Angus Life 2022

Page 1

Strategic Plan Update Focus, Direction and Priorities

OneCup AI Livestock ID How to Get Their Cameras Onto Your Operation

Calving Season Getting the Best Results From Your Efforts

Teat and Udder Structure Genetic and Economic Implications

ANGUS LIFE 2022


MJT SPARK 808F

BAR-H CROSSFIRE 29C X MJT JOANNE 20D

MJT MISS JEWEL 611E

MJT MISS FIZZ 1G

BROOKING BANK NOTE 4040 X PONDEROSA JENN’S 1406 FAY 135A BLAIRSWEST CHARLO 28E X MJT MISS CHEETAH 615E

Mark your calendars for the

BACK TO THE BASICS Bull Sale!

SALE DATE:FEBRUARY 12, 2022 OPEN HOUSE: FEBRUARY 5-6 2022


ANGUS LIFE Canadian Angus Association’s Magazine 2022 Publication #40069807

Angus Life magazine is published by the Canadian Angus Association.

Angus Life Editor-in-Chief: Myles Immerkar Managing Editor: Carmen Koning Executive Editor: Tina Zakowsky Creative Director: Christy Lavallee Design: Christy Lavallee Printer: Canadian Cattlemen magazine Photography: BCRC, Canada Beef, Kiani Evans, Christy Lavallee, Jeff Partridge, Grant Rolston, Tino Suddes, Tina Zakowsky Contributing Writers: Breanna Anderson, Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC), Naomi Best, Morgan Boecker, Canadian Cattle Identification Agency (CCIA), Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB), Kajal Devani, Myles Immerkar, Carmen Koning, Christy Lavallee, Tammi Ribey, Megan Rolf Ph.D., Belinda Wagner, Lexi Wright, Tina Zakowsky Vision: The Canadian Angus Association exists to preserve and expand the Angus breed for Canadian cattle producers and beef consumers, providing the best opportunities for profitability today and for future generations. Mission: To maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed. www.cdnangus.ca Angus Life magazine is an annual publication. To place an ad or to subscribe, please contact the Canadian Angus Association at 1-888-571-3580 or cdnangus@cdnangus.ca. The Canadian Angus Association acknowledges the financial support received for this publication from the Canadian Beef Breeds Council through the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada AgriMarketing program.

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C A NA D IA N A N G U S F O U N DAT IO N ’ S

BUILDING the LEGACY

9

A BIG thank you to all our buyers:

A special thank you to our 2021 donors:

w e nt on l i n e i n Au g u s t 2 0 2 1 r a i s i n g m ore t h a n $ 7 1 , 0 0 0 !

Thank you

to all our donors and buyers for their support.

Alta Genetics Austen Anderson Bannockburn Valley Angus Bar E-L Angus BeefSmart Consulting Inc. Belinda Wagner Blairs.Ag Cattle Co. Boehringer-Ingelheim Animal Health Canada Inc. Bouchard Livestock International Bova-Tech Bow Valley Genetics Canadian Angus Association Canadian Sires—a division of Bohrson Marketing Services Cudlobe Angus Cudlobe Angus West Davis-Rairdan DLMS/Cattle Vids Flat Top Cattle Co. Gail Wildman Gavin Cattle Company Geis Angus Farm Ltd. Get-A-Long Stock Farm Glacier FarmMedia Graham & Karen McLean

Hamilton Farms Home Grown Photography James Arnott Jenna Loveridge Photography Jessica Davey Photography Justin Carvey Fitting KBJ Round Farms Keystone Angus Kiani Evans Livestock Media Plus M & J Farms MacKinnon-Holland Family Manitoba Angus Association Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment Martin Deerline McEwen’s Fuels & Fertilizer Miller Wilson Angus Morgan A.I. Services New Life Mills New Rosedale Feeds Norheim Ranching Northern Alberta Angus Club Northline Angus Nutrien Ag Solutions OBI Livestock Ltd. Park Mazda

Proven Seed Pugh Farms Quick Dick McDick Ramblin’ Rose Creative Ranch Revival Ranchland Vet Supply Red Eagle Acres Resby Coutts Robert Geis Saskatchewan Angus Association SE Saskatchewan Angus Showcase Semex Sheldon Kyle Shiloh Cattle Company Six Mile Ranch Southern Alberta Angus Club Story Brokers, Sarah Wray and Ben Wilson Team Koe Thomas Wildman Tyler Harris Cattle Photography Viper Technology Group Wheatley River Angus Farm Windy Ridge Ultrasound Worth-a-Bit Angus Young Dale Angus

Airam Farm Allandale Angus American Angus Hall of Fame Andrew McElroy Bar Heart Angus Bar Over AJ Cattle Belinda Wagner Belvin Angus Benchmark Angus Bircham Ranch Ltd. Border Butte Angus C & L Beasley Cattle Canadian Angus Association Crescent Creek Angus Cudlobe Angus Devin Harlick Eastondale Angus Elliott Bros Ellsmere Farms Ltd Family Ties Angus Fleming Stock Farms

Freyburn Angus Farms Gary Harron Geis Angus Farm Ltd. Goad Family Angus Graham & Karen McLean Gwillimdale Farms Hamilton Farms Harvie Crest Cattle Company Heart of the Valley Farms HR Hahn Cattle Co. Justamere Farms KCH Cattle Co. Larissa Rutten Lock Farms Mar Mac Farms Merit Cattle Company MJT Cattle Co. Moose Creek Red Angus MWC Investments Inc. NCJ Cattle Co. North Coulee Cattle

Northline Farms Nu-Horizon Angus OBI Livestock Ltd. Peterosa Exports Pinegrove Angus Plum River Cattle Co. Red Eagle Acres Redrich Farms Reverse GC Angus Roxanne Miller Rustic Lily Angus S Box Holdings Scott Kelder SK Ranch Tambri Farms Thomas Copeland Tina Zakowsky Towaw Cattle Co. Triple L Angus Wilbar Cattle

The Building the Legacy Sale is a fundraising auction for the Canadian Angus Foundation. Building the Legacy 10 will be held on Saturday June 11, 2022 at 8:00 p.m. at Delta Hotels Beausejour by Marriott, Moncton, New Brunswick

If you are interested in making a donation to the Building the Legacy Sale, the Canadian Angus Foundation, or would like more information please contact: Belinda Wagner | Canadian Angus Foundation Executive Director bwagner@cdnangus.ca | 306-537-1518 www.cdnangus.ca/foundation/build-the-legacy-fundraiser 2


Annual 31

st

SALE

MARCH 15, 2022

BALOG AUCTION . LETHBRIDGE, AB . 1PM

leeuwenburghangus.com

DENNIS (403)308.3003

JOHNNY (403)382.1794

JACK (403)330.6123


table of 6 8

22 28 38 42 50 53 58 66 68 70 4

Contents

National Events and Reminders

Maritimes

Canadian Angus Association Board of Directors: Our Mentors & Biggest Influences

2022 Sales

Alberta

26

Drought-Related Nutritional Advice Snapshots 2021 Pasture Management During Stressful Conditions Seal the Deal with a Handshake but Capture the Details in a Contract Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society Celebrates 50 Years Using EPDs for Bull Selection Calving Tips: A Refresher on Best Management Practices Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef Making Sense of Board Governance

76 82 85 86 90 92

Ontario

Introducing You To the New HPG EPD Male Fertility Project

Reasons Why Consumers Should Choose (Canadian) Angus Beef Import and Registration Requirements for Canadian Angus Genetics in Global Angus Associations Practical Approaches to Johne’s Disease Stress, Silence, Stigma and Suicide Looking to Make the Most of Forage Quality Focus Under the Hide

British Columbia

96 100 103 106

74

112 114

108

94

Validation of Genetic Technology and GEPD

Ultra High Frequency UHF Technology Opportunity Considerations for Wintering Beef Cows How to Get OneCup AI Cameras Onto Your Operation

116

Factors that Affect Your Sales


Canadian Angus Association

118

Strategic Plan 2022–2024

138 140 148

150

Membership & Programs of the Canadian Angus Association

168

166

Message from CJA President Naomi Best

Meet Kodie Doetzel: 2021 Junior Stockman of the Year

Genetic Condition Policy The What and Why about Performance Data

Member Service FAQs & Tips for Fast Service

Canadian Angus Foundation

152

Message from CAF Chair Tammi Ribey

154 160

Canadian Junior Angus

Why Do You Donate to the Canadian Angus Foundation? 25 Years of Archiving

Saskatchewan

172

Meet Jesse Emery: 2021 Oustanding Young Angus Breeder

208 226

174

Kid’s Corner Activity Pages

Advertising Index

Quebec

184

L’association Canadian Angus Politique relative aux conditions génétiques

186

Vous cherchez à tirer le meilleur parti de la qualité du fourrage ? Tenez compte de ces facteurs

188

Questions fréquemment posées sur les services aux membres et conseils pour un service rapide

Manitoba

163

Canadian Junior Angus and Young Breeder Opportunities

180

194 203 205

206

Getting the Best Results from Your Efforts During Calving Season 2021 Gold Show Results

234

192

Genetic and Economic Implications of Teat and Udder Structure in Canadian Angus Cattle What’s the Difference Between Contemporary Group and Management Group Information? The Most Sophisticated Genetic Selection Tool: Economic Selection Indexes

5


National • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 6

Events & Reminders

Renew membership and verify member details (membership information) Request pedigree extract for sale catalogues and sale promotion package Angus Cow Enrollment (ACE) annual and first spring herd billing Record calf birth weight, calving ease, dam teat score and dam udder score Yearling calves: arrange RFI testing, submit yearling weights, ultrasound scanning, scrotal circumference, hip height, foot and leg, and docility score Order your Canadian Angus RFID indicators: 1-877-909-2333 Order your TSUs, blood cards and hair cards for DNA collection Order Canadian Angus management tags: www.cdnangus.ca/adding-value/ordering-caa-management-tags Bull sales Angus Life magazine distributed Guiding Outstanding Angus Leaders Conference (GOAL), Toronto, ON, February 19–21 Submit registrations Submit DNA test requests (parentage, Angus GS, genetic conditions) Angus Cow Enrollment (ACE) second and third spring herd billing Angus Cow Enrollment (ACE) annual, first and second fall herd billing Spring herds: calf tattooing Fall calving herds: Herd Inventory and Application for Registration form sent via mail or email Record calf birth weight, calving ease, dam teat score, dam udder score Canadian Angus Association Annual Convention, Moncton, NB, June 9–12 Canadian Junior Angus Showdown, Brandon, MB, July 27–29 Gold Shows Ensure all sale animals are registered Request pedigree extract for sale catalogues and sale promotion package Angus Cow Enrollment (ACE) third fall herd billing Spring herds: calf weaning weights, dam mature weight, dam body condition score, dam docility score Submit Female Exposure and Disposal Information Enroll in ACE for next year Submit DNA samples ASAP for Angus GS results in time for your sale catalogue Order your Canadian Angus RFID indicators: 1-877-909-2333 Order your TSUs, blood cards and hair cards for DNA collection Order Canadian Angus management tags: www.cdnangus.ca/adding-value/ordering-caa-management-tags Fall feeder calf sales and bred female sales Gold Shows including Canadian Angus National Show Angus Life magazine submission deadline Spring calving herds: Herd Inventory and Application for Registration form sent via mail or email

January–March

April–August

September– December


Raising

Quality Cattle Breeding Registered Angus Since 2005

April 3, 2022 Champetre County, St. Denis, SK

Breeding Stock & Frozen Genetics

Garry & Donna Berting and Family 306-231-7567 • garry@ravenworth.com Middle Lake, SK • www.ravenworth.com

Like us on Facebook Ravenworth Cattle Black Angus


OUR MENTORS BIGGEST INFLUENCES

&

We asked the 2021–2022 Canadian Angus Association Board of Directors to share who their mentor or biggest influence in the Angus business has been and why. thoughts on sale lots that have piqued our interests, and opinions on selecting Angus genetics. Tim and I have travelled to many shows and visited many farms in western Canada. It is always great to sit around the table to listen to other breeders talking about their Angus cattle. In travelling with Tim, it encouraged me to want to learn more about how the rest of Canada operates in farming and agriculture practices.

Tim Dixon, Lydia and Kevin Yon of Yon Family Farms of South Carolina, and Ronnie Ford at the 2018 Maritime Angus Field Day

Ronnie Ford, Maritimes I feel in the Angus breed I have had a lot of influence from many fellow Angus members. My interest in Angus cattle, and my drive to learn and listen from others, have influenced my involvement with the breed. A close friend of 20 years who I feel has influenced me is Tim Dixon of Worth-A-Bit Angus in PEI. Tim has been breeding Angus genetics for more than 30 years. Tim and I always have detailed discussions on what we think of cattle sales, our 8

David Sample showing cattle with Sidney Castle

David Sample, Quebec Sidney Castle of the Ledges farm was the one man that really helped me when I was starting. My grandfather had bought bulls from Sid for several years. I met Sid the first time when I was 13 years of age


on a visit to Ledges farm with my grandfather to buy a bull. The farm is in Cowansville, Quebec, 1.5 hours east of my place. I started showing cattle myself in 1987. Sid helped me a great deal with the clipping and fitting aspect of the industry. We showed together that summer and went to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair with five head late that fall. What an experience that was. Sid was always ahead of most people doing embryo transfer and AI in the 80s. The Castle family raised Angus cattle from 1949–1990. I bought his last eight cows. Sidney has since passed away but was one of the great stockmen of our breed. Sid wrote a book about his life and I still read a part of it from time to time.

Shawn Birmingham, Manitoba The individuals that I feel have influenced me the most have been multiple past presidents. Over the years I have learned many great lessons from these leaders which help me answer why I have been involved on the board. Being open minded and willing to make difficult decisions for the betterment of our breed has always been the focus for these individuals. I feel very fortunate to have had the chance to know many great Angus leaders through my time on the board. Three past presidents that stand out for me are Gary Latimer, David Bolduc and David Sibbald.

Past President Gary Latimer

Graham and Ronald K. McLean with Richard Tanner

Graham McLean, Ontario I was introduced to Angus cattle when I was 9 years old after dad sold the Holsteins. We showed at many of the local fairs in a highly competitive area. Soon after he wanted us to join the beef club to understand the beef husbandry business plus judging. I did not realize how much judging/evaluating we do in our day-to-day lifestyles. If there was one thing my father insisted on, it was an education; we were never allowed to miss school to go to a fair. Not until showing steers at the Royal for 4-H was I allowed to miss school. While I was not allowed to show, he allowed family friends a chance to learn and show his cattle. My brother and I have allowed neighbours and youth who wouldn’t otherwise have the chance to exhibit our calves. Dad worked hard and played hard. He encouraged us to play sports. I had a successful career in both hockey and softball. He never shied away from competition. I worked out at a young age to contribute to the herd and pay my way for post-secondary education at the University of Guelph. I formed a partnership with dad and my brother in 1995. Dad loved his cows, so Murray and I are proud to be able to carry on the herd after his passing in 2010. You know you learned something from dad when a friend or neighbour says today, “Your dad would be proud to see the herd of cows out in that pasture.”

Past Presidents, Mabel Hamilton, Shawn Birmingham and David Sibbald at Angus Extravaganza 2021

Past President David Bolduc

Dale Easton, Saskatchewan Don Cockwill of Edgeley Acres Angus in Fort Qu’appelle, Saskatchewan helped me out a lot when I was young, providing lots of help and answering questions about breeding and marketing. He was always willing and glad to help. We came to be friends with a father-son-like relationship. I always admired and valued the Hayshaker Sale group’s integrity and values; that’s Dennis Erickson, Brian Geis, Jim Round, Rob Holowaychuk and Ernie Gibson. Dennis helped with marketing and letting me bounce ideas off him. I have always admired what the group did, how they bred cattle and marketed them in different ways. I always tried to put some of their values in our program. Other mentors have been the late Collin Sauder and Shane Castle. I worked with each of them for about 20 years. We have been and were friends and business partners, and I value each of their contributions to my time in the Angus business.

The original Hayshaker group in 1984: Ernie Gibson, Rob Holowaychuk, Barry and Jim Round, Brian Geis and Dennis Erickson

Collin Sauder

9


Rob Garner, Saskatchewan

Doug Munton, Alberta

In the Angus business there are many people who have led the way in the progress of the breed. One whom I have always appreciated in their effort to continually move the breed forward in producing a quality time-tested program is the Olynyk family from Crescent Creek Angus. Wes and Kim have carried on Wes’ parents’ heritage of raising Angus that have always found a prominent place in both purebred and commercial herds.

A mentor is defined as one who is or was an experienced and trusted advisor. A mentor influences and gives valued direction. A very early mentor in my life was my dad, Stanley Warren Munton. Dad continually proclaimed the value of the Angus mother cow, as well as the value of a superior carcass, resulting in a superior eating experience.

Kim and Wes Olynyk

We have also dealt with many commercial programs over the years that maintain a dominant influence of Angus genetics. These producers have used Angus for generations, always producing a product that has been in demand for all aspects of our beef industry.

Sheldon Kyle, Saskatchewan I have been blessed to have received advice and guidance from so many influential breeders from southeastern Saskatchewan over the years. The list would include folks like Barry Young, Kuno Freitag, Ray and Glenn Ippolito, Dale Easton and Cathy Pillar. For their sage and candid advice from a young age I have always strived to be better and forge my career in the Angus breed. I continue to learn from the wisdom of these folks and am inspired by the excitement and enthusiasm of our breed’s youth. To say I have been blessed is an understatement!

At a very early age, our family became acquainted with a purebred Angus breeder from Coaldale, Alberta by the name of Alex Sera. Alex and Elizabeth owned and operated Coalbridge Angus. Alex was a wealth of information and a true breeder of quality Angus cattle. A purchase of Park Lake Gertie in 1960 from Alex developed into a lifelong relationship. Alex left no stone unturned in seeking out genetics that would move his Coalbridge herd forward. He exemplified a tireless work ethic with special attention to detail. Valerie and I in our early years spent countless hours at Coalbridge, soaking up valuable ideas and principles that would build us superior Angus cattle. Our family will be forever indebted to my dad and to the Sera family as long as we continue in our breeding of Angus cattle and the marketing of Benchmark Beef.

Hilda and Stanley Munton

Harold Reich, Alberta

Clockwise from top left: Barry Young, Ray and Glenn Ippolito, Dale Easton, Kuno Freitag

10

My biggest influence in being an Angus breeder was my father Gotthold. I was 11 when my dad gave me a heifer calf. The next spring Jim Leachman came for a visit and my dad ended up selling my heifer, which I wasn’t very happy about, however that heifer ended up being Reserve Grand Champion female at Chicago and Denver. I have been actively involved with Angus ever since, especially selling bulls to the rancher and listening to what the rancher wants and not following fads. My father was one of the top breeders in Canada and has cows and bulls in Tom Burke’s Angus Legends books. My dad taught me lots about a breeding program and how Irmgard and Gotthold Reich to keep genetics predictable.


Greg Pugh, Alberta

Tom deWaal, BC

In an industry as interconnected as ours I have been fortunate to have had guidance from a number of different sources. To start off, on the basis of genetics suiting your environment and management styles, I would list my dad Jim and my grandpa George. They valued cattle that were practical with the ability to breed on and last. They also stressed being in tune and connected to your customer base. Far left: Jim and George Pugh with Greg, showing, in 2011 As they would say, “We learn as much or more from them as they do from us.”

It’s not easy to answer the question of who my greatest mentor has been because I have had many. First and foremost, would be my father. When family hears me say something right off the cuff, they will say “He is his father’s son.” Not only am I a lot like my dad but he molded me to be a decent person (or at least he tried to). His work ethic, love for cattle, honesty and integrity were traits that my dad always tried to instill in all his kids, but my siblings would say I’m the special one because we both have the same name. I could write a book about what dad taught me.

I’ve learned about adapting and flexibility from my father-inlaw Lewis. Lewis was a dairyman Brett Wildman with some beef cows for the greater part of his farming career and made the transition with his family into fully running beef cows and calving on grass when the girls were in their early teens. The flexibility to still be productive on the same acres while adapting your production methods is something I’ve learned from him. From a genetic standpoint in different facets of the industry I’d cite Howard Schnieder as nurturing the want to be competitive, Ryan Archdekin and Jon Fox and the Fox family on the drive to stay your course, Brett Wildman on the basis of historical information to help shape your herd, and Ian Goodbrand on the value of understanding the industry and following the market trends to further weigh your decisions. I’m certainly sure I’ve missed a few that are continuing to offer me guidance and I fully believe that we never stop learning so I’m open to sharing ideas with anyone anytime.

My in-laws Marj and Norman Atkins were Holstein cattle breeders who were known and respected in their industry. They knew that good cattle had to be functional and were endless sources of knowledge. Working alongside the two of them, your mind had a hard time absorbing what they could teach. Marj had a real talent of picking an animal in the raw and Norman would develop it to reach its full potential over the years. I have had many other mentors including the pastor at church (I’m sure he thinks I am a work in progress), schoolteachers, numerous people in the cattle business and also a lot of professionals in the auction business which is my other chosen profession. Some sat on tack boxes at cattle shows and drank my whiskey. But at the end of the day, I have been richly blessed with a good group of relatives, friends, professionals and teachers who have always kept my best interests in the forefront. They say it takes a village to raise a child. I have been very fortunate over the years to have a very big village and for that I am very grateful. I guess it all boils down to one thing: if someone reaches out to you to ask a question and you answer the question and give advice, you have just mentored that person. Leading by example is mentoring.

Brett Wildman, Alberta I have several people that influenced me along my path as an Angus breeder. Firstly, the pioneer breeders of the Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society and the Leachman family for their foresight and dedication to promote and build the breed for the past 50 years, enabling my family to chisel a living for as many years in the Red Angus industry. I would also like to honour a mentor to myself and many others, Mr. Doug Henderson. Doug’s vast knowledge of Angus history was immense, as was his ability to share the story. He was a true stockman that could find the good in any pasture and any person. I had the opportunity to travel many miles with Doug. I am extremely proud to be one of many associates through the years for DJH & Associates.

Brett Wildman with Doug Henderson

Jim and Seth Leachman with Brett Wildman

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National Angus Cookbook A Collection of Recipes by the Canadian Angus Foundation

Tired of the same old recipes? Want to spice up your kitchen? The Canadian Angus Foundation National Angus Cookbook is a great way to bring some new flavours to your table! With hundreds of recipes ranging from savoury mains to sweet bars and sumptuous loaves, you’re bound to find a new favourite. Compiled with the help of Angus breeders from across the country, proceeds from the National Angus Cookbook benefit Foundation activities such as scientific research, historical preservation and many Junior activities. Want to see if it’s right for you? Check out these sample recipes and give them a try tonight. They’ll have your taste buds singing for seconds!

Whiskey Stir-fry

Rosemarie and Pius Zoller, Piro Red Angus, Alberta 2 lb. Angus stir-fry strips Paprika Pepper 1 tbsp. flour

Juice of 1/2 lemon 4 tbsp. whiskey 1/2 c. cream Seasoning salt

Season meat with quite a bit of paprika and pepper. Sprinkle with flour and mix. Squeeze lemon juice over meat. Transfer to container, cover and chill for a day or two. Heat oil in a large frying pan until hot. Add meat and fry on each side until golden brown. Reduce heat to low and add whiskey. Let cook 1/2 minute and then incorporate cream. Season with seasoning salt to your preference. Gently simmer the stir-fry about 5 more minutes. Serve immediately.

Canadian Maple Syrup Cheese Roll Dianna Hargrave, Harprey Farms, Ontario 1 pkg. cream cheese, softened 1 1/2 c. finely grated Cheddar Cheese

4 tbsp. maple syrup, divided 1/2 c. finely chopped pecans

Blend cheeses with 2 tablespoons maple syrup. Chill until firm, about 1 hour. Shape into a roll. Brush with remaining maple syrup and coat all sides with pecans. Serve with crackers.

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Mount Thom Blueberry Cake Marg MacAulay, Nova Scotia Batter: 1/2 c. margarine 3 c. sugar 3 eggs 3 1/2 c. flour

1/2 tsp. salt 2 tsp. baking powder 1 c. milk or buttermilk 3 c. blueberries

Preheat oven to 350F. Prepare 9x13 inch cake pan. Dust blueberries with flour (can be fresh or frozen blueberries). Cream margarine, sugar and eggs. Combine dry ingredients; add to creamed mixture alternately with milk or buttermilk. Gently stir in blueberries. Spread 1/2 of batter in bottom of pan. Middle Layer: 1 - 8 oz. pkg. cream cheese 1/3 c. sugar

1 egg 3/4 tsp. almond extract

Mix all middle layer ingredients together and cream vigorously. Spread over bottom batter layer. It is a thin layer. Spread remaining batter over cream cheese filling. The batter is stiff, so be patient. Spooning batter on filling layer helps to evenly distribute the stiff batter. Add topping layer. Topping Layer: 1/2 c. brown sugar 1/3 c. flour

1/2 tsp. butter 1/4 tsp. cinnamon

Mix all topping ingredients until crumbly. Sprinkle crumbs over top layer of batter. Bake 1 hour and 20 minutes or until nice and brown and toothpick comes out clean. This cake freezes very well.

To order, contact Canadian Angus Foundation Executive Director Belinda Wagner at bwagner@cdnangus.ca or call 306-537-1518. 13


53rd

Jan.29.2022

Annual

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National 50th: 1972–2022

25th: 1997–2022

Anniversaries

Formation of Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society

Creation of the Canadian Angus Foundation archives

10th: 2013–2023 Opening of CAA’s first member-owned building, Angus Central 25th: 1999–2024 Canadian Junior Angus formed

25th: 1999–2024 Canadian Angus Tag Program

25th: 2000–2025 Canadian Junior Angus Showdown

25th: 2000–2025 Presentation of 100th birthday gift heifer to Queen Mother

Need a Reason to Celebrate? Mark Your Calendars for these Future Canadian Angus Anniversaries.

16


CANADA’S ORIGINAL FORAGE DEVELOPED ANGUS BULL SALE

10 0 2 -Y E A R O L D B U L L S S E L L FEBRUARY 24, 2022 STET TL ER , A B . 2P M M ST 72 YEARS OF MATERNAL EXCELLENCE

FEATURING SONS OF BC ROBUST 0807 ADDITIONAL SIRE GROUPS BY: McCumber Steadfast 809 • Chapman Memento 7542E • McCumber Fortunate 7141 • Sitz Payweight 749E McCumber Titanium 5197 • Chapman Coalition 4557B • WRA Cedar Run D2 • Coleman Forte 752

CATALOG BY REQUEST

1400+

CHAPMAN BULLS SOLD TO 85% REPEAT CUSTOMERS

SALE BROADCAST

ACROSS NORTH AMERICA INDICATES VERSATILITY • PREDICTABLITY • VALUE

SILAS CHAPMAN | 403-741-2099 | silas@chapmancattle.com CHAPMANCATTLE.COM


2022 Spring sales

Can’t make it sale day? Tuesday, February 1 - Sedley, SK Blairs.Ag Cattle Co & guests Pursuit of Excellence Bull Sale

Wednesday, February 23 - Olds, AB McLeod Livestock & Kay-R Charolais 9th Annual Bull Sale

Friday, February 4 - Cleardale, AB Northway Cattle Co 3rd Annual Bull & Female Sale

Thursday, February 24 - Lloydminster, SK Robb/Hoegl/Greenwood 17th Annual Bull Sale

Thursday, February 10 - Mercer, ND Rust Mountain View Ranch 11th Annual Bull Sale

Thursday, February 24 - Fort MacLeod, AB Heinz Cattle Co 3rd Annual Bull Sale

Friday, February 11 - Rimbey, AB Genetic Edge 23rd Annual Bull Sale

Friday, February 25 - Camrose, AB Maxwell/Rancier 27th Annual Bull Sale

Saturday, February 12 - St. Anthony, ND Schaff Angus Valley 119th Production Sale

Saturday, February 26 - Spruce Grove, AB Lewis Farms 37th Annual Bull Sale

Sunday, February 13 - DLMS.ca Rod & Stars Simmental Bull Sale

Sunday, February 27 - Camrose, AB Bull Fest ’22 Simmental Bull Sale

Tuesday, February 15 - Innisfail, AB 2022 Draft Picks Gelbvieh Bull Sale

Monday, February 28 - Clavet, SK Erixon Simmentals Bull & Female Sale

Wednesday, February 16 - Innisfail, AB Future Legends 3rd Annual Simmental Bull Sale

Monday, February 28 - Beaverlodge, AB KSL Simmentals 3rd Annual Bull & Female Sale

Friday, February 18 - Carstairs, AB Mader Ranches 33rd Annual Bull Sale

Tuesday, March 1 - Bowden, AB Belvin Angus 10th Annual Bull Sale

Saturday, February 19 - Falun, AB Triple Threat 4th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Tuesday, March 1 - Grenfell, SK Double Bar D “Best of Both Worlds” Annual Bull Sale

Sunday, February 20 - Havelock, QC Hillspride Bull & Select Female Sale

Wednesday, March 2 - Derwent, AB Rusylvia Cattle Co 2nd Annual Bull Sale

Monday, February 21 - Innisfail, AB Ultra/Czech-Mate 5th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Wednesday, March 2 - Olds, AB The Event 2nd Annual Bull & Female Sale

Tuesday, February 22 - Vermilion, AB W2 Land & Cattle Bull Sale – Chapter 4

Thursday, March 3 - Balcarres, SK Pheasantdale 18th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Wednesday, February 23 - Shell Lake, SK Crossroad Farms 16th Annual Bull Sale

Thursday, March 3 - Didsbury, AB Westway Farms 19th Annual Bull Sale Friday, March 4 - Moose Jaw, SK LaBatte Simmentals with guest, East Poplar Annual Sale Friday, March 4 - Cheneville, PQ Ferme Gagnon Inc. & Guests 23rd Annual Bull Sale Saturday, March 5 - Carievale, SK McMillen Ranching 28th Annual Bull Sale

call/TEXT OR EMAIL us today

UTILIZE OUR INDUSTRY LEADING

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TO FIND THE BEST GENETICS TO ELEVATE YOUR HERD!

Scott Bohrson Taylor Richards Rob Voice 403.370.3010 306.821.4169 306.270.6082

Jaxon Payne Martin Bohrson Jay Sibbald 306.830.0456 306.220.7901 403.899.2625

Cody Haney 403.845.8806


We have you covered and guarantee satisfaction by offering FREE ORDER BUYING and SIRE SELECTION CONSULTATIONS. Save time and expense & Have our experienced and professional staff select your next herd bull(s) from the 6,000 head of cattle we are marketing this sale season. we spend the time and effort to analyze your needs and ensure you get a quality bull within your budget suited for your operation. Saturday, March 5 - Rimbey, AB Lockhart Valley 17th Annual Bull Sale

Friday, March 18 - Stony Plain, AB Porter Ranches Bull Sale

Sunday, March 6 - Estevan, SK R-Plus Simmentals 22nd Annual Bull Sale

Friday, March 18 - Crossfield, AB Scott Stock Farm Black and Red Angus Bull Sale

Sunday, March 6 - DLMS.ca March Madness Online Frozen Genetics & Fall Calving Preg. Recipient Sale

Saturday, March 19 - Sangudo, AB Joint Venture 43rd Annual Bull Sale

Monday, March 7 - Oungre, SK Ashworth Farm & Ranch 18th Annual Simmental Bull Sale

Saturday, March 19 - DLMS.ca KT Ranch Online Bull Sale

Tuesday, March 8 - Provost, AB Johnson Ranching 9th Annual Bull Sale

Saturday, March 19 - Canora, SK Sliding Hills Charolais & Mission Ridge Herefords Annual Bull Sale

Monday, March 7 - Lloydminster, SK Red Willow Ranch Bull & Female Sale

Monday, March 21 - Radville, SK Brooking Angus Ranch 10th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Monday, March 7 - DLMS.ca Greenvalley Ranch Online Bull Sale

Tuesday, March 22 - Coaldale, AB U2 Connection Bull Sale

Wednesday, March 9 - Hanley, SK Sunny Valley Simmentals 32nd Annual Bull & Female Sale

Wednesday, March 23 - Delburne, AB Allison Farms 4th Annual Bull Sale

Thursday, March 10 - Strathmore, AB Deeg Simmentals 19th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Thursday, March 24 - Hanley, SK Anchor B/Anchorage Annual Bull & Female Sale

Thursday, March 10 - Moosomin, SK In Pursuit of Perfection Simmental & Angus 17th Annual Bull Sale

Friday, March 25 - DVauction.com Perrot/Come As U R Annual Online Bull & Female Sale

Thursday, March 10 - Stettler, AB Bar-E-L Bull & Select Female Sale

Saturday, March 26 - Moose Jaw, SK Anderson/KT Ranch Bull & Female Sale

Friday, March 11 - DLMS.ca Rainbow River Simmentals 7th Annual Online Bull & Female Sale

Saturday, March 26 - Hand Hills Lake, AB Shiloh 8th Annual “Trendsetter” Bull & Female Sale

Friday, March 11 - Grande Prairie, AB Northern Classic 19th Annual Charolais & Simmental Bull Sale

Sunday, March 27 - Swift Current, AB Schwan Angus Ranch 2nd Annual Bull Sale

Friday, March 11 - Rumsey, AB Richmond Ranch 25th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Monday, March 28 - Swift Current, SK Southwest Showcase Simmental Bull Sale

Saturday, March 12 - Lloydminster, SK Black Gold Simmentals Bull & Female Sale

Monday, March 28 - DLMS.ca Riverstone Cattle Co. Bull Sale

Saturday, March 12 - Saskatoon, SK Wheeler’s Stock Farm 19th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Tuesday, March 29 - Forestburg, AB Redrich Farms 4th Annual Bull & Female Sale

Saturday, March 12 - Neepawa, MB Ranchers Select 3rd Annual Simmental Bull Sale

Wednesday, March 30 - Cochrane, AB Hamilton Farms 27th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale

Sunday, March 13 - Miami, MB Steppler Farms Ltd. 11th Annual Charolais Bull Sale

Friday, April 1 - Medicine Hat, AB Riverfront Angus Ranch 5th Annual Bull Sale

Sunday, March 13 - DLMS.ca Crowe Bros. Online Bull Sale

Friday, April 1 - Mankota, SK Grasslands 8th Annual Angus Bull Sale

Monday, March 14 - Olds, AB Remitall Farms 10th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale

Saturday, April 2 - Fir Mountain, SK Six Mile Ranch 47th Annual Bull Sale

Monday, March 14 - Moose Jaw, SK South Sask Simmental & Angus Bull Sale

Tuesday, April 5 - Olds, AB Diamond T Cattle Co “Stockmans Choice” Bull & Female Sale

Monday, March 14 - DLMS.ca McIntosh Ranch & Guest Bull Sale Tuesday, March 15 - Lloydminster, SK Kuntz-McIntosh-SAJ 23rd Annual Bull Sale

Wednesday, April 6 - Wood Mountain, SK Peak Dot Ranch Spring Sale

Tuesday, March 15 - Innisfail, AB The Prairie Lands 2nd Annual Bull & Female Sale Thursday, March 17 - Forestburg, AB Ter-Ron Farms Annual Bull & Select Female Sale

Thursday, April 7 - Ceylon, SK South View Ranch 21st Annual Bull Sale Wednesday, April 13 - Fort McLeod, AB W Sunrise Angus Bull & Commercial Female Sale

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Rob Voice | 306.270.6082 | rob@bohrson.com


2022 SALES JAN

29 JAN

29 FEB

02 FEB

05 FEB

12 FEB

19

FEB

53rd Annual Lazy S Ranch Bull Power Sale Mayerthorpe, AB ....................................................................................................... M.C. Quantock “Canada’s Bulls” Bull Sale Lloydminster, AB ....................................................................................................... Moose Creek Red Angus 2-Year-Old Bull Sale Kisbey, SK ....................................................................................................... Barn Burnin’ Bull Sale Hill 70 Quantock Ranch Ltd Lloydminster, AB ....................................................................................................... MJT Cattle Co. Ltd. 28th Back to the Basics Bull Sale Edgerton, AB ....................................................................................................... Gillett Angus Private Treaty Sale Beaverdam, AB .......................................................................................................

20

Mac Angus at the Hillspride Bull Sale Havelock, QC

FEB

Ole Farms 17th Annual Graze through the Snow Bull Sale Athabasca, AB .......................................................................................................

21

FEB

24

FEB

.......................................................................................................

Heinz Cattle Co. 3rd Annual Bull Sale Fort MacLeod, AB .......................................................................................................

