hons) candidate)

Mahboobeh Hosseini, BSc Smitha Rajpattan, BPharm, MAppSc Sarita Tiwari, MAppSc, MOBT, DMLT Research Assistants Maria Albania, BSc/BEd Karen Allison, BBehavHlthSc Moa Aye, MBBS, MPH May Chiew, BPharm, MPH(Professional Practice) Bonnie Nixon, BMedSc Susan Spratley, BPsych(Hons) Administration Pinya Leeder, BA, MProfAcct Kimberley McGregor Elle McGlynn, BA

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Grants

Grants Grants awarded to CCNSW ‘B Positive’ Program Robotin M, Porwal M, Penman A. Preventing hepatocellular cancer through optimising the detection and management of chronic hepatitis B in primary care. NSW Ministry of Health Grant. 2011-2013. $183,400 Robotin M, Porwal M, Strasser S, George J. Learning about health disparities using a servicelearning educational model for chronic hepatitis B management in migrant populations. University of Sydney Strategic Teaching Enhancement Projects Grant Scheme. 2011. $35,000

Cancer Research Division New grants in 2011 Canfell K. Evaluation of future cervical cancer prevention strategies in Australia. NHMRC Career Development Award. 2011-2014. $384,160 Canfell K. Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening in Australia. Cancer Council NSW (internal grant via Health Strategies Division). 2011-2012. $200,000 Canfell K, Clements M, Nickson C, Brotherton J, Castle P, Schiffman M, Lord S, Shi JF. Evaluation of primary HPV testing for cervical screening in Australia. NHMRC Project Grant. 2011-2013. $677,522 Canfell K, Smith M, Walker R. Analytical services for National Cervical Screening Program Monitoring Reports. National Screening Unit, New Zealand Ministry of Health. 2011-2014. Chambers S, Baade P, Youl P, Aitken J, Dunn J, Garvey G, Valery P, O’Connell D. The effects of stigma and nihilistic views on lung cancer outcomes. Cancer Australia Request For Tender. 2011-2012. $588,112 Chambers SK, Smith D, Berry M, Lepore S, Foley E, Occhipinti S, Frydenberg M, Gardiner RA. A randomised controlled trial of mindfulness intervention for men with advanced prostate cancer. Cancer Australia; Griffith University. 2011. $570,650 Clements M, Smith D, O’Connell D, Etzioni R, Gardiner R. Testing and treatment for prostate cancer in Australia: epidemiology and modelling. NHMRC Project Grant. 2011-2013. $518,390 Haines M, O’Connell D, Young J, Smith D, Kneebone A, Brooks A, Watt H. Improving evidencebased care for locally advanced prostate cancer: a randomised phased trial of clinical guideline implementation through a clinical network. NHMRC Partnership Project Grant. 2011-2013. $533,442 (NHMRC); $537,674 (PCFA)

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Ingham J, O’Connell D, Phillips J, Davidson P, Girgis A, Wilkinson A, Piza M, Pigot M, Goldsbury D. Last days of life linkage study: patterns of health services use and experiences of adult NSW residents in the year prior to death from illness. Cancer Institute NSW. 2011-2012. $83,748. Nair-Shalliker V. Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia Conference Travel Grant. 2011. $500 O’Connell D, Supramaniam R, Dillon A, Ingham J, Fernando P. Cancer comorbidity, treatment, survival and end-of-life care for Aboriginal people in NSW. Cancer Institute NSW. 2011-2013. $280,688 Shi JF. International Papillomavirus Society Travel Grant for 27th International Papillomavirus Conference and Workshops (IPV2011). 2011. $1,000 Smith D. ANZUP/Novartis Conference Travel Grant. 2011. $1,000 Smith D. Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia Conference Travel Grant. 2011. $500 Continuing grants in 2011 Canfell K. MAVARIC: economic evaluation of manual vs. automated cytology in the UK. UK National Health Service Cervical Screening Program. 2009-2011. Neale R, O’Connell D, Janda M, Merrett N, Goldstein D, Beesley V, Wyld D, Gooden H. Patterns of care and quality of life in patients with pancreatic cancer. NHMRC Project Grant. 2010-2012. $655,213 O’Connell D, Butow P, Armstrong B, Treloar C, Knight R, Dillon A, Newman C, Supramaniam R. Patterns of cancer care for Indigenous people in NSW. NHMRC Health Services Research Grant. 2007-2013. $1,580,755 O’Connell D, Chambers S, Moxey A, Smith DP. Use of complementary and lifestyle therapies by men with prostate cancer: a population-based study. Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia. 2009-2011. $137,766 Shi J, (Supervisor Canfell K). Cost-effectiveness evaluation of cervical cancer prevention strategies in China. American Cancer Society International Fellowships for Beginning Investigators, UICC/ACSBI Fellowship. 2009-2011. Sitas F, Armstrong B, Banks E, Kricker A, Weber M, Pawlita M. Infectious and lifestyle determinants of non-melanoma skin cancer. NHMRC Project Grant. 2009-2011. $953,200 Sitas F, Canfell K, O’Connell D, Banks E, Ward R, Baron M. The NSW Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk (CLEAR) study. Cancer Council NSW. 20062011. $2,500,000 Yu XQ. Projecting prevalence by phase of care for colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancer in New South Wales. NHMRC Fellowship. 2009-2012. $279,000


Health Strategies Division Baur L, Bauman A, Kelly B, Chapman K, Smith B. Food and drink company sponsorship of children’s sport: publicity or philanthropy? Australian Research Council Linkage Grant. 2009-2011. $290,500 Pettigrew S, Quester P, Chapman K, Miller C. Investigating the indirect effects of child-targeted food promotion. Australian Research Council Linkage Grant. 2010-2011. $105,750

Nowak A, McDonald K, Teo C, Wheeler H, Joseph D, Robinson B. Clinical Outcomes and Genetic Epidemiology of high grade Glioma: COGEG. University of Western Australia. 2008-2012. $247,029 Whiteman D, Lord R, Watson D, Phillips W, Hayward N. PROBE-NET: Progression of Barrett’s Esophagus to Cancer Network. Queensland Institute of Medical Research. 2008-2012. $189,757 New Research Project Grants in 2011

Grants awarded by CCNSW New Program Grants in 2011 Hogg P, Dilda P. Metabolism inhibitors for the treatment of brain and pancreatic cancer. University of New South Wales. 2011-2015. $2,250,000 Norris M, Haber M, Marshall G, Kavallaris M. Towards cure of childhood ALL: improved diagnostics, therapeutics and prevention strategies. Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research. 2011-2015. $2,250,000 Ormandy C, Carroll J, Kaplan W, Lakhani S, Naylor M, Swarbrick A. Personalising breast cancer management by discovering the transcriptional basis for tumour phenotype. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. 2011-2015. $2,249,976 Reddel R. Alternative lengthening of telomeres: from basic biology to drug discovery. Children’s Medical Research Institute. 2011-2012. $2,250,000 Continuing Program Grant in 2011