24

Nordal Limousin & Angus 2022 Bull Sale Saskatoon, SK

FEB

Chapman Cattle Company Canada’s Original Forage Developed Angus Bull Sale Stettler, AB .......................................................................................................

24 22

.......................................................................................................

*All sales are subject to change and/or cancellation. Visit www.cdnangus.ca/events for up-to-date sale and event listings. *Sales listed were submitted to the Canadian Angus Association on or prior to November 15, 2021.

MAR

01

MAR

05

MAR

10th Annual Belvin Angus Bull Sale Innisfail, AB ........................................................................................................ Ward’s Red Angus 14th Annual Bull Sale Saskatoon, SK ........................................................................................................

09

Easy Ray Angus 19th Annual Bull Sale Lethbridge, AB

MAR

BMB Brewin Angus, bulls consigned to Easy Ray Angus Bull Sale and available through private treaty Taber, AB ........................................................................................................

09

MAR

09

MAR

10

MAR

11

MAR

11

MAR

12

MAR

14

MAR

14

........................................................................................................

Mar Mac Farms Bull Sale Brandon, MB ........................................................................................................ Excel Ranches 34th Annual Excellence Bull & Female Sale Westlock, AB ........................................................................................................ Standard Hill Connection—Angus and Hereford Bull Sale Maidstone, SK ........................................................................................................ ARDA Farms & Freeway Angus 25th Annual Bull Sale Acme, AB ........................................................................................................ Wheeler’s Stock Farm Red & Black Angus Bull Sale Saskatoon, SK ........................................................................................................ Remitall Farms Bull & Select Female Sale Olds, AB

........................................................................................................ The Blairswest Bull Sale Drake, SK

........................................................................................................


MAR

15

MAR

15

MAR

15

MAR

15

MAR

16

MAR

17

MAR

17

MAR

18

MAR

18

MAR

19

MAR

19

MAR

19

Reid Angus Heat Seeker Bull Sale Brooks, AB ...................................................................................................... Dwajo Angus, consigning to 22nd Annual On Target Bull & Female Sale Barrhead, AB ...................................................................................................... Leeuwenburgh Angus 31st Annual Sale Lethbridge, AB ...................................................................................................... Pugh Farms Bull Sale Veteran, AB ...................................................................................................... Spruce View Angus Bull Sale Killam, AB ...................................................................................................... JPM Farms Bull & Select Female Sale Parkbeg, SK ...................................................................................................... Nesset Lake Angus All Black Bull Sale Meadow Lake, SK

MAR

19

MAR

21

MAR

24

MAR

24

MAR

25

MAR

25

MAR

Poplar Meadows Angus Northern Alliance Bull Sale Fort Fraser, BC ........................................................................................................ Brooking Angus Ranch 10th Annual Bull Sale Radville, SK ........................................................................................................ Rivercrest 19th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale Castor, AB

........................................................................................................ Swan Hills Ranch Annual Bull & Female Sale Swan River, MB ........................................................................................................ Swan Hills Ranch Annual Bull & Female Sale Swan River, MB ........................................................................................................ Thistle Ridge Ranch Bull Sale Lethbridge, AB ........................................................................................................

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Anderson/KT Ranch Bull & Female Sale Moose Jaw, SK

Yarrow Creek Farm and Ranch & Gurney Land and Livestock 16th Annual Bull Sale Lethbridge, AB ......................................................................................................

MAR

Swan Hills Ranch Annual Bull & Female Sale Swan River, MB

Scott Stock Farm 9th Annual “The Bull Sale” Crossfield, AB

MAR

......................................................................................................

...................................................................................................... Hamco Cattle Co. 24th Annual Bull Sale Glenboro, MB ...................................................................................................... Heart of the Valley Farms Bulls From The Heart Sale Clinton, BC ...................................................................................................... KT Ranch Online Simmental & Angus Sale www.dlms.ca ......................................................................................................

26 26

MAR

........................................................................................................

........................................................................................................ Shiloh Cattle Company Trendsetter Bull & Select Replacement Heifer Sale Craigmyle, AB ........................................................................................................

30

Hamilton Farms 27th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale Cochrane, AB

MAR

HBH Angus Farms Inc. Cattleman’s Connection Bull Sale Oak River, MB

31

APR

02

........................................................................................................

........................................................................................................ Six Mile Ranch 47th Annual Bull Sale Fir Mountain, SK ........................................................................................................ 23


2022 SALES

APR

02

APR

03

APR

03

APR

04

APR

04

APR

04

APR

04

APR

APR

Howe Farm Bull Sale Moose Jaw, SK

Crescent Creek Angus 24th Annual Bull & Female Sale Goodeve, SK

APR

Peak Dot Ranch Spring Bull Sale Wood Mountain, SK

Ravenworth Cattle Momentum Speckle Park & Angus Bull & Female Sale St. Denis, SK ........................................................................................................

APR

........................................................................................................

Rebel Creek Angus 2022 Bull Sale Pollockville, AB ........................................................................................................ Eastondale 15th Annual On The Farm Bull Sale Wawota, SK ........................................................................................................ Rebel Creek Angus 2022 Bull Sale Pollockville, AB ........................................................................................................ Delorme Ranch Your Choice Bull Sale Robsart, SK ........................................................................................................ Justamere Farms 27th Annual Angus Bull Sale Lloydminster, SK ........................................................................................................

05

Rebel Creek Angus 2022 Bull Sale Pollockville, AB

APR

Diamond T Cattle Co. Stockmans Choice Bull & Female Sale Olds, AB ........................................................................................................

05

APR

........................................................................................................

05

Windy Willows Farms Git ‘R Done Bull and Female Sale Hodgeville, SK

APR

JAS Red Angus 18th Annual Buy the Beef Bull Sale with guest consignor Camo Cattle Co. Neepawa, MB ........................................................................................................

05

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........................................................................................................

06 ........................................................................................... 06 ........................................................................................... Kenray Ranch Annual Online Bull Sale www.kenrayranch.com

06 ...........................................................................................

APR

07

APR

07

APR

11

APR

12

APR

13

OCT

17

DEC

03

DEC

07

DEC

07

Kenray Ranch Annual Online Bull Sale www.kenrayranch.com ........................................................................................... Rainbow Hills Ranch Bull & Female Sale Delburne, AB ........................................................................................... Moose Creek Red Angus Yearling Bull Sale Kisbey, SK ........................................................................................... Rodgers Red Angus 49th Annual Performance Bull Sale Lethbridge, AB ........................................................................................... Flying K Ranch Bull Sale Swift Current, SK ........................................................................................... Justamere Farms 23rd Sale of the Year Annual Angus Sale Lloydminster, SK ........................................................................................... Peak Dot Ranch Fall Bull Sale Wood Mountain, SK ........................................................................................... Gemstone Cattle Company 8th Annual Hereford & Angus Bull & Female Sale Brooks, AB ........................................................................................... 23rd Annual Cudlobe Bull Sale Stavely, AB

...........................................................................................


Let’s Get Social! February:

January:

Ring in the new year with the sound of cow bells! Got a cow bell? Send in a photo or short video of it being put to good use!

April:

Spring is in the air! Let’s see your photos of springtime.

February may be the shortest month of the year, but it can also be the busiest! Send in a photo of you or a family member in action working on the farm.

March:

Feeling lucky? Enter with photos of green Canadian Angus RFID indicators.

2022: Keep Your Eye on the Prize! May:

Take a walk down memory lane. Send in your throwback/ nostalgic photos for a month of history and reminiscing.

June:

School’s out for summer! Send us your end of the school year celebration photos.

July:

It’s officially hot cow summer! Send in your photos of Angus cows basking in the sun.

September:

Back to school, back to school! Send in your photos of reading, writing or arithmetic.

August:

December:

There once was a man from Nantucket… send in your best limerick. Please keep it PG!

October:

Harvest season! Enter with images of your harvest bounty.

November:

End the year with a bang! Submit your celebration images, new or throwback, to join in the holiday spirit!

November rain— enter with your rainyday images.

The Canadian Angus Association is hosting a year of virtual fun and contests to run throughout 2022! Each month will be a different social media contest—mark your calendars and play often! Submit your entries on Facebook via the comment section with #CdnAngusContest. Winners will be announced at the end of each month. Prizes are awarded at random and include Canadian Angus management tags and/or various Canadian Angus merchandise.

Watch our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CanadianAngusAssociation for more details and reminders as the year develops. Note: all photos submitted will become property of the Canadian Angus Association for use in marketing and communications materials.

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Alberta

ALBERTA JAN

President Luke Tannas

Vice President Kelsey Knott

Water Valley, AB (403) 637-2425 tannasranches@aol.com Expiry: 2024

Ardrossan, AB (780) 619-9239 kelsey_knott@hotmail.com Expiry: 2024

Finance Chair Grayden Kay

Administration Officer Susanne Fankhanel

Lloydminster, AB (780) 872-1565 graydenkay@gmail.com

New Norway, AB (403) 556-9057 abangusoffice@gmail.com

Events

21–22 Canadian Bull Congress Camrose, AB

FEB

4–5 Feeder Association of Alberta Annual Convention Red Deer, AB

MAR

2–4 Alberta Beef Industry Conference Red Deer, AB

JUN

Livestock Identification Services Convention AB

JUL

Summer Synergy Olds, AB

9–18 Calgary Stampede Calgary, AB Southern Alberta Angus Club Field Day AB

Board Representatives

Alberta Angus Junior Show Bashaw, AB

Brett Wildman Sangudo, AB (780) 785-3709 wildmanlivestock@hotmail.com Expiry: 2022

Greg Pugh Edgerton, AB (780) 806-1319 gjpugh@hotmail.com Expiry: 2023

AUG

Doug Munton Lethbridge, AB (403) 328-6966 doug@muntonco.com Expiry: 2024

Harold Reich Bashaw, AB (403) 783-0207 reichca@yahoo.ca Expiry: 2024

NOV

Farmfair International (Gold Show) Edmonton, AB

DEC

Southern Alberta Angus Club AGM AB

Alberta Junior Angus Shana Lee Fankhanel New Norway, AB (780) 855-2580 slmfankhanel@gmail.com Expiry: 2022 26

OCT

Alberta Angus Association AGM AB

Olds Fall Classic (Gold Show) Olds, AB

50th Annual Red Roundup Red Deer, AB

Medicine Hat Pen Show Medicine Hat, AB

All events are subject to change and cancellation. Some events may be adjusted for virtual attendance.

www.albertaangus.com

For more information, please contact the Alberta Angus Association for inquiries regarding events in 2022.


ALBERTA

Statistics collected from November 2020 through October 2021

26,584 179 108 121 7,594 24 576 Registrations

Transfers

Junior Memberships

Young Breeder Memberships

Annual Memberships

Total New Members

Active Life Memberships

27


Drought-Related Nutritional Advice from a Panel of Experts

T

he Beef Cattle Research Council hosted a webinar on drought stress last year, a recording of which is available on their website (www.beefresearch.ca). Drought conditions can exacerbate the variation in feed quality, in particular variables like nitrate levels can be very different. The shock from these differences often creates serious health implications in the herd. Dr. Bart Lardner from the University of Saskatchewan highly recommends feed testing during drought years. Dr. Lardner suggests diluting feed sources if nitrate levels are high. Similarly, water sources should be tested for minerals and compounds that can be toxic at certain concentrations. Cattle typically stop drinking water altogether if the water source is contaminated. Particularly in drought years, the additive effect of feed and water should be considered. For example, producers may feed salvaged canola in drought years which can be high in sulfates. Sulfates in the water

28

source will also add to total consumption. Additively, this might result in sulfate toxicity. Outcomes can include neurological issues, lower pregnancy rates and higher incidence of white muscle disease. In drought conditions, weeds can provide excellent nutrition. However, weeds can also be poisonous or high in toxins that bind necessary minerals. Some main takeaways from the webinar include: avoid feeding flax, be aware of chemicals used on salvage feeds if grazing them, test your feed and water, and be aware of the additive effect of feed and water. To view a recording of the Beef Cattle Research Council webinar on feeding during drought conditions, or other informative webinars from the past year, visit www.beefresearch.ca.



- Jesse, Sarah, Ila & Holden -



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REMITALL F SPITFIRE 145F

REMITALL F RENOWN 312F REMITALL F Connection 82G Peak Dot Colossal 828G

S A V RAINFALL 6846

S A V EXPERTISE 7028

SAV Quarterback 7933

SAV Emblem 8074

Brooking mercury 9057

BROOKING FIREBRAND 6068



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SED F OR RAN

E !”

Est. 1971

US

R O DG “R A

GE

NGUS

E R DA S R E

GE

4 9 TH A N N U A L P E R F O R M A N C E B U L L S A L E

TUESDAY APRIL 12, 2022 | PERLICH BROS. AUCTION MARKET SHAWN: 403.421.0162 | KURT: 403.421.0359 | PERLICH BROS: 403.329.3101 bandkr@live.ca | www.rodgersredangus.com

34


Pride in the Pursuit of Excellence

TRENDSETTER BULL & SELECT REPLACEMENT HEIFER SALE

Saturday, March 26th , 2022

OFFERING : 40 RED & BLACK PUREBRED ANGUS BULLS 50 PUREBRED RED ANGUS AND RED & BLACK ANGUS/SIMMENTAL CROSS REPLACEMENT HEIFERS

Blake Morton - 403-820-4162 Darcy Olesky - 403-820-1830 Alisha Minchau ( Herdsman ) - 403-857-9563 Home - 403-665-2023

www.shilohcattle.com shilohcattle@netago.ca Visit us on FACEBOOK


“When you start the game with an ace, it’s always better.”

- David Goffin, currently ranked highest Belgium male tennis player

The voluntary ACE program gives breeders the option to pay an annual fee of $65/cow enrolled to gain access to a full suite of member services provided at no extra cost. To enroll: return your completed Female Exposure Worksheet and the signed ACE form to the Canadian Angus Association office by December 1. Any cows left active on this worksheet will be enrolled in ACE and assessed an ACE fee as of January 1. You can choose to pay either as a one-time annual fee or a tri-annual fee where fees are broken down into three equal payments. • Spring herds will be assessed their annual fee on January 1 or their tri-annual fee on January 1, April 1 and July 1. • Fall herds will be assessed their annual fee on April 1 or their tri-annual fee on April 1, July 1 and October 1.

“I find the ACE program to be highly valuable to our operation; from a book and record keeping perspective, it’s great only getting billed three times a year as opposed to previously when we were making payments ad hoc throughout the year. Sire verification for the whole calf crop has been extremely valuable; we believe in the value this provides to both our operation as well as the value this passes on to our customers. We have the most accurate online inventory herdbook we’ve ever had as a result of joining ACE. It’s created flexibility for us during breeding season resulting in a tighter calving interval and easier decisions around grass management.” - Bryan Willms, Wilbar Cattle

If you are interested in the ACE program or require additional information, please call the Canadian Angus Association at 1-888-571-3580.

36

By enrolling in the ACE program, breeders gain access to more than 30 member services. These services include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Membership Fee Regional Association Membership Fee *Calf Registration Calf Transfer *Weaning Weight Submissions Yearling Weight Submissions Ultrasound Scan Results Processing Charge Canadian Angus Performance Program Membership Fee Non-Financial Transfers *SNP Parentage Verification Test Export Package AI Approval for Sire Donor Dam Approval Registration of Imported Animal Registration of Lease Registration of Herd Name Registration of Tattoo Letters Transfer of Herd Name or Tattoo Letters Name Change of a Registered Animal Duplicate Certificate Five-Generation Pedigree Correction Fee Sale Promotion Package Online Herdbook Photos Geneprob Report Herd Data Extract for On-Farm Software Program *Canadian Angus Indicator Program RFID Indicator Tissue Sampling Units (TSUs) Age Verification Pedigree Extract

Discounted services include: • *Angus GS Genomic Panel ($14 per test discount) * These items must be accessed within two calendar years. For example, members have until December 31, 2023 to access services for cows enrolled on the program in January 2022.



SNAPSHOTS Showdown 2021 | August 26-27 | Olds, Alberta

Sisters Ainsley (back) and Sydney Van Sickle showing their heifers in the peewee class.

Logan Mathon

Riley Frey—along to help her siblings!

Summer Arthur

Kevin Koe of Team Koe prepares to sample an entry in the Angus Cook-off Competition

Dean Fadden, Intercity Packers—Certified Angus Beef representative and John Morris, Team Koe judging the Cookoff

CJA Board members during the AGM. Naomi Best is at the podium. On the stage from left to right are Robert Geis, Hillary Sauder, Carson Liebreich, Morgan Davey, Morgan MacIntyre and Beverly Booth.

38

Calynn Gardner taking a break with her dad Brody

From left to right: Sterling Christman and Kordell Morrison


2021

Angus Extravaganza August 25 | Angus Central Geoffrey Shmigelsky of OneCup AI explains the camera technology

CAA Member Service team members Mandi Tilleman and Avery Parkson

CAA CEO Myles Immerkar provides an update on the 2022–2024 strategic plan

CAA Director of Science and Technology Kajal Devani shares an update on new research initiatives

Past Presidents Mabel Hamilton and David Sibbald welcome Shawn Birmingham into the Past Presidents Club

Elaine and Brian Edwards, Valleyhills Angus, receive their 50-year long-term recognition award from CEO Myles Immerkar, left and President Sheldon Kyle, right

OneCUP AI booth Doug Munton of Benchmark Angus, centre, receives his 50-year long-term recognition award from CEO Myles Immerkar, left and President Sheldon Kyle, right

Georgina Smith, Bar Heart Angus, centre, receives her 50-year long-term recognition award from CEO Myles Immerkar, left and President Sheldon Kyle, right

Neogen Canada booth

The Shoe Shine Shack booth

39


DWAJO ANGUS

RED BULLS SIRED BY

RED BIEBER ROOSEVELT W384 RED NRA MERCHANT 79G RED HEART VALLEY STOUT 25D RED GOAD HIGH ROLLER 142’17 RED LAURON FAVOR 122F

Consigning to 22nd Annual

RED LAURON FAVOR 122F

March 15, 2022

BLACK BULLS SIRED BY

Barrhead Ag Barn at 1:00PM 40 Black & Red Angus Bulls 6 Red & Black Angus Heifers

BORDER BUTTE FOUNDATION 15C U-2 COALITION 206C DWAJO REALLY WINDY 60C COUNTRY LANE SENSATION 6F HF HOSTAGE 170G DWAJO COALITION 75J

Dwayne, Joanne & Jesse Emery Camp Creek, AB

Home: (780) 674-4410 • Dwayne Cell: (780) 305-4209 Jesse Cell: (780) 284-3490 dwajo@telusplanet.net • www.dwajo.ca

It’s never too early to start thinking about

Christmas Pre-order your Canadian Angus Association 2022 Christmas ornament today and reserve its spot on your tree! Want to complete your collection? We may still have them in stock! Contact us and we can send you previous years’ ornaments based on availability.

cdnangus@cdnangus.ca 1-888-571-3580

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Pasture Management During Stressful Conditions By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association Steve Kenyon runs Greener Pastures Ranching in Bursby, Alberta. You might have heard him talk about regenerative agriculture and soil management or have read one of his articles in Canadian Cattlemen magazine. I had the pleasure of interviewing him about pasture management, particularly under stressful conditions. Dry conditions throughout the prairies, hail, grasshoppers, rain at the wrong time, and too much rain in the eastern provinces have plagued the industry this past year. Across the nation, not many farmers and producers had ideal growing conditions, no matter what their location. Steve said, “You cannot plan for a drought during a drought. We need to be planning for the next drought every year.” Steve generously spent some time explaining the biomechanics of soil and pastures to me. He describes the relationships between plants and everything encompassed in the word soil (dirt, rocks, minerals, bugs, roots, fungi) using a market metaphor. It worked because I’ll never forget this: Steve recommends that you think of plants as the mob. Plants use the sun, air and water to create sugar. And they will trade a little sugar with soil minions like bacteria for nitrogen and phosphorus. A favourite soil minion is Mycorrhizal fungi. These fungi create gigantic root-hair networks. They behave like root extenders allowing plants to reach water and nutrients that they would not be able to reach using their own roots. These fungi are the best way to get through a drought. They can reach far and wide to bring water to your plants. Our biggest challenge is that you need to have supported these soil minions (bacteria and fungi) in good times before the drought. Chemicals, even good ones like fertilizers and fungicides, can have detrimental impacts on these minions, and to the long-term health of your soil. Steve advocates managing natural ecosystems and pastures rather than changing them. He believes that managing all the tools nature provides on pastureland correctly will result in healthy soil and feed sources that are resilient to stressful conditions. This practice is called regenerative agriculture. Steve suggests that producers manage weeds so that they don’t take over an area rather than spraying them. Spraying weeds might kill them but it also kills bacteria and legumes which put nitrogen back into the land. Killing off nature’s nitrogen replacer, we fertilize the land to incorporate nitrogen back into 42


the land. This costs time and money. And, as a side effect, it changes the pH of the land, killing off those fantastic Mycorrhizal fungi which create root extensions and add water and nutrients to the land, making crops susceptible to harmful pests. In reaction, producers might apply pesticides to manage the problem. Inadvertently this creates another problem. Pesticides also kill off beneficial insects such as bees, dung beetles, dragonflies and spiders creating a neverending cycle of stressed land and needed inputs. Each input creates a side effect as it unbalances nature and requires another input. The result is land that is not optimized and cannot withstand stress. Steve’s example of the domino effect of spraying weeds instead of managing weeds reminded me of going to see a doctor who just prescribes a medication to get rid of the symptom rather than addressing the root of the problem. Inevitably, the medication will have a side effect and you can expect more medications to help manage those side effects until you’re one very susceptible individual.

the best fertilizer in the world, the cow. Cows are the most effective way to keep the nutrients from your land on your land. They recycle nutrients and even spread them for you without depleting your nitrogen, without killing off your legumes, good bacteria and fungi, and beneficial insects.

I asked Steve how we manage weeds so that they don’t take over an area. He recommended that we create favourable conditions for the desired species. To do this, sometimes we need to identify what is creating better conditions for weeds over other plants. Typically, this involves overgrazing and depleting nutrition from the land. Normally, this is because we are not following the correct grazing cycle. We need to have high stock densities to ensure every plant is utilized or tramped down once and to ensure even manure distribution. The grazing period should avoid a second bite. Exactly how long that period should be will depend on the season and the pasture. “On my pastures, in the spring this is approximately three days,” says Steve.

“One approach that I recommend,” says Steve, “is to think of agriculture as growing soil from plants rather than growing plants from soil. Developing and managing health ecosystems on pasture land continually adds carbon and fertility to the soil. Maintaining natural organisms in our soil, enhancing the biodiversity on our pastures is actually a huge cost savings for producers, and results in healthy soil ecosystems that can withstand environmental stress conditions more successfully. It is easy to do if you think about growing soil from your plants rather than growing your plants from your soil.”

Steve recognized that most producers are great at making hay: you let it grow to late stage-2 and then you cut it down; you let it grow to late stage-2 again and you cut it down again. He suggested that grazing plants should be managed in the same way. Let the plants grow and replenish their energy levels and then send the animals in to cut it all down; move the animals away and let the plants regrow till they have replenished their energy sources, then repeat. Pastures that are overgrazed will result in weeds overtaking the other plants. Steve also commented on even manure spreading. He recommends employing

“We need to manage for grazing periods that prevent animals from grazing a plant for the second time once it starts to regrow. This approach gives the plant a resting period that allows it to replenish its energy source. This takes management, not inputs.”

An example that Steve shared is mismanagement of water cycles which can cause desertification, floods and

droughts. Less runoff causes less flooding. More water holding capacity could mean fewer fires. Small things like maximizing the edges on flowing water sources (meandering versus straight through for example), ensuring that there’s a stagnant water source, have significant long-term impact. A sign of a broken water cycle that many producers are seeing this year are grasshoppers. It seems like you cannot step anywhere without a cloud of grasshoppers whizzing up at you. When I asked Steve about them he explained that during years of a healthy water cycle, Entomophaga grylli, another one of those soil minion fungi, grows strong. This fungus is a natural pathogen that kills grasshoppers. Where you have enough water holding capacity and these fungi can grow you’ll find that your grasses and barley are not eaten up by the grasshoppers. “I can actually fence out grasshoppers from my land by having more water holding capacity in my soil than neighbouring lands,” says Steve. It might be time to consider some of Steve’s advice and start planning for the next drought. Steve recommends broadcasting to increase the polyculture on your land. “What you spread will depend on where you are,” he says. In Alberta, clover works well, in Ontario Birdsfoot trefoil works well. “Think about it as healing the land after a stressful situation like drought. You will likely get more longterm benefits from healing the soil from the inside rather than applying chemicals to the outside,” he adds. Think about what you can do to increase the water holding capacity of your soil. Start by supporting your ‘soil minions’. Steve Kenyon writes for Canadian Cattlemen and Stockman Grass Farmer magazines monthly. He also maintains a Facebook page and runs soil management classes frequently. We thank Steve for contributing his time and experience towards this article.

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Naturally developed, 2 year old bulls for sale by private treaty. Look for our catalog on issuu.com in December

Heart Valley Angus

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17

th

GRAZE THROUGH

THE SNOW Annual BULL SALE

High Fertility | Never Pushed Calving Ease | Easy Fleshing

February 21, 2022 • Athabasca, AB

On offer:

180 Purebred Angus Bulls 220 Commercial Bred Heifers

Kelly Olson (780) 689-7822 • Graham Olson (780) 675-0112 Jay Wildman (587) 777-9004

info@olefarms.com • www.olefarms.com



Hazel Bluff Angus

Purebred Angus bulls available by Private Treaty Open House: First weekend in April

The Clausen Family Martin & Erica, Erich & Meggie Box 5728, Westlock, AB, T7P 2P6 Martin: 780.307.7042 | Ph: 780.349.2768 hazelbluffangus@gmail.com www.hazelbluffangus.wordpress.com Bulls, female breeding stock and exportable embryos always available by private treaty and at select sales Quality ~ Service ~ Selection

Jaynell and Colbie Coglon-Pasichnuk | 780-815-0921 Beaverdam Alberta

THEIR SONS SELL IN THE 2022

RED EXCEL KASSIE 813F

Excellence SALE

RED EXCEL LAKIMA 901G

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Yearling and 2-Year-Old Red and Black Angus Bulls Selling March 10, 2022 REAL DATA ON REAL CATTLE

- INCLUDING CARCASS DATA ON ALL SALE BULLS

Sale Consulting by OBI Livestock Ltd.

Excellence 34th

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T HU R SDAY, M A R C H 10, 2 02 2 AT TH E R A N C H

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CODY & AMY MILLER AND FAMILY 780-349-0644 RR1 Site 1 Box 5 Westlock, AB T7P 2N9

cody@excelranches.com www.excelranches.com facebook.com/excelranches

STO P BY THE RANC H ANYTI M E , O R GI V E U S A S HO U T I F YO U ’D L I K E A SAL E C ATA LO G


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Seal the Deal with a Handshake but Capture the Details in a Contract By Tina Zakowsky, Canadian Angus Association Buying cattle and genetics is exciting and exhilarating. Unfortunately breeders find that the process is not always as smooth as it should be. Some buyers and sellers of animals and genetics neglect to draw up contracts before the transaction is completed, leading to buyer’s remorse, seller’s regret, broken business relationships, mistrust, and in some cases, legal battles. Take a moment to think about the last time you had a conversation prior to buying or selling an animal or genetics to make sure that everyone had the same understanding and expectations. You are not alone if the thought of asking for a contract makes you uncomfortable, but it is both a standard and integral part of business—and not just the agriculture business. Think about buying shoes, a refrigerator, or even a tractor. Each of these transactions has a contract associated with it. The shoe store has terms of sale that will include the conditions for returning or exchanging the shoes. The refrigerator likely comes with a standard contract that outlines terms such as price, delivery, and your rights if the fridge is

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not delivered as promised or does not work. While you may have accepted those contracts without question, there will likely be some negotiation involved in the tractor purchase and the contract will be amended before the transaction is finalized.

• Purchase price and payment terms • Delivery date • Seller and buyer responsibilities for testing, veterinary inspection, etc. • Transfer conditions (e.g. transfer will be submitted within 30 days of receipt of final payment) • Conditions under which the animal can be returned including acceptable reason(s), required tests/proof, and the time period for reporting • Terms of salvage

When buying cattle and genetics, you study sale catalogues to find the best fit for your operation. You should also check to see if the terms of sale are printed in the catalogue. Many Canadian Angus Association members conduct their sales according to the terms in our Breeder’s Guarantee Guidelines (see www.cdnangus. ca/breeder-guarantee-guidelines). If there is no indication of the sale terms and you are interested in making a purchase, contact the seller to discuss terms and conditions prior to bidding or making an offer.

The Canadian Angus Association provides members with a sample bill of sale (available for download from the forms page of www. cdnangus.ca). Space is provided on the bottom for additional information.This section can be used to note conditions of sale if there is no separate contract.

A contract is a standard business practice and should not be perceived as offensive or an expression of mistrust. When it comes to live animals and genetics, a contract should cover: • The names and addresses of the buyer(s) and sellers • The animal(s) or genetics that are being purchased

The cattle business is first and foremost a people business and many deals are solidified with a handshake. But don’t let the transaction end there. Whether buying or selling, take the time to make sure that all parties understand and agree to the terms of sale and put those terms in writing to save you time and headaches down the road.


Progeny on offer 19th Annual

Bull & Select Female Sale Peak Dot No Doubt 235D

Thursday, March 24th, 2022 1:30pm @ The Ranch

70+ Black Angus Bulls

& Select Offering of Heifers

Visit DLMS for on-line videos

Thank you to all our customers for your ongoing support. You have helped us build the quality and foundation we are breeding today. Here are a few of our 2021 sellers.

Deer Valley Growth Fund

Sold to Valley Blossom Ranch

Rivercrest No Doubt 12H Sold to Lazy HE Ranching/K Cow Ranch

Sold to Stauffer Ranches

Rivercrest No Doubt CSP 85H Sold to Grant Chittick

Brooking Renovation 9068

Rivercrest No Doubt 7H Sold to Dan & Andrea Webster

Rivercrest No Doubt CSP 8H Sold to Klink Ranch

Musgrave 316 Stunner

Rivercrest Hot Lotto CSP 105H

River Valley Hooch 3H

Visit us online at: www.rivercrestangus.com

Rivercrest Angus Coleman Bravo 6313

Craig Spady 403-740-4978

Guest: River Valley Angus Cody Innocent 403-740-3205


Happy

50th

Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society

Anniversary! The Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society was formed in September 1972 by a group of 12 like-minded Red Angus cattle breeders from Alberta and Saskatchewan. Together, they formed a society to specifically promote the red colour of the Angus breed. Today a membership of 275 breeders across Canada is represented by this national society. We work together with the Canadian Angus Association and other breed associations in Canada. In order to help promote Red Angus cattle, the Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society coordinates annual sales and events such as Red Roundup and the Red Angus Summer Tour, both very popular events among purebred and commercial red cattle breeders alike. The Society now has a strong influence in nationwide advertising, breed shows, and also encourages young cattlemen and women through 4-H bursaries and awards and junior breeder incentives.

Gearing up for 2022 50th Anniversary Canadian Red Round-up October 2022

$100,000 50th Anniversary Progressive Junior Futurity Visit www.redangus.ca for details.

Why Red Angus? Find out why people in the know bet on red! The Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society supports: • 4-H awards • Canadian junior shows • Red Round-up Junior Heifer Calf Futurity • Canadian Red Angus Tour • CWA Red Angus Show • Breed promotion Visit www.redangus.ca for: • Member directory • Red Angus sales • Red Round-up Junior Futurity • Breed information • Membership information • Sale listings

For more information, please visit our website or contact: Justine Gardner, Secretary (403) 969-3730 • redoffice@sasktel.net


By Tina Zakowsky, Canadian Angus Association The Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society came to be through a field day held in the fall of 1972. The field day attracted a large crowd and there was some informal discussion that there needed to be an established group to help ensure that Red Angus would be seen as equal to Black Angus in both production and quality. Over supper that evening, 12 breeders decided to form such a group. According to at least one founding member, the meeting and supper were at Michael Rodgers’ farm, so he was selected as president. Ken Frazer

suggested the group be named Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society so he became vice-president. A suggestion was made that notes should be taken and since Gail Wildman volunteered a pencil, she became the secretary. Rod Mackenzie was chosen to be a director and the first board of directors was complete. In its first year, CRAPS had about 30 members. The first Red Roundup was held on October 20, 1973. The CRAPS logo was established in 1974 when members would ride around in pickup trucks promoting their new organization. The first CRAPS field day was held in 1976.

The history of CRAPS is one chapter in the history of Red Angus in Canada and we can’t pay tribute to those who founded and maintained the Society without looking back at those who laid the groundwork for Red Angus in Canada. The first record of Red Angus in Canada is the recorded importation of a red cow from Scotland in 1886. Rancher Matthew Cochrane imported Red Angus from Scotland in 1889 for his ranch west of Calgary, Alberta. Volume I of the Canadian Angus Herdbook was published in 1908. Red Angus females were included but red males were excluded.

Some Red Angus milestones: 1962: The Mackenzie Brothers imported a Red Angus herd sire, a cow/calf pair and two bred heifers from Beckton Stock Farm in Wyoming 1964: The first Red Angus bull was sold in Canada 1969: The first Canadian-registered Red Angus bull was sold at auction 1970: The first Canadian-raised purebred Red Angus bull, Red Mac 15Z, was sold at the Calgary Bull Sale for $1,800 1970: The first grand championship awarded to a Red Angus animal in Canada was won at the 1970 Olds Fair 1971:

Red Stormalong 3A was a Calgary Bull Sale champion selling for $7,200

1972: The Mackenzies held the first Red Angus production sale in Canada with 56 lots selling as far away as Ontario 53


On March 15, 1921, the CAA bylaws were amended, and all Red Angus cattle were excluded from the herdbook. Although Red Angus were not eligible for registration in the Canadian Angus Herdbook, several breeders accumulated herds of Red Angus cattle and registered them with the Red Angus Association of America after it was chartered in 1954. After Red Angus arrived in Canada, breeders fought to get their breed into the Canadian Angus Herdbook. John Willmott, an Ontario-born breeder based in Saskatchewan, became a significant player in this effort by making presentations to the Canadian Angus Association. He faced opposition from breeders who felt that registering Red Angus would prevent the transfer of Black Angus pedigrees into the United States. In 1968, CAA directors John Willmott and Don Matthews (who in 1969 became the Canadian Angus Association President) sponsored a resolution to the Minister of Agriculture of Canada that requested the Canadian Angus Herdbook be open to Red Angus. Fellow advocates Jim Leachman and Sally Forbes from the USA made the trip to Calgary to meet with the board and help sway the vote, as it was known that the odds were stacked against them. On April 3, 1968, Minister of Agriculture John James Greene allowed Red Angus to be registered in the Canadian Angus Herdbook. When red cattle were once again permitted in the Canadian Angus herdbook, the supply of Canadianborn Red Angus was very limited and breeders turned to the United States to find breeding stock. The Association encouraged registration of Red Angus by offering to register all Red Angus cattle under the age of 24 months at the lowest price point, allowing Red Angus breeders an affordable opportunity to populate the herdbook and register their herds. Congratulations to the pioneers who persevered with the Red Angus breed in Canada, and to all of those who have contributed to the longevity and success of the Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society.

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Hamilton Farms Full page


Using EPDs for Bull Selection Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) are a genetic selection tool that some producers appreciate and use to select their bulls. EPDs are calculated using pedigree, performance and genomic data. Many Canadian Angus members participate in the voluntary Canadian Angus Performance Program through which they collect and submit performance data on fertility, calving ease, growth, structure, carcass quality, and feed efficiency for their calves. We appreciate the members who take the time to measure and record this data; without you we cannot generate the genetic selection tools that we do. Many members have started measuring and submitting phenotypes for the traits included here. As you start calving, please do not forget to record teat and udder scores on your cows.

WW EPD is a predictor of a sire’s ability to transmit weaning growth to his progeny compared to that of other sires. A bull with a WW EPD of +50 will sire calves that are, on average, 20 pounds heavier at weaning than a sire with a WW EPD of +30 (given equal management).

Canadian Angus Association Genetic Evaluation Definitions

Residual Average Daily Gain (RADG) EPD describes an animal’s ability to grow post weaning on a constant amount of feed. RADG EPD, expressed in pounds per day, is a predictor of a sire’s genetic ability for postweaning gain in future progeny compared to that of other sires, given a constant amount of feed consumed. A bull with an RADG EPD of +1.5 will sire calves that, on average, will grow 1 extra pound per day more than calves from another bull with an RADG EPD of 0.5 on the same amount of feed.

Production EPDs: Calving Ease Direct (CED) EPD describes the percentage of expected unassisted births when a bull is exposed to first-time heifers. The higher the number, the higher the probability that first-time heifers bred to the bull in question will calve with no assistance. The EPD predicts the average difference in ease with which a sire’s calves will be born when he is bred to first-calf heifers. Birth Weight (BW) EPD describes in pounds the difference in expected progeny weight, on average. A bull with a BW EPD of +4 will, on average, sire calves that are 2 pounds heavier than a bull with a BW EPD of +2 (given equal management). Weaning Weight (WW) EPD describes in pounds the difference in expected weaning weight in progeny, on average.

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Yearling Weight (YW) EPD describes in pounds the difference in expected yearling weight in progeny, on average. YW EPD is a predictor of a sire’s ability to transmit post weaning growth to his progeny compared to that of other sires. A bull with a YW EPD of +100 will sire calves that are, on average, 30 pounds heavier at weaning than a sire with a WW EPD of +70 (given equal management).

Dry Matter Intake (DMI) EPD describes the feed intake potential for weaned calves from one sire compared to the feed intake potential of calves from another sire. This EPD is expressed in pounds per day. Weaned calves from Sire A with a DMI EPD of 0.50 will eat approximately 0.5 pounds of dry matter a day more than weaned calves from Sire B with a DMI EPD of 0.00. This EPD should also be used in conjunction with a growth EPD, such as YW EPD, as unlike RADG EPD, it does not include a growth component. Used independently of a growth EPD the DMI EPD selects solely for appetite.


Scrotal Circumference (SC) EPD describes the difference in average scrotal circumference in sons. Expressed in centimetres, a sire with an SC EPD of 1.2 will, on average, have sons with scrotal circumference that is 1 centimetre larger than the sons from a sire with an SC EPD of 0.2. SC EPD has also been correlated with daughter’s age at puberty and progeny fertility. Docility (Doc) EPD is expressed as a difference in yearling cattle temperament, with a higher value indicating more favourable docility. It predicts the average difference of progeny from a sire in comparison with another sire’s calves. In herds where temperament problems are not an issue, this expected difference would not be realized. Claw Set (Claw) EPD is expressed in units of claw-set score, with a lower EPD being more favourable indicating a sire will produce progeny with more functional claw set. Ideally, toes are symmetrical, even and appropriately spaced. Foot Angle (Angle) EPD is expressed in units of foot-angle score, with a lower EPD being more favourable indicating a sire will produce progeny with a more ideal foot angle. The ideal is a 45-degree angle at the pastern joint with appropriate toe length and heel depth. Carcass EPDs: Carcass Weight (CW) EPD is expressed in pounds and is a predictor of the differences in hot carcass weight of a sire’s progeny compared to progeny of other sires. A bull with a CW EPD of +30 will sire calves that, on average, will result in 10 pounds more hot carcass weight than the progeny of a bull with CW EPD of +20. Marbling (Marb) EPD describes the marbling potential of calves from one bull compared to the calves from another bull, given the same management. This EPD is expressed as the difference in grade score. Given the same management, the calves from a bull with a Marb EPD of 0.6 will marble ½ a grade score better than the calves from a bull with a Marb EPD of 0.1.

Ribeye Area (RE) EPD describes in square inches the difference in ribeye area of a sire’s progeny compared to progeny of other sires. Fat Thickness (Fat) EPD expressed in inches, describes the differences in back fat thickness at the 12th rib (as measured between the 12th and 13th ribs) of a sire’s progeny compared to progeny of other sires. Maternal EPDs: Heifer Pregnancy (HPG) EPD is a selection tool to increase the probability or chance of a sire’s daughters becoming pregnant as first-calf heifers at first exposure. A higher EPD indicates a higher probability of conception. Calving Ease Maternal (CEM) EPD describes the probability of not requiring assistance when a bull’s daughters calve for the first time. The higher the EPD, the higher the probability that a bull’s daughters will not require assistance at calving time. Milk EPD describes, in pounds, the portion of a calf ’s weaning weight attributed to milk and mothering ability. On average, daughters from a bull with a Milk EPD of +20 will contribute 5 pounds more to their calves’ weaning weight than the daughters of a bull with Milk EPD of +15. Milk EPD is a threshold trait that should be maintained at a moderate level dependent on the management and environment of the herd. Mature Weight (MW) EPD expressed in pounds, is a predictor of the difference in mature weight of daughters of a sire compared to the daughters of other sires. Mature Height (MH) EPD expressed in inches, MH EPD is a predictor of the difference in mature height of a sire’s daughters compared to daughters of other sires.

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Sitz Resilient

BIRTHDATE: 2/15/2018 BW: 80LBS YEARLING WEIGHT: 1530LBS

Sitz Resilient has the potential to be one of the most impactful sires the Angus breed has to offer. He is one of Stellar's best sons. Resilient ranks in the top 1% of the breed for weaning and yearling weight and in the top 25% or better for calving ease, birth weight, carcass weight, marbling, ribeye area and foot quality. Extraordinary potential to sire outstanding calves for you in 2022.

BROOKING MERCURY 9057

PF OKLAHOMA 6625

SAV AJAX 8885

SAV QUARTERBACK 7933

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ALTA CUSTOM COLLECTION For over 50 years, we have offered a custom collection, storage, and global distribution service based in Alberta, Canada, for your privately-owned beef bulls. WE OFFER LOCAL SERVICES FOR A GLOBAL MARKET. Our passion for the industry, our care for the

bulls and our operational excellence are second to none. We offer private storage and a complete line of AI supplies and tanks. Supported by our applied advanced laboratory technology, we are qualified for owners, domestic, export, EU and China. Now offering the option of custom collection sexed semen!

INTERESTED IN MORE INFO? CONTACT US FOR DETAILS! Terry White 403-585-4769 403-226-0666 | 1-800-465-8858 | info@altagenetics.com canada.altagenetics.com/beef/custom-beef




Upcoming feeder calf sale? The Feeder Calf Performance Endorsement Certificate is an initiative by the Canadian Angus Association to provide an opportunity for members and commercial producers to showcase the genetic potential of their feeder calves based on the commercial producer’s bull battery average.

Oct 2nd 2021

The certificates feature the Angus Feeder Calf Index, which is strictly a terminal index combining groups of traits relevant to the feedlot’s performance and quality grade, focusing on a balance of marbling, weaning to yearling performance, rib eye size, yield, and carcass weight. Members can use these certificates to help support their commercial customers’ feeder calf sales. Commercial producers can use the certificates to help differentiate their cattle and as a testament to the high-quality genetics that they use in their program. In 2019, Canfax completed a price comparison of feeder calves being marketed with the Canadian Angus Association Feeder Calf Performance Endorsement Certificates and Feeder Calf Index to all other sales held that week. Canfax reported a $6/CWT premium for feeder calves being marketed with the Canadian Angus Association Feeder Calf Performance Endorsement Certificates and Feeder Calf Index compared to other sales for similar weight calves in that same period.

To access the certificates: • Purchase Angus bulls from any CAA member and have the bulls transferred into your name • Use Canadian Angus RFID indicators and have calves that carry the Angus green tag • Request your Performance Endorsement Certificates for your feeder calf sale The CAA will provide a certificate showcasing the genetic merit of your calves with known data through the sire lineage.

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You invested in high quality Canadian Angus genetics—take an endorsement of that to market! Contact your Canadian Angus Association at kdevani@cdnangus.ca or 1-888-571-3580 for more information.


2022 Bull Sale Timed Auction Sale

Begins April 3rd and closes April 5th Open House, Special Viewing and Registration on April 3rd at the ranch in Pollockville, AB

40 Yearling Red and Black Angus bulls, and 15 two year old Red Angus bulls on offer.

All bulls will be carcass ultrasound and are AngusGS tested.

Calvin & Catherine Rooke • 403-633-2726 or 403-566-2726 crookeranching@gmail.com • http://www.rebelcreekangus.com/


Calving Tips: A

cross the nation, one thing that beef producers have in common is the goal to raise the greatest number of healthy calves per number of cows exposed. Angus cows are renowned for their maternal ability. Using Angus bulls also tends to make calving easier on cows and producers. Nonetheless, calving can be a stressful time for both cattle and producers. I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Claire Windeyer for some expert tips for successful calving. Dr. Windeyer is a veterinarian and production animal health specialist at the University of Calgary. Her expertise is in ruminant health management, and she has led extensive research on calving management, risk factors associated with calving, and the benefits of colostrum. Despite being a natural process, successful calving takes planning. Dr. Windeyer shared a few (simple) management preparations that can help 66

A Refresher on Best Management Practices By Kajal Devani Canadian Angus Association

reduce disease, complications and stress. To minimize the incidence and spread of disease, she recommends that producers calve cows on fresh ground and separate the cows from the heifers if that is feasible for your operation. If you do not have the space, you can also separate them by calving heifers before the cow herd. This separation can help producers feed and monitor heifers more frequently as heifers have greater risk of calving difficulties. Calving heifers earlier and/or separately from cows has multiple benefits including less disease exposure for calves and more rebreeding time for the heifers. Preplanning for inevitable weather conditions can also go far to reduce disease and stress. Whenever possible, shelter, bedding and windbreaks should be planned and set up ahead of calving season. Studies show that straw deep enough to cover calves’ legs can provide an extra 5 degrees worth of warmth. Dr. Windeyer says that she advocates for preventative management

because disease-causing pathogens or ‘bugs’ are always around; whether calves get sick or not is dependent on how the calves are being taken care of.

“The bugs are there; they exist on the farm and they exist within the adult animals. It is how we take care of those calves and how we manage our calving groups that determine whether or not those calves get sick.”


Dr. Windeyer also recommends being prepared for instances when things do go wrong. Producers need to recognize if there is an issue at the group level. This is easier with good record keeping. Producers should work with their veterinarian to ensure that they have the right health protocols and implementation of those protocols. On an individual level, if a cow does require assistance during calving, do it in a timely manner. Producers should know beforehand what to do when calf resuscitation and warming are required. Hanging calves by their hind end is not the correct approach when resuscitation is necessary. Suspending calves upside down actually puts pressure on their lungs making it even harder for the calf to breathe. Instead, Dr. Windeyer suggests placing the calf upright with its back legs extended up towards its ears (https://youtu. be/VTg6AXWOGl4) and poking the nasal septum (the wall between the nostrils) with a strong piece of straw. Typically, this action will stimulate the calf to take in a big gasp of air. In addition, vigorous rubbing can help stimulate the calf; it will get the blood flowing and help warm the calf. Finally, squirting a little cold water in a calf ’s ear can have the same impact as someone dumping a bucket of cold water over your head. It can be an effective way to bring alertness to a calf but be sure not to flood the ear!

nutrition. Cow hygiene, in terms of clean udders, also improves calves’ chances of fighting off disease. For more information on the impact of teat and udder structure, please see our article on page 194 in this magazine. Ideally, newborn calves access colostrum directly from their dams within an hour of birth. The next best thing would be to let a calf suckle from a bottle (at least 1 litre within four hours of birth). Dr. Windeyer suspects from her research that one of the leading causes of compromised calf health on cow-calf operations is not getting colostrum into calves soon enough, so if they don’t drink from their dam shortly after birth (within one to two hours), she recommends intervening as soon as possible. Collecting and freezing colostrum

to help calves that need extra assistance is highly recommended. The antibody concentration in colostrum from beef cows typically ranges from 100–150 grams per litre. Antibody concentration from dairy colostrum is much lower (approximately 50 grams/litre). Market colostrum products vary greatly in terms of concentration of antibodies. Dr. Windeyer recommends producers using market colostrum check the label carefully to ensure their calves are getting enough colostrum within four to six hours of calving. Dr. Windeyer and the CAA team wish everyone a healthy and stress free calving season.

“Once they are up, get them suckling,” recommends Dr. Windeyer. Calves are born with naïve immune systems, so it is imperative that calves suckle and ingest colostrum as soon as possible. Colostrum is an important source of antibodies, vitamins, minerals and calories. Studies show that herds that monitor whether calves have suckled or intervene to ensure that calves receive colostrum have lower calf mortality rates. Specifically, this is important for calves that have required calving assistance. These calves have reduced suckle reflex, higher incidence of mis-mothering, and are less likely to access colostrum within the vital 4 to 6 hours post-calving timeframe. Colostrum quality and quantity is impacted by cow immunization and 67


Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef

T

he Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB) was established in 2014 with a vision to bring together sustainability conversations across the Canadian beef value chain and beyond, and drive continuous improvement, environmental, social and economic sustainability through multistakeholder engagement, collaboration, communication and science. Through our membership, now over 100 strong, we achieve this through industry-wide sustainability performance benchmarking, setting strategic improvement goals, and demonstrating progress through projects. Sustainable practices on the ground are recognized through the Certified Sustainable Beef Framework, a third-party certification

®

®

CRSB CERTIFIED

IN ACTION CRSB CERTIFIE

program that also enables sustainable sourcing and delivers credible claims to the consumer about sustainability.

overall GHG emissions, less than half the global average • Helps store over 1.5 billion tonnes of carbon in Canada, and • Provides 68% of Canada’s wildlife habitat capacity on only one-third of Canada’s agricultural 17% 1332 land

IN ACTION

Our first farm to fork benchmarking of Canadian beef production, the National Beef Sustainability Assessment, was released in 2016. It provided key metrics to show the sustainability performance of the Canadian beef industry, and identifies key areas for improvement. For example, the assessment has provided science-based metrics that are instrumental in showing our positive environmental contribution in Canada.

As of June 30, 2021, there are:

OVER

Farms and ranches certified to CRSB standards

of the Canadian cattle herd now raised on farms and ranches certified to CRSB sustainability standards.

Certifying Sustainability

3 Momentum continues to build CRSB in the area of certifying beef CERTIFIED PRODUCER sustainability. As the first country DISTRIBUTION in the world with a farm to fork sustainability certification program for beef, CRSB regularly fields Canadian beef production: As of June 30, 2021,who there are: questions from supply chains are • Contributes only 2.4% of Canada’s interested in sustainable sourcing and supporting farmers and ranchers like you who embody sustainability in Canada. CERTIFICATION BODIES

CRSB-approved Certification Bodies carry out 3rd party auditing of the Framework standards on Canadian farms, ranches and in processing facilities, as well as for Chain of Custody tracking. Sustainable Beef Production Standard:

Sustainable Beef Processing Standard and Chain of Custody:

13 | CANADIAN ROUNDTABLE FOR SUSTAINABLE BEEF

Cow/Calf (45%) Backgrounding (<1%) Feedlots (7%) Combined Operation (2 or more of above) (46%)

1332

Farms and ranches certified to CRSB standards

Sustainable practices are certified against outcome-based standards across all five principles of sustainable beef. CRSBapprovedCERTIFICATION Certification BODIES Bodies carry out third-party auditing against CRSB standards Certificationat Bodies carry out 3 party auditing and CRSB-approved program requirements all stages of beef of the Framework standards on Canadian farms, ranches and in production and processing, and for tracking processing facilities, as well as for Chain of Custody tracking. beef through the supply chain, which enables Sustainable Beef Production Standard: consumer claims.

3

rd

13 |

Since the program was fully launched in Sustainable Beef Processing Standard 2018, there has been steady growth; as of and Chain of Custody: June 30, 2021, 17% of the Canadian cattle herd is raised on Canadian CRSB Certified farms and ranches. There are now five processing facilities certified to the standards, and five further processors who have met the requirements to provide beef to their CANADIAN ROUNDTABLE FOR SUSTAINABLE BEEF customers sourced from CRSB Certified Operations. Beginning with McDonald’s Canada in 2018, there are now eight retailers, foodservice companies and restaurants sourcing from CRSB Certified farms and ranches. Partnerships with companies like these help share the story of sustainable beef production with Canadian consumers, and show their support of the hard work done on the ground by Canadian farmers and ranchers. Many of

68


Working with the CRSB has been a long journey that has afforded our team at Chop Steakhouse the ability to be part of learning about where our food comes from and how it is produced. This is of growing importance to our guests and to us. We feel privileged to have had the opportunity to learn more about the families that make up the heart and soul of food production in Canada­­—Canadian Farmers & Ranchers. Perhaps the only thing as gratifying as getting to know everyone along the beef supply chain, is working together with them towards continual improvements in sustainable practices. We are proud to have been the first full service national restaurant chain in Canada to commit to serving steaks with a sustainable sourcing claim on their menu. Marcel Blais, President – Chop Steakhouse and Bar

these restaurants offer products that highlight the Angus brand, so there is a clear opportunity for adding the value of sustainability. To learn more about the program, or how to get certified, visit crsbcertified.ca, or contact one of our Certification Bodies.

Sustainability Goal-Setting

This year has also been marked by intensifying coverage regarding sustainability and climate change, and the role of beef and the food system. The Canadian beef industry knows it has a vital role to play as a solution for climate change, and continues to demonstrate its continued leadership in sustainability. Through collaborative initiatives regionally, nationally and globally, beef industry stakeholders have been working on establishing robust 2030 goals that are practical, yet ambitious, and demonstrate our collective intention to make continual progress as part of the solution. In Canada, through the seven national organizations that form the Canadian Beef Advisors, a suite of ambitious 10-year goals across seven key topics areas that address continual improvement in how cattle are raised, the importance of livestock production for climate change mitigation, supporting communities, embracing innovation, and the overall sustainability of our food system. These goals build on the National Beef Strategy and

address improvements in: reducing greenhouse gases and sequestering carbon; conserving land use and biodiversity; improving water and soil quality; best practices in animal health and care; supporting health and safety of people; improving beef quality and food safety, and embracing technology to improve efficiencies. The wide variety of topics addressed underscores the vast benefits of raising beef cattle in Canada beyond supplying global protein demand, and address all five of the principles of beef sustainability adopted here in Canada—Natural Resources, People & Community, Animal Health and Welfare, Food, and Efficiency & Innovation. The CRSB and many of our members also contributed to the development of global beef sustainability goals through our involvement in the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef on climate, nature positive solutions and animal health and welfare. Learn more at grsbeef.org. These initiatives all show the commitment of the beef sector to continual improvement, and the importance of agriculture in a sustainable food system. To learn more about our work, visit us at crsb.ca or contact us at info@crsb.ca.

69


Making Sense of Board Governance:

Understanding the Roles of the Board, the Association, and the Membership By Tina Zakowsky, Canadian Angus Association Most Canadian Angus Association members know that the Association is governed by an elected volunteer board of directors. Not all volunteer boards operate the same; for example there are huge differences between how the regional association boards and the CAA board operate. Understanding how CAA’s governance structure works will explain how policies are set, may help you choose a candidate in your region’s next board election and could even lead you to let your name stand for election. Why is Governance Important? Simply put, governance is a broad term for the way that a board operates. There are many different styles of governance. Some members may be familiar with the concept of policy governance which is how the CAA board operated until spring 2020. Also known as the Carver model, policy governance is intended to clearly differentiate between governance and management responsibilities while directing the board to future thinking or visioning for the organization. After working within this model for about 20 years, the CAA board worked with a governance expert to come up with a new approach to managing the Association’s affairs. One of the primary motivations was to make it easier for directors to understand their role and to spend less time reviewing and understanding policies. A significant change under this new governance structure is that the board uses committees to carry out specific governance tasks and make recommendations to the board. The board encourages debate and speaks with a single voice once decisions are made. It is led by the president who speaks on behalf of the board. The board’s connection to the operational

Mission

There is a defined hierarchy: articles contained in the Animal Pedigree Act have priority followed by the bylaws, governance policies, Association policies, and finally operating policy. In the case of discrepancy, the higher-level authority prevails.

aspects of the organization is through the chief executive officer (CEO). The CEO is responsible for maintaining operational sustainability and is accountable to the board. The Animal Pedigree Act, Bylaws and Policies and Why They Matter The Canadian Angus Association was incorporated under the Animal Pedigree Act. The purpose of the Act is to promote breed improvement, and to protect people who raise and purchase animals. The principal purpose of breed associations incorporated under the Act is the registration and identification of animals and the keeping of animal pedigrees. The Act specifically defines the power of associations and the accountability of each with respect to governance and bylaws. The Association, directors, members, and staff are bound to abide by the Act. Failure to comply with the Animal Pedigree Act is an indictable offense and is grounds to have

To maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

70

membership revoked. Non-compliance with the Act by CAA staff is punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. The Animal Pedigree Act outlines mandatory bylaws that provide guidance for the organizational structure and governance principles. Any proposed changes to the bylaws are determined by the CAA board and presented to the membership. If the membership approves the proposed changes, the bylaws are presented to the Animal Pedigree Act officer who in turn presents them to the federal minister of agriculture for ultimate approval or rejection. The board of directors is responsible for setting the strategic direction and principles of the Association which they have done in part by creating governance policies. These policies include board operating elements such as running meetings under Robert’s Rules of Order, the board’s code of conduct and the board’s travel and expense

Vision

The Canadian Angus Association exists to preserve and expand the Angus breed for Canadian cattle producers and beef consumers, providing the best opportunities for profitability today and for future generations.


expectations such as requiring that a portion of the Association’s profits be invested in a reserve fund annually and presenting an annual budget for board approval; and establishing the board’s committee structure. What are Board Committees and Why Are They Necessary? The board has four committees: pedigree; audit, finance and risk; governance; and executive. The president and CEO sit on all committees, and every director sits on at least one committee and a maximum of two based on their skills and interests.

reimbursement policies; registration policies such as the genetic condition policy and official regulations for artificial insemination and embryo transplant; policies that direct the CEO in the form of performance

The pedigree committee is mandated in CAA’s bylaws and has the authority to authorize the change of ownership and registration of pedigrees where signatures or other information are for any reason unobtainable. They are also responsible for reviewing CAA’s compliance with the Animal Pedigree Act, regulations, and breedrelated policies. The audit, finance and risk committee assists the board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities with respect to the

Association’s financial health, sustainability and risk management. An example of how the committee fulfills their role is reviewing the audited financial statements and recommending to the board of directors if they should be approved. All directors have access to the audited financial statements and can ask questions, and it is ultimately up to a majority decision of the board of directors whether to accept or reject the audited financial statements. The governance committee ensures that board and Association governance policies, practices and initiatives are regularly reviewed and makes recommendations to the board regarding all governance matters of the Association including the Association’s strategic planning processes, the Association’s code of conduct and ethics, reputation, and stakeholder relations. The strategic plan is a key document in which the board and CEO set short- and long-term goals for the Association. Best practice in strategic planning recommends that planning is a collective effort and that no single person be responsible for producing the Association’s strategic plan.

2021–2022 Board Committees Executive Committee Chair President Sheldon Kyle President Elect Graham McLean Past President Shawn Birmingham CAA CEO Myles Immerkar

Audit, Finance and Risk Committee

Pedigree Committee

Chair Tom deWaal

Chair Dale Easton

Shawn Birmingham Doug Munton Ronnie Ford Harold Reich

Sheldon Kyle Brett Wildman CEO Myles Immerkar CAA Member Service Team Leader Lexi Wright

Governance Committee Chair Greg Pugh Graham McLean Rob Garner David Sample Brett Wildman Dale Easton 71


The governance committee began working on proposed bylaw amendments in fall 2019. The committee quickly realized that it would be easier to completely rewrite the bylaws which have been continuously modified since 1906. Acknowledging that the board lacked the expertise to oversee this process, the committee recommended that the board hire a parliamentarian to rewrite the bylaws as directed by the committee. The committee oversaw the work, presented the board with proposed bylaws for discussion, made changes and ultimately developed a revised set of bylaws to be presented to the membership for approval in 2022. The executive committee is comprised of the president, past president, president elect and CEO. This committee has the authority to act on behalf of the board in an emergency and acts on behalf of the entire board to fulfill the board’s responsibilities in terms of the CEO’s performance assessment, employment agreement, compensation, and relationship with the board. The board executive gets input from the board on a regular basis and meets with the CEO regularly to address concerns and questions. The executive committee sets the CEO’s

72

performance goals and annually assesses the CEO’s performance in achieving the goals. Collectively and with input from the committees, the Board also sets a number of performance standards and operating expectations. It is the CEO’s responsibility to ensure that staff and volunteers abide by these guidelines and meet targets. Is There Such a Thing as an Ideal Director? Over the last few years mainstream and agriculture media have published numerous articles about the need for diversity, particularly on boards, and the CAA board is no exception. Diversity does not simply encompass race and culture, it also includes gender, regional input, industry experience and expertise, purebred and commercial points of view, herd size and skills and perspectives outside of the cattle business. For any board to operate efficiently, as much diversity as possible is optimal to ensure the board considers the impact of their decisions on those who do not sit at the board table but whose interests the board is representing. A few years ago the board turned to a skills matrix to help them assess their performance and look for areas in which the board

required training. New and continuing directors complete the skills matrix annually to identify areas where the board has skills, areas where skills are lacking, and to use in the process of selecting the president elect and president. The skills matrix also helps the board recruit new directors. If the board identified that there was a lack of financial acumen, they could emphasize the necessity of that particular skill when recruiting candidates for an upcoming vacancy on the board. Still Not Sure What the Board Does? Members reading the board meeting highlights may wonder what exactly takes place when the board spends two or three days in meetings. Unlike a volunteer organization board of directors that scrutinizes financial statements to look for financial efficiencies and cost savings and plans and executes events, the CAA board acts on behalf of members to provide strategic oversight and ensure that the organization achieves its goals. They set policies in accordance with the bylaws and to assure that the breed registry remains both accurate and current while also providing access to the best tools


available to verify parentage. The CEO has authority to make dayto-day decisions and ensure the smooth operation of the Association. Through decisions at meetings, the board provides collective long-term strategic direction to the CEO. Another important role for the board is to exercise fiduciary responsibility which includes setting fees and reviewing them regularly as well as ensuring the Association’s finances are appropriately managed. When implementing policy changes, directors consider the financial and operational impact on members in different regions, with various herd sizes, with mixed purebred and commercial herds, with mixed breeds, with mixed farms, as well as the timing of the decision and how much time members may need to prepare. Many decisions that the board makes, especially policy decisions, go through a period of discussion, analysis and advance communication to members that can take up to two years from the time the suggestion is brought forward until the policy takes effect. Directors are elected by members in a particular region, but they make decisions in the best interest of all members and do not act solely on behalf of their region. Members have diverse opinions and priorities and the board makes every effort to consider the impact of their decisions on all members. It is rare that directors establish a policy that will please everyone. Sometimes directors make policy decisions that are detrimental for their personal operations or management practices, but they make the best decision for the overall membership. The Board speaks with a unified voice. Directors often engage in debate during meetings. Sometimes the debates are prolonged and may even become heated. All directors have the opportunity to share their thoughts and opinions and varied perspectives are considered. But once the decision is made, it doesn’t matter if a director was in favour of or opposed to the motion, it is their responsibility to support the decision. The board must also maintain confidentiality and not discuss how they or other directors vote or even divulge if there was unanimous support for a decision. What if I Don’t Agree with a Board Decision? Members are welcome to contact any director to engage in respectful dialogue and provide feedback. Members can also make suggestions for policy changes to directors to bring to board meetings, or if they prefer, they can attend an annual general meeting and make a recommendation to the board at the appropriate time. Members are also invited to contact the CEO or staff with suggestions for operational changes. All suggestions and feedback are considered, although we cannot accommodate all requests. If any member feels that they can make good contributions and help provide CAA with strategic direction, recruitment for the CAA board is ongoing. You are encouraged to reach out to current directors to get their perspective on board operations and understand what you could potentially be getting into.

Canadian Angus Association Board of Directors: President: Sheldon Kyle

306-452-7545 | sheldon@kenrayranch.com

President Elect: Graham McLean 519-808-6511 | grahamm@agris.coop

Past President: Shawn Birmingham

204-573-6377 | shawnbirmingham@yahoo.ca

British Columbia: Tom deWaal

250-960-0022 | tom@harvestangus.com

Alberta: Doug Munton

403-328-6966 | doug@muntonco.com

Alberta: Greg Pugh

780-806-1319 | gpugh@hotmail.com

Alberta: Harold Reich

780-372-2175 | reichca@yahoo.ca

Alberta: Brett Wildman

780-785-3709 | wildmanlivestock@hotmail.com

Saskatchewan: Dale Easton 306-739-2805 | 306-577-7456 eastondale.angus@sasktel.net

Saskatchewan: Rob Garner

306-946-7946 | nordallimousin@sasktel.net

Quebec: David Sample

450-247-2696 | macangusfarms@gmail.com

Maritimes: Ronnie Ford

902-394-0059 | ronnie.ford@bellaliant.net

73


Ontario ONTARIO President Don McNalty

Vice President Kyle Pethrick

Singhampton, ON (519) 922-2741 robroyangus@gmail.com

Campbelford, ON (705) 768-3560 worth-mor@hotmail.com

2nd Vice President Brian Whitwell

Past President Paula Cornish

Hagersville, ON (905) 768-5148 b.whitwell57@gmail.com

Indian River, ON (705) 295-2925 paula.cornish@td.com

Secretary/Treasurer Julie Smith Fergus, ON (519) 787-2397 secretaryontarioangus@gmail.com

SEPT

Events

Brampton Preview Show (Gold Show) Brampton, ON

OCT

Fall Finale Beef Show Lindsay, ON

NOV

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair (Gold Show) Toronto, ON

All events are subject to change and cancellation. Some events may be adjusted for virtual attendance.

Board Representative Graham McLean Watford, ON (519) 808-6511 graham@agris.coop Expiry: 2024 Ontario Junior Angus Morgan MacIntyre Russell, ON (613) 445-0506 xcellivestock.morgan@gmail.com Expiry: 2022

74

www.cdnangus.ca/ontario-angus-association/ For more information, please contact the Ontario Angus Association for inquiries regarding events in 2022.


ONTARIO

Statistics collected from November 2020 through October 2021

2,727 75 50 1,046 264 Registrations

Transfers

Junior Memberships

Young Breeder Memberships

Annual Memberships

Total New Members

Active Life Memberships

5

44

75


Reasons Why Consumers Should

Choose (Canadian) Angus Beef, Every Time: a (Biased) Summary that Celebrates our Breed By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association Consumers are driven to know more about their food and how it is produced. In beef, carcass quality and eating satisfaction attributes include flavour, tenderness and juiciness. Credence attributes that influence consumer demand include price, locally produced, animal health and welfare, environmental impact, food safety and food healthfulness. There are many reasons why consumers should choose beef. Beef is one of the most wholesome and nutrient dense protein sources available. Beef production supports local producers and communities who turn food crop byproducts and arid grasslands into delicious and nutritious protein. Livestock graze and regenerate land that is largely unusable for crop production; 86% of livestock feed is inedible to humans and there is a global shortage of protein and nutritional intake. There are also many reasons why consumers should choose to consume (Canadian) Angus beef

76

specifically. Production economies and feed efficiency significantly impact producer profitability, product price, impact on the environment, and animal health and welfare. Ideally, beef producers would select genetics with the potential to gain quickly using the least resources including feed and water. Numerous studies show that (Canadian) Angus genetics in North American production environments, in tropical environments, and when used for crossbreeding in dairy, gain better, finish faster and are more feed efficient. The use of (Canadian) Angus genetics furthers animal and environmental caring through increased maternal production efficiencies including shorter gestation lengths, increased calving ease and improved maternal ability. In addition to improving production efficiencies, these traits contribute significantly to improved animal health and welfare. Further, Canadian Angus is developing genetic selection tools for High Immune Response to identify and

select for animals that are better able to resist disease. These animals will have lower incidence and severity of disease. Canadian Angus animals are also naturally polled mitigating the need for painful and stressful dehorning, and eradicating the dangers of horns to both humans and other cattle. The biggest driving factor for Angus beef consumption is carcass quality. In

one “ ofBeeftheismost wholesome and nutrient dense protein sources available.


preference studies, beef eating experiences are significantly elevated by increased tenderness and marbling. Comparative carcass quality studies demonstrate that higher percentages of Angus genetics equate to more tender, better marbled beef. In addition to more tender, juicier, and more flavourful beef, more marbling is also associated with higher levels of healthy fatty acids and good cholesterol. Besides a more satisfying eating experience, more tender beef mitigates the need for mechanical tenderization and is therefore associated with increased food safety. Further, quality consistency has been a challenge in beef markets globally. This lack of consistency can erode consumer confidence. Studies show Angus beef is of higher carcass quality in higher proportions, ensuring product consistency. To develop and deliver trustworthy branded beef that instills consumer confidence and drives consumer purchasing, branded beef programs follow strict predetermined qualification parameters for their product. Despite these parameters, global audits of branded meat products frequently find mislabelled and misidentified product. The Canadian Angus Association has the largest animal indicator (RFID tag) program in the world. Thus, the Association is in a unique position to offer Canadian Angus beef consumers a trustworthy, high quality, healthful, safe and ethically responsible eating experience.

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When you’re paid by the pound make ‘em count!

PSH 9J | BW 88 | 1156 LBS SIRE HF ALCATRAZ 60F

Weight Date: PSH 11J | BW 94 | 1125 LBS SIRE HF ALCATRAZ 60F Oct. 12, 2021

PSHJ 7J | BW 78 | 1045 LBS SIRE HF ALCATRAZ 60F

PSH 13J | BW 92 | 1000 LBS SIRE HOOVER KNOW HOW

Large group of bulls to pick from.

Select your bull now, we will develop, semen test, ultrasound and deliver.

Sires: HF Alcatraz 60F, Youngdale Jullian 64E, Musgrave Stunner, Hoover Know How, S A V President, Musgrave Big Sky Private treaty sales available at the farm.

Harprey Angus Farms

307483 Centre Line A Proton Station, ON • N0C 1L0

Allan Hargrave: 519.375.5541 Don Hargrave: 519.375.1500 Jarrett Hargrave: 519.374.5516 harprey@gmail.com


Featuring bulls sired by

THESE TOP INDUSTRY PERFORMERS

NORFOLK COLONEL 18G Owned by Clarke Family Farms Inc.

S A V AMERICA 8018

Baldridge Colonel C251 X S A V Madame Pride 5290 Full Brother to Mohnen General 548

ELLINGSON HOMEGROWN 6035


We’re Looking for a Few Good Partners

The Canadian Angus Association has several opportunities that will not only expand your brand and help your business grow, but will also add value and keep you top-of-mind with your target audience. Our loyal base includes purebred and commercial producers, industry and retail partners, as well as consumers. This audience includes leaders in their fields as well as new up-and-comers. They hold circles of authority with their families, communities, regions and country. They are the decision makers, the influencers, the ones you want to be talking to. They are the ones who will make a difference for years to come.

Various sponsorship opportunities available at the Canadian Angus Association include but are not limited to:

The Gold Show

The Gold Show program encourages breeders to move between regions to show cattle. Awards are presented based on the number of points accumulated over the course of the show season. Hundreds attend each event, with shows held across the country. Our exclusive app, Ringside, posts results in real time.

The Canadian Angus National Convention

The Canadian Angus National Convention is the event of the year, with attendees travelling from across the country to network, market, and learn from industry-leading experts. Spread out over three days plus regional day trips, Convention provides ample opportunities for members and businesses alike.

Angus Broadcasting Canada

Angus Broadcasting Canada (ABC) is the Canadian Angus Association’s dedicated media channel. Available on our website and YouTube, ABC is a go-to for industry information, educational content, and updates on products, programs and services. We also feature specialty content, including cooking videos 80

with Olympic athlete John Morris, Canadian Angus Foundation living histories and Canadian Junior Angus personalities.

Canadian Junior Angus

The future is in good hands. With programs that help our youth grow and learn about Angus, more innovations are just around the corner. In additional to regular communications, newsletters and social media outreach, CJA offers annual events such as the Guiding Outstanding Angus Leaders (GOAL) Conference which promotes leadership skills, Showdown, an opportunity for juniors from across the county to gather in one location and exhibit their Angus cattle in conformation divisions and participate in non-cattle competitions, as well as virtual events throughout the year.

We are also happy to offer custom sponsorship packages, tailored to your specific requirements. Interested in becoming a partner and expanding your sponsorship reach? Contact us today: cdnangus@cdnangus.ca or 1-888-571-3580.


0200AN10737 COLOSSAL

BUILDING BETTER BEEF

0200AN10728 ATTRACTIVE

0200AN10734 RENOVATION

0200AR20729 MOSSY OAK

0200AN10743 ENTERPRISE

0200AR20728 ROCKEFELLER

Building Better Beef is more than just our slogan, it’s what we’ve been doing for over 30 years in Canada and around the world. Semex has 80+ distributors in over 100 countries working with producers shoulder-to-shoulder every day, expanding our global footprint for Canadian producers and securing the future of the Beef industry. We’re Canada’s best genetic source for structural soundness, functionality and industry-leading performance.