Baxter R. Targeting IGFBP-3 signalling pathways as a novel therapeutic approach in triple-negative breast cancer. University of Sydney. 2011-2013. $119,659 Bryan T. G-quadruplex stabilisers as cancer therapeutics. University of Sydney. 2011-2013. $97,508 Chircop M, Sakoff J, McCluskey A, Jones N. Dynamin as a new drug target for the treatment of glioblastoma. University of Sydney. 2011-2013. $120,000 Greer P, Denham J, Dowling J, Salvado O. Does the initial treatment plan predict doses delivered to normal tissues during prostate radiation therapy? Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital. 2011-2013. $116,598 Henderson B, Brocardo M, Molloy M. Regulation of APC intracellular dynamics and function. Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research. 2011-2013. $120,000

Horvath L, Ackland S, Balleine R, Biankin A, Catchpoole D, Clarke S, deFazio A, Gurney H, Links M, Mann G, Moscato P, Murray M, Nath C, Richardson D, Scott R. Building capacity in pharmacogenomics across NSW: PRIMe (Pharmacogenomic Research for Individualised Medicine). Garvan Institute of Medical Research. 2010-2015 $300,000

Howell V, Gill A. New opportunities for the study of ovarian cancer through characterisation of mouse models. University of Sydney. 2011-2013. $97,508

New Strategic Research Partnership (STREP) grants in 2011

Lui T, Zhang Y, Pasquier E. The critical role of the histone demethylase JMJD1A in cancer. University of New South Wales. 2011-2013. $110,250

Biankin A, Grimmond S, Apte M, Goldstein D, Clarke S, Kench J, Gill A, Samra J, Gebski V, Wu J, Med S, Horvath L. Genotype-guided cancer therapy (genomics theranostics). Garvan Institute of Medical Research. 2011-2015. $1,500,000

MacKenzie K, Fletcher J. The prognostic and therapeutic significance of dyskerin and telomerase enzyme activity in neuroblastoma. University of New South Wales. 2011-2013. $117,508

Sanson-Fisher R. Behavioural Science Strategic Research Partnership. University of Newcastle. 2011-2014. $1,200,000 Continuing Strategic Research Partnership (STREP) grants in 2011 George J, McCaughan G, Dore G, Liddle C, Strasser S. Epidemiology, prevention and management of liver cancer in NSW: towards a strategic research partnership. University of Sydney. 2008-2012. $250,000

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

Lock R, Kaplan W, Carol H. Predicting the in vivo sensitivity of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia to BH3-mimetic drugs. Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research. 2011-2013. $109,750

Macrae F, Boussioutas A, Clarke J, Topping D, Toden S, Lynch P, Spigelman A, Appleyard M, Hollington P, Ee H, Cameron D. The effects of butyrylated high-amylose maize starch on polyposis in FAP volunteers. Royal Melbourne Hospital. 2011-2013. $119,489 Rasko J, Bailey C. Dissecting the multi-component machine that controls chromatin architecture. Centenary Institute. 2011-2013. $119,658

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Grants

Rasko J, Ritchie W, Holst J. The role of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) in alternative splicing. Centenary Institute. 2011-2013. $120,000 Vial P, Kuncic Z, Greer P, Baldock C, Holloway L, Barton M. A next-generation detector for radiotherapy treatment verification with dual capability for simultaneous imaging and dosimetry. South Western Sydney Local Health District. 2011-2013. $115,375 Ward R. Role of dietary compounds on PGC-1 alpha methylation in colorectal cancer. University of New South Wales. Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2011-2013. $107,087 Ward R, Bourke M, Hawkins N. Laterally spreading tumours of the colorectum: an alternative pathway of colorectal cancer development in the Western world. University of New South Wales. 2011-2013. $120,000 Zhang X, Yang M. Targeting pro-survival mechanisms to sensitise human melanoma to immunotherapy. University of Newcastle. 2011-2013. $119,750 Continuing Research Project Grants in 2011 Baker M, Nice E. A colorectal cancer ‘interactome’ paradigm that influences patient survival. Macquarie University. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $100,000 Bendall L, Juarez J. The role of sphingosine-1phosphate in haematopoietic stem cell egress from the bone marrow. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $120,000 Bryan T, Cohen, S. Recruitment of human telomerase to telomeres. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $116,250 deFazio A. Pathways of malignant progression in ovarian cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $119,075 Greer P. Real-time dose monitoring for patient safety in radiation therapy. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $120,000 Kohonen-Corish M, Pangon L, Musgrove E. Functional characterisation of the putative tumour suppressor gene MCC in colorectal cancer. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $120,000 Liu T, Bedalov A, Scarlett C. Targeting Myc onco-protein degradation for the treatment of Myc-induced malignancies. University of New South Wales. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $106,500 Lyons G, Halliday G. Restoring epithelial differentiation to squamous cell carcinomas. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2010-2012. $120,000

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Meiser B. Too much, too soon? The impact of treatment-focused genetic testing in patients newly diagnosed with breast cancer. University of New South Wales. Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2010-2012. $21,149 Ashman L, Verrrills N, Denham J. Tetraspanin proteins in prostate cancer progression and prognosis. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $119,000 Bebawy M, Grau G, Combes V. Microparticlemediated transfer of P-glycoprotein in conferring multidrug resistance in cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $118,375 Byrne J, Bright R, Catchpoole D, Smith B. The molecular basis of cell transformation produced by TPD52 overexpression. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $94,750 Chen S, Slavin M, Szer J, Bardy P, Sorrell T, Schwarer A, Morrissey O. Randomised trial of diagnostic strategies for invasive aspergillosis in at-risk haematology patients: funding extension. Westmead Hospital. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $71,875 Daly R, Ormandy C. Tyrosine kinase profiling of human basal breast cancers. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $119,250 Fabbro M, Sakoff J. Dynamin inhibitors as new anti-cancer drugs. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $118,500 Goldstein D, Spry N, Padbury R, Shannon J, Biankin A, Kneebone A, Fitzgerald P. LAP07: randomised multicentre phase III study in patients with locally advanced adenocarinoma of the pancreas: gemcitabine with or without chemoradiotherapy and with or without erlotinib. University of Sydney. Cancer Australia Prioritydriven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2009-2012. $26,967 Gottlieb D, Clancy L. Adoptive immunotherapy for the prevention of varicella-zoster virus reactivation post–stem cell transplant. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $99,750 Haass N. The role of melanoma stem cells in melanomagenesis. Centenary Institute. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $120,000 Hart D, Radford K. RNA loading of tumour-associated antigens and the activation of blood dendritic cells for prostate cancer immunotherapy. University of Queensland. Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2009-2012. $30,970 Haydon A, Zalcberg J, Walpole E, Yip D, Price T, Howard K. SCOT: Short Course Oncology Therapy. A study of adjuvant chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. Monash University. Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2009-2012. $31,213