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Import and Registration Requirements for Canadian Angus Genetics in Global Angus Associations By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association Canadian Angus genetics are marketed globally. Their registration eligibility, however, is dependent on the requirements of the receiving country’s Angus association. Recently, several global Angus Associations have modified their registration requirements for imported genetics. To help Canadian Angus Association members to anticipate these requirements we have compiled the most up-to-date requirements from global Angus associations that frequently process registration requests for imported Canadian Angus genetics. Some of the biggest changes come from the American Angus Association. Imported animals must now be Angus GS tested, tested for all genetic conditions, have a physical DNA sample on file at Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI), and be tested homozygous black for coat colour if there is a red animal (or red carrier) in the animal’s pedigree. All of these requirements can be coordinated through your Canadian Angus Association. Angus associations in Europe have moved to requiring high density genotyping for imported genetics. Thus, Canadian Angus genetics being marketed in Europe will need to be Angus GS tested, parent verified, and tested for (all) genetic conditions to be eligible for registration in European Angus associations. All of these requirements can be coordinated through your Canadian Angus Association. Finally, Angus Associations globally are starting to require performance information (the Red Angus Association of America requires a weaning weight and weigh date for full registration status) and more are moving towards requiring EPDs. In Brazil, the state has a minimum requirement for EPDs and percentile ranks.

DNA SAMPLE COAT COLOUR TESTING

 

 

 

 

  

DM

EPDS

PERFORMANCE DATA 82

 = required

   

   

SOUTH AFRICA

CZECH

 

IRELAND

BRAZIL

     

DENMARK

AUSTRALIA (RED)

DM

AUSTRALIA

GENETIC CONDITION TESTING

PARENTAGE VERIFICATION

ARGENTINA

ANGUS GS TESTING

  

REG CERTIFICATE

US (AAA) US (RAAA)

UK

The Canadian Angus Association member service team is happy to help you with the import and registration process with our global Angus association counterparts. We recommend that you have parentage verification, Angus GS testing, and genetic condition testing completed prior to marketing Canadian Angus genetics internationally. Your international customers will sincerely appreciate it.

  MA


GRACO

Conversation 14F Junior Champion and Reserve Grand Champion Bull 2019 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair 2019 Canadian Gold Show Junior Champion Bull

Tullamore Angus is in the process of moving our farming operations. We look forward to celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Angus Cattle in our family in 2023 at our new location 260 Regional Road 39, Zephyr, Ontario L0E 1T0.

TULLAMORE FARMS Bill & Sylvia Jackson

Visitors always welcome • Breeding stock always available 12201 Torbram Road, Caledon, Ontario L7C 2T4 Tel: 905-843-1236 Cell: 647-990-2697 tullamore.angus@gmail.com

Whiskey Lane Ladies

Proud of our past, passionate about our future.

WLL 19W

WLL 2D

Scott, Paula, Jason and Shelby Cornish 2295 Hwy 7 Indian River, Ontario K0L 2B0 705-341-3220

WLL 32H

Visitors always welcome.

WLL 37E owned by Golden Oak Livestock

83


Gold Shows are tentatively scheduled to run across Canada from July through November. British Columbia Angus Association September

Ontario Angus Association September

Armstrong, BC Burns Lake, BC

Alberta Angus Association October

Brampton Preview Show, Brampton, ON

November

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, Toronto, ON

Olds Fall Classic, Olds, AB

November

Farmfair International, Edmonton, AB

Saskatchewan Angus Association November

Saskatchewan Angus Gold & Junior Show Lloydminster Stockade Roundup, Lloydminster, SK Canadian Western Agribition, Regina, SK

Manitoba Angus Association July

Quebec Angus Association September

Expo Brome, Brome, QC

October

Expo Boeuf, Victoriaville, QC

Maritime Angus Association August

Old Home Week, Charlottetown, PEI

September

New Brunswick Beef Expo, Sussex, NB Heritage Beef Classic, Windsor, NS

Harding Fair, Harding, MB

October

Manitoba Ag Ex, Brandon, MB

Note: dates and locations are subject to change. Please check our Gold Show page for current listings: www.cdnangus.ca/buyers-sellers/gold-shows

To view results from the 2021 Gold Shows, please visit:

www.cdnangus.ca/buyers-sellers/gold-shows 84

The Canadian Angus Association has partnered with Ringside, an app that will allow us to provide live results coverage of all the Gold Shows, so you’ll be able to follow along no matter where you are in the country. www.beringside.com Ringside is free to download. It sends you live show notifications, tracks top animals and allows users to view past results. Download your Ringside app today and change how you view Gold Shows.


Practical Approaches to Johne’s Disease By Roy Lewis, DVM

Johne’s (pronounced “Yonees”) disease causes non-responsive diarrhea with severe weight loss in cattle, bison, small ruminants (sheep and goats) and camelids. It may last for months and is invariably fatal. A paratuberculosis organism similar to tuberculosis causes it. The organism is Mycobacterium Avium subspecies Paratuberculosis abbreviated “MAP”. It has a very long incubation period of at least two years. Young calves under three months of age are the most susceptible to first contracting the disease. Heifer offspring from affected cows should be culled, as they will most likely show clinical signs later in life. With this disease, cattle maintain a voracious appetite but a thickening of the small intestine does not allow nutrients to be absorbed so weight loss is dramatic. In winter, a huge manure ball will often be frozen to the tail. If you suspect this disease it is imperative to have the animal examined and verified. Your veterinarian can confirm the presence of Johne’s disease by clinical exam and/or testing. This article will outline some very practical methods of minimizing the incidence of Johne’s disease on your beef farm. Johne’s disease has basically a worldwide distribution. The two biggest concerns are the economic losses associated with cows having decreased production requiring culling and the potential spread to others in the herd. This concern is especially critical for purebred and commercial herds that sell breeding stock. If we ever identify Johne's in our herds we must work on a control and elimination strategy to avoid passing it on to other herds. In a recent cow-calf surveillance project of Saskatchewan herds, in a large number of herds an average of 1.6% of cows tested positive for Johne’s disease, equating to 5.4% of herds. This number may seem low but we need to continue to identify and cull positive cows and decrease this number even further. In 1998 the Alberta government in cooperation with private practitioners sampled Alberta herds and found 4.4% of herds had at least one positive animal on fecal culture so we are in a very similar position as we were 20 years ago.

Spread of Johne’s is primarily through a fecal to oral transmission route with exposure to lots of the organisms over time necessary for transmission to occur. Transmission through milk or transplacentally (through the uterus) has also been demonstrated. The organism has also been isolated from bull semen. Control centers around good manure management, culling affected animals as soon as possible and herd testing where necessary. The organism can survive in moist manure packs for up to one year and is resistant to freezing. It can also survive in soil or water longer than one year. Desiccation is effective in killing Johne's so harrowing pastures is one effective means to minimize its presence. Manure should be spread on grain land, not on pasture or hay land if at all possible. Do not use the same frontend loader for loading manure and feeding without proper disinfection in between tasks; it is best to have interchangeable buckets. Any calving area such as the maternity pen should be disinfected with a phenolic-based disinfectant whenever cleaned. Keep feed bunks and watering bowls clean of manure to help break the fecal-oral transmission cycle. Always buy herd bulls and replacement cattle from known sources where herd health status is known. Renting bulls and in some cases pasturing in community pastures always has the possibility of increasing your cattle’s exposure. We are fortunate in western Canada to spread out our cattle for most of the year on pastures minimizing the type of exposure confinement brings. Also be sure to screen embryo transplant recipients for Johne’s. Culling known cases immediately reduces their shedding and if done early before severe weight loss occurs, they will pass slaughter inspection and the meat is edible. Cattle with severe weight loss (body condition under two) would still qualify under the BSE testing program and should be disposed of that way. As mentioned already, review the

records and cull recent heifer calves as they are highly likely to contract Johne’s from their positive mothers. You may have heard about the “iceberg” theory with Johne’s whereby for every clinical case diagnosed in your herd there are probably at least 10 more animals incubating the disease. The worst-case scenario I have encountered was years ago in a small 20 to 30 head commercial herd which was experiencing one to two clinical cases a year and depopulation, thorough cleaning and disinfection were the only way to eliminate it on this premise. The herd was then repopulated successfully. I have found in herds we deal with that by isolating and then eliminating clinical cases as quickly as possible, removing their heifer offspring and through proper manure management we can go a very long way to keeping disease presence at an absolute minimum. Johne’s disease is what we call a notifiable disease in some provinces which means your veterinarian or the lab must report it. We can then help you develop a herd strategy to decrease its presence. Decreasing Johne’s disease is absolutely critical in commercial and especially purebred herds where lots of breeding females or breeding bulls are sold. Have any case of weight loss diarrhea accompanied by a good appetite checked out by your veterinarian. The earlier we find Johne’s disease, the earlier we can eliminate it from the herd and minimize transmission. It is one of the productionlimiting diseases we should always be on the lookout for. 85


Stress, Silence, Stigma and Suicide: Let’s Talk About (the Lack of ) Mental Health in Canadian Agriculture farming and ranching is a highly stressful occupation. High levels of stress that are not well managed can lead to physical health problems such as eating disorders, high blood pressure, heart disease and to mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. The reason that the role of stress gets so much attention in discussions about mental health is because it has both positive and negative impacts. Positive impacts of stress include motivation and energy. As stressors compound and build upon each other without relief, poor mental health results. Stress can trigger pre-existing mental disorders. By Tina Zakowsky, Canadian Angus Association Agriculture producers in Canada are more likely to experience higher rates of stress and mental illness than almost any other industry and are also more likely than those in other professions to hide their mental health struggles and suffer in silence. There is also a lack of access to mental health supports in rural areas and to agriculturespecific mental health supports. Fortunately, while the industry still has a long way to go, the attitude toward mental health and mental illness in agriculture is changing and more agriculture specific resources are being developed. The current reality is that agricultural producers work long hours, often in isolation, have no control over unpredictable weather or government regulations, are quickly impacted by trade issues and often face family conflicts. It’s also common for a farmer or rancher to be the mechanic, veterinarian, agronomist, business manager, nutritionist, genomics expert, accountant, marketer, salesperson and labourer, sometimes all in the same day. Add in the growing public misconceptions about farming, particularly raising livestock, and it’s no wonder that 86

According to a survey of Canadian farmers conducted through the University of Guelph, about 35 percent of farmers/ranchers meet the classification for depression and 58 percent meet the classification for anxiety. While 45 percent of farmers/ranchers report high stress and 68 percent are more susceptible to chronic stress than the general population, 40 percent say they are uneasy seeking professional help. It is estimated there are 20 to 30 percent more suicides among Canadian farmers and ranchers than other

sectors. The lack of ag-specific resources is a significant contributing factor to the high suicide rate, but so is the perceived shame in asking for or seeking help.

About 35% of farmers/ ranchers meet the classification for depression and 58% meet the classification for anxiety. While 45% of farmers/ranchers report high stress and 68% are more susceptible to chronic stress than the general population, 40% say they are uneasy seeking professional help. Mental health is about more than being unable to cope with stress or suffering from depression. Poor mental health can impact a person’s ability to think clearly, make good decisions, increase risk-taking behaviour, impair communication, have a negative impact on the ability to handle stress and regulate emotions.


Signs of decreasing mental health include: • Changes to routine such as sleep patterns, poor hygiene and dietary choices, (increased) substance use • Really low or high energy • Difficulty concentrating • Extreme mood changes and increased interpersonal conflicts • Isolation • Engaging in risky behaviours and poor decision-making • Poor animal health/farm deterioration Factors such as lack of sleep, dehydration, nutrition, substance use, stress, and environmental exposures (e.g. to chemicals or threats to safety) impact not only physical health but also mental health. The most important asset on any farm/ranch are the human resources; in other words, you. It is vital to make yourself a priority: stay hydrated, eat nutritious foods regularly, sleep, be active, disconnect from social media and/or news, identify an interest outside of farming/ranching. To help ensure good mental health, take note of your stress and poor mental health triggers and your patterns of coping. You will come to know your triggers before they arise so you can be prepared and better able to cope. This practice will also help you identify what triggers are within your control. Identifying triggers that you cannot control allows you to focus on addressing the stressors that you can control. It’s also important to be aware that we take on others’ attitudes and stress. Farming is demanding and stressful for everyone, not

just you or your operation. While there is much to be said for friendly competition and the race to be the first or the best, avoid toxic comparisons to other producers and other farms. In many areas, the nearest neighbour has different soil conditions, a different operational history and often even different weather conditions. Comparing yourself to your neighbour or a competitor is like comparing apples to oranges in the dark while wearing gloves. No matter what information you have to make comparisons, you do not have all the information and are not dealing with the same conditions, impacts or stressors. Stigma and shame remain the biggest barriers to seeking help when our mental health is poor. When your mental health is suffering and you are struggling, it is important not to suffer in silence. Remember who your supports are and reach out. There may come a time when you will need to seek out professional help for yourself or for someone you love. If you or someone you know is at risk of harming themself or others, contact emergency services immediately.

Resources:

Mental health matters. If your mental health is suffering and you’re not sure where to turn, here are some resources: • • • • • • •

Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Mental Wellbeing in Times of Crisis webinar with clinical psychology master’s degree candidate Cynthia Beck recorded August 24, 2021: www.youtube.com/watch?v=cA3RQRyOugo Do More Ag www.domore.ag Canadian Agricultural Safety Association www.casa-acsa.ca Ag Health & Safety Alliance aghealthandsafety.com/mental-health-in-ag Call 211 across Canada to access services in your province/territory Canadian Mental Health Association cmha.ca Crisis Services Canada www.crisisservicescanada.ca • Call 1-888-454-4566 • Text 45645 87


2023

ANGUS life Angus Life 2021 has been nominated for the Advertising and Design Club of Canada Awards

Insipiring innovation. Compelling engagement. Angus Life is an industryleading resource for purebred and commercial breeders, retailers, researchers, consumers and partners. Issues feature relevant, up-to-date content. Space is limited, book your ad today!

For more information on Angus Life or to purchase an ad for the 2023 edition, please contact the Canadian Angus Association at 1-888-571-3580 or cdnangus@cdnangus.ca

88


When you need just the facts so you can get back to the important things.

Windcroft Farms BLACK ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY

BRED FOR SUCCESS from field to rail

-at the farmSired by:

MUSGRAVE 316 COLOSSAL BALDRIDGE BRONC SAV RAINFALL 6846 KOUPAL KOZI 418

Angus Broadcasting Canada Your first stop for updates, tutorials and all things Angus. Visit the official channel at www.youtube.com/CanadianAngusAssoc

573333 Boot Jack Ranch Road Priceville, Ontario N0C 1K0

226-203-4506 | windcroftfarms@gmail.com

Payment is required to accompany all work submitted. Members can choose to keep a valid credit card on file, to send a cheque with their submission, or pay by e-transfer. Please remember to provide the verification code on the back of your card when you provide or update your credit card information. We are unable to process credit card payments without the verification code. To pay by e-transfer, send it to ayuen@cdnangus.ca and use your CAA member id as the answer to the security question.

Please be aware that failing to provide a method of payment with your work submission may result in delays processing your work. Declined payments may result in overdue charges and account suspension. 89


Looking To Make The Most Of Forage Quality?

Consider These Factors

Thank you to the Beef Cattle Research Council, www.BeefResearch.ca, for permission to share. Thank you to New Brunswick Cattle Producers and Les Producteurs de bovins du Québec for providing access to a French version of this article, available on page 186 in the Quebec section of Angus Life 2022. By Beef Cattle Research Council

F

orage quality is an important factor to consider when feeding cattle. While this may seem obvious, maximizing forage quality is sometimes not the focus when management decisions are being made. Yet focusing on quality might enable producers to save costs by getting more out of the forage they have and reducing reliance on expensive concentrates and feed additives. Forage quality and yield variations in a field depend on a variety of factors including the stage of maturity of the forage, growing conditions, species composition within the field and/or harvest timing decisions. Harvest considerations also include dry down time, or time laying in the windrow, which is impacted by chop length, the use of conditioners and swath width behind the mower. Post harvest management also affects forage quality and is impacted by decisions such as whether to wrap bales in plastic or not and how baled forage is stored. Being aware of these range of factors allows producers to make pre-harvest, harvest, and storage decisions that can optimize forage quality. To maximize the use of available quality forage, an inventory and quality testing system should be implemented. Notes should be taken on fields which include information such as plant species, maturity at cutting, and age of field. This will allow baled forage to be grouped together based on the same cutting timing (1st, 2nd, 3rd, or 4th cut), 90

forage that was cut and/or baled at a similar time, or that has a similar forage composition. In addition, feed should be stored to allow access to any group at any time, taking into consideration facilities and limitations. Forage quality testing each feed group provides a better understanding of what quality of feed is on-farm and whether supplies are adequate to meet the herd’s requirements for the year. Early assessment allows time to plan for shortfalls in yield or quality. Testing can begin once stored forage has stabilized, prior to the sale or purchase of forage, or prior to feeding out to animals. Ensure samples are sent to the lab to allow enough time to get results back so that they can inform ration decisions. Once forage quality test results are received, they can be provided to a nutritionist or producers can use BCRC’s Feed Value Estimator tool to identify how well the tested forage will meet the requirements of different classes of cattle in their herd and their production demands. With this information, producers can better match their forage groups to the production cycle of their animals and more accurately identify the amount of concentrates and feed additives required to meet nutritional needs not fulfilled by forages in the ration. The following producers have found ways to optimize their feed harvest, inventory, and storage in order to place priority on feed testing and ration development.


Kintail Farms, Brook Village, Nova Scotia Andrew MacLennan and Krista MacGillivray, of Kintail Farms, run a beef and sheep operation near Brook Village, Nova Scotia. By focusing on their forage quality and feed management, Kintail Farms has grown from four cows and 5060 ewes a few years ago to currently 25 cows and 200 ewes. Some of the changes implemented include harvesting as close as possible to plant boot stage to target higher quality forage and the creation of an inventory and quality testing system for their feed. A tower silo is used to store the highest quality forage while the remaining forages are turned into baleage, chopped silage, and dry hay.

Wrapped forages are stored to allow for ease of access as well as grouped together based on when they were harvested and their forage composition. These groups are stored separate from one another to ensure that mixing of different groups does not happen and to reduce the risk of confusion when pulling from different feeds when creating rations. They test all of their forage to determine feed quality and then use this information to build rations for their herd, taking into account the production cycle of the animals. By pulling from their different on-farm produced feed quality groups,

they can reduce their reliance on offfarm feed sources and supplements. The forages are supplemented by soybean meal and occasionally whole barley or whole corn depending on needs and market prices, however they’ve been able to reduce the amounts of supplements necessary to meet nutritional demands. The changes to their cutting and forage management system have allowed them to reduce the amount of time it takes for their calves to reach slaughter weight by three to five months for the directto-consumer market. This has greatly reduced feed and management costs.

Gilchrist Farms, Lucknow, Ontario Brad and Kristie Gilchrist of Gilchrist Farms near Lucknow, Ontario run a cash crop and purebred Angus cowcalf operation as well as a winter bull development centre. Their focus on feed management is highlighted by the many different feed options produced on– farm, which are grown to target specific quality needs and provide a range of options when making rations for their herd. All feed is tested for nutritional quality and each forage is identified, inventoried, and stored separately. Gilchrist Farms utilizes pasture, haylage, wrapped dry hay, corn silage stored in bunker silos, and other feed ingredients from on-farm and off-farm sources. Some forage fields are managed

specifically to target higher protein requirements of their more nutritionally demanding animals, such as the bulls at the development centre, and are cut based on stage of maturity. Other fields are cut to target yield with this feed used for animals with lower nutritional needs. Feed storage is important as well with all feed being either wrapped, placed in bunker silos, or stored inside to maintain quality. They maintain a close working partnership with their feed sales representative and animal nutritionist. The herd is split into different groups based on production type, with diets created to cater to specific nutritional needs in each phase of production.

Rations are modified further based on animal performance and changes in air temperature throughout the year. Their bulls are weighed every 28 days with daily and average gains tracked to ensure animals are meeting targets. At Gilchrist Farms, on-farm production of feed and intensive management of diets allows them to have greater control of their herd’s diets and allows them to maintain production targets while reducing costs. This article was developed in collaboration and with the expertise of staff at Perennia Food and Agriculture, based in Nova Scotia.

Learn More:

Beef Cattle Research Council Resources: Forage Quality - www.beefresearch.ca/research-topic.cfm/forage-quality-86 Stored Forages - www.beefresearch.ca/research-topic.cfm/stored-forages-87 Record Keeping & Benchmarking - www.beefresearch.ca/resources/recordkeeping/record-keeping-and-benchmarking-overview.cfm Feed Testing - www.beefresearch.ca/research/feed-value-estimator.cfm Ball, D.M., M. Collins, G.D. Lacefield, N.P. Martin, D.A. Mertens, K.E. Olson, D.H. Putnam, D.J. Undersander, and M.W. Wolf. 2001. Understanding Forage Quality. American Farm Bureau Federation Publication 1-01, Park Ridge, IL Digman, M., D. Undersander, K. Shinners and C. Saxe. 2011. Best Practices to Hasten Field Drying of grasses and alfalfa. University of Wisconsin – Extension, Cooperative Extension Publication A3927, Madison, WI

91


FOCUS UNDER THE HIDE Alberta ranch earns Certified Angus Beef award.

By Morgan Boecker, Producer Communications Manager, Certified Angus Beef In the distance, corn stalks rustle and soft lowing is heard. Cows call to their calves to pair back up after being moved to their winter home. Inside the red, ranch-style farmhouse, lively chatter and laughter fill the dining room as the Niznik family gathers for supper after a long day’s work. It’s the sight and sounds of fall at Niznik Ranch in Brooks, Alberta. Brothers Brad and Bruce Niznik carefully plan and meticulously execute all tasks. To anyone else it’s just another ranch, but for the Niznik family, it’s home. From the bulls they buy, the cows they cull and the grass their cattle graze, each decision is evaluated based on how it affects the ranch’s economics, the land and the family. “We’re capitalizing on data and raising the best product and doing the best with the environment we’re given,” Brad says. “It is a culmination. Our goal is to reach the top, to be the best at what we do.” This management style earned the Niznik family the Certified Angus Beef (CAB) 2021 Canadian Commitment to Excellence award. Better Living Producing the best starts with a strong base. “If you’ve got a good Angus cow, you can probably make a good living with her,” Bruce says, adding that technology takes the guesswork out of finding and breeding “good” ones. “We won’t buy a bull if we do not know what’s under the hide,” he says. “The ultimate animal we want to produce is a Prime, Yield Grade one.” They’ve differentiated their cattle to fit into a premium beef market by buying bulls that rank in the top 5% of the breed for marbling and above-average ribeye area, among other traits. They use genetic testing to pinpoint traits they want in their replacement heifers. “We run a closed herd,” Bruce says. “The one opportunity to add new genetics is from the purebred producer using every available technology to improve their herd so that we can improve ours.” A successful partnership with their bull supplier requires similar goals, Bruce says. That’s why the Nizniks continue to use Cudlobe Angus bulls. As a customer, it also gives them access to a ready market in the Cudlobe-influenced feeder calf sale. Each year they see return buyers bid on their calves. “If the market’s terrible, we have the top of the terrible market,” Bruce says. “But when it’s a good market, it’s really good for us.” They’ve created a reputation for calves that perform on the rail, with recent loads averaging 32% Prime and 68% AAA.

The Niznik family works together to make the ranch their home, and have for generations.

Results like that start with genetics. “A lot of people might not think that’s on the mind of people producing beef,” Bruce says. “But to people like us, that’s our end goal.” “Certified Angus Beef delivers that product,” Brad adds. “A product that people want, all over the world.” The Ripple Effect With incremental progress, came steady growth and increased efficiency in the Niznik cow herd. Twenty years ago, 700 cows were a lot, and the family worked tirelessly to keep them fed. The short summers were spent in the hay fields and long winters meant hours each day in the tractor. “Basically, in this country, all you do is prepare for winter,” Bruce says, “because they’re hard.” Twelve years ago, they turned cows out on full corn stalks for the winter and they’ve done it every year since. They went from putting more than 1,000 hours on a tractor in the winter to 100, from feeding hay six months to just three weeks. “That was probably as big of a change on this place as the round baler was for our dad,” Bruce says. Their summers changed, too. Less time was spent baling hay, resulting in fewer expenses. The cattle are handled less and grazing longer, doing more with less. Now, there’s more time for the ranchers to focus on their family. Today, the ranch supports more than 1,000 head and supports four families. The brothers hope it will be a place for the fifth generation to return, Bruce says. “Everyone knows their place and contributes in their own way,” Bruce’s wife Jodi says. “I think everyone has the same passion to make Niznik Ranch what it is today and something in the future.” It’s a place to instill grit in the family and a focus on raising cattle that produce high-quality beef for generations to come.



British Columbia BRITISH COLUMBIA JAN President Bob Miller

Vice President Robyn Burt

Tobiano, BC (250) 819-0858 bobmiller@ownershipid.ca

Quesnel, BC (250) 991-2993 robynburt@hotmail.com

Secretary/Treasurer Kristina Moller

Past President Vacant

Quesnel, BC (250) 991-0921 kmranch2763@gmail.com

Board Representative Tom deWaal Prince George, BC (250) 562-5200 tom@harvestangus.com Expiry: 2024 BC Junior Angus Wade MacDonald Vanderhoof, BC jbar3cattle@gmail.com

21st Annual Peace Country Beef Congress Dawson Creek, BC

MAY

BC Cattlemen’s AGM and Convention Ft. St. John, BC

AUG

16–18 Canadian Beef Industry Conference Penticton, BC

SEPT

BC Angus Association AGM BC Gold Show Armstrong, BC

Gold Show Burns Lake, BC

OCT BC Junior Angus Association Coordinator Carley Henniger Kamloops, BC (250) 571-3475 henniger.bcangus@gmail.com

Events

Angus Influence Feeder Sales held at Okanagan Falls, Kamloops, Williams Lake and Vanderhoof, BC

All events are subject to change and cancellation. Some events may be adjusted for virtual attendance.

www.bcangus.ca For more information, please contact the BC Angus Association for inquiries regarding events in 2022. 94


BRITISH COLUMBIA

Statistics collected from November 2020 through October 2021

1,925 38 864 96 Registrations

Transfers

Junior Memberships

Young Breeder Memberships

Annual Memberships

13

Total New Members

Active Life Memberships

8

15

95


Validation of Genetic Technology and GEPD By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association

Technology, in all aspects of beef production, is advancing at an incredible pace. What seemed impossible a decade ago is now considered common practice. It has been almost a decade since we started using genomic technology as a genetic selection tool. Particularly for traits that are difficult or expensive to measure like feed intake and carcass quality traits, genomic technology has allowed us to make more accurate predictions of genetic merit. The idea is to identify animals with superior genetic merit for certain traits and use them for breeding, thereby improving the genetic potential of the next generation for those traits. Canadian Angus Association members invest a lot of time, money and effort in Angus GS testing their cattle. Therefore, we wanted to validate our genomic technology and the resulting genomically enhanced EPDs (GEPDs). For this study we used performance information from 2,795 calves from 173 seedstock and commercial herds. We categorized the bulls as low performance (bottom 33%), medium performance (middle 33%) and high performance (top 33%) for each trait. Next, we compared the average performance for calves from low performance bulls to calves from medium performance bulls and calves from high performance bulls. Here is what we found: on average, calves from high performance bulls weighed 47 pounds more at weaning than calves from low performance bulls. Further, calves from high performance bulls averaged 101 pounds more at yearling compared to calves from low performance bulls. In the case of birth weight, there was an 8-pound difference between the low and high sire groups. The table below summarizes these results.

Calf Performance Average calf birth weight (lb) Average calf weaning weight (lb) Average calf yearling weight (lb)

Low Performance Sires

Medium Performance Sires

High Performance Sires

76

78

84

588

625

635

998

1,010

1,099

Ultimately, using calf performance data from both seedstock and commercial operations, we found that genomic technology (the Angus GS test specifically) and GEPDs do a good job of identifying breeding stock that have high genetic merit for growth traits. Results from this study clearly demonstrate that Canadian Angus producers can confidently use GEPDs to identify and use higher performance sires to drive genetic improvement within their herds. Next steps involve repeating this exercise for other traits that are included in our genetic evaluations.

96




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HEART AUCTIONEER RYAN KONYNENBELT

RED U2 BONO

MARCH 19

2022

RED MINBURN COPENHAGEN

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CLINTON RODEO GROUNDS CLINTON , BRITISH COLUMBIA

BULLS CAN BE VIEWED THIS WINTER AT U2 RANCH . COALDALE, AB AND AT THE CLINTON RODEO GROUNDS 1 WEEK PRIOR TO THE SALE BRAD & ALETA CHAPPELL . 6409 TSOLUM RIVER RD COURTENAY, BC V9N 7J3 . (250) 897-0619 email: rdangus@telus.net LIMESTONE CHAROLAIS . CLINTON, BC . CRAIG & CARRIE ALLISON & BRENDA MILLER . (250) 706-7987 find us on facebook


canadaid.ca

CCIA

CANADIAN CATTLE IDENTIFICATION AGENCY

Ultra High Frequency UHF Technology Opportunity While UHF has existed for quite some time, a resurged interest has surfaced as the advantages become more appealing with upcoming regulatory amendments. Recent work by industry has uncovered opportunities and challenges for implementing the technology in Canada. A basic understanding of protocols and timelines will help with these decisions.

What is UHF? Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) is the band of frequencies on the electromagnetic spectrum between 860-960Mhz.

UHF technologies transmit data between the transceiver and the transponder. The robustness of the technology allows fast, efficient data transfer of information, primarily in the supply chain now. UHF ear tags utilize this technology to communicate unique information between the animal and the equipment collecting the data. UHF is faster and has additional benefits not found with Low Frequency technology (LF – what is available now).

Why all the interest? Rapid collection of tag data allowing animals to move at the speed of commerce is driving interest.

Segments of the livestock production sector are eyeing performance benefits that are available with advanced technologies such as UHF. Faster read-rates for livestock, longer read-ranges of ear tags, group scans of animals, and higher read rates of tags at critical junctures (processing and auction markets).

Who are the key players? • Tag and technology manufacturers • International Organization of Standardization (ISO) • Registration Authorities (ICAR) • Competent Authority (CFIA)

Key players generally bring identification products and technologies to the market. These components must work in unison to support markets and governments who build and manage traceability systems for the benefit of everyone. Without this cooperation, there would be incompatible systems that wouldn’t mesh.

• Responsible Administrators (i.e., CCIA) 1-877-909-2333 | info@canadaid.ca | canadaid.ca | support.canadaid.ca | tags.canadaid.ca 100


UHF Technology Opportunity

When could it be implemented? • Non-official UHF tags/equipment is available for use by specific sectors of industry including cattle feeding, bison, swine, dairy, and processing. Optimization of UHF is difficult without specific standardization, but it can be used to provide speed and efficiency in select market channels.

Moving to a UHF technology platform will be a significant change for the livestock industry. There is no real way to transition from LF technology. It will need to pivot to the new platform and run concurrently if deemed advantageous overall. Current ISO standards keeps our tags compatible with other systems in the world. Working within the global standard is important for industry.

• Software has been developed/ adapted to cross-reference official LF tags with UHF tag numbers in concurrent system.

• provision of matched pairs (LF+UHF) and/or custom marked UHF tags

• Reader/antenna options and cost analysis for co-mingling sites could begin. • Modifications to CLTS data field for UHF tag number sequence (24-digit vs 15-digit)

1st year: UHF tag retention studies could be completed using modified LF tests in the National Identification and Methodology Advisory Committee (NIDMAC) testing Framework: • dual technology tag available for cattle 2nd year: UHF tag longevity data will be available on tags in use: • readers adapted for use in transport and high-capacity co-mingling sites 3rd year: UHF animal numbering scheme and testing standards will be in place and supported by ISO countries and trading partners: • approved UHF tags available meeting Canadian standards • ISO Standardized UHF tags approved in USA

How is CCIA involved? UHF has evolved from its introduction to livestock over 15 years ago. Lack of standards for the livestock sector have prevented the widespread introduction and adoption of system-wide UHF transponders as identifiers for livestock. The traditional path for a new technology approval is convoluted, but the CCIA Board of Directors had identified the merit of exploring the technology a few years ago.

• UHF technology investigation initiated 2018 (back-tags, deadstock tags, dual-ear tags) • UHF research project: Literature review and technology readiness assessment of ultra-high frequency radio frequency identification to Canadian livestock applications completed in early 2021 Recommended next steps include gap analysis and implementation plan for Canada • Development of technology implementation pathway for CCIA board to assess (work plan) • Ongoing consultations with governments on mutually beneficial options • CCIA supporting work on ISO Standards development, NIDMAC Framework adaptation, and field testing • CCIA conversing and sharing learnings with other UHF supportive countries 101


Canadian Angus Tags

The Tag with Benefits Angus-branded programs across Canada need and want to verify that what they are selling as Angus is indeed Angus. One way to prove that is by procuring cattle that are tagged Canadian Angus.

Tagging your animals with Canadian Angus tags has its benefits: •

Sell direct or through one of the 169 Canadian Angus Feeder Sales across Canada.

Canadian Angus tags visually and electronically identify Angus and Angus cross cattle. It’s our guarantee that the animal bearing the tag has a minimum of 50% Angus genetics.

CCIA compliant indicator—no other RFID indicator is required for national identification.

There are a number of branded beef programs in Canada that are unable to find enough verified Angus cattle to satisfy their program demands. The only way to verify? With our Canadian Angus tag!

Many Angus branded programs require Angus verification for qualification into their programs. Maximize your marketing opportunities by using Canadian Angus tags.

As more and more global markets demand the Angus brand, sourcing cattle to meet our brand specs becomes of increasing importance and value. The assurance that the CAA tag provides knowing purchased cattle will qualify for our Angus brands takes the guesswork out of the equation and adds value into the cattle we acquire. Nicolas Ednie Bouvry Exports Canada

By being part of the CAA tag program and working with the CAA, Authentic Angus was able to be the first Canadian beef brand in Europe to feature the Rancher Endorsed logo. Using the logo and having the backing of the CAA has given us additional credibility in the market and allowed us to simplify the process for making our Angus beef label claim. David Saretsky Authentic Angus

Ordering your Canadian Angus RFID indicators has never been so easy:

Please order directly from CCIA online at www.canadaid.ca or call 1-877-909-2333 CCIA carries both the Datamars brand Temple Tag ComfortEar Canadian Angus RFID indicator as well as the Allflex brand Canadian Angus RFID indicator.

Canadian Angus tagged animals are in high demand by Canadian Angus beef programs. Order your Canadian Angus management tags directly through the Canadian Angus Association. Order online www.cdnangus.ca/adding-value/ordering-caa-management-tags or call 1-888-571-3580.

102


Considerations for Wintering Beef Cows

By Breanna Anderson, Consulting Ruminant Nutritionist, BeefSmart Consulting

The winter feeding period in Canada can last upwards of 200 days and plays a major role in the success of your herd production. Beef cow requirements are influenced by a number of factors including stage of production, body weight, age, breed and environmental conditions. Body condition scoring your herd is a great management tool that allows you to better assess the herd’s needs for the upcoming winter. Cow body condition can impact maintenance requirements and the cow’s ability to calve, rebreed and raise a healthy calf. Research has shown time and time again that cows in proper body

condition at calving (2.5–3 body condition score [BCS] on mature cows; 3 BCS on young cows) rebreed sooner and have better overall pregnancy rates. Thin cows can take 30–40% more feed to overwinter, whereas obese cows can have calving issues and may be slower to rebreed. Body condition scoring in a year like this when feed costs have skyrocketed helps you better manage who to cull or how best to utilize the feeds you have. A beef cow’s energy and protein requirements follow the same general path. Her protein and energy requirements are lowest at 7–8 months post calving when calves are weaned and pregnancy requirements are low. Requirements increase as gestation reaches the third trimester and peak at calving through the first 60 days of lactation; therefore the last 60 days of gestation and first 60 days of lactation are key areas of focus. In the last trimester the fetus grows rapidly, mammary development ahead of lactation occurs, and colostrum production begins. Following calving, the cow works hard to increase milk production and return to estrous to be bred within 80 days of calving. First and second lactation females also have body growth demands which add further pressure to their nutritional requirements. Intakes around calving can often decrease which further compounds the issue, however many producers worry about overfeeding in the last trimester as it could increase calf birth weights. There is a risk on the flip side where underfeeding can create a calf that has

failure to thrive and a cow without the fitness to deliver. Be sure to balance for protein and energy requirements and avoid playing catch up on body condition in the last 60 days to set the herd up for success. Crude protein and total digestible nutrients (TDN) requirements of the herd are often the focus of discussion and producers look at these results on a feed test first to see if it will meet requirements. The digestibility of the feed is often overlooked and impacts intake and nutrient availability. For example, a cow can get by on a straw and grain diet if needed, but a diet of barley straw and barley grain likely has a much different overall digestibility and energy and protein balance than a diet of flax straw and screening pellets. On diets with large amounts of straw or fibrous feed ingredients, a proper feed test becomes increasingly important to better understand how the fibre will break down in the rumen and the availability of the protein and energy in the given feedstuff. Proper vitamin and mineral supplementation to match on-farm feeds is important to avoid deficiencies or toxicities on farm. Mineral supplementation has come a long way from grabbing a bag of 2:1 during calving and 1:1 during breeding from your local feed stores. Avoid comparing tags as you can easily overlook target feeding rates, actual animal intake (palatability) and ingredient quality. Since many of the forages put up in western Canada were under drought stress this year, vitamin and mineral availability in forages could be even lower than normal. Work with your nutritionist to make sure you are meeting mineral and vitamin requirements. Meeting the beef herd’s needs is a balancing act, and in years like this when forage quantity and quality are limited and ingredients are costly, it can seem like an overwhelming task. Reach out to your fellow producers or local nutritionist to see if there are some creative ways to stretch the feed you have and ensure a seamless calving season ahead. 103


What is

Your sale catalogue has never looked so good! Looking for Canadian Angus content to beef up your sale catalogue? The Canadian Angus Association is pleased to offer a variety of press-ready ads for your sale catalogue.

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Want to explain EPDs? We got you covered. Looking to highlight Canadian Angus RFID indicators? Consider it showcased. Interested in promoting the value of transfers? So are we. Believe that Juniors are the future? We’re on the same page!

In exchange for sharing our advertisements in your sale catalogue, we will offer you a $250 credit as a thank you.*

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Please contact the Association at 1-888-571-3580 or cdnangus@cdnangus.ca to request your ad. .

Visit www.cdnangus.ca/buyers-sellers/helping-you-prepare-for-your-sale for more information and to download available press-ready ads. *Credit is valid only towards Canadian Angus Association merchandise and clothing purchases. $250 credit is only offered for placement of full-page Canadian Angus ads in published sale catalogues. Proof of published catalogue must be submitted to the Association for credit. Maximum one $250 credit per sale.

The Canadian Angus Association has branded merchandise available for sale. Looking for a comfy hoodie (or bunny hug if you live in Saskatchewan)? Need a warm toque? Wanting to update your show vest? Searching for a stylish jacket?

New items are being offered regularly. For the current list of items available for sale, please visit www.cdnangus.ca/buyers-sellers/merchandise/

www.cdnangus.ca/buyers-sellers/merchandise To order, contact the Association at 1-888-571-3580 or email cdnangus@cdnangus.ca. 104


GS

Angus GS Testing It’s important to plan for when you will want your Angus GS test results. The test turnaround time from when the sample arrives at the lab is 21 calendar days (lab staff work through weekends). The deadline for data going into our monthly AngusONE genetic evaluation is the 15th of the month. The results of the genetic evaluation will be posted after the first weekend of the following month. For example, if you submit your request on January 1, the next genetic evaluation would be the February evaluation, so the results would be received well in time for the February 15 deadline. The results of that genetic evaluation would be published on March 4.

Submit DNA sample CAA test request Jan. 1

Jan. 2

Test Results

DNA sample received Jan. 7

Genetic Evaluation

Data Into Evaluation

Jan. 28

Feb. 15

Feb. 20

GEPDs Mar. 4

If you need your Angus GS test results back for a specific date, please plan ahead. You can see from this timeline you will need to request the test and submit your samples well in advance.

dear

Canadian Angus Association

member:

AngusNOW workshop

Our member service team is offering one-on-one workshops for AngusNOW via Zoom (walk through with shared screen) or phone call (verbal walk through). If you are wondering how to: • Enter your calf information • Enter weaning or yearling weights • Do disposals • Do transfers • Look up information on what animals you have • Run reports for performance (EPD) information • Retrieve reports • Change information on your account

Then this workshop is for you!

: :

Take this opportunity to set up your own private session to help you with all aspects of AngusNOW.

Please email registry@cdnangus.ca to book a date and time.

We look forward to helping you! 105


How to Get OneCup AI Cameras Powered by BETSY Onto Your Operation Who and what is OneCup AI? OneCup AI uses computer vision to uniquely identify livestock and wildlife from almost any angle, effectively a type of facial recognition software for animals, called 360 Live ID. With 360 Live ID and artificial intelligence (AI), we then track health, growth, activity, nutrition and phenotypes. It is a revolutionary idea that will disrupt the agricultural industry. Our company name, OneCup, originates from the idea of managing your herd over a cup of coffee.

How does BETSY work? OneCup’s technology replaces animalattached hardware with contact-free visionpowered software. Our cameras and edge computing devices play the role of trained ranch hands. BETSY has the intelligence and skills of a farmer or rancher, embedded into a device the size of a small book or hosted in the cloud. Each camera produces around 200 million points of data every month. Her eyes are cameras strategically placed at a farm or ranch to capture animal activity.

What is BETSY? We call our artificial intelligence for cattle BETSY, or Bovine Expert Tracking and Surveillance. BETSY is a computer program that uses vision to observe different characteristics of cattle. Unlike traditional engineering where computers are programmed, BETSY is taught. She learns the skills she needs to possess—just as a child would learn how to read a book. OneCup AI builds a different AI for each species; currently, we have swine, sheep, horses, bison, elk and others. Why did OneCup AI create BETSY? The idea originated in the summer of 2019 when we were sitting around a campfire with our ranching family members. They explained the tracking and livestock monitoring challenges facing the industry. Ranchers explained how animals can lose their tags or how shipping animals is a manual process. They described how an animal could develop a disease or how challenging calving season can be. We realized that automated computer vision could address many of their needs, at a low cost, on farms and ranches around the world. 106

all the historical footage for a single animal. With the click of a button, it is possible to index and locate all individual animal instances in captured footage. How is Betsy proactive? BETSY does much more than monitor and track your animals. When BETSY senses that an animal needs assistance, such as during calving season, she will notify you. Notifications take the form of emails or text messages. In addition, BETSY records a log of all events she observes for reference purposes. How is BETSY set up on a farm or ranch? OneCup AI provides all the hardware needed to run BETSY. A BETSY system typically consists of WiFi gear, an edge computer, and four to six cameras to begin. However, many of our sites have scaled up to 8 to 10 or more cameras. Each system is pre-programmed before it leaves our shop to enable plug and play at our client sites.

How does a farmer or rancher use BETSY? OneCup AI provides a friendly and easyto-understand interface on both mobile and web to access your animal data. At any time, a farmer or rancher can pull up the information on their herd or dive into the details of any single animal. You can be in your home enjoying a cup of coffee or viewing our animal data on a mobile device in the field. Having your herd’s information at your fingertips is what BETSY is all about. BETSY tracks every time she identifies an animal. An everyday use case is to pull up

If you have high-speed Internet at your location, such as SpaceX’s Starlink, BETSY can also work using the cloud. In this way, BETSY pulls in feeds from cameras on site and processes the footage remotely. OneCup AI recommends signing up for high-speed Internet for the optimal user experience. This is especially true when pulling up live footage on a mobile device. Where do I install the cameras? Our cameras talk to BETSY using Wi-Fi. They are powered in one of three ways—


BETSY

Computer Vision AI

1 Edge Computer Handles Up to 16 Cameras

2

3

1

solar, power over ethernet (POE) or regular AC power. As long as the cameras can communicate with BETSY, they can serve as BETSY’s eyes on the ground. OneCup AI recommends placing cameras anywhere the animals congregate or pass through regularly. A feeding station, watering hole, gate or barn are natural locations for the cameras. Can the cameras handle extreme weather conditions? Last year, OneCup AI deployed cameras to more than a dozen locations to test camera reliability. We found that the cameras could withstand heat, rain and cold without issues. Even the solar cameras could remain charged in the dead of winter. Our single biggest loss of cameras was due to animals playing with the cameras or eating the cables. What if I have my own cameras? BETSY can also work with many preinstalled cameras. If you have calving cams or some other camera setup, BETSY can use these video sources. However, not all cameras are compatible, and we review cameras on a case-by-case basis.

What are common use cases? For a farm or ranch, the most common use case is around calving time. BETSY tracks the contractions of expecting heifers to help determine the time of delivery. During the birth process, BETSY records the duration and if the calf is in breech position. After birth, BETSY watches closely to see if a calf is standing and able to suckle its colostrum. Can BETSY track phenotypes? OneCup AI is working with the Canadian Angus Association to train BETSY to classify phenotypes. We are teaching BETSY to classify hooves, udders, teats and claws. OneCup AI believes that BETSY can help standardize the measure of phenotypes using vision. She would be consistent across different herds and locations. For example, a hoof score of five would be the same regardless of where the images were captured or which herd it is, giving the industry a reliable method to record phenotypes. How do I sign up? To sign up for BETSY, please visit www.onecup.ai and fill out an application form online. 107


Maritimes

MARITIMES JAN

Events

Maritime Angus Association AGM Nova Scotia

President Amy Higgins

Vice President Tim Dixon

APR

Quispamsis, NB (506) 349-5395 amy.higgins808@gmail.com

Albany, PEI (902) 432-4771 dixonfarms1@live.com

Maritime Beef Test Station Bull & Heifer Sale Nappan, Nova Scotia

JUN

9–11 National Canadian Angus Convention

Board Representative Ronnie Ford Oyster Bed, PEI (902) 394-0059 ronnie.ford@bellaliant.net Expiry: 2023 Maritime Junior Angus Beverly Booth Jolicure, NB (506) 364-2853 boofer37@gmail.com

AUG SUMMER SEPT

Old Home Week Angus Gold Show & Futurity Charlottetown, PEI Maritime Angus Field Day & Junior Heifer Show New Brunswick Beef Expo Gold Show & Futurity Sussex, New Brunswick Heritage Beef Classic Gold Show Windsor, Nova Scotia

OCT

Atlantic Alliance Sale Nappan, Nova Scotia Maritime Beef Conference New Brunswick

All events are subject to change and cancellation. Some events may be adjusted for virtual attendance.

www.maritimeangus.com For more information, please contact the Maritime Angus Association for inquiries regarding events in 2022. 108


MARITIMES

Statistics collected from November 2020 through October 2021

332

Registrations

115

Transfers

Junior Memberships

14

Young Breeder Memberships

Annual Memberships

51

9

Total New Members

Active Life Memberships

1

4

109


110


Notice of Canadian Angus Association Annual General Meeting Notice is hereby given that the Canadian Angus Association Annual General Meeting will be held on Saturday, June 11, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. at Delta Hotels Beausejour by Marriott (750 Main Street) in Moncton, New Brunswick for the purpose of: • Receiving and considering the annual report and financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2021 and the report of the auditors thereon • Review and acceptance of the 2019, 2020 and 2021 annual general meeting minutes • Transacting such further and other business as may properly come before the meeting Voting cards will be available for pick up at the registration table on site Saturday, June 11 from 8:00–9:00 a.m. only. Late entrance to the meeting is permitted but no voting cards will be handed out after 9:00 a.m.

Avis de convocation à l'assemblée générale annuelle de l'Association Canadian Angus Avis est par les présentes donné que l'assemblée générale annuelle de l'Association Canadian Angus aura lieu le samedi 11 juin 2022, à 9 h, au Delta Hotels Beausejour by Marriott (750, rue Principale (750 Main Street)), à Moncton, au Nouveau-Brunswick, aux fins suivantes : • Réception et examen du rapport annuel et des états financiers pour l'exercice clos le 31 décembre 2021, ainsi que du rapport des vérificateurs sur ces derniers. • Examen et acceptation des procès-verbaux des assemblées générales annuelles de 2019, 2020 et 2021 • Traiter toutes les autres questions qui peuvent être dûment soumises à l'assemblée. Les bulletins de vote pourront être obtenus uniquement sur place, à la table d’inscription, le samedi 11 juin de 8h00 à 9h00. L’entrée tardive à la réunion est autorisée mais les bulletins de vote ne seront pas distribués après 9h00.

111


Introducing you to the new HPG EPD By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association

of getting pregnant at first exposure than the average daughters from Bull B.

The new Canadian Angus Association Heifer Pregnancy (HPG) EPD is an exciting tool to bring to our members and commercial customers. Fertility is the most impactful factor in the profitability and sustainability of beef production. Having a genetic selection tool that identifies animals with superior genetic potential for increased fertility is important. The new HPG EPD describes the probability of a bull’s daughters getting pregnant at first exposure. The higher the EPD, the higher the probability of pregnancy. Bull A HPG EPD = 15 Bull B HPG EPD = 10 Expected Difference in Progeny = 5

HPG EPDs are calculated from female exposure data submitted by Canadian Angus Association members. This exposure data is cross-referenced with resulting calf or cow status information. This tells us if a female was exposed, the bull that bred her, and whether the breeding resulted in a calf or an open female. The Canadian Angus Association Performance Program is based on whole herd reporting so that we have this information for all females in the cow herd which allows us to estimate the genetic potential for heifer pregnancy with increasing accuracy. As with all other complex traits, there is a genetic component to heifer pregnancy and an environmental one. The heritability of Heifer Pregnancy, within our population, is estimated at 0.15. This means

In this example, the daughters from Bull A will, on average, have a 5% higher probability

112

that 15% of the variation observed in heifer pregnancy rates is due to genetic factors. It also means that using HPG EPDs in your breeding program can increase the genetic potential for fertility in your cow herd. Considering that reproductive efficiency is the most deterministic factor towards profitability in beef production, a genetic selection tool that identifies animals that have higher genetic potential of successful conception is exciting. The potential positive impact of this EPD in the Canadian beef herd is significant. CAA Director of Science and Technology Kajal Devani is happy to answer questions about the HPG EPD or our suite of other genetic selection tools. Please see page 114 for information on our male fertility project.


wheatley riVer farm PUREBRED ANGUS & COMMERCIAL SIMMENTAL-ANGUS

Wheatley River Harlyn 12H

Wheatley River Harper 11H

East Coast Black & Red Angus Ronnie Ford 585 Crooked Creek Road, PEI 902-394-0059 ronnie.ford@bellaliant.net

isitors Vwelcome 113


MALE FERTILITY

PROJECT By Drs. Megan Rolf, Kansas State University and Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association

Fertility is the primary factor in beef operation profitability and sustainability. Across the board, producers aim to maximize the number of calves weaned per cow exposed. There are also many advantages to getting cows bred early in the breeding season. Canadian Angus producers currently have access to two genetic selection tools associated with fertility: Heifer Pregnancy and Scrotal Circumference EPDs. The Heifer Pregnancy (HPG) EPD describes the probability of a heifer becoming pregnant at first exposure. The higher the HPG EPD the higher this probability. However, the correlation between male and female fertility is low. Canadian Angus producers also measure scrotal circumference and thus have access to Scrotal Circumference (SC) EPDs. Typically, SC EPDs are used as an indicator of bull maturity and age at puberty for daughters. However, studies show low correlations between SC and factors that impact male fertility including libido (the desire to breed), physical soundness (the physical

ability to breed) and semen quality (volume, concentration, motility, abnormalities). Although it varies significantly between herds, a percentage of bulls fail their breeding soundness exams. And, because bulls have to reach puberty to be tested, significant time and resources have already been invested in animals that cannot be marketed for their intended purpose. Identifying and selecting for bulls that would be more likely to pass a breeding soundness exam would save producers the cost of developing those bulls. In addition, deferrals and low conception bulls are expensive and difficult to manage. The objective of this USDA-funded, fiveyear male fertility project in partnership with Kansas State University, the University of Wisconsin, the American Angus Association and the Canadian Angus Association is to identify and evaluate the impact of semen quality traits in genetic evaluation. It will utilize data recorded during semen testing (breeding soundness examinations) as well as beef on dairy conception data to develop a prototype sire conception rate EPD and investigate the importance of semen quality

traits. This project will result in a suggested model for evaluation of male fertility in beef bulls utilizing semen quality metrics that are already collected by producers and their veterinarians. Thus, from this project, the American and Canadian Angus Associations will have a framework to include male fertility in their routine genetic evaluations. The project includes estimating the genetic correlation between semen quality traits and other production traits such as growth, carcass quality and scrotal circumference. The project will also endeavour to evaluate the effects of heat stress and cold stress on semen quality metrics. For traits that are heritable and important to male fertility, the team will work towards identifying SNP markers that might be used to improve the accuracy of any future genetic evaluations for male fertility. The potential benefits of genetic selection for increased male fertility are numerous and significant to the industry. The Canadian Angus Association is proud to be a partner in this project. We encourage members who routinely semen test their animals to submit their semen test results for use in this project (email your reports to CAA Director of Science and Technology, Kajal Devani at kdevani@cdnangus.ca). Currently, estimates of heritability of semen quality traits vary between different populations. It is important to study these traits, and to identify which of these traits are heritable and important to the male component of conception rates in our population.

“ The potential

benefits of genetic selection for increased male fertility are numerous and significant to the industry.

114


The New Traits and Angus GS Program In our recent survey, Canadian Angus members and commercial customers identified traits that are of economic and utmost importance for them. In order for your Canadian Angus Association to deliver EPDs for these traits we need to start measuring and recording these new traits.

YOUR ASSOCIATION HAS AN INCREDIBLE OFFER FOR MEMBERS WHO MEASURE AND RECORD MATURE COW WEIGHTS! We have partnered with Neogen Canada to offer you the Angus GS genomic test (which includes parentage verification). $25/cow on cows with records of the following traits: • Mature cow weights (taken within 45 days of calf weaning weight) • Body condition score (taken on date of mature cow weight)

• Hoof angle and claw set • Teat and udder (taken within 72 hours of calving)

• Docility This offer is only available to the first 5,000 head enrolled. Each will receive the Angus GS test at the discounted price of $25/test. The Angus GS test gives members more accurate: • EPDs • Genomic percentile ranks • Parentage verification The CAA parentage verification policy requires all sires (born on or after January 1, 2019) to be parent verified so having Angus GS testing on your cow herd is of great value!

To enroll for this offer, please contact Kajal Devani at kdevani@cdnangus.ca or 403-537-5604. 115


Factors That Affect Your Sales 2021 Statistics Produced by Red Angus Association of America’s Commercial Marketing Team Compiled by Carmen Koning and Christy Lavallee

Factors that affect cattle sales, just like how operations are run, vary for producers from region to region. But there are some common factors that are worth noting for how customers respond to the various components that go into a sale. Everything from how a catalogue is presented to the weather on the day of that sale can affect the bottom line. The following statistics were compiled from the fall 2020 and spring 2021 bull sale season by the Red Angus Association of America’s Commercial Marketing Team. Even though the statistics are specific to Red Angus sold in the United States, the information they convey is beneficial to Black and Red Angus sold throughout Canada and the United States.

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Offering Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Number of Bulls Offered $6,000 $5,500 $5,000 $4,500

$5,604

17%

$4,644 $4,284

Over 100

$3,000

39%

$2,500 $2,000

Less than 50

50 to 100

Over 100 Quantity of Sales

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Age of Bulls Offered - $5,500 $4,978 $5,143

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Perception and Reputation

$4,000

12%

0 to 3 4 5

64%

5 Quantity of Sales

*Catalogue Quality Score includes paper quality and binding, full colour versus black and white, picture quality, organization and legibility, and information provided

$4,500

Quantity of Sales

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Supplemental Data

$5,500 $5,000 $4,500 $4,000

$4,810 34% $4,087 No Yes

$3,500

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Number of Years Having Sale $6,000 $5,500 $5,000

Yearling 18-Month-Olds 2-Year-Olds Mixed Ages

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Ultrasound Data

$2,500

Average Price

$3,000

66%

$2,500 $2,000 No

Yes Quantity of Sales

Average Price $5,689 $5,068 $4,533

Less than 10

24%

$4,591

39%

$4,000 $3,500

10-19 years 20-29 years

13%

$3,000

More than 30 years

$2,500 $2,000 Less than 10 years

10-19 years

20-29 years

Average Price

More than 30 years

24% Quantity of Sales

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Feed Intake Data $5,500

$5,177

$5,000 $4,500

14%

$4,464

$4,000

No Yes

$3,500 $3,000 86%

$2,500 $2,000 No

Yes Average Price

116

Mixed Ages

13%

Average Price

24%

4

2-Year-Olds 58%

$3,000

$4,495

0 to 3

18-Month-Olds

$3,500

$3,500

$2,000

Yearling 9%

$4,000

$2,000

$3,869

$3,000

20%

$4,761

$4,500

$2,500

$5,238

$4,500

$4,881

$5,000

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Catalogue Quality Score* $5,000

50 to 100

$3,500

Average Price

$5,500

Less than 50

44%

$4,000

Quantity of Sales


Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Weather $5,500

$5,319

$5,000

15%

$4,925

$4,766

$4,500

Bad

$4,000 $3,500

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Setting

$5,500

$2,500 $2,000

Nice Quantity of Sales

$5,500

$4,966

$5,000

30%

Ranch

$4,500

$4,000

Sale Barn

$4,000

$3,500

Other (Feedlot, Fairgrounds, etc)

$3,500

$3,000

63%

$2,500 $2,000

OK

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Online Bidding Availability 7%

$4,450

$4,500

Bad

Average Price

$5,171 $4,457

Nice 67%

$3,000

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Sale Location $5,000

OK

18%

No

$3,831

Yes

$3,000 $2,500

Ranch

Other (Feedlot, Fairgrounds, etc.) Average Price

98%

$2,000

Sale Barn

No

Yes

Quantity of Sales

Quantity of Sales

Average Price

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Customer Service Score $6,000 $5,500 $5,000 $4,500 $4,000

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Customer Service

$5,030 $4,415

0 to 2

$4,097

3 to 4 5 to 6 36%

33%

$2,000

7 to 8 9 to 10

$2,500 0 to 2

3 to 4

5 to 6

7 to 8

9 to 10

Average Price

$5,500 $4,800

$5,000 36%

$4,174

$3,500

Quantity of Sales

No

$4,500

Yes

$4,000

$5,316 $4,620

37%

$3,500 64%

$3,000

15%

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Hospitality

$4,000

No Additional Events 63%

Pre- and/or Post Sale Event

$3,000

$2,500 $2,000

14%

$3,000

$5,500 $5,000

2%

$5,923

$3,500

Factors Affecting Sale Averages: Insurance Offered

$4,500

$5,578

$2,500 No

$2,000

Yes Average Price

Quantity of Sales

No Additional Events

Pre- and/or Post Sale Event

Average Price

Quantity of Sales

Statistics reproduced with courtesy of the Red Angus Association of America. For more information on the Red Angus Association of America, please visit redangus.org. It’s never too early to start preparing for your next sale. Contact the Canadian Angus Association for assistance or visit www.cdnangus.ca/buyers-sellers/helping-you-prepare-for-your-sale for a list of promotional tools available to help promote your business and sell your Angus cattle. 117


2022–2024

Strategic P lan

CANADIAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION

118


MISSION

To Maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and the position of the Angus breed

VISION

The Canadian Angus Association exists to preserve and expand the Angus breed for Canadian cattle producers and beef consumers, providing the best opportunities for profitability today and for future generations

119


E

OBJECTIV

1

LONG-TERM SUSTAINABILITY OF THE ANGUS BREED IN CANADA THROUGH THE CREATION OF MEMBER VALUE AND INDUSTRY VALUE

KEY OUTCOME 1:

Store, protect and record CAA data and information through leading-edge platforms

STRATEGIES:

• Support the development of a state-of-the-art software system for the long-term protection of CAA information that provides members with access to leading-edge technology, tools and reports that create on-farm efficiencies for registering and submitting data on their cattle • Create efficiencies within the industry, ensuring future programming is capable of connecting to other databases and programs relevant to creating industry and product value • Provide easy-to-use dashboards for animal searches and look up • Provide access to efficient reporting • Increase the ease and learning of online registration to develop industry efficiencies

120


“ Information is the oil of the 21st century, and analytics is the combustion engine” Peter Sondergaard

KEY OUTCOME 3: KEY OUTCOME 2:

Oversee the process of updating the Canadian Angus Association Bylaws and policies to ensure the CAA long-term future is protected and the information to members is transparent, understandable and accessible

STRATEGIES:

• Review and rewrite the Canadian Angus Association

Bylaws and present them for membership review in June 2022 • Update and consolidate information in the member handbook for easy access • Develop a searchable member handbook for easy access • Update Association policies to ensure clear division in responsibility within policies and bylaws • Develop standard operating procedures for all staff to remain consistent in processes and interpretation

Ensure the long-term financial stability of the organization

STRATEGIES:

• Complete the 2014-launched initiative to build the CAA reserve fund by the end of the 2024 calendar year to its initial desired target • Develop and implement a strategic opportunity fund to support investment opportunities to create future value for the organization that may arise • Review CAA investment strategies to optimize returns within the desired risk level • Explore new operational efficiencies within the organization, optimizing return value and use of new technology to create new efficiencies and value for all CAA members 121


“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known” Carl Sagan

O

ECTIVE BJ

2

LEVERAGE THE ANGUS ADVANTAGE TO ADVANCE THE ANGUS BREED AND BEEF INDUSTRY

122


KEY OUTCOME 1:

Develop a continuous long-term research strategy supporting key industry concerns and challenges while remaining focused on the value of genetic improvement for the industry

STRATEGIES:

• Commercial validation of current CAA programs and technology for genetic selection • Develop a CAA-focused animal care program supporting all CAA members and the work they do every day • Utilize current data to its fullest capacity to create new metrics in female fertility and longevity • Support further development of industry technology such as artificial intelligence camera systems and their data collection capabilities • Take a leading role in the exploration of industry concerns that can affect the Angus breed such as congestive heart failure

KEY OUTCOME 2:

Develop, implement and support policies and programs supporting breed purity that have been identified as of critical importance to membership

STRATEGIES:

• Ensure breed purity policies such as DNA parentage support the Association’s member-approved mission and vision • Continue to establish strong relationships with key service providers to improve accuracy, service and education

123


E

OBJECTIV

3

COMMUNICATE, COLLABORATE AND EDUCATE

KEY OUTCOME 2: KEY OUTCOME 1:

Continue to develop grassroots programs and platforms to ensure we grow and strengthen strong regional support sharing the CAA mission and vision

STRATEGIES:

• Aid in the development and maintenance of key

124

regional communication platforms to create regional efficiencies such as the development of consistent regional website platforms that connect to the Canadian Angus Association • Utilize CAA resources for the support and development of other communication platforms in the implementation of a regional communication strategy • Share the long-term CAA mission and vision recognizing regional differences and opportunities for increased regional support of that plan through their initiatives • Support key regional activities that support the growth and advancement of the CAA mission and vision

Develop and implement an annual communication strategy to reach all CAA members across various platforms to ensure all members and commercial members are aware of all Angus activities and initiatives

STRATEGIES:

• On an annual basis, CAA will develop an annual publication Angus Life as a key member communication platform for the upcoming year • Develop and implement a social media strategy to inform and engage with members in a timely manner • On a monthly basis, use online resources to communicate pertinent information through the Angus Advisor newsletter • On an annual basis, host our CAA convention in conjunction with our AGM to provide a collaborative and educational platform for all members • Support key regional events across Canada that allow for deeper grassroots engagement with members and customers • Provide one-on-one training for members on CAA platforms • Provide support for regional communication strategies


“To effectively communicate, we must realize that we are all different in the way we perceive the world and use this understanding as a guide to our communication with others.” Tony Robbins

KEY OUTCOME 3:

Expand the reach of Canadian genetics to global markets through global marketing strategies and the development of key international industry relations

STRATEGIES:

• Support all Canadian genetic exporters in their endeavours with documentation, education and other resources they require to ensure Canadian genetics are eligible for registration in foreign markets • Collaborate with key international associations on the development of programs that will enhance international trade and market access • Facilitate key international visitors to Canada through invitations, hosting, presentations or other facilitation to make their in-bound missions successful • Develop a marketing strategy to reach regions of opportunity for Canadian genetics and understanding of Canadian Angus programs that will facilitate the ease of genetic trade

KEY OUTCOME 4:

Identify opportunities and platforms to expand Angus messaging to consumers increasing education about how our product is produced and growing the Canadian Angus brand nationally and globally

STRATEGIES:

• Continue to develop messaging targeted at the consumer on the production of Angus beef • Develop and work with industry partners on the development and messaging of Angus beef products • Continue to identify key platforms of consumer engagement providing opportunities for Angus branding, awareness and education • Grow awareness, acceptance, requirement and value of CAA Angus programming in the eyes of the consumer 125


O

ECTIVE BJ

4

“The only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.” Mark Zuckerberg

126

EXPLORE THE REALMS OF OPPORTUNITY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES THAT SUPPORT CURRENT REVENUE STREAMS FOR THE CANADIAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION


KEY OUTCOME 1:

Develop stronger business relationships with key industry partners in the availability of their products and services to CAA members

STRATEGIES:

• Establish business relationships with industry partners on a variety of products and services utilized by CAA members • Be on the leading edge of new products and technology to the beef industry and be early adopters of value-added products and services

KEY OUTCOME 2:

Support key industry collaboration with valued partners to play our role in moving the entire industry forward and removing barriers of inefficiency

STRATEGIES:

• Take an active and leading participation role on boards, committees and industry meetings to ensure Angus continues to play an important role in their planning • Contribute a leadership role in the CBIN (Canadian Beef Innovation Network) and CBBC (Canadian Beef Breeds Council) platforms ensuring Angus represents a strong voice in future opportunities within the industry • Support the continued development of the CBIN (Canadian Beef Innovation Network) project to explore areas of opportunity for the shared value and improved collaboration of the entire beef industry • Collaborate with industry partners on new programs and initiatives • Develop a strategy for staff and director participation at industry events • Leverage the strength of the Angus brand and the strong consumer reputation of the brand into increased revenue-generating opportunities through value-added programming • Continue growth of CAA green tag program and value tied to the program through industry partners and the value of Angus verification to branded Angus programs

127


L’association Canadian Angus

Le plan stratégique 2022–2024

128


NOTRE MISSION

Maintenir le registre de la race, la pureté de la race et fournir des services qui améliorent la croissance et la position de la race Angus.

NOTRE VISION

L’Association Canadian Angus est chargée de préserver et de développer la race Angus pour les éleveurs et les consommateurs de bœuf canadiens, en leur offrant les meilleures possibilités de rentabilité aujourd’hui et pour les générations futures.

129


O B J EC TIF

1

LA DURABILITÉ À LONG TERME DE LA RACE ANGUS AU CANADA PAR LA CRÉATION DE VALEUR POUR LES MEMBRES ET POUR L’INDUSTRIE.

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°1:

Conserver, protéger et enregistrer les données et informations de la CAA grâce à des plateformes de pointe

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Soutenir le développement d’un système logiciel de pointe pour la protection à long terme de l’information de la CAA qui donne aux membres l’accès à une technologie de pointe, à des outils et à des rapports qui créent des efficacités à la ferme pour l’enregistrement et la soumission des données sur leur bétail. • Créer des efficiences au sein de l’industrie, en s’assurant que la programmation future est capable de se connecter à d’autres bases de données et programmes pertinents pour créer de la valeur pour l’industrie et les produits. • Fournir des tableaux faciles à utiliser pour la recherche et la consultation des animaux. • Fournir un accès à des rapports efficaces • Améliorer la facilité et l’apprentissage de l’enregistrement en ligne afin de développer l’efficacité du secteur.

130


“L ’information est le pétrole du 21e siècle, et l ’analytique le moteur à combustion”. Peter Sondergaard

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°2:

Voir au déroulement du processus de mise à jour des règlements et des politiques de l’Association Canadian Angus afin de s’assurer que l’avenir à long terme de l’ACA est protégé et que l’information aux membres est transparente, compréhensible et accessible.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Réviser et reformuler les règlements de l’Association Canadian Angus et les soumettre à la considération des membres en juin 2022. • Mettre à jour et consolider l’information dans le manuel des membres pour en faciliter l’accès. • Élaborer un manuel des membres consultable pour un accès facile. • Mettre à jour les politiques de l’Association pour assurer une meilleure répartition des responsabilités dans les politiques et les règlements. • Développer des procédures opérationnelles standard pour tout le personnel afin de rester uniforme dans les processus et l’interprétation.

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°3:

Assurer une stabilité financière à long terme de l’organisation

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Achever l’initiative de 2014 visant à constituer le fonds de réserve de la CAA d’ici la fin de l’année civile 2024 pour atteindre son objectif initial. • Développer et mettre en œuvre un fonds d’opportunités stratégiques pour soutenir les opportunités d’investissement qui pourraient se présenter afin de créer une valeur future pour l’organisation. • Revoir les stratégies d’investissement de la CAA afin d’optimiser les rendements en fonction du niveau de risque souhaité. • Exploration de nouvelles efficacités opérationnelles au sein de l’organisation, en optimisant la valeur de rendement et l’utilisation de nouvelles technologies pour créer de nouvelles efficacités et de la valeur pour tous les membres de la CAA. 131


“Quelque part, quelque chose d ’incroyable attend d ’être révélé”. Carl Sagan

O

ECTIF BJ

2

OPTIMISER L’AVANTAGE ANGUS POUR FAIRE PROGRESSER LA RACE ANGUS ET L’INDUSTRIE BOVINE.

132


RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°1:

Développement d’une stratégie de recherche constante à long terme répondant aux préoccupations et aux défis importants de l’industrie tout en restant concentré sur la valeur de l’amélioration génétique pour l’industrie.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Validation commerciale des programmes et de la technologie actuels de la CAA pour la sélection génétique • Développer un programme de soins aux animaux visant à soutenir tous les membres de la CAA et le travail qu’ils accomplissent chaque jour. • Utiliser les données disponibles au maximum pour créer de nouvelles mesures de la fertilité et de la longévité des femelles. • Soutenir le développement de technologies industrielles telles que systèmes de caméras à intelligence artificielle et leurs capacités de collecte de données. • Jouer un rôle de premier plan dans l’exploration des préoccupations de l’industrie qui peuvent affecter la race Angus, comme par exemple l’insuffisance cardiaque congestive.

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°2:

Développez, mettez en œuvre et soutenez les politiques et les programmes qui soutiennent la pureté de la race et qui ont été identifiés comme étant de toute première importance pour les membres.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Veiller à ce que les politiques de pureté de la race, telles que la parenté par l’ADN, soutiennent la mission et la vision approuvées par les membres de l’Association. • Continuer à établir des relations solides avec les principaux fournisseurs de services afin d’améliorer les précisions, le service et la sensibilisation.

133


F

OBJECTI

3

COMMUNIQUER, COLLABORER ET ENSEIGNER.

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°2: RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°1:

Poursuivre le développement de programmes et de plates-formes à la base afin de s’assurer que nous développons et renforçons un soutien régional solide partageant la mission et la vision de la CAA.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Aider au développement et à la maintenance des principales plateformes de communication régionales afin de créer des avantages régionaux tels que le développement de plateformes de sites Web régionaux cohérents qui se connectent à l’Association Canadian Angus. • Utiliser les ressources de la CAA pour le soutien et le développement d’autres plateformes de communication dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre d’une stratégie de communication régionale. • Partager la mission et la vision à long terme de la CAA en reconnaissant les distinctions régionales et les possibilités d’accroître le soutien régional à ce plan par le biais de leurs initiatives. • Soutenir les activités régionales fondamentales qui favorisent la croissance et l’avancement de la mission et de la vision de la CAA.

134

Développer et mettre en œuvre une stratégie de communication annuelle pour atteindre tous les membres de la CAA à travers diverses platesformes afin de s’assurer que tous les membres et les membres commerciaux sont au courant de toutes les activités et initiatives d’Angus.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Sur une base annuelle, la CAA élaborera une publication annuelle “ Angus Life “ qui servira de plateforme de communication importante pour les membres au cours de l’année à venir. • Développer et mettre en œuvre une stratégie de médias sociaux afin d’informer et d’engager les membres en temps réel. • Sur une base mensuelle, utiliser les ressources en ligne pour communiquer des informations pertinentes par le biais du bulletin Angus Advisor. • Chaque année, organiser le congrès de la CAA en même temps que l’AGA afin de fournir une plateforme de collaboration et une formation à tous les membres. • Soutenir les événements régionaux importants à travers le Canada qui permettent un engagement plus profond avec les membres et les clients. • Fournir une formation individuelle aux membres sur les plateformes de la CAA. • Fournir un soutien aux réseaux de communication régionaux.