Jolly C, McKay M, Manis J, Xu H. Understanding AID-induced cancer: unravelling complex mutation and repair pathways. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $120,000 Leong T, Gebski V, Smithers B, Watson D, Spry N, Zalcberg J. Randomised phase II/III study of preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer. University of Sydney. Cancer Australia Prioritydriven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2009-2012. $5,773 McDonald K, Bennett M, Davey R, Robinson B. The role of IQGAP1 in actively migrating glioma cells and its regulation by miR-124. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $119,750 Murray M, Gurney H, McLachlan A. Development of personalised dosage protocols for tyrosine kinase inhibitors in oncology patients. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011 $95,550 Naylor M. Role of beta1 integrin in prostate development and carcinogenesis. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011 $120,000 O’Neill G, Golemis E. The signalling switch function of the pro-metastatic, adhesion adaptor protein HEF1. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $120,000 Poulsen M, Veness M, Rischin D, Macfarlane D. Phase II efficacy study of chemoradiotherapy in PET-staged II-III merkel cell carcinoma of the skin. Princess Alexandra Hospital. Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2009-2012. $9,631 Tangye S, Palendira U. EBV-specific CD8+ T cells in anti-tumour immune responses in patients predisposed to developing lymphoma. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $120,000 Williams M, Metcalfe P, Bailey M, Rozenfeld A, Forstner D, Everitt C. A dosimetric Inter-Comparison of Australian Radiotherapy IMRT Systems (ICARIS). University of Wollongong. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011. $68,625 Young J, Solomon M, Frizelle F, Heriot A, King M, Salkeld G. Quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness of pelvic exenteration for people with advanced rectal cancer. University of Sydney. Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme. 2009-2012. $20,046 Zhang ZD, Avery-Kiejda K, Hersey P. Targeting p53 isoforms, 40p53 and p53ß, to promote chemosensitivity in human melanoma. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant. 2009-2011 $119,000 Innovator Grants Don A. Developing sphingosine kinase 2 inhibitors to block glioblastoma cell proliferation. University of New South Wales. 2011-2012. $8,648

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

George J, Hebbard L. Novel molecular targets for treatment of hepatocellular cancer (HCC). University of Sydney. 2011-2012. $100,000 Grau G, Suter C. Deep sequencing of glioma-derived microparticles. University of Sydney. 2011-2012. $100,000 Murray M. Pharmacogenomic approaches to minimise sorafenib toxicity in patients with liver cancer. University of Sydney. 2011-2012. $97,730 Phillips W. Using familial genetics to identify genes involved in the biology of Barrett’s oesophagus. Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. 2011-2012. $100,000 Shackel N. Discovering novel non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic markers in hepatocellular carcinoma. University of Sydney. 2011-2012. $100,000 Thompson S. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in oesophageal adenocarcinoma – improving staging accuracy and optimising treatment. The Royal Adelaide Hospital. 2011-2012. $94,255 Willowson K. The role of imageable microspheres in radioembolisation treatment planning for HCC. University of Sydney. 2011-2012. $3,217 Research programs Biankin A. International Cancer Genome Consortium. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. $500,000 Cancer Trials NSW, in partnership with Cancer Institute NSW. $600,000 45 and Up Cohort Study. Sax Institute. $300,000 Commissioned research projects Bonevski B. Consumer understanding of vitamin D messages. University of Newcastle. 2011. $39,452 Burton S, Spanjaard D. An investigation of the impact of retail distribution on tobacco purchase and smoking, and on high-kilojoule food purchases. University of Western Sydney. 2011-2012. $75,951 Currie G, Wheat J, Kiat H. Novel approach to MRI-based molecular imaging: proof of concept. Macquarie University. 2011. $56,080 Sanson-Fisher R. Cancer survival study. University of Newcastle. 2011. $70,000 Whiteman D. PROBE-NET centres of research excellence: proposal development grant. Queensland Institute of Medical Research. 2011. $5,000 Clinical Trials Protocol Grant Lord RV, Bourke M, Watson D. Randomised trial of endoscopic radiofrequency ablation versus complete mucosectomy with stent for Barrett’s high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal adenocarcinoma. St Vincent’s Centre for Applied Medical Research; University of New South Wales. 2011-2012. $50,000

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Publications, presentations and posters

Publications, presentations and posters ‘B Positive’ Program Publications Macartney KK, Porwal M, Dalton D, Cripps T, Maldigri T, Isaacs D, Kesson A. Decline in rotavirus hospitalisations following introduction of Australia’s national rotavirus immunisation program. J Paediatr Child Health. 2011;47(5):266-70. DOI:10.1111/ j.1440-1754.2010.01953.x. Epub 2011 Jan 18. Robotin M. Botanical products in the 21st century: from whence to whither. Cancer Forum. 2011;35(1):6-9. Robotin M. From traditional medicines to drug discovery. In: Olver I, Robotin M, editors. Perspectives on complementary and alternative medicine. Singapore: Imperial College Press; 2011. p.157-186. Robotin M. Hepatitis B prevention and control: lessons from the East and the West. World J Hepatol. 2011;3(2):31-7. [editorial] Presentations Porwal M, Brooke M, Nguyen D, Robotin M. Understanding the key drivers impacting chronic hepatitis B screening in south-western Sydney – proposal for community engagement framework. Presentation at: National Hepatitis Health Promotion Conference; 2011 Nov 24-25; Brisbane, Australia. Robotin M. Community-based strategies to increase hepatitis B awareness and testing in migrant communities. Presentation at: Fairfield Migrant Resource Centre; 2011 Aug 30; Cabramatta, Australia. Robotin M. Hepatitis B and liver cancer. Health professional talk at: Cancer Council Western Australia; 2011 Aug 22; Perth, Australia. Robotin M. Hepatitis B and liver cancer: what is the link? Presentation at: public forum, Perth Library; 2011 Aug 22; Perth, Australia. Robotin M. Hepatitis B, hepatocellular cancer and the ‘B Positive’ project. Presentation at: Public Health Professionals CME Meeting; 2011 Aug 23; Albany, Australia. Robotin M. Hepatitis B infection and health inequalities in migrant populations in Australia. Presentation at: Fairfield Migrant Interagency Forum, Fairfield City; 2011 Jul 15; Sydney, Australia. Robotin M. Hepatitis, liver cancer and the ‘B Positive’ Program. Address to: Hepatitis Australia Board; 2011 Sep 14; Sydney, Australia.