“ Pour communiquer efficacement, nous devons prendre conscience que nous sommes tous différents dans notre façon de percevoir le monde et utiliser cette compréhension comme un guide pour notre communication avec les autres.” Tony Robbins

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°3:

Élargir la portée de la génétique canadienne sur les marchés mondiaux grâce à des stratégies de marketing international et au développement de relations stratégiques avec l’industrie internationale.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Soutenir tous les exportateurs canadiens de produits génétiques dans leurs efforts en leur fournissant la documentation, les informations, la formation et les autres ressources dont ils ont besoin pour s’assurer que les produits génétiques canadiens sont admissibles à l’enregistrement sur les marchés étrangers. • Travailler avec les principales associations internationales pour élaborer des programmes qui amélioreront le commerce international et l’accès aux marchés. • Faciliter la venue des principaux visiteurs internationaux au Canada par le biais d’invitations, d’accueil, de présentations ou d’autres mesures visant à assurer le succès de leurs missions. • Élaborer une stratégie de marketing pour atteindre les régions qui offrent des possibilités pour la génétique canadienne et pour faire comprendre les programmes Angus canadiens qui faciliteront le commerce génétique.

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°4:

Identifier les opportunités et les plateformes permettant de communiquer le message Angus aux consommateurs en les informant davantage sur la façon dont notre produit est fabriqué et en développant la marque Canadian Angus à l’échelle nationale et mondial

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Continuer à développer la communication sur la production du bœuf Angus à un niveau ciblé sur le consommateur. • Développer et travailler avec les partenaires de l’industrie sur le développement et le marketing des produits de bœuf Angus. • Continuer à identifier les plates-formes importantes d’engagement des consommateurs qui offrent des opportunités pour l’image de marque Angus, la sensibilisation et la sensibilisation. • Accroître la sensibilisation, l’acceptation, l’exigence et la valeur des programmes Angus de la CAA du point de vue du consommateur. 135


O

ECTIF BJ

4

EXPLORER LES DOMAINES D’OPPORTUNITÉS DANS LE DÉVELOPPEMENT DE NOUVELLES OPPORTUNITÉS COMMERCIALES QUI SOUTIENNENT LES FLUX DE REVENUS ACTUELS DE L’ASSOCIATION CANADIAN ANGUS.

“La seule stratégie dont l ’échec est garanti est de ne pas prendre de risques.” Mark Zuckerberg

136


RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°1:

Développer des relations d’affaires plus solides avec les principaux partenaires de l’industrie afin de mettre leurs produits et services à la disposition des membres de la CAA.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Établir des relations d’affaires avec des partenaires de l’industrie sur une variété de produits et de services utilisés par les membres de la CAA. • Être à la pointe des nouveaux produits et des nouvelles technologies pour l’industrie bovine et adopter rapidement des produits et services de qualité.

RÉSULTAT PRINCIPAL N°2:

Soutenir les principales collaborations industrielles avec des partenaires de valeur afin de jouer notre rôle dans l’avancement de l’ensemble de l’industrie et l’élimination des obstacles à l’inefficacité.

LES STRATÉGIES:

• Jouer un rôle actif et de premier plan dans les conseils d’administration, les comités et les réunions de l’industrie pour s’assurer qu’Angus continue de jouer un rôle important dans leur planification. • Contribuer à un rôle de leader dans les plateformes CBIN (Canadian Beef Innovation Network (Réseau canadien d’innovation bovine)) et CBBC (Canadian Beef Breed Council) en s’assurant qu’Angus représente une voix forte dans les opportunités futures de l’industrie. • Soutenir le développement continu du projet CBIN (Réseau canadien d’innovation bovine) afin d’explorer les domaines d’opportunité pour la valeur partagée et la collaboration améliorée de l’ensemble de l’industrie bovine. • Collaborer avec les partenaires de l’industrie sur de nouveaux programmes et initiatives. • Développer une stratégie pour la participation du personnel et des directeurs aux événements de l’industrie. • Tirer parti de la force de la marque Angus et de la solide réputation de la marque auprès des consommateurs pour accroître les possibilités de générer des revenus grâce à des programmes à valeur ajoutée. • Poursuivre la croissance du programme d’étiquette verte de la CAA et la valeur liée au programme par l’intermédiaire des partenaires de l’industrie et la valeur de la vérification Angus pour les programmes désignés Angus. 137


Membership & Programs of the Canadian Angus Association General Membership • • • • • • • • •

Members in good standing are eligible to vote and serve on the board of directors. May register eligible animals. Registered animals may compete in Canadian Angus Association Gold Shows and vie for the annual Show Female of the Year and Show Bull of the Year awards. Eligible to participate in the Canadian Angus Performance Program to receive Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs). Eligible to request pedigree extracts for sale catalogues, which may be posted on the Canadian Angus Association website. Members can receive enhanced web access through the AngusNOW section of the Canadian Angus Association website. If you have a valid email address on file, the monthly e-newsletter will be sent to you, keeping you informed about deadlines, news, policy changes and Association events. Membership in your provincial Angus association is included. Increased marketing opportunities through the Canadian Angus Indicator Program.

ACE Program The Angus Cow Enrollment (ACE) program is the Canadian Angus Association’s voluntary fee schedule program. The program allows members to access a full suite of Canadian Angus Association services at only $65 per active cow. The full list of services provided under the program is detailed on the following page. The current Canadian Angus Association fee schedule is still available to all members; ACE is an alternative fee program available for interested members. A member’s ACE enrollment fee is based on the number of active cows in their inventory. If a breeder does not wish to enroll an animal in the ACE program, they must submit the Female Exposure and Disposal Worksheet by December 1 to indicate all cows that are no longer active. The ACE program has flexible billing options that allow breeders to pay for ACE enrollment annually or tri-annually (January 1, April 1, October 1 for spring herds and April 1, July 1 and October 1 for fall herds). The ACE program is poised to simplify the breeder experience so members can spend less time paying bills and more time doing what matters to them. Junior members receive their first five animals at no charge. In order to enroll in the program, interested members must return their completed Female Exposure and Disposal Worksheets which are sent out in the fall and due December 1 each year. 138

Performance Program The Canadian Angus Association strives to provide its members with tools to improve breed health and profitability. The most powerful breeding tools used to evaluate cattle herds are Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs). EPDs are values that predict how the future progeny of an animal will perform relative to the progeny of other animals in the breed. EPDs allow for a fair comparison of animals from different herds. Members who participate in the Canadian Angus Performance Program (CAPP) have the advantage of accessing EPDs on their animals. Based on total herd reporting, CAPP members are required to submit either a calf or an action code for all their females at registration time as well as all weaning weights and/or disposals on calves at weaning. Not all calves are required to be registered however they must be recorded with an appropriate tattoo/tag identification number, birth date, and sex. Members also submit performance (weaning weights, yearling weights, mature cow weights, docility, body condition score, teat & udder, feet traits), fertility and carcass data on paper through the office or through AngusNOW. The 205-day weight is a mandatory weight and the most important weight for genetic evaluation purposes. Any animals without weights must be disposed of using a designated fate code. Contemporary group information is required for all aspects of reporting as they are very important in the function of EPDs.


Non-CAPP

CAPP

ACE

Service

Regular Member

Young Breeder

Junior Member

CAPP Member Jr & YB

ACE & CAPP Member Jr & YB

Membership

$133.33

$75.00

$25.00

$25–$133.33

CAPP Fee

N/A

N/A

N/A

$25.00

ACE Fee per Cow

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

$65.00

Junior members are not charged CAPP or provincial membership fees. CAPP is based on whole herd reporting. Must be compliant each year to get CAPP pricing. Enroll cows on a per year basis. First five cows are free for Juniors.

AngusNOW Herd Management

Membership must be paid for current year.

Calf Registration 0–7 mth

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$20.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Calf Registration 7–12 mth

$83.33

$83.33

$83.33

$66.67

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Calf Registration 12 months+

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Member Transfer < 30 days

$14.00

$14.00

$14.00

$10.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Member Transfer 30 - 90 days

$20.00

$20.00

$20.00

$16.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Member Transfer > 90 days

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Commercial Transfer < 90 days

$20.00

$20.00

$20.00

$16.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Commercial Transfer > 90 days

$40.00

$40.00

$40.00

$32.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Non Financial Transfers

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Weaning Weight

N/A

N/A

N/A

$2.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Late Weaning Weight

N/A

N/A

N/A

$4.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE CAPP is voluntary for ACE members who choose to have performance information

Note

Performance Trait Recording

N/A

N/A

N/A

TSU (box of 10)

$30.00

$30.00

$30.00

$30.00

Parent Verification (PV) Test

$18.00

$18.00

$18.00

$18.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Angus GS (GS) Test

$45.00

$45.00

$45.00

$45.00

$31.00

Regular fees apply for ET calves - ACE

Export package

$75.00

$75.00

$75.00

$75.00

$50 if less than 3 items requested

AI Approval for Domestic Sire

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

AI Approval for Foreign Sire

$400.00

$400.00

$400.00

$400.00

Donor Dam Approval

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

Registration of Imported Animal

$75.00

$75.00

$75.00

$75.00

Registration of Lease

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

Registration of Tattoo Letters

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

Registration of Herd Name

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$50.00

$50.00

$50.00

$50.00

Five Generation Pedigree

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

Correction Fee

$6.67

$6.67

$6.67

$6.67

Sale Promotion package

$45.00

$45.00

$45.00

$45.00

Gene Prob Report

$20.00

$20.00

$20.00

$20.00

$106.67

$106.67

$106.67

$106.67

$3.12

$3.12

$3.12

$3.12

Purchased through CCIA. ACE members will receive credit on their CAA account with proof of purchase.

Age Verification

Rush fee available for $2/head up to $100.

Pedigree Extract/Head

N/A

N/A

N/A

$2.50

Worksheets, Performance Reports, and EPDs

N/A

N/A

N/A

Herd Inventory Worksheets

Angus Life Magazine

Transfer of Herd Name or Tattoo Name Change of Registered Animal

Herd Extract for On-farm Software Canadian Angus Tag Program RFID Tag

No charge if member gives away Angus indicators or reports sale results to CAA within 24 hours of sale.

CAPP is voluntary for ACE members who choose to have performance information.

139


Canadian Angus Association Genetic Condition Policy

This “Genetic Condition Policy” replaces all previous policies of the Canadian Angus Association including those titled “Genetic Defect Policy”.

Effective September 22nd, 2013, revised January 27, 2020, and applying to animals born on or after September 22, 2013

Recessive genetic conditions exist in all animals. The CAA Genetic Condition Policy applies to genetic conditions that may impact beef cattle. The purpose of this policy is to monitor such conditions and support producers in managing undesirable mutations.

1. The Canadian Angus Association currently monitors the following genetic conditions: Double Muscling (DM) Dwarfism (DW) Developmental Duplication (DD) Heterochromia Irides (HI) Oculocutaneous Hypopigmentation (OH) Hypotrichosis (HY) Protoporphyria (PR) Pulmonary Hypoplasia (PH) Syndactyly (SN) Tibial Hemimelia (TH)

2. The Canadian Angus Association has additional registration requirements for the following genetic conditions: Arthrogryposis Multiplex (AM) Neuropathic Hydrocephalous (NH) Osteopetrosis (OS) Contractural Arachnodactyly (CA) Mannosidosis (MA)

For genetic conditions subject to additional registration requirements, the following actions are necessary: • Calves that have known carriers of a genetic condition in the first two generations (parental and grandparental) of their pedigree without an intervening free animal need to be tested for the causative gene to be eligible for registration. • If the animal is found to be a carrier of the causative gene, it is eligible for registration and transfer. The subject animal’s genetic condition status will be noted on its registration certificate and CAA’s online herdbook. Genetic condition testing: • Testing to determine whether an animal is a carrier or free of the causative gene of a genetic condition shall be conducted through the CAA. • Results of the testing shall be noted on the subject animal’s registration certificate and in the online herdbook. • Following testing of an animal for a genetic condition, the animal’s registration certificate and online record shall be noted in one of the following ways: 1. the letter “F” designating “FREE” on the registration certificate and in the online herdbook of any animal that has been determined by such a test to be free of the genetic condition; 2. the letter “C” designating “CARRIER” on the registration certificate and in the online herdbook of any animal that has been determined by such test to be a carrier of the genetic condition. 3. the letter “A” designating “AFFECTED” on the registration certificate and in the online 140

• •

herdbook of any animal that has been determined by such test to be homozygous for the genetic condition. Should a member wish to retest an animal, the second DNA sample will be verified through parentage verification. AI sires and donor dams that have a known carrier of any genetic condition, for which there is a DNA test commercially available, within the first two (2) generations of their pedigree without an intervening free animal are required to be tested prior to registration of calves. Foreign animals with a known carrier of a genetic condition, for which a DNA test is commercially available, in the first two (2) generations of their pedigree must be tested for the causative genetic condition in order to be eligible for registration.

Genetic conditions for which there is no DNA test: • Animals that have known carriers of a genetic condition for which there is no DNA test commercially available in the first two (2) generations of their pedigree are eligible for registration without any DNA testing requirements. New genetic conditions: • The Association will notify all members with registered animals (purebred breeders) by email or mailed letter summarizing the information on any new genetic conditions identified. In the event of a new genetic condition, currently registered animals that are tested as carriers will remain registered.


Canadian Angus Association Parent Verification Policy

Procedure

The following procedures shall be followed in connection with the registration status of potential and known carriers of a genetic condition: I. Status of Currently Registered Females and Bulls • Notwithstanding any subsequent test results, all registered females and bulls with the impacted genetics in their pedigrees as of January 1st in the year following the CAA’s identification and acknowledgment of a genetic condition shall remain registered. II. Testing of Animals • Testing to determine whether an animal is a carrier, or free, of the causative gene of a genetic condition shall be conducted through the CAA. III. Publication of Test Results by the Association • Results of the testing shall be noted on the registration certificate of subject animals, including electronically. The Association shall also maintain an updated list of each animal determined to be a carrier, as well as those who have tested free of such condition. Upon request, the CAA shall provide such a list at no cost to the requesting member. IV. Right to Request a Second DNA Test • In those instances in which an animal previously registered or seeking registration is tested and determined to be a carrier of the genetic condition (and is identified as such electronically on the Association’s website), the member owner of record may request that an approved laboratory conduct a second DNA test on a sample from subject animal. In order to process a request for a second test, the member owner of record must provide materials or samples sufficient to permit the laboratory to verify the parentage of the animal in question. V. Notations on Registration Certificates • Upon testing of an animal for a genetic condition, the animal’s registration certificate shall be noted in one of the two following manners: A. the letter “F” designating “FREE” on the registration certificate of any animal that has been determined by such a test to be free of the genetic condition; B. the letter “C” designating “CARRIER” on the registration certificate of any animal that has been determined by such test to be a carrier of the genetic condition.

For Sires •

All sires born on or before December 31, 2018 must have a DNA parentage profile on record with the Canadian Angus Association showing sire verification before their offspring can be registered. All sires born on or after January 1, 2019 must have a DNA parentage profile on record with CAA showing parentage verification (to both sire and dam) before their offspring can be registered Sires being used for AI must be parentage verified (to both sire and dam) before they are granted AI Approval status

PLEASE NOTE: we encourage sellers to have a hair, blood or tissue sample on file for both the bulls and their dams or to have them parent verified prior to selling)

For Dams •

Cows being used as Donor Dams must be tested to the fullest extent possible. The minimum requirement is sire verification. If the dam is alive or has DNA on file, it must be tested prior to Donor Dam approval status being granted. Only in special cases will we require reconstructions of a DNA verification to be done.

For Calves • •

Embryo transfer calves must be parentage verified (to both sire and dam) before they can be registered Calves from cows that have been exposed to multiple sires within 14 days of one another must be sire verified before they can be registered

141


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Canadian Angus Hair Sample Instructions Pull hair sample from the switch of the tail. Include 50–60 hairs ensuring that the hair root bulbs are attached.

Submit test request to CAA office. Send CAA-generated paperwork and hair card to Neogen Canada.

6 5

Label the hair card clearly, carefully, and accurately. Store hair card in a safe dry place until you send it to the lab.

1

2

4

Place hair roots on the hair card (there is a circle in the middle of the hair card that says “Place hair roots here”).

3

Affix hair with tape at the bottom of the card (there is a rectangle that says “Place tape here”).

Trim off excess hair extending from the hair card.

Canadian Angus Association 292140 Wagon Wheel Blvd, Rocky View County, AB T4A 0E2

Neogen Canada 7323 Roper Road NW Edmonton, AB T6E 0W4

Angus Central: (403) 571-3580 • Toll free: 1-888-571-3580 • registry@cdnangus.ca 143


Data Collection Guide BREEDING DATA

Form www.cdnangus.ca/adding-value/how-to-complete-femaleexposure-worksheet • Submit on Female Exposure and Disposal Worksheets • Submit for all females • Record all AI and Natural services, including sires and dates

DAM STATUS CODES

11 – Animal on Lease 12 – Open (missed calving opportunity) 13 – ET Donor Dam 14 – ET Recipient Dam 15 – Moved to Next Calving Season 16 – Still to Calve in Current Season 17 – Aborted Calf

MATURE ANIMAL DISPOSAL CODES

1 – Died Disease 2 – Died Age 3 – Died Other 4 – Culled Physical Defect 5 – Culled Fertility 6 – Culled Performance 7 – Culled Temperament 8 – Culled Age 9 – Sold for Breeding (no papers transferred) 10 – Sold for Breeding (transfer forthcoming) 18 – Moved to Commercial Herd

CALF DATA

Form www.cdnangus.ca/forms/herd-inventory-application-forregistration

CALVING EASE

• Submit on Application for Registration and Herd Inventory Worksheets, or on AngusNOW • Collect at birth U = Unassisted Delivery, E = Easy Pull, H = Hard Pull (hand or mechanical), M = Malpresentation, S = Surgical (Caesarean) Intervention

BIRTH WEIGHT

• Submit on Application for Registration and Herd Inventory Worksheets, or on AngusNOW • Collect within 24 hours of birth • Weigh with a scale, in pounds • Management group information should only reflect different treatment of dams while pregnant

SERVICE TYPE (NATURAL, AI, ET OR ET BY IVF )

• Submit on application for registration and herd inventory worksheets or on AngusNOW • Must submit service date for all AI services • Use first date of exposure for natural services • ET is Embryo Transfer (use implant date for service date) • ET by IVF is In-vitro Fertilization (use implant date for service date)

144

NURSE INFORMATION

Blank – Single Born, Nursed Own Dam 1 – Calf was Fostered onto Another Cow 2 – Twin Calves Both Nursed Own Dam Together 3 – Twin Calf That Nursed Own Dam Alone

CALF DISPOSAL CODES

B – Stillborn (Full Term) C – Died at Birth (Defect) D – Died at Birth (Other) E – Died Before Weaning (Disease) F – Died Before Weaning (Other) G – Died After Weaning (Disease) H – Died After Weaning (Other) I – Sold (no transfer) J – Sold (transfer forthcoming)

WEANING WEIGHT

Form www.cdnangus.ca/forms/blank-weaning-205-day-weightworksheet-2 • Submit on Weaning Weight Worksheets, or AngusNOW • Collect between 120–280 days when the majority of calves are as close to 205 days as possible • Weigh with a scale, in pounds • Individual weights should be recorded on the entire weaned group on the same day • Management group information should reflect different treatment of calves from birth to weaning

YEARLING DATA

Form www.cdnangus.ca/forms/yearling-weight-worksheet-2 • Submit on Yearling Weight Worksheets, or AngusNOW • Collect between 320–440 days when the majority of calves are as close to 365 days as possible • Weigh with a scale, in pounds • Individual weights should be recorded on the entire group on the same day • Management group information should reflect different treatment of calves from weaning to yearling

SCROTAL CIRCUMFERENCE

• Submitted on yearling weight worksheets, or on AngusNOW • Collect between 320–440 days of age • Measure in cm, using a tape placed at the largest diameter of the scrotum • Same day weight not required • Management group information should reflect different treatment of calves from weaning to yearling

HIP HEIGHT

• Submit on Yearling Weight Worksheets, or AngusNOW • Collect between 320–440 days of age • Measure the distance from the ground to the hooks or hip bones in inches • Same day weight is required • Individual heights should be recorded on the entire group on the same day • Management group information should reflect different treatment of calves from weaning to yearling


DOCILITY SCORE

Form www.cdnangus.ca/forms/yearling-calf-docility-feet-legscoring-worksheet • Submit on AngusNOW and CAA worksheets 1 = Docile (acceptable, mild disposition) 2 = Restless (restless during processing) 3 = Nervous (nervous and impatient) 4 = Flighty (jumpy and out of control, quivers and struggles) 5 = Aggressive (extreme agitation) 6 = Very Aggressive (extremely violent behaviour)

FEET AND LEG SCORING

Form www.cdnangus.ca/forms/yearling-calf-docility-feet-legscoring-worksheet • Submit on AngusNOW and CAA worksheets • Collect on date of yearling weight and subsequently when scoring mature cow weight on untrimmed cattle • Management group information includes animals that were fed and pastured the same • Foot and claw scores range from 1–9 (see chart) • Leg scoring (rear leg side view and rear leg rear view) range from 1-9 (see chart)

ULTRASOUND DATA

Form www.cdnangus.ca/adding-value/ultrasound-testing • Collect on bulls between 320–440 days of age, and on heifers and steers between 320–460 days of age • Scanning must be performed by a certified ultrasound technician; data and images must be reported to the Association by the CUP lab • At least 5 animals, from 2 different sires, are required for the contemporary group to be included in genetic evaluations • Management group information should reflect different treatment of calves from weaning to yearling

FEED INTAKE DATA

• Submit by member or Growsafe directly, on CAA template spreadsheet • Collect at 160–480 days of age • Must be on test a minimum of 45 days with at least 14 days adjustment period • Weaning Weight, Yearling Weight and In and Out Weights must be recorded

CARCASS DATA

• Submit on CAA template spreadsheet • Calves must be at least sire verified; dams must be identified • Calf tattoo, date of birth and sex must be recorded • Collect harvest data between 360 and 660 days of age • At least 5 animals, from 2 different sires, are required for the group to be included in genetic evaluations • Carcass traits recorded include: - Harvest plant and location - Hot carcass weight - Marbling score (e.g., MD30) - Carcass maturity - Fat thickness - Ribeye area - Percent pelvic, heart, and kidney fat, if available - Quality grade - Yield grade

MATURE COW DATA

www.cdnangus.ca/forms/mature-cow-weight-and-scoring-at-calfweaning-worksheet-2

MATURE COW BODY CONDITION SCORE

• Submit on AngusNOW or on CAA worksheets BCS 1 = Bone structure of shoulder, ribs, back, hooks and pins are sharp and easily visible, no fat deposits or muscling. BCS 2 = No fat deposition, some muscling in the hindquarters, the spine feels sharp to the touch. BCS 3 = Beginning of fat cover over the loin, back and fore ribs, the backbone is still highly visible. BCS 4 = Fore ribs are not noticeable but the 12th and 13th ribs are still noticeable to the eye. Spine can be felt with slight pressure and feels rounded. BCS 5 = The 12th and 13th ribs are not visible to the eye. The backbones can only be felt with firm pressure but are not noticeable to the eye, areas on each side of the tail head are well filled but not mounded. BCS 6 = Ribs are fully covered, hindquarters are plump and full, noticeable sponginess over the fore ribs and on each side of the tail head. BCS 7 = Abundant fat cover on either side of the tail head with evident patchiness. BCS 8 = Animal takes on a smooth, blocky appearance, bone structure disappears from sight, fat cover is thick and spongy. BCS 9 = Bone structure is not seen or felt, tail head is buried in fat, the animal’s mobility may actually be impaired by excessive fat.

FEET AND LEG SCORING

• Submit on AngusNOW and CAA worksheets • Collect on date of yearling weight and subsequently when scoring mature cow weight on untrimmed cattle • Management group information includes animals that were fed and pastured the same • Foot and claw scores range from 1–9 (see chart) • Leg scoring (rear leg side view and rear leg rear view) range from 1-9 (see chart)

MATURE COW WEIGHT

• Submit on AngusNOW and CAA Worksheets • Must be taken +/- 45 days of calf ’s weaning weight date • Must be taken with a body condition score

DOCILITY SCORE

• Submit on AngusNOW and CAA worksheets 1 = Docile (acceptable, mild disposition) 2 = Restless (restless during processing) 3 = Nervous (nervous and impatient) 4 = Flighty (jumpy and out of control, quivers and struggles) 5 = Aggressive (extreme agitation) 6 = Very Aggressive (extremely violent behaviour)

TEAT AND UDDER SCORING

• Submit on AngusNOW and CAA worksheets • Recorded on Herd Inventory and Application for Registration Worksheets or AngusNOW • Collect within 72 hours of calving • Udder suspension and teat size scores range from 1–9 (see interior chart)

145


146


Breed Development Contact Kajal Devani

Director of Science and Technology Email: kdevani@cdnangus.ca Ph: 403-537-5604

With thanks to the Beef Improvement Federation for permission to use

147


The What and Why About Performance Data By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association

C

anadian Angus producers often ask about phenotypes: What should I be measuring and recording? How should I measure for highest value and accuracy? Does it actually make a difference? We would like to take this opportunity to answer some of your questions. What should I be measuring and recording? The Canadian Angus Association Performance Program is a voluntary program. Members who choose to participate on the program commit to accurately measuring and recording complete herd inventory information (record a calf or cow fate code) and weaning weights on all calves within their calving seasons. Typically though, these members record so much more. And all that data informs our genetic evaluations. The Canadian Angus Association and American Angus Association partner in these genetic evaluations. When all our performance program data is combined, the number of traits and measurements of performance for these traits is incredible. The table below describes exactly how much data we are talking about.

Does it make a difference if I submit performance information such as birth weights or female exposure data? These phenotypes are very valuable. They make our genetic evaluations, and our predictions of genetic merit for breeding stock very accurate. At the Beef Improvement Federation 2021 convention, Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI) President Kelli Retallick-Riley presented the results from an exercise where the results of a complete genetic evaluation (including all performance, pedigree, genomic, and ultrasound information) and an incomplete genetic evaluation (excluding ultrasound scan data from the past decade)

The complete BIF convention proceedings are available on the BIF website: beefimprovement.org were compared. The AGI team found EPDs from the genetic evaluation that included the complete data were up to 66% more accurate

Trait

Phenotypes

Trait

Phenotypes

CE

1.8 Million

Foot Scores

127,000

BW

9.4 Million

MW

244,000

WW

9.8 Million

Ultrasound

2.5 Million

YW

4.8 Million

Carcass

130,000

HPG

127,000

Feed Intake

31,000

Doc

345,000

HD Genotypes

1 Million

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compared to the EPDs from the genetic evaluation with removed ultrasound scan data. Accurate and well-informed genetic evaluations and EPDs are important to drive genetic improvement. This is particularly true for traits that cannot be measured early in life or easily. Let’s use marbling as an example of this. Industry statistics show that in the U.S. only 6.6% of fed cattle qualified for Certified Angus Beef and 37.5% of fed cattle graded USDA Select. In comparison, 14.4% of fed cattle qualified for Certified Angus Beef in 2020 and only 22.0% of fed cattle graded USDA Choice. Similar trends have been identified in Canada; we have a higher proportion of cattle grading AAA and Prime and a substantially lower proportion of cattle grading A and AA. This is very convincing evidence that, in the day and age of genomic technology, phenotype is still king. Investments in genotypes certainly give you EPDs for traits that are difficult or expensive to measure. Genotyping technology can give us more accurate GEPDs. This past summer we reached the impressive milestone of having 1 million animals that have been high density genotyped in our genetic evaluation. This is a remarkable milestone and a testament of our members’ commitment to accessing the most accurate EPDs and driving genetic improvement within their herds. But, it is still extremely important to measure and record accurate phenotypic data.


“In the day and age of genomics, phenotype is still king.” Mike Coffey

Why are accurate well-informed genetic evaluations and EPDs important? They drive genetic improvement. For those producers who don’t think that there has been substantial genetic improvement in our population over the past decade, let us look at the phenotypic trends for some additional traits. In the past decade, the average birth weight for Canadian Angus cattle has decreased by 2 pounds while the average actual weaning weight has increased by 11 pounds and yearling weights have increased by 80 pounds. This change is a direct result of Canadian Angus Association members breeding for lower or maintained birth weight while at the same time selecting for higher yearling weights. These changes in actual phenotypes are a testament to the accuracy of EPDs and the value of the millions of birth weights and yearling weights that inform our genetic evaluations. Fortunately, almost all our members record birth weights and yearling weights on their cattle. Let us compare this to a different set of traits. Unfortunately, not all our members are able to ultrasound scan to measure and record information on carcass quality traits. Therefore, EPDs for these traits tend to stay at a lower accuracy level. This lower accuracy coupled with the fact that not all producers select for improved carcass quality traits has meant less movement, on average, for these traits. Where possible, Canadian Angus Association members should consider accurately measuring their cattle for all the traits that we collect information on, including ultrasound scanning for carcass quality. It is not always possible to collect the data, and that is when genomic technology can help. Canadian Angus Association members have access to the Angus GS genomic panel that helps us calculate the most accurate EPDs possible. The final piece of course, is using these GEPDs to select for the most profitable and sustainable cattle possible. The Association recently released the Canadian Balanced Index (CBI). This index combines animals’ EPDs for many traits into one balanced number. It might be the most sophisticated way to use EPDs. Check out page 205 for more information on the new CBI.

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Member Service

FAQs & Tips for Fast Service How can I submit my work? • • • •

Email registry@cdnangus.ca or fax 403-571-3599 Mail to 292140 Wagon Wheel Blvd, Rocky View County, AB T4A 0E2 Please include the animal’s complete tattoo, your name, contact information, and member ID We are not able to accept requests to complete work over the phone but are happy to answer your questions

What methods of payment can I use? • • • •

Visa or Mastercard E-transfer to ayuen@cdnangus.ca Personal or business cheque Please remember to include your member ID in the notes/memo field for both cheque and e-transfer payments

What are the registration and transfer fees? • • •

See www.cdnangus.ca/fee-schedule for the full fee schedule There are fee incentives for completing registrations and transfers early and for participating on the Canadian Angus Performance Program We also offer the Angus Cow Enrollment program (ACE), a cow-based fee schedule

Not sure what to record for a service date on your application for registration? This field records the first day of natural service exposure, the AI date, or the implant date for ET calves

What is the difference between disposal codes 12 and 15? • •

Code 12 – Open, missed calving opportunity will move the animal to the next year, e.g. from Spring 2022 to Spring 2023 Code 15 – Moved to next calving season will move the animal to the next season, e.g. from Spring 2022 to Fall 2022

What are CM and ? numbers? • • •

A seven-digit number means the animal is registered A CM number means the animal has been recorded but not registered and can be registered later upon request A ?pending number means that additional information is needed to complete the animal’s registration. You will receive a request for information (RFI) with details.

What does E-store Certificate mean? •

This means your certificates are not automatically printed or emailed to you. You can request printed or emailed certificates anytime you want them.

Did you share a bull or sell semen from a bull? •

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A sire authorization form must be submitted to allow members without ownership access to the bull. There is a $50 fee per sire authorization (linked herds are included in same fee). If a member prefers, they can set the bull up for public access AI approval for a one-time $100 fee. The AI approval fee for imported bulls is $400.


Member Service

FAQs & Tips for Fast Service Importing animals, semen or embryos? Here are some tips. Imported genetics need to meet Canadian Angus Association registration requirements. To avoid processing delays: • Submit the import request on the CAA Application for Import Form with the $75 animal import fee • Provide proof of ownership and proof of legal import from CFIA • CAA will contact the association of origin for parentage verification information (a $15 fee may apply). You may need to arrange for a DNA sample for the animal or its parents to be submitted if information is incomplete or unavailable.

How do I submit DNA samples? • • • • •

Hair, blood, tissue, and semen are all accepted All samples must be clearly labelled with complete tattoo information to avoid processing delays and extra charges Hair cards are provided to members at no cost, courtesy of CAA. Samples must be fixed to these bar-coded cards or each loose hair sample will be assessed a lab processing fee of $4. DNA samples that are not labelled or that are submitted to the lab without a DNA test request are subject to a fee of $54/sample. These samples impact the lab turnaround times for all samples. Blood cards and tissue sampling units (TSUs) can be ordered from CAA

Canadian Angus Association Parentage Verification Policy Reminder All sires born on or after January 1, 2019 must have a DNA parentage profile on record with CAA showing parentage verification (to both sire and dam) before their offspring can be registered.

How long does it take to get my DNA results? • • •

Our lab, Neogen Canada, aims to report all DNA test results, including genetic condition testing, parentage verification testing, Angus GS testing, and coat colour tests, within 21 calendar days of the sample arriving at the lab GEPDs and Genomic Percentile Ranks from Angus GS tests require an additional 2–6 weeks to be incorporated into our monthly genetic evaluations after the tests are complete To verify that your DNA sample arrived at the lab and find your estimated date for results, check the DNA Portal on our website at www.cdnangus.ca/dna-portal

When should I request a pedigree extract? Please allow at least two weeks prior to your catalogue being printed. To avoid processing delays, email registry@cdnangus.ca a list of tattoos, lot numbers and the sale date for your sale. We will do our best to process your request within four business days.

How can I get Angus tags? • • •

To order Canadian Angus RFID tags, call CCIA at 1-877-909-2333 or order online at tags.canadaid.ca. As of May 31, 2019, Angus RFID tags are sold through CCIA and are no longer available direct from CAA. Allflex management tags can be purchased through CAA Leader Products management tags can be ordered from www.leaderproducts.com or by calling 1-833-549-1563

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Canadian Angus Foundation Chair’s Message A good thing that has come out of the pandemic has been our re-evaluation of what is important in our lives when we were not able to do the things we normally do. In the past two years, the Canadian Angus Foundation Board of Directors has been doing just that. We have continued to support our Juniors. We have a new Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador for 2021–2022— Riley Leeson. We hope that as things open up you will be able to meet her at Angus events across the country. Our Outstanding Young Angus Breeder is Jesse Emery, and the Junior Angus Stockman of the year is Kodie Doetzel. We presented the Dick Turner scholarship to Hillary Sauder and the Gordon Pritchard Memorial Scholarship was given to Halley Adams and Heidi Tymko. We awarded the Legacy Scholarships to Baxter Blair, Thomas Wildman, Jessica Davey, Keely Adams and Caylee Dorval. We presented awards, scholarships and heifer vouchers at Showdown. We are pleased to be able to continue to help our Juniors and we couldn’t do it without you. Last year we started a new fundraising initiative, the 15 for 50 program. This initiative allowed members to support the Foundation by donating 15% of the proceeds from a lot in their bull sales. We raised more than $40,000 with the 15 for 50 program due to the generous uptake by many breeders. We are continuing this fundraising initiative again in 2022. The Building the Legacy Sale took on a new look this past year with the cancellation of the national convention. The sale was hosted online in August through DLMS Farm Gate. Again, we received overwhelming support from our breeders with donations of genetics and wonderful experiences. The Foundation was able to raise over $70,000! 152

Our plans for 2022 remain solidly behind our three goals—supporting our Juniors, education and research, and history and archives. Our goal is to support members of the Canadian Angus Association with initiatives that help all members. We hope to provide more funding for speakers for events across the country, allow more Junior travel and scholarship experiences, and continue to expand our archives with videos of elder Angus members who remind us of past events and issues. We have always counted on the generous donations of our members to help support the Foundation and we very much appreciate your kindness and generosity. If you have never donated to the Foundation, please consider us in 2022. The Foundation belongs to all members, and we would love all members to support us. We have also started looking for financial support from industries that benefit from our Canadian Angus members to help lessen the financial burden on our members. We will continue to approach our industry partners and welcome inquiries from them. In closing, I want to thank our donors for their support. I want to thank our Juniors for participating in our scholarships and awards: you are the future of our breed. I want to thank the board of the Foundation for giving of their time and energy to continue the good work of the Foundation. I also want to thank our Executive Director Belinda Wagner for always keeping us on track and finishing the initiatives that we begin. The future is bright for the Canadian Angus Foundation. There is no limit to the good work we can do!