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Robotin M, Patton Y, Kansil M , Penman A , George J. The costs of treating chronic hepatitis in Asian populations – a comparison of current treatment guidelines. Presentation at: Asia Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) 2nd Hepatocellular Carcinoma Conference; 2011 Dec 1-3; Jeju Island, Republic of Korea. Robotin M, Porwal M, Prado S. Engaging communities in the fight to address health disparities: the case of hepatitis B. Presentation at: Federation of Ethnic Communities’ Councils of Australia (FECCA) Conference (Advancing Multiculturalism); 2011 Nov 18; Adelaide, Australia. Posters Liu Y, Robotin M. Evaluating the impact of research: a bibliometric analysis of research by Cancer Council NSW. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Nguyen D, Porwal M, Robotin M. Engaging with Vietnamese communities in the fight against hepatitis B–related liver cancer. Poster presented at: National Hepatitis Health Promotion Conference; 2011 Nov 24-25; Brisbane, Australia. Patton Y, Porwal M, George J, Penman AG, Robotin M. Developing a chronic hepatitis B disease registry to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma in NSW. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Porwal M, Robotin M. Community-based interventions raising awareness and promoting screening for chronic hepatitis B in CALD communities. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Robotin M, Holliday C, George J, Enright C, Penman A. Defining a research agenda for liver cancer in Australia – the role of the not-for-profit cancer control organisations. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Robotin M, Patton Y, Putha V, George J. Population-level prevention of hepatitis B–related HCC in Australia – the primary care perspective. Poster presented at: Asia Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL) Conference; 2011 Feb 17-20; Bangkok, Thailand.


Cancer Research Division Publications Aminisani N. Cervical screening in New South Wales and its relationship to country of birth and socioeconomic status. PhD [thesis]. Sydney: University of Sydney; 2011. Canfell K, Lew JB, Smith M, Walker R. Costeffectiveness modelling beyond MAVARIC study end-points. In: Kitchener HC, Blanks R, Cubie H, Desai M, Dunn G, Legood R, Gray A, Sadique Z, Moss S, on behalf of the MAVARIC Trial Study Group. MAVARIC – a comparison of automationassisted and manual cervical screening: a randomised controlled trial. Health Technol Assess. 2011;15(3). Canfell K, Lew JB, Smith M, Walker R. Modelling HPV test of cure. In: Moss S, Kelly R, Legood R, Sadique Z, Canfell K, Lew JB, Smith M, Walker R. Evaluation of sentinel sites for HPV triage and test of cure. Report to the NHS Cancer Screening Programs. UK; September 2011. Canfell K, Shi JF, Lew JB, Walker R, Zhao FH, Simonella L, Chen JF, Legood R, Smith MA, Nickson C, Qiao YL. Prevention of cervical cancer in rural China: evaluation of HPV vaccination and primary HPV screening strategies. Vaccine. 2011;29:2487-94.

Henry DA, Carless PA, Moxey AJ, O’Connell D, Stokes BJ, Fergusson DA, Ker K. Anti-fibrinolytic use for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(1):CD001886. Epub 2011 Jan 19. IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans (including Sitas F). The evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans [IARC monographs]. Vol. 100, A review of human carcinogens. Part B, Biological agents. Lyon, France: World Health Organisation International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2011. Jemal A, Thun M, Yu XQ, Hartman AM, Cokkinides V, Center MM, Ross H, Ward EM. Changes in smoking prevalence among US adults by state and region: estimates from the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey, 1992-2007. BMC Public Health. 2011;11:512. Salagame U, Canfell K, Banks E. An epidemiological overview of the relationship between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer. Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab. 2011;6:397-409. Shi JF, Canfell K, Lew JB, Qiao YL. The burden of cervical cancer in China: synthesis of the evidence. Int J Cancer. 2012;130(3):641-52. DOI: 10.1002/ ijc.26042. Epub 2011 Jun 10.

Carless PA, Rubens FD, Anthony DM, O’Connell D, Henry DA. Platelet-rich-plasmapheresis for minimising perioperative allogenic blood transfusion. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011;(3):CD004172. DOI:10.1002/14651858. CD004172.pub2.

Shi JF, Canfell K, Lew JB, Zhao FH, Legood R, Ning Y, Simonella L, Ma L, Kang YJ, Zhang YZ, Smith MA, Chen JF, Feng XX, Qiao YL. Evaluation of primary HPV-DNA testing in relation to visual inspection methods for cervical cancer screening in rural China: an epidemiologic and cost-effectiveness modelling study. BMC Cancer. 2011;11:239.

Chambers SK, Pinnock C, Lepore SJ, Hughes S, O’Connell DL. A systematic review of psychosocial interventions for men with prostate cancer and their partners. Patient Educ Couns. 2011;85:e75-e88.

Sitas F, Yu XQ, O’Connell D, Blizzard L, Otahal P, Newman L, Venn A. The relationship between basal and squamous cell skin cancer and smoking-related cancers. BMC Res Notes. 2011;4:556.

Fry SA, Afrough B, Lomax-Browne HJ, Timms JF, Velentzis LS, Leathem AJ. Lectin microarray profiling of metastatic breast cancers. Glycobiology. 2011;21:1060-70.

Smith M, Canfell K. Cervical Screening in New Zealand: Independent Monitoring Annual Report (2008-2009). Commissioned report for National Cervical Screening Program Advisory Group. Wellington, New Zealand; 2011.

Goldsbury DE, Smith DP, Armstrong BK, O’Connell DL. Using linked routinely collected health data to describe prostate cancer treatment in New South Wales, Australia: a validation study. BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:253. Green J, Cairns BJ, Casabonne D, Wright FL, Reeves G, Beral V, Million Women Study Collaborators (including Canfell K). Height and cancer incidence in the Million Women Study: prospective cohort, and meta-analysis of prospective studies of height and total cancer risk. Lancet Oncol. 2011;12:785-94.

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

Smith M, Canfell K. Cervical screening in New Zealand: Independent Monitoring Report 33 (January-June 2010). Commissioned report for National Cervical Screening Program Advisory Group. Wellington, New Zealand; 2011. Smith M, Canfell K. Cervical Screening in New Zealand: Independent Monitoring Report 34 (July-December 2010). Commissioned report for National Cervical Screening Program Advisory Group. Wellington, New Zealand; 2011.

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Publications, presentations and posters

Smith M, Canfell K. Cervical Screening in New Zealand: Independent Monitoring Report 35 (January-June 2011). Commissioned report for National Cervical Screening Program Advisory Group. Wellington, New Zealand; 2011.

Yu XQ, Smith DP, Clements MS, Patel MI, McHugh B, O’Connell DL. Projecting prevalence by stage of care for prostate cancer and estimating future health service needs: protocol for a modelling study. BMJ Open. 2011;1(1):e000104. Epub 2011 Apr 7.

Smith M, Lew JB, Walker RJ, Brotherton JM, Nickson C, Canfell K. The predicted impact of HPV vaccination on male infections and male HPV-related cancers in Australia. Vaccine. 2011;29:9112-22.

Presentations

Smith M, Walker R, Clements M, Canfell K. Independent Monitoring Report for July-December 2008: National Cervical Screening Program. Report to the NZ National Screening Unit. National Screening Unit: New Zealand; March 2011. Smith M, Walker R, Clements M, Canfell K. Independent Monitoring Report for January-June 2009: National Cervical Screening Program. Report to the NZ National Screening Unit. National Screening Unit: New Zealand; March 2011. Smith M, Walker R, Clements M, Canfell K. Independent Monitoring Report for July-December 2009: National Cervical Screening Program. Report to the NZ National Screening Unit. National Screening Unit: New Zealand; March 2011. Velentzis LS, Keshtgar MR, Woodside JV, Leathem AJ, Titcomb A, Perkins KA, Mazurowska M, Anderson V, Wardell K, Cantwell MM. Significant changes in dietary intake and supplement use after breast cancer diagnosis in a UK multicentre study. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2011;128:473-82. Wang SM, Shi JF, Kang DJ, Song P, Qiao YL. Impact of human papillomavirus–related lesions on quality of life: a multicentre hospital-based study of women in Mainland China. Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2011;21:182-8. Wang W, O’Connell D, Stuart K, Boyages J. Analysis of 10-year cause-specific mortality of patients with breast cancer treated in New South Wales in 1995. J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol. 2011;55:516-25. Weber MF, Banks E, Sitas F. Smoking in migrants in New South Wales, Australia: report on data from over 100,000 participants in the 45 and Up Study. Drug Alcohol Rev. 2011;30:597-605. Willcox S. What do cancer patients and their partners believe causes cancer? Master of Public Health Honours [thesis]. Sydney: University of Sydney; 2011. Willcox SJ, Stewart BW, Sitas F. What factors do cancer patients believe contribute to the development of their cancer? (New South Wales, Australia). Cancer Causes Control. 2011;22:1503-11. Xiang W, Shi JF, Li P, Wang JB, Xu LN, Wei WQ, Zhao FH, Qiao YL, Boffetta P. Estimation of cancer cases and deaths attributable to infection in China. Cancer Causes Control. 2011;22:1153-61.

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Canfell K. Challenges in evaluating new strategies for cervical cancer prevention: integrating cervical screening and HPV vaccination. Presentation at: Health Economics Collaboration Seminar Series; 2011 May; Sydney, Australia. Canfell K. COMPASS: a randomised controlled trial of primary HPV testing in Australia. Presentation at: Preventing Cervical Cancer Conference (PCC) 2011; 2011 Nov 9-11; Melbourne, Australia. Canfell K. Evaluation of cervical cancer prevention in China. Presentation at: Preventing Cervical Cancer Conference (PCC) 2011; 2011 Nov 9-11; Melbourne, Australia. Canfell K. Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of primary HPV testing in urban populations in China. Presentation at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference and Clinical and Public Health Workshops; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Canfell K. Pap smears versus HPV screening. Presentation at: 6th Annual Family Planning NSW Conference; 2011 Aug 20; Sydney, Australia. Canfell K. What evidence base would be required for a transition to primary HPV screening in Australia? Presentation at: Symposium on Cytology vs. Primary HPV Screening, held at Cancer Council NSW; 2011 Nov; Sydney, Australia. Canfell K, Lew JB, Howard K, Gertig D, Smith M, Nickson C, Shi JF, Dyer S, Lord S, Tan J. Cervical screening expenditure in Australian women targeted for HPV vaccination. Presentation at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Canfell K, Shi JF, Lew JB, Walker R, Smith M, Nickson C, Qiao Y. Predicted long-term outcomes after single-round HPV screening in rural China. Presentation at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Carmichael LK, Goldsbury DE, Smith DP, Gattellari M, Chambers S, Slevin TJ, O’Connell D L. Who are the men aged over 75 who are having PSA tests? Presentation at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. [Nominated for Best of the Best Oral Presentation – Urology] Chiew M. Social isolation among older Australian smokers: 45 and Up. Presentation at: Annual 45 and Up Study Collaborators Meeting; 2011 Sep; Sydney, Australia.


Darlington-Brown J. Cervical Health Study. Presentation at: NSW Pap Test Register; 2011 Dec; Sydney, Australia. Darlington-Brown J, Christian K, Smith D, Revius M, Canfell K, O’Connell D. Career progression within Cancer Council. Presentation at: NSW & ACT Cancer Epidemiology Network Meeting; 2011 Dec; Sydney, Australia. Goldsbury D. The Colorectal Cancer Referral Pathways Study: 45 and Up Study. Presentation at: Annual 45 and Up Study Collaborators Meeting; 2011 Sep; Sydney, Australia. Hodgkinson V. Skin Health Study: challenges in data collection: 45 and Up Study. Presentation at: Annual 45 and Up Study Collaborators Meeting; 2011 Sep; Sydney, Australia. Luo Q, O’Connell D, Smith D, Yu XQ. Characteristics of men with unstaged prostate cancer: analysis of NSW Central Cancer Registry data. Presentation at: Early Career Researcher Award presentation, NSW & ACT Cancer Epidemiology Network Meeting; 2011 Dec; Sydney, Australia. Nair-Shalliker V. Sun exposure and prostate cancer risk in New South Wales, Australia. Presentation at: Annual General Meeting of the Australasian Epidemiological Association; 2011 Nov; Perth, Australia. Nickson C, Creighton P, Lew JB, Clements M, Smith M, Howard K, Dyer S, Lord S, Canfell K. Cervical cancer screening in Australia: modelled evaluation of the impact of changing the recommended interval from two to three years. Presentation at: Annual General Meeting of the Australasian Epidemiological Association; 2011 Nov; Perth, Australia. Pascoe SW, Harris MF, O’Connell DL, Veitch C, Beilby JJ, Spigelman AD, Goldsbury D, Barton MB, Olver I, Crossland L, Stubbs J. The Colorectal Cancer Referral Pathways Project: findings from record linkage, audit of referral letters and focus groups. Presentation at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. [Nominated for Best of the Best Oral Presentation – Primary Care] Shi JF, Canfell K, Lew JB, Ma L, Walker R, Zhao F, Smith M, Chen J, Qiao Y. Cost-effectiveness of primary HPV screening in urban populations in China. Presentation at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Sitas F, Egger S, Urban MI, Taylor PR, Abnet CC, Boffetta P, O’Connell DL, Whiteman DC, Brennan P, Malekzadeh R, Pawlita M, Dawsey SM, Waterboer T, Webb PM, Green AC, Hayward NK, Zaridze D, Holcatova I, Mates D, SzeszeniaDabrowska N, Ferro G, Janout V, Curado MP, Menezes AM, Koifman S, Islami F, Nasrollahzadeh