Tammi Ribey


Building the Legacy has become the Canadian Angus Foundation’s main fundraiser focus and is a main source for generating resources to further our mission. Please join us. The Canadian Angus Foundation functions to preserve and expand the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research, and historical preservation and restoration. The Canadian Angus Foundation was incorporated in 1993 and is the charitable arm of the Canadian Angus Association. The vision of Building the Legacy is to allow the Foundation to build monetary resources. The Foundation uses its funds to provide opportunities for our youth, young breeders and membership to grow in the areas of leadership, marketing, networking, animal husbandry, genetic improvement and to learn about developing tools to enhance Angus production. The vision also includes the importance of preserving Angus history. By fostering these areas we can ensure our Angus history is not lost and will keep Angus as the breed of choice for the commercial beef sector and end users for years to come. Because of generous donors, we can support initiatives, scholarships, travel bursaries and learning opportunities. Through benevolent donations of livestock, semen, embryos, items and experiences, as well as the purchasing of the auction offerings, the Foundation is able to put together a great suite of opportunities for our Angus membership. Please join us! If you are interested in making a donation to the Building the Legacy sale, the Canadian Angus Foundation, or would like more information please contact: Belinda Wagner Canadian Angus Foundation Executive Director bwagner@cdnangus.ca • (306) 537-1518

C A NA D IA N A N G U S F OU N DAT IO N ’ S

10

BUILDING the LEGACY

Canadian Angus Foundation’s Building the Legacy Sale 10 Saturday June 11, 2022 – 8pm delta hotels beausejour by Marriot Moncton, New Brunswick 153


Donate Why Do You

to the Canadian Angus Foundation?

By Belinda Wagner, Canadian Angus Foundation Incorporated in 1993, the Canadian Angus Foundation (CAF) is run by a volunteer board of directors and is the charitable arm of the Canadian Angus Association. Like any charitable organization, the Foundation relies on the generosity of its donors.

Six Mile Ranch When we are asked “Why do you donate to the Canadian Angus Foundation?” the answer is simple. We are giving back to a breed that has given so much to us. We are supporting the future of the Angus breed by investing in bright young Angus breeders. We are preserving the past by ensuring our history is documented. And we are pushing our breed to the forefront with research and development projects. But honestly… it’s supporting the youth in our breed that is of the utmost importance. I was fortunate to be a director with the

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Fir Mountain, Saskatchewan

Canadian Angus Association when the Building the Legacy Sale was created. It was a team effort, initiated by Kevin Blair with an assist by Shane Castle, but became an exciting initiative for our whole board and membership. The money raised there has been truly inspiring. Here at Six Mile Ranch, there is no greater LEGACY than seeing our next generation succeed with the breed we love. By donating to the Canadian Angus Foundation, and in particular the Legacy sale, we ensure that the

future is there for them. Corinne, Clayton, Cade and Coy Gibson; Tyson, Callie, Sloane and Fowler Hertz, Six Mile Ranch Ltd., Fir Mountain, SK Six Mile Ranch has donated valuable genetics to the Building the Legacy Sale. Corinne helped to develop a lot of the programming and awards the Foundation implemented with the funds raised through the Legacy sales.


The Bolduc family Stavely, Alberta The Canadian Angus Foundation in recent times has been able to achieve significant goals. These go beyond the initial achievement of junior programs and now include preservation of historical Angus artifacts and recording of Canadian Angus history. The funding of scientific research for Angus advancement as well as member education is now also a large part of Foundation activities.

These achievements are a direct result of our benevolent membership that so generously supports the Foundation. Our family has been directly impacted by the Foundation’s activities. As juniors they acquired leadership skills and knowledge relative to the livestock industry. As young adults they utilize the scientific tools of Angus advancement funded by the Foundation. It has been an honour and a privilege to be involved on the Foundation board of directors in the past. We donate annually to the Foundation. The Angus breed has been significant to our family. Paying back to it in this manner is a simple task that achieves such good results. David Bolduc, Cudlobe Angus West The Canadian Angus Foundation is an organization that we think is incredibly important to the growth and strength of our breed. The Angus breed is a fraternity that we have grown up in ourselves and have been proud and blessed to raise our children in. We see so many young people with so many hidden and untouched talents just waiting to be tapped into and we are proud that the Canadian Angus Foundation contributes to helping our

juniors explore and experience what the Angus breed is worldwide.

We have seen the benefits of the Foundation encouraging youth to grow right here in our own home. The Foundation made it possible for Kaitlynn to travel to New Zealand on the World Angus Forum Youth team and also enabled her to travel to Australia to further network and learn from some of the greatest Angus breeders in the world. We strongly believe that without these experiences, Kaitlynn would have never felt empowered to travel for school in Kansas or finish her degree at Montana State University where she graduated at the top of her class, which was also supported by a Foundation scholarship. Support for the Junior program enabled Kevin to take a leadership role on the Canadian Junior Angus board, preparing him for a leadership position here on the farm. The love and passion our children have for the breed is due in large part to the Angus fraternity. In addition to support for juniors is the research and education that the Canadian Angus Foundation contributes to helping us to develop new technologies. We feel the future of our breed and youth will be due in large part to the strength of our Canadian Angus Foundation, and that is why we have donated in the past and will continue to donate to the Foundation for years to come. Dyce Bolduc, Cudlobe Angus The Bolducs have been annual supporters of the Foundation for many years, donating and purchasing in the Legacy Sales as well as investing funds and their time.

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Glasman Farms

Russell, Manitoba To us, a donation to the Foundation was an important investment in the history and future of a breed and organization that will pay dividends. Like all history, we need to remember and learn from it, whether that be from mistakes or successes. I participated in the Junior program and can’t believe how far it has come and improved. We feel it is an important program with lots of great opportunities available to help youth create strong work ethics and leadership skills for their futures. We hope that our three children can also benefit from it. Matthew Glasman, Glasman Farms Russell, Manitoba Matthew and his wife Leanne were a part of our new 15 for 50 program this spring.

We thank all our donors and supporters for their generosity!

Corinne has this toways say: you too can contribute: ThereGibson are various When•we are asked “Why do you donate to the items. CanadianAngus Angus Central Foundation?” answerdisplay is simple.ofWe are giving Angus back to aartifacts breed that has Donating or loaning archive has the a large Canadian given so much to us. We are supporting the future of the Angus breed by investing in bright young Angus breeders. We are preserving the and memorabilia and we welcome items to add to the collection. Items can be donated or loaned for a past by ensuring our history is documented. And we are pushing our breed to the forefront with research and development projects. But period time. honestly…specified it’s supporting the of youth in our breed that is of the utmost importance.

The Gift of Time. We are always looking for people to help with our programs. Whether you are

I was fortunate to be a in director with the the Canadian Association when the the Legacy Sale wasBuilding created. Itthe was Legacy a team effort, interested joining board ofAngus directors, available to Building help with the annual initiated byfundraiser Kevin Blairauction, with an assist by Shane Castle, but became an exciting initiative for our whole board and membership. The money have time to contribute to a history project, or want to assist with judging scholarship raised there has been truly inspiring.

applications, please contact us to let us know how and when you can help. • SixPlanned Giving. Foundation gratefully accepts monetary tothe support specific Here at Mile Ranch, there isThe no greater LEGACY than seeing our next generationdonations succeed with breed we love. Byinitiatives donating to the and programs well as unrestricted donations to bethatused where Canadian Angus Foundation,asand in particular the Legacy sale, we ensure future is therethe for greatest them. need exists. Donations Corinne, Clayton, Gibson; Tyson, Callie, and Fowler Six Mile Ranchcharitable Ltd., Fir Mountain, SK or as a can be Cade madeandonCoy a one-time basis, on Sloane an annual basisHertz, as part of your giving plan, planned initiative through a will, living trust or insurance policy. All donations of $20 or more receive Six Mile Ranch has donated valuable genetics to the Building the Legacy Sale. Corinne helped to develop a lot of the programming and awards a tax receipt and are recognized in the annual report and online. Donating to the Building the Legacy the Foundation implemented with the funds raised through the Legacy sales. Sale or our 15 for 50 initiative also comes with promotion of your operation. Purchasing a spot on the Angus Roots Tree, a Wall of Honour plaque or Breeders’ Choice Silhouette at Angus Central provides opportunity for recognition of a loved one, your farm/business or stand-out animal. More details on all of these programs can be found on the CAF website at www.cdnangus.ca/foundation. The Canadian Angus Foundation functions to preserve and expand the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research, and historical preservation and restoration.

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Show them

where it all began.

The Breed, the Legends, the History: Canadian Angus History Book, 2019 Edition Contact Canadian Angus Foundation Executive Director Belinda Wagner at bwagner@cdnangus.ca or (306) 537-1518 to order.

This program was funded by the Government of Alberta and the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation 157


HOW YOU CAN

SUPPORT

Looking for t

The Canadian Angus Foundation ha Canadian Angus History Book

ng A Looking for the perfec

The Breed | The Le

the Canadian Angus Foundation The Canadian Angus Foundation has a variety of gifts for the Canadian Angus

Did you know you can support the History Book Canadian Angus Foundation by purchasing merchandise?

A Looking for the perfect gift? You can get great gifts for family and friends or treat yourself and support an excellent cause all at the same time. By purchasing items like the 2019 Canadian Angus history book, you are supporting the Foundation which The Canadian Angus a and variety includes preservation and Foundation conservation of has images stories like the ones you see and read about in this Canadianas Angus great book. Cookbooks well as limited edition Wendy History Book Risdale Angus prints are also for sale.

ngus

The Breed | The Legends | The History

Angus Roots Tree Leaves

of gifts for the holiday season!

As a special than purchase an Ang the Foundation b will receive a free Canadian Angus

Foundation National 2019 Canadian Angus History Book $90 Angus Cookbook

Prints:

Cookbook $20

Angus

The Breed | The Legends | The History

As a special thank you to all those who The Canadian Angus Foundation has committed to purchase an Angus Roots Leaf to support “Building a Strong Foundation”. This is an initiative the Foundation before the new year, they that will allow members to get involved and provide will receive a free ‘I Love Angus’ pin! building blocks for the Foundation to grow and find Angus Roots Tree success with future projects. These include Angus Leaves Roots, which provides scholarship awards to six Canadian Angus Juniors at Showdown each year; the opportunity to Foundation National Print: Master of theHerd Herd Matern Master of the Prints: Angus Cookbookby Wendy Risdale $150 immortalize highly respected Angus breed builders or Contact Canadian Angus Founda loved ones with a picture hung on the Wall of Honour for more information: 306-7 at Angus Central; and The Breeder’s Choice, which permanently recognizes a standout animal. As a special thank you to all those who purchase an Angus Roots Leaf to support To purchase merchandise or be a part of the Foundation before the new year, they Angus Roots, please contact Belinda Wagner at will receive a free ‘I Love Angus’ pin! (306) 537-1518 or bwagner@cdnangus.ca.

Angus Roots Tree Leaves

Prints:

“I Love Angus” Pin

Master of the Herd

Contact Canadian Angus Foundation Executive Director Belinda Wag for more information: 306-757-6133 or bwagner@cdnangus.ca

2021 Angus Roots Recipients at Showdown

Maternal Watch Master Leftof to the right:Herd Reese Wildman, Lexi Dietrich, Wynton Brandl, 158

Print: Maternal Watch Watch Maternal by Wendy Risdale $150

Kasey Adams, Callie Steen and Kylie Willms

Print: Time Time OutOut by Wendy Risdale $150

Contact Canadian Angus Foundation Executive Director Belinda Wagner for more information: 306-757-6133 or bwagner@cdnangus.ca


What is the Canadian Angus Foundation? One of the important pieces of history for the Canadian Angus Association was the development of the Canadian Angus Foundation. Incorporated in 1993, the Foundation is run by a group of dedicated volunteers. The main functions of the Foundation are to preserve and expand the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research and historical preservation and restoration.

Mission

The Canadian Angus Foundation functions to preserve and expand the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research, and historical preservation and restoration. The Canadian Angus Foundation was incorporated in 1993 and is the charitable arm of the Canadian Angus Association.

Vision

With inspiration and bold initiatives, we create opportunities to grow our Angus legacy. The Canadian Angus Foundation is committed to fulfilling their mission statement and is currently supporting initiatives in Canadian Angus research, working on a living history project to bring our archives to life and developing educational programming. Support of scholarships and awards for young breeders and junior members is ongoing.

Help Support the Canadian Angus Foundation

The future of Canadian Angus is all about preserving and expanding the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research and historical preservation and restoration. Help support the future and brand it your own today!

There are various ways that you can support the Foundation. It is with your help and care that the Foundation is able to offer different programs to Canadian Angus Association members from coast to coast, both breeders and supporters of the Canadian Angus cause who donate and purchase in support of our Foundation and our national youth. You can support the Canadian Angus Foundation throughout the year through donations to scholarships and awards such as the Outstanding Young Angus Breeder and the Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador, as well as travel bursaries and junior shows. This support also includes providing junior and young breeders the opportunity to learn and grow in areas of leadership, marketing, technology, and Angus production as well as opportunities for non-livestock youth to learn about our industry. Funding is also provided to assist with speakers and events targeted at member education.

Contact the Foundation to find out more information about the area you are interested in supporting. www.cdnangus.ca/foundation

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25 Years of Archiving More than 116 Years of History By Tina Zakowsky, Canadian Angus Association

The Canadian Angus Foundation was formed in 1993. The registered charitable arm of the Canadian Angus Association has a mandate to promote research, historical preservation, education and youth development.

The Foundation made its first real foray into historical preservation in 1997. A significant donation of memorabilia in 1996 resulted in two custom display cabinets being commissioned and the first official archive display was created the following year.

The CAA archives in 1996 (left) and the same cabinets today

The board room served as a staging area while staff found places to display artifacts and artwork. This photo was taken about halfway through that process.

When the Canadian Angus Association decided to invest in its first member-owned office facility, care was taken to ensure adequate space was allotted to display the archive items. Although it was a very large undertaking, CAA staff enjoyed finding spaces to display artifacts and artwork that had been in storage for years or crowded on walls throughout the previous office space.

Dick Turner’s widow Shirley made a significant donation of his cameras and memorabilia to the CAF archives in 2010 160

The original Canadian Angus Foundation logo

This handwritten farm record book dating from the early 1900s was loaned to the CAF archives by Jim Miller.


2017 summer interns Kiani Evans and Megan Mcleod sorted the Association’s collection of sale catalogues. The oldest catalogue is an undated horse sale catalogue from around 1900.

The Canadian Angus Foundation was fortunate to receive funding through the Canada Summer Jobs program to hire students over three consecutive summers, in 2016, 2017 and 2018. The students sorted, purged and organized items in the archives, and researched artifacts in an attempt to learn about their historical significance. Although summer students and staff had spent a few hours sorting and cataloguing archive material, this archival student program was the most significant investment into the archives and into the Foundation’s mandate to preserve the past. The CAF also invested in a database program to ensure an accurate record exists of what is in the archives as well as any information that could be gathered on the artifacts.

The oldest Canadian Angus sale catalogue is from the dispersal of J.D. McGregor’s Angus herd.

The Foundation welcomes donations of artifacts and historical memorabilia for display or to use in fundraising. Arrangements can also be made for short- or long-term loan of items. Please contact CAF Executive Director Belinda Wagner (bwagner@cdnangus.ca or 306-537-1518) or CAA Administration Team Leader Tina Zakowsky (tzakowsky@cdnangus.ca or 403-571-3584) for more information.

Some of the items from the 1976 centennial commemoration of Angus in Canada

The archives have a copy of the 1985 Canadian Angus History Update by Lloyd Pickard that was signed by the board of directors

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A few items were donated as they were received in the mail. These include a promotional film, hats from the 1985 World Angus Forum and herd books.

George Chiga, a pioneer in the Red Angus breed in both the USA and Canada, wrote a small book/pamphlet about Choctaw Chief 373, one of the best-known Red Angus bulls in the history of the breed. At one time, nearly 95% of registered Red Angus cattle were descended from his Chiefline breeding program.

The Foundation has received several championship banners to display.

In 2014, the Foundation received a historical pedigree chart from Alison Paine. Her Uncle, Dr. George Hart, had recently passed away. Dr. Hart was a medical doctor who had a herd of purebred Angus in Lake Placid, NY. He worked on a genealogy project on the breed and had the pedigree chart made. Alison donated one of the few copies to the CAF archives to ensure her uncle’s work would be preserved as there is no electronic copy.

Former CEO Doug Fee has a history of making clocks in his spare time. He made a mantle clock for each president that he worked with, presenting the clock at the annual general meeting banquet. When he retired in 2011, he made a pendulum wall clock that was donated for auction. CAA staff bid heartily but failed to win the coveted item. In 2014, when the Angus fraternity was shaken by the unexpected passing of Margaret Bolduc of Cudlobe Angus, Doug made and donated a grandfather clock in Marg’s memory.

The CAF archives have what is believed to be a full set of Hycroft plates, one in each colour and design. These china plates were manufactured in Medicine Hat, Alberta. The Hycroft China Ltd. Factory operated from 1938 until the late 1980s and produced many products including Angus plates. The centennial plate pictured on the far left is especially rare. 162


CANADIAN JUNIOR ANGUS AND YOUNG BREEDER OPPORTUNITIES

Scholarships Foundation Legacy Scholarship | Deadline: January 5 Three awards totalling $10,000 will be presented to Canadian Junior Angus members recognizing overall academic achievement, leadership, community involvement, and industry knowledge. Awards in the amounts of $5,000, $3,000 and $2,000 will be presented. Dick Turner Memorial Award | Deadline: May 15 The Dick Turner Memorial Award was established after the passing of legendary Angus icon Dick Turner. During his lifetime, Dick committed 55 years of his career to livestock publishing and successfully promoted and advertised the Angus breed specifically through the Canadian Aberdeen Angus News magazine. One $1,000 scholarship is presented annually. Canadian Junior Angus Scholarships | Deadline: June 15 A total of three scholarships will be awarded in the amounts of $2,000, $1,500, and $1,000.

Awards Junior Angus Stockman of the Year | Nominations due April 15 The Junior Angus Stockman of the Year award recognizes outstanding young cattlemen who are constantly growing their capacity by actively working with their Angus cattle, promoting their operation and cattle to the public, growing their knowledge of nutrition, genetics and breeding, and producing/selling quality Angus cattle. Five finalists will be selected from the nominations and will each receive $250. The winner of the award will receive a $3,500 bursary to be used for genetics, cattle supplies/equipment, and/or training, along with travel assistance to attend Showdown. Outstanding Young Angus Breeder | Nominations due April 15 The Outstanding Young Angus Breeder award was developed to recognize an Angus breeder between the ages of 22 and 30 who has demonstrated a desire to stay involved in the Angus business based on their involvement within the breed up to this point in his/her career. The winner will receive $3,500. CAF Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador | Applications due April 30 The Junior Ambassador acts as a role model for youth and represents members of the Canadian Angus Association. It is an opportunity to network with leaders in the agriculture industry and learn from them. Five finalists are selected from the applications and they each receive a $1,000 scholarship and a finalist buckle as well as assistance to attend Convention where they will compete for the Ambassador title for the year. Ambassadors have the opportunity to attend at least one international event and various major agricultural events in Canada.

Bursaries GOAL Travel Bursaries | Deadline: January 1 Bursaries of up to $750 will be awarded to12 deserving CJA members from anywhere in Canada. Bursaries must be used within the same year awarded to help offset travel and registration costs for attending the GOAL Conference. Showdown Travel & Trucking Bursaries | Deadline: May 25 & June 1 Bursaries of up to $750 will be awarded to six deserving CJA members from anywhere in Canada. Bursaries must be used within the same year awarded to help offset travel costs for attending Showdown. Trucking assistance is also available for those who travel over 1,000 km one way. U.S. Exchange Program | Deadline: May 31 Canadian Junior Angus members have the opportunity to attend the Junior Red Angus Association Round-Up and the National Junior Angus LEAD Conference each summer, and in return members of the JRA and NJAA attend Showdown or GOAL. Connecting Food and Farm Bursary The Connecting Food and Farm Travel Bursary was developed to encourage urban or non-livestock youth to attend one of our events with a current member to learn about the industry. Examples of events may include but are not limited to GOAL Conference, the Canadian Angus National Convention or livestock shows. Self-Directed National or International Travel Bursaries The Self-Directed National or International Travel Bursaries were developed to assist young Angus breeders with financial travel assistance for conferences or events related to the beef cattle industry. For members aged 18–30. For more information contact Belinda Wagner at (306) 537-1518 or at bwagner@cdnangus.ca www.cdnangus.ca/foundation www.cdnangus.ca/canadian-junior-angus

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YOUR DONATION OF 15% OF AN ANIMAL TO SELL IN 2022 WILL HELP GROW YOUR CANADIAN ANGUS FOUNDATION.

15 for 50

WITH YOUR HELP AND SUPPORT WE WILL CONTINUE TO FURTHER OUR MISSION AND THE BREED.

$40,000+

SINCE ITS INCEPTION IN 2020, FUNDS RAISED THROUGH THE 15 FOR 50 INITIATIVE HAVE EXCEEDED $40,000! THIS IS ALL THANKS TO DONORS LIKE YOU.

15%

MEANS A LOT: • • •

In 2019 and 2020, more than $125,000 was invested in member education, awards, bursaries and youth scholarships. $180,000 invested in Angus research over the last three years leveraged an additional $360,000 in grant funding. $60,000+ has been invested in history and archives, including your 2019 Canadian Angus history book.

If you are interested in giving back or learning more about this new initiative, please contact Belinda Wagner, Canadian Angus Foundation Executive Director at 306-537-1518 or email bwagner@cdnangus.ca. You can also visit the Canadian Angus Foundation website at www.cdnangus.ca/foundation.

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Thank You

TO ALL OUR 15 FOR 50 DONORS 66 Ranch Ltd., Duchess, AB

Ivanhoe Angus, Belle Plaine, SK

Allison Farms, Delburne, AB

Joint Venture Bull Sale Towaw Cattle Co., Sangudo, AB and Rainbow Red Angus, Cherhill, AB

Anderson Cattle Co., Swan River, MB Arda Farms & Freeway Angus, Acme, AB

JPD Angus, Oro-Medonte, ON

Atlasta Angus, Sylvan Lake, AB

JPM Farms, Gravelbourg, SK

Bandura Ranches, Brooks, AB

Kary Family Farm, Montmartre, SK

Bar Double M Angus, Lethbridge, AB

KBJ Round Farms, Clyde, AB

Benchmark Angus, Lethbridge, AB

Lamb's Quarters Angus, Cadillac, SK

Black Ridge Angus, Dysart, SK

Miller Wilson Angus, Bashaw, AB

Brookside Angus, Brookdale, MB Bullseye Bull Sale, C & L Beasley Cattle Ltd., Patricia, AB Burnett Angus, Swift Current, SK

Nordal Limousin & Angus, Simpson, SK Ole Farms Ltd., Athabasca, AB

Crescent Creek Angus, Goodeve, SK

On Target Bull Sale Cinder Angus, Barrhead, AB and Dwajo Angus, Camp Creek, AB

Cudlobe Angus, Stavely, AB

Peak Dot Ranch, Wood Mountain, SK

Cudlobe Angus West, Claresholm, AB

Pedersen Livestock, Edgerton, AB

Eastondale Angus, Wawota, SK

Rainbow Hills Ranch, Delburne, AB

Female Focus Sale Hollinger Land & Cattle, Neudorf, SK and J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK

Redrich Farms, Forestburg, AB

Count Ridge Red Angus, Bassano, AB

Fleming Stock Farms and RJ Livestock, Granum, AB Fleury Cattle Co., Aberdeen, SK Flying K Ranch, Swift Current, SK Freyburn Angus Farms, Oxbow, SK Geis Angus, Barrhead, AB Glasman Farms, Russell, MB Hamilton Farms, Cochrane, AB Harvest Angus, Prince George, BC HBH Angus Farms Inc., Oak River, MB

Shiloh Cattle Co., Hand Hills Lake, AB South View Ranch, Ceylon, SK SweetPro Canada Premium Supplements Ter-Ron Farms, Forestburg, AB Triple A Bull Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Bell Angus; Cottonwood Angus; Glen Gabel Angus; Hi Low Angus; Nu-Horizon Angus; Triple H Angus and Willowview Angus Ward’s Red Angus, Saskatoon, SK Wilbar Cattle Co., Dundurn, SK Windy Willows Farms, Hodgeville, SK

Howe Red Angus, Moose Jaw, SK

The Canadian Angus Foundation functions to preserve and expand the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research, and historical preservation and restoration. The Canadian Angus Foundation was incorporated in 1993 and is the charitable arm of the Canadian Angus Association. Donations are tax deductible.

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Message from the CJA President,

Naomi Best

The Canadian Junior Angus board consists of nine members that each represent an area from across Canada. As a board, we work together to organize our two major events, Showdown and Guiding Outstanding Angus Leaders (GOAL). As a team we fundraise throughout the year to promote the Junior program and put on these exciting events. Director positions are open for nomination from the regions each year with a nomination deadline of January 31. Terms commence at Showdown in July and are for two years. Our GOAL Conference is held annually over the February long weekend and we look forward to hosting GOAL 2022 in Toronto, Ontario, February 19–21. The weekend consists of educational speakers and many activities that allow for Juniors to gain knowledge, connect and create friendships with other members from across the nation. The Foundation Legacy Scholarship interviews and panel discussion also take place at GOAL. This is where the five finalists selected by the Canadian Angus Foundation take part in a panel discussion and Juniors in attendance are allowed to watch. It is a great opportunity to share your knowledge about Canadian Angus and the industry, as well as gain confidence and learn from your fellow scholarship applicants. I highly recommend Juniors apply for the travel bursaries that are available and come out to GOAL—you won’t regret it! Showdown is our second major event which is being held July 27–29, 2022 in Brandon, Manitoba. Showdown is fantastic for Juniors to showcase not only their cattle but display their knowledge and talent in a variety of other competitions. These competitions include photography, literature, graphic design, sales talk, public speaking, judging, team grooming and showmanship. There are trucking bursaries available for Juniors travelling 1,000 kilometres or more one way. There are also travel bursaries available for Juniors to apply for. At Showdown we award three CJA Scholarships to Junior members so keep that in mind when looking at applying for scholarships. There are plenty of other opportunities available throughout the year for Juniors besides GOAL and Showdown. These include the Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador competition, self-directed travel bursaries, scholarships and exchange programs to attend junior Angus events in the United States such as LEAD, Certified Angus Beef Young Leaders Seminar and Round-Up. I am personally very thankful for these opportunities as I have had the privilege of attending many myself. The connections I have made with not only Canadian Angus breeders, Canadian Junior Angus members but even our neighbours in the American associations is tremendous. Through these events I have been able to expand my knowledge, gain confidence in my interpersonal skills and most importantly make many memories. All of these opportunities would not be possible without the help of our generous donors, sponsors, volunteers and fellow breeders. I would like to thank everyone who has contributed to the Junior programs not only this year but over the years. Your support is greatly appreciated and never goes unnoticed. I hope everyone has a smooth, safe and good calving season. I look forward to seeing everyone throughout bull sale season and into next summer.

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GUIDING OUTSTANDING ANGUS LEADERS CONFERENCE

GOAL

2022

February 19–21, 2022 Toronto, Ontario Event subject to change and/or cancellation dependent upon current public health and government guidelines.

The Guiding Outstanding Angus Leaders (GOAL) Conference promotes leadership skills within the Angus breed. Junior members from all over the nation attend this three-day event that is held in a different location each year. During GOAL the Juniors hear from motivational and educational speakers, participate in workshops, get involved in teamwork activities and develop beef and industry knowledge. Juniors are also given the opportunity to network and socialize with fellow Junior Angus members. Please stay tuned for more details. www.cdnangus.ca/canadian-junior-angus/goal Watch our Facebook and Instagram pages and visit our website for more details on 2022 scholarship deadlines, awards and other events.

GOAL Travel Bursaries

Application deadline January 1 Bursaries of up to $750 will be awarded to 12 deserving Canadian Junior Angus members from anywhere in Canada. Bursaries must be used within the same year awarded to help offset travel and registration costs for attending the GOAL Conference.

For more information contact Belinda Wagner, Canadian Junior Angus Coordinator, at 306-537-1518 or bwagner@cdnangus.ca 167


Name: Kodie Ted Doetzel Ranch: Nu-Horizon Angus Age: 22 City/Town: Lipton Province: Saskatchewan By Carmen Koning, Canadian Angus Association Kodie Deotzel has been an integral part of the Nu-Horizon Angus operation from a very young age. He has carried a feed pail since the day he could walk. He was always out with his parents, Deb and Kieran Doetzel, when working with the cattle. His passion shone through and many cattlemen have commented, "He was born to be a cattleman; it is just in his blood." When talking to various people about Kodie Doetzel, a common theme emerges: he’s had a passion for Angus cattle since a very young age. Jenna Loveridge, who has done cattle photography for the family since Kodie was a child, describes him as a quiet, independent, determined young man who did everything himself. “In the picture pen he picked up every detail that needed to be accomplished to get the right photo needed to market their animals. He was so willing to listen, question and learn about the process. I was so impressed with his natural ability to read livestock and work with them in a way that they would co-operate for him.” Kodie has always been involved with all aspects of the Nu-Horizon Angus purebred and commercial cattle operation. He is extremely interested in and knowledgeable 168

about the genetics and pedigrees of their herd. As a family they discuss which Al sires to use on their purebred cattle, what bulls to buy to use as service bulls, which females and bulls to retain and cull in the fall. He tackles his chores, processes cattle, moves cattle to pastures, synchronizes heifers for breeding, gets bulls ready for bull sales, calving, harvesting, haying and more, all without complaint. Kodie is also involved in marketing the business including purebred bull sales as well as sales at farm gate. He enjoys talking with potential buyers and educating them about Nu-Horizon’s breeding program. He can see what the commercial cattle industry is looking for and tries to deliver a product that will fulfill their needs. After sale day, Kodie delivers the bulls and continues to build the relationship with the buyer. Kodie was an active 4-H member throughout his school years. He loves participating in Showdown, Agribition and any other shows he can fit into his schedule. When he was only 12, he convinced his parents to show at Agribition and he has never missed participating in a show since. He has spent endless hours preparing his animals, and other people's animals, by halter breaking, grooming and clipping them. Attending shows is a great way to network with people of all ages, and Kodie’s ability to connect

with any age speaks of his character. He can hold an in-depth conversation with the most seasoned Angus veteran and then be found lending a helping hand to the youngest Junior member in the barn. His ability to effectively interact with others has served him extremely well and will provide him many opportunities in the future. At shows he is always scoping out what should be their next purchase to bring their purebred herd to the next level. Sheldon Kyle, long-time family friend and Canadian Angus Association President, comments, “Observing Kodie while he is at industry events is a pleasure. He has an innate ability to draw people towards him in his own quiet and unassuming manner. Kodie’s ability to interact with Angus breeders of all ages is unique.” His former childhood baseball coach, Janet Nameth, describes Kodie as a very coachable kid, always willing to take instruction and strive for improvement. She says that he was a team player and got along very well with his teammates. “Kodie is an outstanding young man who is passionate about the cattle industry. His enthusiasm will serve our industry well!” Kodie's ability to know the pedigree of their 200-head operation is impressive to say the least. He is a walking encyclopedia when it comes to pedigrees, not only within their


herd but potential genetics they may want to incorporate into their herd. He loves to talk pedigrees with anybody who will listen. While Kodie was in grade 12, he contemplated going to Lakeland College in Vermillion or Hutchinson College in Kansas. He was awarded a trip to a Red Angus conference in Kansas. From there, on his own, he arranged a meeting with the coach from the judging team at Hutchinson College. The coach and Kodie connected, and he offered Kodie a spot on the team. When Kodie came home he had decided that was where he wanted to attend school. If you ask his reason, he says it is plain and simple, "It will help me to evaluate cattle better for improving our own herd and help me select great cattle for the commercial cattleman as I want to become an order buyer.” He has competed across the country and has been very successful. The knowledge he has gained from this experience is an asset to his breeding program and the cattle industry. Kodie attended his first two years at Hutchinson Community College before moving on to South Dakota State University to complete his general agriculture degree.

The degree will provide him with knowledge for all aspects of his farm operation that he intends to merge with his parents. Accounting, genetics, soils, crops, nutrition and marketing are just some of the courses he has enrolled in to gain knowledge for his operation. While at college, he still plays an important role in the decision-making on the farm. Daily texts or phone calls to his parents to check on every detail of the farm are normal for Kodie. During bull sale season in the spring and selling females in the fall he still helps market those animals using Facebook, making phone calls and texts. In March 2020, Kodie came home to finish his academic year online. He balanced his schoolwork, harvesting the crop that couldn't be done the previous fall and completely took control over the cattle herd so his dad could concentrate on seeding the year’s crop. He had completed the Al course at college and was able to artificially inseminate the purebred herd on natural heats. He checked heats for possible recipients to place embryos in them, and then arranged with the vet to implant them. He gave the shots to the cattle

before pasture and then hauled them out, most times single handed. He made sure the fencing was done before the cattle went to pasture and made sure salt and mineral was always available. Jenna adds, “His obvious care for the livestock comes foremost, and this leads to his desire to be involved within the cattle industry as a whole. We are fortunate to have a young cattleman like Kodie with so much passion for the industry.” Sheldon describes Kodie as having inherent passion for Angus. Kodie spends hours studying the Angus breed, he is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to pedigree details, breeder profiles and more recently the evaluation of conformation and how that impacts cattle function. “Kodie is always willing to learn more about the Angus breed and the most relevant management practices to raise them. It is common for Kodie to reach out to industry players for advice, support and mentorship on his own initiative. He is a young man that is determined, focused and well rounded. You cannot help but enjoy your time spent with Kodie.”

Questions and Answers with Kodie Doetzel

Why did you join the Canadian Junior Angus program? Back when I was 6 years old and we were still living in Alberta, my family was only breeding Red Angus cattle. Jason and Bev Kelly (Prime Time Cattle Co.) had a junior program that offered a junior incentive: if you bought one of their heifers, they would feed and take the heifer to Showdown and the Alberta Junior Angus show for you. It was really good for people who had to travel abroad and the people like my family, who at the time knew nothing about showing cattle. The thing was… they only had blacks! It was not hard to convince my parents and so Prime Time’s 457 Ruby 605’06 was the start to our Black Angus herd, showing career, and most importantly, was my start in CJA. How has Canadian Junior Angus been beneficial to you? It has been beneficial in so many ways, from the friendships, scholarships, connections and experiences. I can guarantee I would not be the person I am today without being a part of the CJA. Many of my closest friends are from the Angus breed, fellow Juniors as well as mentors and adults. 169


When did you first know you wanted to stay involved with cattle ranching? Honestly there was not just a ‘day’ that I knew I wanted to stay involved. There just has been a passion for the industry built in since a young age that could not be broke. Most definitely, there have been things that could have turned me away along the way, but here we are and there is not any other industry that I would rather be involved in. What has been one of your highlights or favourite memories of raising Angus cattle? Since I have been involved for such a long time it would be hard to pick a definite favourite but a few highlights could be selling my first bull or winning my first banner. But what keeps coming back to my mind would be the full experience with Red Blairswest Power Up 1B. Back in the fall of 2014 I picked Power Up out in the stalls at Agribition. I told mom and dad that I thought he was the next breeding piece for our herd and sure enough we were able to get him bought. What a journey he took us on. I convinced my parents to take him out as a yearling and he did show with some success. Then come the fall of 2016 and we were fortunate enough to win the Brandon Angus show and that led to one of the greatest experiences of my life. Even though we were just on the outside of the top 10 I will always be thankful for the experience of showing in the Supreme with many of the people I looked up to. How has your experience with the Canadian Junior Angus program been for you so far? It has been awesome. From all of the GOAL conferences to Showdowns that led to so many friendships and connections that will last a lifetime. I know my Junior career is just coming to an end, but I will always cherish all of the opportunities and relationships the CJA has given me throughout the years.