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

D, Hu N, Goldstein AM, Gao Y, Ding T, Kamangar F. InterSCOPE – International Collaboration on HPV and Oesophageal Cancer. Presentation at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Smith D. Sexual function five years after a diagnosis of localised prostate cancer: results from the NSW Prostate Cancer Care and Outcomes Study. Presentation at: Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ) Supplementary Meeting; 2011 May; Sydney, Australia. Smith D, Egger S, O’Connell DL, King MT, Berry MP, Stricker PD, Cozzi P, Armstrong BK. Patientreported quality of life in men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer: five-year results of the NSW Prostate Cancer Care and Outcomes Study. Presentation at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. [Nominated for Best of the Best Oral Presentation – Urology]. Smith D, Weber M, Latz I, Korda R, Tikellis G, Patel M, Clements M, Dwyer T, Banks E. Lower urinary tract symptoms in older Australian men: 45 and Up Study. Presentation at: Annual 45 and Up Study Collaborators Meeting; 2011 Sep; Sydney, Australia; Supramaniam R, O’Connell D. Lower breast cancer survival for Aboriginal women in NSW was not explained by demographic, disease or surgery factors. Presentation at: 3rd Coalition for Research to Improve Aboriginal Health (CRIAH) Aboriginal Health Research Conference; 2011 May 5-6; Sydney, Australia. Velentzis LS. Dietary patterns and breast cancer recurrence. Presentation at: Annual General Meeting of the Australasian Epidemiological Association; 2011 Nov; Perth, Australia. Wang S, Li J, Zhao F, Shi JF, Zhang X, Pan Q, Belinson J, Qiao Y. Six-year prospective study on cervical outcomes associated with HPV load. Presentation at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Weber M. Age-related patterns of erectile dysfunction among older men across NSW. Presentation at: Annual General Meeting of the Australasian Epidemiological Association; 2011 Nov; Perth, Australia. Weber M. Social isolation among older Australian smokers: results from a large population-based cohort. Presentation at: Annual General Meeting of the Australasian Epidemiological Association; 2011 Nov; Perth, Australia. Weber M, Smith D, O’Connell D, Patel M, DeSouza P, Clements M, Sitas F, Banks E. Age-related patterns of erectile dysfunction among older men across NSW: 45 and Up Study. Presentation at: Annual 45 and Up Study Collaborators Meeting; 2011 Sep; Sydney, Australia.

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Publications, presentations and posters

Willcox S, Stewart B, Sitas F. What do cancer patients think causes their cancer? Presentation at: GP11 – The Conference for General Practice; 2011 Oct 6-8; Hobart, Australia. Yu XQ, Luo Q, Smith DP, Clements MS, O’Connell DL. Challenges in projecting prevalence for prostate cancer: issues and options. Presentation at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. [Nominated for Best of the Best Oral Presentation – Epidemiology] Posters Armstrong BK, Canfell K, Aminisani N. Participation in recommended cervical screening by Asian and Middle Eastern migrants in Australia: a record linkage study. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Canfell K, Shi JF, Lew JB, Walker R, Smith M, Nickson C, Qiao Y. Predicted long-term outcomes after single-round HPV screening in rural China. Poster presented at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Christian K, Hodgkinson K, Sitas F. Cancer Council NSW biobank: a rich resource for researchers. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Goldsbury D, O’Connell D. Pancreatic cancer surgery and survival in NSW: a population-based observational study using linked data and propensity scoring. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Hodgkinson V, Christian K, Sitas F. Cancer Council NSW biobank: improving blood collection protocols. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Luo Q, Yu XQ, Smith DP, O’Connell DL. Characteristics of men with unknown spread of prostate cancer at diagnosis: analysis of NSW Central Cancer Registry. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Nair-Shalliker V, Smith DP, Egger S, Hughes AM, Kricker A, Armstrong BK. Sun exposure may increase risk of prostate cancer in the high-UV environment of New South Wales, Australia: a case-control study. Poster presented at: 12th Australasian Cancer Conference; 2011 Aug; Melbourne, Australia. O’Connell D, Carmichael L, Smith D, Gattellari M, Chambers S, Pinnock C, Slevin T, Ward J. Prostate-specific antigen testing awareness

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and participation in New South Wales, Australia: demographic, lifestyle and health-related factors. Poster presented at: XIX IEA World Congress of Epidemiology; 2011 Aug 7-11; Edinburgh, Scotland. O’Connell D, Kahn C, Simonella L, Sywak M, Boyages S, Ung O. Pathways to diagnosis do not explain all of the increase in thyroid cancer: results of a population-based cross-sectional study. Poster presented at: XIX IEA World Congress of Epidemiology; 2011 Aug 7-11; Edinburgh, Scotland. O’Connell D, Kahn C, Simonella L, Sywak M, Boyages S, Ung O. Post-surgical pathology reporting of thyroid cancer in NSW. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Shi JF, Canfell K, Lew JB, Ma L, Walker R, Zhao F, Smith M, Chen J, Qiao Y. Cost-effectiveness of primary HPV screening in urban populations in China. Poster presented at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Sitas F. InterSCOPE – International Collaboration on HPV and Oesophageal Cancer: pooled seroepidemiological analysis of HPV and oesophageal carcinoma. Poster presented at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Smith D. Sexual function five years after diagnosis of localised prostate cancer: results from the New South Wales (NSW) Prostate Cancer Care and Outcome Study. Poster presented at: Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ) 64th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Feb 21-24; Christchurch, New Zealand. Supramaniam R, Gibberd, A, O’Connell D. Lung cancer treatment and survival for Aboriginal people in NSW: the Aboriginal Patterns of Cancer Care project (APOCC). Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Supramaniam R, O’Connell D. Differences in socioeconomic status, spread of disease, rural residence and access to surgery do not explain lower survival from breast cancer for Aboriginal women. Poster presented at: XIX IEA World Congress of Epidemiology; 2011 Aug 7-11; Edinburgh, Scotland. Supramaniam R, Rowstorne P, Rodger J, Dillon A, Butow P, Saunders V, O’Connell DL. Developing a questionnaire to explore the pathways to diagnosis of cancer for Aboriginal people in NSW: the Aboriginal Patterns of Cancer Care project (APOCC). Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia.


Supramaniam R, Tang A, O’Connell D. Epidemiology and Indigenous health policy: rising to the challenge. Poster presented at: XIX IEA World Congress of Epidemiology; 2011 Aug 7-11; Edinburgh, Scotland. Wang S, Li J, Zhao F, Shi JF, Zhang X, Pan Q, Belinson J, Qiao Y. Six-year prospective study on cervical outcomes associated with HPV load. Poster presented at: 27th International Papillomavirus Conference; 2011 Sep 16-22; Berlin, Germany. Yu XQ, Clements M, O’Connell D. Estimating fraction cured from cancer: which statistical package to use? Poster presented at: XIX IEA World Congress of Epidemiology; 2011 Aug 7-11; Edinburgh, Scotland. Yu XQ, Clements M, O’Connell D. Projecting prevalence by stage of care for colon cancer and estimating future health service needs in New South Wales, Australia. Poster presented at: XIX IEA World Congress of Epidemiology; 2011 Aug 7-11; Edinburgh, Scotland.

Cancer Information and Support Services Publications O’Callaghan V. Patients’ perceptions of complementary and alternative medicine. Cancer Forum. 2011;35(1):44-7. O’Callaghan V. The consumer experience – case studies of complementary therapy use among people diagnosed with cancer. In: Olver I, Robotin M, editors. Perspectives on complementary and alternative medicines. London: Imperial College Press; 2011. p. 373-98. Presentations Fitz-Gerald L. Understanding your rights: managing legal and financial issues throughout your cancer journey. Paper presented at: Cancer Nurses Society 14th Winter Congress; 2011 July 21-23; Sydney, Australia. O’Callaghan V. Aboriginal Cancer Journeys – editing for an Aboriginal audience. Paper presented at: 5th National Editors Conference; 2011 Sep 7-9; Sydney, Australia. Posters King S. Engaging in national partnerships to promote the mutual aid model of support through a telephone support group format. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Newling G, Forsyth L. Helping patients with travel and accommodation for treatment. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Newling G, Forsyth L. Out-of-area patients in central Sydney. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncological Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. O’Callaghan V, Nance J. Extending the reach: bringing audiovisual cancer resources to deaf and hearing-impaired people. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia. Wuellner L, Nance J, Batt G, Humphries, E. Cancer, work and you: providing a printed resource for working patients and carers. Poster presented at: Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) 38th Annual Scientific Meeting; 2011 Nov 15-17; Perth, Australia.

Health Strategies Division Publications Bonevski B, Girgis A, Magin P, Horton G, Brozek I, Armstrong B. Prescribing sunshine: a crosssectional survey of 500 Australian general practitioners’ practices and attitudes about vitamin D. Int J Cancer. 2012 May 1;130(9):2138-45. DOI: 10.1002/ijc.26225. Epub 2011 Aug 9. Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C, Hull P, O’Brien J. Implementing a smoking cessation program in social and community service organisations: a feasibility and acceptability trial. Drug and Alcohol Rev. 2011. DOI: 10.1111/j.14653362.2011.00391.x. Epub 2011 Dec 6. Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C, O’Brien J, Oakes W. Developing cessation interventions for the social and community service setting: a qualitative study of barriers to quitting among disadvantaged Australian smokers. BMC Public Health. 2011;11:493-500. Chapman K, Stacey F, Groves E, Pratt IS. After the storm: nutrition after cancer treatment. Cancer Forum. 2011;35(2):77-81. Dixon H, Scully M, Wakefield M, Kelly B, Chapman K, Donovan R. Parents’ responses to nutrient claims and sports celebrity endorsements on energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods: an experimental study. Public Health Nutr. 2011;14(6):1-9. Glasson C, Chapman K, James E. Fruit and vegetables should be targeted separately in health promotion programs: differences in consumption levels, barriers, knowledge and stages of readiness for change. Public Health Nutr. 2011;14(4):694-701. Hebden L, King L, Grunseit A, Kelly B, Chapman K. Advertising of fast food to children on Australian television: the impact of industry self-regulation. Med J Aust. 2011;195(1):20-4.

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Publications, presentations and posters

Hebden L, King L, Kelly B, Chapman K, InnesHughes C. A menagerie of promotional characters: promoting food to children through food packaging. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2011;43(5):349-55.

Winstanley M, Pratt I, Chapman K, Griffin H, Croager E, Olver I, Sinclair C, Slevin T. Alcohol and cancer: a position statement from Cancer Council Australia. Med J Aust. 2011;194:479-82.

Kelly B, Baur LA, Bauman AE, King L, Chapman K, Smith BJ. Food and drink sponsorship of children’s sport in Australia: who pays? Health Promot Int. 2011;26:188-95.

Presentations

Kelly B, Baur LA, Bauman AE, King L, Chapman K, Smith BJ. ‘Food company sponsors are kind, generous and cool’: (mis)conceptions of junior sports players. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:95. Kelly B, Baur, LA, Bauman AE, Salah S, Smith BJ, King L, Chapman K. Role modelling unhealthy behaviours: an analysis of food and drink sponsorship of peak sporting organisations. Health Promot J Aust. 2011;22(1):72-5. Kelly B, Chapman K, King L, Hebden L. Trends in food advertising to children on free-to-air television in Australia. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2011;35:131-4. James EL, Stacey F, Chapman K, Lubans DR, Asprey G, Sundquist K, Boyes A, Girgis A. Exercise and Nutrition Routine Improving Cancer Health (ENRICH): the protocol for a randomised efficacy trial of a nutrition and physical activity program for adult cancer survivors and carers. BMC Public Health. 2011;11:236-44. O’Brien J, Geike A, Jardine A, Oakes W, Salmon AM. Integrating smoking care in community service organisations to reach disadvantaged people: findings from the Smoking Matters project. Health Promot J Aust. 2011;21:176-82. Potente S, Anderson C, Karim M. Environmental sun protection and supportive policies and practices: an audit of outdoor recreational settings in NSW coastal towns. Health Promot J Aust. 2011;22(2):97-101. Potente S, McIver J, Anderson C, Coppa K. ‘It’s a beautiful day . . . for cancer’: an innovative communication strategy to engage youth in skin cancer prevention. Soc Mar Q. 2011;17(3):86-105. Scully M, Wakefield M, Niven P, Chapman K, Crawford D, Pratt IS, Baur LA, Flood V, Morley B, NaSSDA Study Team. Association between food marketing exposure and adolescents’ food choices and eating behaviours. Appetite. 2012;58(1):1-5. Epub 2011 Oct 5.

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Buffet K, Rock V, Anderson C. Supporting and empowering childcare centres in disadvantaged communities to become SunSmart. Paper presented at: Australian Health Promotion Association 20th National Conference; 2011 Apr 10-13; Cairns, Australia. Chapman K. Advocacy on food marketing to children. Paper presented at: Preventing Obesity: moving policy recommendations to action; 2011 Mar 22-23; Ottawa, Canada. Chapman K. Challenges and opportunities in public health nutrition. Paper presented at: Working Together for a Healthy WA: a settings approach to physical activity, healthy weight and healthy eating; 2011 May 26-27; Perth, Australia. Gander K. An RCT to evaluate the efficacy of a peer-led nutrition education intervention designed to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Paper presented at: Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity; 2011 Jun 15-18; Melbourne, Australia. Hughes C. Evaluating the potential usefulness of fast food menu labelling. Paper presented at: Public Health Association of Australia Food Futures Conference; 2011 Nov 22-23; Hobart, Australia. Hull P, O’Brien J, Rayson D, Salmon A. Engaging the social and community service sector to help highly disadvantaged smokers. Paper presented at: Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2011; 2011 Oct 18-20; Brisbane, Australia. Malpas G, Tang A. Cancer and Local Government: a potent combination. Paper presented at: Making Cities Liveable Conference; 2011 July 28-29; Noosa, Australia. O’Brien J, Bonevski B, Frost S, Salmon A, Yiow L, Yip S. A survey of the NSW social and community services sector: smoking-related attitudes, policies and practices. Paper presented at: Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2011; 2011 Oct 1820; Brisbane, Australia.

Wellard L, Glasson C, Chapman K. Fries or a fruit bag? Investigating the nutritional composition of fast food children’s meals. Appetite. 2012;58(1):105-10. Epub 2011 Oct 6.

O’Brien J, Williams K, Moore R, Jones B. Building capacity in community services to tackle smoking among disadvantaged groups: findings from the Smoking Care project. Paper presented at: Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2011; 2011 Oct 18-20; Brisbane, Australia.

Wellard L, Glasson C, Chapman K, Miller C. Fast facts: the availability and accessibility of nutrition information in fast food chains. Health Promot J Aust. 2011;22(3):184-8.

Penman A. Examining data about tobacco retailers in NSW: what does it tell us? Paper presented at: Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2011; 2011 Oct 18-20; Brisbane, Australia.


Rock V, McIver J. Introducing Sun Sound: a creative approach to mass media. Paper presented at: International Skin Cancer Conference; 2011 May 3-5; Copenhagen, Denmark. Rock V, McIver J. OMG LOL: using digital media to reposition sun protection for teenagers. Paper presented at: International Skin Cancer Conference; 2011 May 3-5; Copenhagen, Denmark. Tang A. Intervening in the retail supply of tobacco: the role of licensing retailers. Paper presented at: Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2011; 2011 Oct 18-20; Brisbane, Australia. Tang A, Hull P, O’Brien J, Hohnen L, Peters A. Working effectively with the community and social service sector to promote tobacco control activities. Paper presented at: Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2011; 2011 Oct 18-20; Brisbane, Australia. Watson W. Advocacy: a role in healthier futures. Paper presented at: Federation of P&C Associations of NSW Annual Conference; 2011 Jul 29-31; Tamworth, Australia. Watson W. Junkbusters: helping parents navigate self-regulation on food marketing to children. Paper presented at: Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity; 2011 Jun 15-18; Melbourne, Australia. Watson W. Self-regulation of food marketing to children: is the community concerned? Paper presented at: Public Health Association of Australia Food Futures Conference; 2011 Nov 22-23; Hobart, Australia. Watson W. ‘We’re all so busy and need energy’: do shoppers understand the term ‘energy’? Paper presented at: Australian New Zealand Obesity Society Conference; 2011 Oct 20-22; Adelaide, Australia.

Posters Chapman K, Watson W, Kelly B, King L, Glasson C, Wellard L, Gill T. Understanding nutrition literacy in relation to front-of-pack food labelling. Poster presented at: Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity; 2011 Jun 15-18; Melbourne, Australia. Chapman K, Watson W, Kelly B, King L, Glasson C, Wellard L, Gill T. Understanding nutrition literacy in relation to front-of-pack food labelling. Poster presented at: Public Health Association of Australia Conference; 2011 Sep 26-28; Brisbane, Australia. Hull P, O’Brien J, Salmon A, Rayson D. Much needed, long overdue: working with community service organisations to tackle tobacco amongst disadvantaged smokers. Poster presented at: Australian Health Promotion Association 20th National Conference; 2011 Apr 10-13; Cairns, Australia. Watson W, Chapman K, Mackay S, Martin J. Food marketing complaints registry: helping parents navigate self-regulation. Poster presented at: Public Health Association of Australia Conference; 2011 Sep 26-28; Brisbane, Australia. Wellard L, Glasson C, Chapman K, Miller C. Fast facts: availability and accessibility of nutrition information in fast food outlets. Poster presented at: Annual Meeting of the International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity; 2011 Jun 15-18; Melbourne, Australia. Wellard L, Glasson C, Chapman K, Miller C. Fast facts: availability and accessibility of nutrition information in fast food outlets. Poster presented at: Public Health Association of Australia Conference; 2011 Sep 26-28; Brisbane, Australia.

Wellard L. Fast facts: availability and accessibility of nutrition information in fast food outlets. Paper presented at: Public Health Association of Australia Conference; 2011 Sep 26-28; Brisbane, Australia. Wellard L. Observation of healthy and unhealthy purchases at fast food stores. Paper presented at: Public Health Association of Australia Conference; 2011 Sep 26-28; Brisbane, Australia. Williams K. Building capacity in community services to tackle smoking among disadvantaged groups: the Smoking Care project. Paper presented at: Australian Health Promotion Association 20th National Conference; 2011 Apr 10-13; Cairns, Australia. Williams K, Butler J. A critical piece of the puzzle: consumer action and advocacy for tobacco control. Paper presented at: Oceania Tobacco Control Conference 2011; 2011 Oct 18-20; Brisbane, Australia.

Cancer Council NSW Research Activity Report 2011

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Board and committees

Board and committees Cancer Council NSW Board of Directors Mr Bruce Hodgkinson SC (Chair) Barrister, Denman Chambers Dr Stephen Ackland Staff Specialist, Medical Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital Ms Jill Boehm OAM (Deputy Chair) Ms Mary Chiew Managing Director, Giorgio Armani Australia Dr Patrick Cregan Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Western Sydney Mr Paul Lahiff Consultant Prof Graham Mann Professor in Medicine, University of Sydney at Westmead Institute for Cancer Research

Dr Melanie Price Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), and Executive Director, PsychoOncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), University of Sydney Dr Monica Robotin Medical Director, Cancer Council NSW, and Senior Lecturer in Public Health, University of Sydney A/Prof Natalka Suchowerska Head, Research and Education (Medical Physics), Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Sydney Prof Kate White Professor of Nursing and the Cancer Institute of NSW Chair in Cancer Nursing, University of Sydney Cancer Council NSW Ethics Committee

Mr Stephen Roberts Senior Partner, Asia Pacific for Mercer Investments

Ms Meghan Carruthers (Chair) Senior Associate, HWL Ebsworth

Mr Bob Sendt Consultant and former NSW Auditor-General

Ms Amanda Adrian Laywoman

Ms Melanie Trethowan Consultant

Mr Bill McCarthy AM Medical Graduate with Research Experience

Cancer Council NSW Cancer Research Committee

Dr Graeme Morgan Medical Graduate with Research Experience

Prof Michelle Haber AM (Chair) Professor, Executive Director and Head of Experimental Therapeutics Program, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research

Ms Joanne Muller Lawyer

Prof Mark Baker Professor of Proteomics, Macquarie University

Mr Felix Ratcliff Allied Health Professional

Ms Jane Bennett Consumer Representative

Dr Monica Robotin Medical Graduate with Research Experience

Prof Andrew Biankin Professor and Head, Pancreatic Cancer Research, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Dr John Sanders (Deputy Chair) Layman

A/Prof Anna deFazio Head, Gynaecological Oncology Research Group, Westmead Institute for Cancer Research

Research Review Committee

Prof Sandra Jones Professor and Director, Centre for Health Initiatives, University of Wollongong

Ms Gillian Batt Director, Cancer Information and Support Services Division, Cancer Council NSW

Prof Reg Lord AM Professor and Head, Gastroesophageal Cancer Research Program, and Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeon, St Vincent’s Hospital

Mr Jim Grainda Consumer Representative

Mr John Moroney Consumer Representative

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Dr Andrew Penman AM CEO, Cancer Council NSW

Rev John Neasey Religious Representative

Prof Louisa Jorm (Chair) Research Director, Sax Institute

Dr Monica Robotin Medical Director, Cancer Council NSW A/Prof Freddy Sitas Director, Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council NSW


Contact Cancer Research Division

Research Strategy Unit

Cancer Council NSW PO Box 572 Kings Cross NSW 1340

Cancer Council NSW PO Box 572 Kings Cross NSW 1340

P: 02 9334 1837 F: 02 8302 3550 E: crd@nswcc.org.au

P: 02 9334 1854 E: research@nswcc.org.au

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Research Activity Report 2011