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What is the best thing about being in the Canadian Junior Angus program? It’s hard to just pinpoint one thing, but I would have to say all of the opportunities the CJA has given me. Through both the CJA and Saskatchewan Junior Angus Association they have given me many travel bursaries to travel to many GOAL conferences and Showdowns across Canada as well as the Red Angus conference in the US. Yes, it has allowed me to see the country but for me truly the best part would be the mentorship opportunities and the friendships to last a lifetime. Why would you recommend the Canadian Junior Angus program to others? I would most definitely recommend the program to others. There are just so many programs and events that give you the best opportunity to start networking with many other breeders from a young age. Plus at GOAL, the board does a very good job to find impactful speakers that are full of knowledge and wisdom that we can use and expand in our programs. I do know I would not be where I’m at today or the same person I am without CJA. Any advice for Juniors just starting in the Angus business? Three things come to mind right off the bat: 1. Find a mentor or mentors. There are always people out there that are willing to give a helping hand. Just show the interest and they will help teach you the right things to succeed. 2. Always keep an open mindset. There’s always different ways of doing things that may be more efficient or more practical. Don’t be afraid to try new things and ask questions because most of the time it will better you in the end. 3. Get involved with CJA or at least your provincial breed associations. When I

first started at a very young age, I knew absolutely nobody but the associations brought me together with likeminded people of the same age and created friendships and networks all across Canada that will last a lifetime. Want to learn more about the Junior Angus Stockman of the Year award? The Junior Angus Stockman of the Year award was developed to recognize those outstanding young cattlemen who are constantly growing their ‘stockmanship’ capability by actively working with their Angus cattle; with actual farm involvement in day-to-day care of their livestock; learning the pedigrees and being actively involved in some breeding decisions within their operation; promoting their operation and cattle to the public through various and diversified means; growing their knowledge of nutrition, genetics and breeding; producing, selling and supporting demonstrable, reputable, notable, superior quality cattle; and understanding the relationship between our purebred Angus business and the commercial cattle and beef industry from the cow/calf producer through to the retail consumer experience. Five finalists are selected from the nominations and each receive $250 with the winner receiving a $3,500 bursary and a custom trophy buckle. Nominations are due by April 15. For more information, please visit the Canadian Angus Foundation website at: www.cdnangus.ca/foundation/ scholarships-bursaries-and-awards


22nd Annual Canadian Junior Angus

SHOWDOWN 2022

July 27–29 Brandon, Manitoba

Event subject to change and/or cancellation dependent upon current public health and government guidelines.

Tuesday, July 26, 2022 1:00 pm • Move in begins

Wednesday, July 27, 2022 12 noon • Move in complete 12 noon • Lunch & Orientation 12:30 pm • CJA Annual General Meeting 1:30 pm • Judging (individual competition – written reasons)

2:00 pm • Team Grooming 5:30 pm • Supper & Extravaganza

Thursday, July 28, 2022 9:00 am • Showmanship 11:00–4:00 pm • Print Marketing 1:00–4:00 pm • Sales Talk 12 noon • Public Speaking 2:00 pm • Judging (must qualify from individual competition)

6:00 pm • Cook-off & BBQ For up-to-date Showdown information, please visit www.cdnangus.ca/canadian-junior-angus/showdown The Canadian Angus Foundation will provide travel and trucking bursaries to attend Showdown as well as significant cash prizes and scholarships for the Aggregate Winners. There will also be three draws made for vouchers to purchase Angus females—one at $3,000 and two at $2,000. All exhibitors will automatically be entered to win!

Friday, July 29, 2022 9:00 am • Conformation Classes 5:00 pm • Banquet, Awards Presentations, Auction & Dance

Visit the Canadian Angus Foundation website at www.cdnangus.ca/foundation for more information and to apply for the bursaries. Naomi Best • President/Manitoba Director: 204-851-7233 Belinda Wagner • Coordinator: 306-537-1518 or bwagner@cdnangus.ca 171


and let others do the work. He has very hardworking parents and has certainly picked up their work ethic as his own. Jesse has been involved in many aspects of farming and the cattle business from a very young age. He has been growing his own Red and Black Angus herd for quite some time. He has been selling bulls in his own name at the On Target Sale in Barrhead, Alberta, since he was a child. His work ethic and calm demeanour are a great asset to his family’s purebred operation, Dwajo Angus. Jesse left the farm for brief period to further his agricultural knowledge, receiving a degree in agriculture, majoring in animal science. Upon his return to the family farm, he took on more responsibilities.

Name: Jesse Emery Ranch: Dwajo-Jes Award: Canadian Angus Foundation Outstanding Young Angus Breeder (2021) City/Town: Camp Creek Province: Alberta

J

esse Emery was raised in Camp Creek, Alberta. Throughout his childhood, he was a member of the Camp Creek 4-H Club and was involved in 4-H activities at all levels, not just his local club. Jesse learned many things cattle related, skills that he would later pass on to juniors and first timers who joined the Camp Creek Club. He took his skills and knowledge with him to attend various local and national cattle shows as well as judging shows across Alberta. Jesse was recognized as the youngest member of the junior team to win Agribition at the age of 16. Jesse is well respected and liked amongst his Angus peers, serving as president and in several other capacities with the Alberta Junior Angus Association. He was also a member of Canadian Junior Angus, attending many national Junior events over the years. Jesse has travelled internationally as well, touring Angus herds around the world, participating in the World Angus Forums in New Zealand in 2013 and the United Kingdom in 2017. Jesse is always willing to step up, help the junior Angus associations when needed and help mentor young Angus enthusiasts. As a child, Jesse would trail his parents, Dwayne and Joanne Emery, to Angus events. He has been very involved showing his cattle alongside his parents at Farmfair, Agribition and smaller local shows as well. Jesse has always fully participated. He’s not one to sit back 172

Jesse has joined the OBI Livestock Ltd. sales staff as a sales consultant and is learning the ropes of sales management in the cattle industry, travelling to many sales and farms across western Canada offering his opinion and knowledge of the cattle industry. As Mark Holowaychuk of OBI Livestock Ltd. says, “He continues to impress all with his eye for cattle and the way he conducts himself as a professional with clients.” In the fall of 2020, Jesse purchased a farm close to his childhood home. He now runs his own purebred cattle under the name Dwajo-Jes. He continues to source out different genetics and breed some exceptional cattle, marketing progeny from them at various sales including the Northern Select Sale and the On Target Bull Sale. As long-time family friend Karen Brown from Lone Stone Farms states, “I really trust Jesse’s ability to judge and pick top quality cattle. He’s an all-around great kid. He has a great smile that is friendly and interested in you.” Jesse has worked hard over the years to improve his cow herd and the genetics that he has utilized in his breeding program. Jesse has a desire to learn and ask questions of other reputable breeders not only within the Angus breed but other breeds as well. He has recently begun incorporating embryo transfer into his program to further propagate the strong females that he has in his herd, flushing them to some of the top sires in the industry. Jesse is driven to continue to improve his program and provide high quality genetics to the cattle industry. Jesse takes great pride in marketing bulls to the commercial cow men and servicing their needs with strong Angus genetics. As Barclay Smith, Jesse’s colleague and former 4-H leader, summarizes, “Jesse’s passion for the livestock industry continues to grow and expand and I look forward to seeing the impact his drive and determination have on the future of his breeding program.”


transition. I hope to be able to increase numbers and land base but of course that is only if the opportunity arises.

Questions and Answers with Jesse Emery Why did you join the Canadian Junior Angus program? My parents have had Angus cattle since 1982, allowing me the opportunity to acquire my first Angus heifer Erica 27N from them for my first year in 4-H. She allowed me to start my Junior Angus herd and I jumped at as many chances as I could to show her. She is still one of the most behaved animals I have shown to date. How was Canadian Junior Angus beneficial to you? Canadian Junior Angus has benefited me in multiple ways. It has provided me with events that have helped me network, make friends and learn from professionals in the industry. The competitions that Canadian Junior Angus hosted helped me develop skills such as marketing, judging and public speaking that I continue to use on my operation today. When did you first know you wanted to stay involved with cattle ranching? Growing up, animals were a huge part of my upbringing and I got lucky enough to be born into a family that raised Angus cattle. I always knew that in my life I needed cows around. Coming out of high school into university I knew I wanted to stay in the agriculture field because then I could stay close to livestock. What has been one of your highlights or favourite memories of raising Angus cattle? My top three highlights of raising Angus cattle would be number one being able to show my heifer Erica 27N at the World Angus Forum at Spruce Meadows in 2009. She won me a medal. The second highlight is having the high selling bull at the annual On Target Bull Sale, going to another purebred herd. My third highlight would be being

able to see a group of good producing cows and knowing they are multiple generations of my breeding. Tell us a bit about Dwajo Angus and Dwajo-Jes. Dwajo Angus was started in 1982 by my parents Dwayne and Joanne Emery. They started with 10 Black Angus bred heifers out of Sir WMS Wampum. Later they started their Red Angus herd in the 90s. They helped found the On Target Bull sale in 2000, which continues to run annually. Currently Dwajo Angus has 160 head of cattle consisting of 80 blacks and 80 reds. Dwajo-Jes was started in 2003 at the young age of 9. My dad helped guide and motivate me to start my own herd, which resulted in getting my own herd name and tattoo. My herd was started originally with Dwajo Erica 27N, that I purchased from my parents using my income from my first 4-H steer. Currently Dwajo-Jes consists of 25 head, 20 blacks and 5 reds. Dwajo-Jes has bought and sold numerous animals in the Northern Select Sale, which was a great place to get a young Angus breeder’s feet wet in the industry. Currently I work fulltime raising Angus cattle at Dwajo Angus, but occasionally work at OBI as a sales consultant. What are your short-term goals as a breeder? And long-term goals? My short-term goals are to reach 40 head of high quality, good producing cattle. This goal has now become more achievable ever since I acquired my own farm with my girlfriend Miranda, giving us more summer pasture, and increasing our land base.

Any advice for young breeders just starting in the Angus business? My advice for young breeders is to make as many connections as possible and participate in the industry as much as possible. For example, go to sales, put your own animals in sales, go to conferences, et cetera. A lot of these connections you will make over the years will help you be successful as you can learn something from everyone you meet. What takes you from an unknown breeder to a known breeder is having the right person invite you to participate in industry events. What does winning the Outstanding Young Angus Breeder Award mean to you? Winning this award means that I am on the right path as a cattleman and Angus producer. I know it hasn’t been a lifetime of work as of yet but it shows all the work I have put in has been paying off. This award means a tremendous amount to me because my job, my life and my passion stem from the Angus industry. I would like to thank my parents for all the support and guidance over the years. I wouldn’t be able to have this amazing life without them. I would like to extend that thank you to the On Target Bull Sale group, The Northern Alberta Angus Club, Alberta Junior Angus Association, Canadian Junior Angus and the Holowaychuk family for all the opportunities and guidance over the years. Want to learn more about the Outstanding Young Angus Breeder award? The Outstanding Young Angus Breeder award was developed to recognize an Angus breeder between the ages of 22 and 30 who has demonstrated a desire to stay involved in the Angus business for years to come based on their involvement within the breed up to this point in his or her career.

My long-term goals are to eventually take over Dwajo Angus through a gradual The winner will receive promotion and publicity of their Angus cattle operation through the Canadian Angus Association, plus financial reward. Nominations are due by April 15. For more information, please visit the Canadian Angus Foundation website at: www.cdnangus.ca/foundation/scholarships-bursaries-and-awards 173


KID’S CORNER Can you help this cow find her calf?

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connect the dots

If a cow laughed really hard... would milk come out of her nose? If a cowboy is happy does that make him a jolly rancher? 175


176 1. tractor 2. fence 3. barn 4. scarecrow 5. cattle 6. bales 7. cowboy hat 8. cat

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erosion harvest agriculture

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Fill-in-the-blank story Get ready to laugh as you do our fillin-the-blank story. The story contains blank spaces. Ask your partner to give you words to fill in the blanks (don’t tell them what the story is about or read the story aloud yet). Once all the blanks are filled in, read the whole story aloud! Get ready for a good laugh! 1. adjective_ _____________________ 2. colour_ _______________________ 3. adjective_ _____________________ 4. noun_ ________________________

It was the first __________ snowfall of the year. We woke up adjective

to a blanket of __________ outside and knew we could finally colour

use our new __________toboggans at the big__________. adjective

noun

We put on our__________and were out the door, but item of clothing

our__________ Fred decided he wanted to come too and animal

hopped on the toboggan to come with us. I__________ but it verb ending in -ed

wouldn’t budge, my brother came over to help and finally we were able to push him off and we were on our way. We got

5. item of clothing_________________

to the top of the __________and__________on for the best

6. animal________________________

ride ever but halfway down I realized we were heading right

7. verb ending in -ed_______________

for__________ the cow! I tried to stop by putting my foot

8. noun_ ________________________ 9. verb ending in -ed_______________ 10. name________________________

noun

verb ending in -ed

name

down and my __________ fell off. Thankfully, when she saw item of clothing

us coming she__________ in the other direction but now I verb ending in -ed

11. item of clothing________________

was stuck at the bottom without my __________. My brother

12. verb ending in -ed______________

__________ up to get it but by the time he was back my foot

13. item of clothing________________

was so cold I felt like it was going to fall off, so we headed in for

14. verb_________________________ 15. drink_ _______________________ 16. holiday_______________________

178

item of clothing

verb

some__________. Maybe we’ll try again on__________. drink

holiday


The future is in good hands. With programs that help our youth grow and learn about Angus, more innovations are just around the corner.

Canadian Junior Angus (CJA) was established in 1999 as a junior organization to the Canadian Angus Association. Juniors, who are 21 years of age and younger, participate in national events throughout the year that allow for opportunities to network, learn and grow. These events include Showdown, the national Junior show, and the Guiding Outstanding Angus Leaders (GOAL) Conference, which encourages Juniors to become involved in and excited about the industry and the breed with interactive activities and motivational speakers. Canadian Junior Angus also offers many different opportunities that Juniors can apply for through the Canadian Angus Foundation. The Foundation functions to preserve and expand the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research and historical preservation. For more information and to get involved, please visit: www.cdnangus.ca/canadian-junior-angus/

179


Quebec President Frédéric Gouin

Vice President Stan Christensen

St-Adrien-d’Irlande, QC (418) 333-2112 fredsophie@live.ca

Lac Ste-Marie, QC (819) 467-2979 stan@fermesage.ca

QUEBEC Events/Événements FEVRIER

Station Génétique de la Beauce Vente de taureaux (Bull Sale) 136, rang 1 Shenley Sud St-Martin-de-Beauce, QC

MARS

Vente de taureaux Ferme Louber 1630, Route St-Martin, Ste-Marie-de-Beauce, QC Info: Bernard Bégin (418-389-7181)

Vente de Taureaux Synergie Ste-Sophie-de-Lévrard, QC Info: Luc Noiseux (450-379-9989) Vente de Taureaux Vinoy 426, route 315, Chénéville, QC Info: Francis Gagnon (514-975-3722)

Secretary Cynthia Jackson Durham-Sud, QC (418) 784-2311 quebecangus@live.ca

Board Representative David Sample Havelock, QC (450) 247-2696 macangusfarms@gmail.com Expiry: 2023

JUIN

Quebec Junior Beef Show Location TBD

JUILLET

Saint-Hyacinthe Angus Show (Gold Show) Saint-Hyacinthe, QC

AOÛT

Cookshire Angus Show Cookshire, QC Ayer’s Cliff Angus Show Ayer’s Cliff, QC

SEPTEMBRE Brome Angus Show Brome, QC Expo Shawville Fair Shawville, QC OCTOBRE Expo Boeuf (Gold Show) Victoriaville, Quebec

www.cdnangus.ca/quebec-angus-association For more information, please contact the Quebec Angus Association for inquiries regarding events in 2022. 180

Vente des Partinaires / Partners for Progress Sale (Female Sale) 163 Chamin Clark Hill, Shefford, Quebec Info: Luc Noiseux ( 450-379-9989)

All events are subject to change and cancellation. Some events may be adjusted for virtual attendance. Tous les événements sont susceptibles d’être modifiés ou annulés. Certains événements peuvent être adaptés pour une participaction virtuelle.


Q QUEBEC

Statistics collected from November 2020 through October 2021

628

Registrations

Junior Memberships

344 Transfers

3

Young Breeder Memberships

Annual Memberships

57

7

Total New Members

Active Life Memberships

2

10

181


SEMEN ULTRA FERTILE

SIX MILE BLACK DIAMOND 129H 322AN11111

AVAILABLE IN

Frozen Semen

Sexed Semen

40M by dose

Fresh Semen

Un atout pour tous les éleveges

On demand

EPD PERCENTILES FOR SIX MILE BLACK DIAMOND 129H RELEASE JULY 23, 2021 | BLACK ANGUS (PED EST)

$

10

CALVING EASE DIRECT

HARDER

EASIER

BIRTH WEIGHT

HEAVIER

LIGHTER

WEANING WEIGHT

LIGHTER

HEAVIER

YEARLING WEIGHT

LIGHTER

HEAVIER

MATERNAL CALVING EASE

HARDER

EASIER

MILK

LOWER

HIGHER

100 90

/ unit

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

50TH PERCENTILE IS THE BREED AVG. EPDS FOR 2020 BORN CALVES

TOP

1

SHOWMAN FALL 2020

GRAPHIC INFORMATION CALVING EASE

EPD

BIRTH WEANING YEARLING WEIGHT WEIGHT WEIGHT

TOP

TOP

1

%

His Sire:

WEANING WEIGHT

TOP

15

%

15%

%

YEARLING WEIGHT

CALVING EASY

BIRTH WEIGHT

GRAPHIC INFORMATION (RELEASE JULY 23, 2021 | BLACK ANGUS (PED EST)

RADG

DMI

SCROTAL DOCILITY CIRC.

CLAW

ANGLE

CARCASS MARBLING WEIGHT

REA

FAT

HPG

MAT CALVING EASE

MILK

MATURE WEIGHT

MATURE HEIGHT

CBI

+8.0

+0.5

+74

+131

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

+9.5

+28

-

-

-

ACCURACY

P

P

P

P

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

P

P

-

-

-

TOP %

15

15

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

10

-

-

-

AVERAGE EPDS FOR BLACK CALVES BORN IN 2020 - AVERAGE EPDS FOR ALL THE RED AND RED CARRIER BORN IN 2020 EPD

+3.4

+2.1

+49

+86

+0.22

+0.72

+0.78

+16

+0.46

+0.48

+37

+0.39

+0.47

+0.016

+10

+6.8

+22

+52

+0.3

+26

+2.6

+1.2

+37

+63

+0.18

+0.27

+0.60

+12

+0.45

+0.51

+23

+0.24

+0.36

+0.004

+10

+5.2

+23

+36

+0.2

+21

Semen for Canada Use (Domestic)

Export Qualified Semen | EU qualified

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182

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Sale Managed by

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L’association Canadian Angus Politique relative aux conditions génétiques

La présente “ Politique sur les conditions génétiques “ remplace toutes les politiques antérieures de l’Association Canadian Angus, y compris celles intitulées “ Politique sur les défauts génétiques “.

En vigueur le 22 septembre 2013, révisé le 27 janvier 2020, et s’appliquant aux animaux nés le 22 septembre 2013 ou après.

Les conditions génétiques récessives existent chez tous les animaux. La politique de la CAA sur les conditions génétiques s’applique aux conditions génétiques qui peuvent avoir un impact sur les bovins de boucherie. L’objectif de cette politique est de surveiller ces conditions et d’aider les producteurs à gérer les mutations indésirables. 1. l’Association Canadian Angus fait présentement le suivi des conditions génétiques suivantes : Double musculature (DM) Nanisme (DW) Duplication du développement (DD) Hétérochromie iridienne (HI) Hypopigmentation oculocutanée (OH) Hypotrichose (HY) Protoporphyrie (PR) Hypoplasie pulmonaire (PH) Syndactylie (SN) Hémimélie tibiale (TH)

2. l’Association Canadian Angus a des exigences d’enregistrement additionnelles pour les conditions génétiques suivantes : Arthrogryposis Multiplex (AM) Hydrocéphalie neuropathique (NH) Ostéopétrose (OS) Arachnodactylie contractuelle (CA) Mannosidose (MA) Pour les maladies génétiques soumises à des exigences d’enregistrement additionnelles, les démarches suivantes sont nécessaires : • Les veaux qui ont des porteurs connus d’une maladie génétique dans les deux premières générations (parents et grands-parents) de leur pedigree, sans présence d’un animal exempt, doivent être testés pour le gène en question afin de pouvoir être enregistrés. • S’il s’avère que l’animal est porteur du gène en question, il est éligible à l’enregistrement et au transfert. Son statut génétique sera indiqué sur son certificat d’enregistrement et dans le livre généalogique en ligne de la CAA. Les tests de conditions génétiques : • Les tests visant à déterminer si un animal est porteur ou exempt du gène causatif d’une maladie génétique sont effectués par l’intermédiaire du CAA. • Les résultats des tests sont notés sur le certificat d’enregistrement de l’animal concerné et dans le livre généalogique en ligne. • À la suite du test d’un animal pour une condition génétique, le certificat d’enregistrement et le registre en ligne de l’animal doivent porter l’une des mentions suivantes : 1. la lettre “F” désignant “ FREE “ sur le certificat d’enregistrement et dans le livre généalogique en ligne de tout animal qui a été déterminé par un tel test comme étant sans condition génétique ; 2. la lettre “C” désignant “ CARRIER “ sur le certificat d’enregistrement et dans le livre généalogique en ligne de tout animal qui a été déterminé par ce test comme étant porteur de la condition génétique. 3. la lettre “A” désignant “AFFECTÉ” sur le certificat d’enregistrement et dans le livre 184

• •

généalogique en ligne de tout animal qui a été déterminé par ce test comme étant homozygote pour la condition génétique. Si un membre souhaite tester à nouveau un animal, le deuxième échantillon d’ADN sera vérifié par le biais de la vérification de la parenté. Les taureaux d’IA et les mères donneuses qui ont un porteur connu de toute condition génétique, pour laquelle il existe un test d’ADN disponible dans le commerce, dans les deux (2) premières générations de leur pedigree sans intervention d’un animal exempt, sont requis d’être testés avant l’enregistrement des veaux. Les animaux provenant de l’étranger qui sont reconnus porteurs d’une maladie génétique, pour laquelle un test d’ADN est disponible dans le commerce, dans les deux (2) premières générations de leur pedigree, doivent être testés pour la maladie génétique en question afin de pouvoir être enregistrés.

Les maladies génétiques pour lesquelles il n’existe pas de test ADN : • Les animaux qui sont reconnus porteurs d’une maladie génétique pour laquelle il n’existe pas de test d’ADN disponible dans le commerce dans les deux (2) premières générations de leur pedigree sont admissibles à l’enregistrement sans qu’aucun test d’ADN ne soit exigé. Nouvelles conditions génétiques : • L’Association informera tous les membres ayant des animaux enregistrés (éleveurs de race pure) par courriel ou par courrier en résumant les informations sur toute nouvelle condition génétique identifiée. Dans le cas d’une nouvelle condition génétique, les animaux actuellement enregistrés qui sont testés comme porteurs demeureront enregistrés.


L’Association Canadian Angus Politique de vérification parentale

La procédure

Les procédures suivantes doivent être suivies en ce qui concerne le statut d’enregistrement des porteurs potentiels et connus d’une maladie génétique : I. Statut des femelles et des taureaux présentement enregistrés • Nonobstant tout résultat de test ultérieur, toutes les femelles et tous les taureaux enregistrés dont les pedigrees présentent les caractéristiques génétiques concernées au 1er janvier de l’année suivant l’identification et la reconnaissance d’une condition génétique par la CAA continueront d’être enregistrés. II. Les tests sur les animaux • Les tests visant à déterminer si un animal est porteur, ou exempt, du gène déterminant d’une maladie génétique seront administrés par le CAA. III. La publication des résultats des tests par l’Association • Les résultats de ces tests doivent être notés sur le certificat d’enregistrement des animaux concernés, y compris par voie électronique. L’Association doit également maintenir une liste à jour de chaque animal déterminé comme étant porteur, ainsi que de ceux qui ont été testés comme étant exempts de cette condition. Sur demande, la CAA fournira cette liste sans frais aux membres qui en font la demande. IV. Le droit de demander un deuxième test ADN • Dans les cas où un animal préalablement enregistré ou en cours d’enregistrement est testé et déterminé comme étant porteur de la condition génétique (et est identifié comme tel électroniquement sur le site Web de l’Association), le membre qui est le propriétaire inscrit peut demander qu’un laboratoire agréé effectue un deuxième test ADN sur un échantillon de l’animal en question. Afin de traiter une demande pour un deuxième test, le membre qui est le propriétaire inscrit doit fournir des matériaux ou des échantillons suffisants pour permettre au laboratoire de vérifier la paternité de l’animal en question. V. Mentions sur les certificats d’enregistrement • Lorsqu’un animal est soumis à un test de dépistage d’une maladie génétique, le certificat d’enregistrement de l’animal doit porter l’une des deux mentions suivantes : A. la lettre “F” désignant “ EXEMPT/ FREE” sur le certificat d’enregistrement de tout animal qui a été déterminé par un tel test comme étant exempt de la condition génétique ; B. la lettre “C” désignant “PORTEUR/ CARRIER” sur le certificat d’enregistrement de tout animal qui a été déterminé par un tel test comme étant porteur de la maladie génétique.

Pour les taureaux •

Tous les taureaux nés le 31 décembre 2018 ou avant doivent avoir un profil de parenté ADN enregistré auprès de la Canadian Angus Association montrant la vérification du taureau avant que leur progéniture puisse être enregistrée. Tous les taureaux nés le ou après le 1er janvier 2019 doivent avoir un profil de parenté ADN enregistré auprès de la CAA montrant la vérification de la parenté (du père et de la mère) avant que leur progéniture puisse être enregistrée. Les taureaux utilisés pour l’IA doivent faire l’objet d’une vérification de leur parenté (avec le père et la mère) avant de recevoir le statut d’approbation de l’IA.

VEUILLEZ NOTER: nous encourageons les vendeurs à fournir un échantillon de poils, de sang ou de tissu pour les taureaux et leurs mères ou à les soumettre à une vérification parentale avant la vente.

Pour les mères •

Les vaches utilisées comme mères donneuses doivent être testées le plus complètement possible. L’exigence minimale est la vérification du père. Dans le cas où la mère est vivante ou si son ADN figure dans le fichier, elle doit être testée avant que le statut de mère donneuse ne soit accordé. Ce n’est que dans des cas particuliers que nous demanderons la reconstitution d’une vérification de l’ADN.

Pour les veaux •

Les veaux issus d’un transfert d’embryon doivent faire l’objet d’une vérification de la parenté (avec le père et la mère) avant de pouvoir être enregistrés. Les veaux issus de vaches qui ont été exposées à plusieurs taureaux à 14 jours d’intervalle doivent faire l’objet d’une vérification de la parenté avant de pouvoir être enregistrés. 185


Vous cherchez à tirer le meilleur parti de la qualité du fourrage ?

Tenez compte de ces facteurs

Merci au Beef Cattle Research Council, www.BeefResearch.ca, pour la permission de partager. Merci aux Producteurs de bovins du Nouveau-Brunswick et aux Producteurs de bovins du Québec d’avoir donné accès à une version française de cet article. By Beef Cattle Research Council

L

a qualité du fourrage est un facteur important à prendre en compte lors de l’alimentation du bétail. Bien que cela puisse sembler évident, la maximisation de la qualité du fourrage n’est parfois pas au centre des décisions de gestion. Pourtant, le fait de se concentrer sur la qualité pourrait permettre aux producteurs de réaliser des économies en tirant un meilleur parti du fourrage dont ils disposent et en réduisant la dépendance à l’égard des concentrés et des additifs alimentaires coûteux. La qualité du fourrage et les variations de rendement dans un champ dépendent d’une variété de facteurs, notamment le stade de maturité du fourrage, les conditions de croissance, la composition des espèces dans le champ et/ou les décisions relatives au moment de la récolte. Les considérations relatives à la récolte comprennent également le temps de séchage, ou temps de repos dans l’andain, qui est influencé par la longueur du hachage, l’utilisation de conditionneurs et la largeur de l’andain derrière la faucheuse. La gestion post-récolte affecte également la qualité du fourrage et est influencée par des décisions telles que l’emballage des ballots dans du plastique ou non et la manière dont le fourrage pressé est entreposé. En étant conscients de cette gamme de facteurs, les producteurs peuvent prendre des décisions avant la récolte, pendant la récolte et pendant l’entreposage qui peuvent optimiser la qualité du fourrage. Afin de maximiser l’utilisation du fourrage de qualité disponible, un système d’inventaire et d’analyse de la qualité devrait être mis en place. Il faut consigner des notes sur les champs qui comprennent des informations telles que l’espèce végétale, la maturité à la coupe et l’âge du champ. Cela permettra de regrouper le fourrage en ballots en fonction du même moment de coupe (1re, 2e , 3e ou 4e coupe), du

186

fourrage qui a été coupé et/ou mis en ballots à un moment similaire, ou qui a une composition fourragère similaire De plus, les aliments doivent être entreposés de manière à permettre l’accès à tout groupe à tout moment, en tenant compte des installations et des limites. L’analyse de la qualité des fourrages de chaque groupe d’aliments permet de mieux comprendre la qualité des aliments présents sur l’exploitation et de savoir si les réserves sont suffisantes pour répondre aux besoins du troupeau pour l’année. Une évaluation précoce donne le temps de se préparer à des déficits de rendement ou de qualité. Les analyses peuvent débuter une fois que le fourrage entreposé s’est stabilisé, avant la vente ou l’achat de fourrage, ou avant l’alimentation des animaux. Veillez à ce que les échantillons soient envoyés au laboratoire et prévoyez suffisamment de temps pour obtenir les résultats afin de pouvoir prendre des décisions éclairées sur les rations. Une fois les résultats des analyses de la qualité du fourrage reçus, ils peuvent être transmis à un nutritionniste ou les producteurs peuvent utiliser l’outil Feed Value Estimator du BCRC pour déterminer dans quelle mesure le fourrage analysé répondra aux besoins des différentes classes de bovins de leur troupeau et à leurs exigences de production. Grâce à cette information, les producteurs peuvent mieux adapter leurs groupes de fourrages au cycle de production de leurs animaux et déterminer avec plus de précision la quantité de concentrés et d’additifs alimentaires nécessaires pour répondre aux besoins nutritionnels non satisfaits par les fourrages des rations. Les producteurs suivants ont trouvé des moyens d’optimiser leur récolte, leur inventaire et leur entreposage d’aliments pour animaux afin de donner la priorité à l’analyse des aliments et à l’élaboration des rations.


Kintail Farms, Brook Village, Nova Scotia Andrew MacLennan et Krista MacGillivray, de Kintail Farms, dirigent une exploitation bovine et ovine près de Brook Village, en Nouvelle-Écosse. En mettant l’accent sur la qualité du fourrage et la gestion des aliments, Kintail Farms est passé de quatre vaches et 50 à 60 brebis il y a quelques années à 25 vaches et 200 brebis actuellement. Parmi les changements mis en œuvre, citons la récolte le plus près possible du stade du pied de la plante afin de cibler un fourrage de meilleure qualité et la création d’un inventaire et d’un système d’analyse de la qualité pour leurs aliments. Un silo de type tour est utilisé pour entreposer le fourrage de la plus haute qualité, tandis que le reste du fourrage est transformé en ballots, en ensilage haché et en foin sec.

Les fourrages emballés sont entreposés pour en faciliter l’accès et regroupés en fonction de leur date de récolte et de leur composition fourragère. Ces groupes sont entreposés séparément les uns des autres afin d’éviter le mélange de différents groupes et de réduire le risque de confusion lors de la création de rations à partir de différents aliments. Kintail Farms teste tous ses fourrages pour déterminer leur qualité et utilise ensuite ces informations pour élaborer les rations de son troupeau, en tenant compte du cycle de production des animaux. En puisant dans les différents groupes de qualité des aliments produits à la ferme, ils peuvent réduire leur dépendance à l’égard des sources d’aliments et des suppléments provenant de l’extérieur

de la ferme. Les fourrages sont complétés par du tourteau de soja et, à l’occasion, par de l’orge ou du maïs entier, selon les besoins et les prix du marché, mais ils ont pu réduire les quantités de suppléments nécessaires pour répondre aux besoins nutritionnels du bétail. Les changements apportés à leur système de gestion de la coupe et du fourrage leur ont permis de réduire de trois à cinq mois le temps nécessaire pour que leurs veaux atteignent le poids d’abattage sur le marché de la vente directe au consommateur. Cela a permis de réduire considérablement les coûts d’alimentation et de gestion.

Gilchrist Farms, Lucknow, Ontario Brad et Kristie Gilchrist, de Gilchrist Farms, près de Lucknow, en Ontario, dirigent une exploitation de cultures commerciales et de vaches-veaux Angus de race pure, ainsi qu’un centre de développement de taureaux d’hiver. L’accent qu’ils mettent sur la gestion de l’alimentation est mis en évidence par les nombreuses options d’alimentation produites à la ferme, qui sont cultivées pour répondre à des besoins de qualité spécifiques et fournir une gamme d’options lors de la préparation des rations pour leur troupeau. La qualité nutritionnelle de tous les aliments est testée et chaque fourrage est identifié, inventorié et entreposé séparément. Gilchrist Farms utilise des pâturages, de l’ensilage de foin, du foin sec emballé, de l’ensilage de maïs entreposé dans des siloscouloirs et d’autres ingrédients alimentaires provenant de sources agricoles et non agricoles. Certains champs de fourrage

sont gérés spécifiquement pour répondre aux besoins en protéines plus élevés de leurs animaux les plus exigeants sur le plan nutritionnel, comme les taureaux du centre de développement, et sont coupés en fonction du stade de maturité. D’autres champs sont coupés pour cibler le rendement et ces aliments sont utilisés pour les animaux ayant des besoins nutritionnels moindres. L’entreposage des aliments est également important, tous les aliments étant soit emballés, soit placés dans des silos-couloirs, soit entreposés à l’intérieur pour en préserver la qualité. Gilchrist Farms travaille en étroite collaboration avec son représentant en alimentation animale et son nutritionniste. Le troupeau est divisé en différents groupes en fonction du type de production, avec des régimes alimentaires créés pour répondre aux besoins nutritionnels spécifiques à chaque

phase de la production. Les rations sont en outre adaptées en fonction du rendement des animaux et des changements de température de l’air tout au long de l’année. Leurs taureaux sont pesés tous les vingthuit jours et les gains quotidiens et moyens font l’objet d’un suivi pour s’assurer que les animaux atteignent les objectifs fixés. Chez Gilchrist Farms, la production d’aliments sur place et la gestion intensive des régimes alimentaires leur permettent de mieux contrôler l’alimentation de leur troupeau et de maintenir les objectifs de production tout en réduisant les coûts. Ce billet de blogue a été élaboré en collaboration et avec l’expertise du personnel de Perennia Food and Agriculture, basé en Nouvelle-Écosse.

Pour en savoir plus: Ressources du Beef Cattle Research Council: Qualité du fourrage - www.beefresearch.ca/research-topic.cfm/forage-quality-86 Fourrages entreposés - www.beefresearch.ca/research-topic.cfm/stored-forages-87 Tenue de dossiers et analyse comparative - www.beefresearch.ca/resources/recordkeeping/record-keeping-and-benchmarking-overview.cfm Analyse de l’alimentation - www.beefresearch.ca/research/feed-value-estimator.cfm Ball, D.M., M. Collins, G.D. Lacefield, N.P. Martin, D.A. Mertens, K.E. Olson, D.H. Putnam, D.J. Undersander et M. W. Wolf. 2001. Understanding Forage Quality. Publication 1-01 de l’American Farm Bureau Federation, Park Ridge, IL Digman, M., D. Undersander, K. Shinners et C. Saxe. 2011. Best Practices to Hasten Field Drying of grasses and alfalfa. Université du Wisconsin - Extension, Cooperative Extension Publication A3927, Madison, WI 187


Questions fréquemment posées sur les services aux membres et conseils pour un service rapide Comment puis-je soumettre mon travail ou des données ? • • • •

par courriel registry@cdnangus.ca ou par télécopieur 403-571-3599 par courrier à 292140 Wagon Wheel Blvd, Rocky View County, AB T4A 0E2 Veuillez inclure le tatouage complet de l’animal, votre nom, vos coordonnées et votre numéro de membre. Nous ne sommes pas en mesure d’accepter les demandes de travaux par téléphone, mais nous serons heureux de répondre à vos questions.

Quels modes de paiement puis-je utiliser ? • • • •

parVisa ou Mastercard Virement électronique à ayuen@cdnangus.ca Chèque personnel ou professionnel N’oubliez pas d’indiquer votre numéro de membre dans le champ “notes/mémo” pour les paiements par chèque et par virement électronique.

Quels sont les frais d’enregistrement et de transfert ? • • •

Voir www.cdnangus.ca/fee-schedule pour le barème complet des frais Il y a des avantages tarifaires pour les inscriptions et les transferts effectués à temps ainsi que pour la participation au programme de performance Canadian Angus. Nous offrons également le programme d’inscription des vaches Angus (ACE), un barème de tarification basé sur les vaches.

Vous vous demandez ce que vous devez inscrire comme date de service sur votre demande d’enregistrement ? Ce champ enregistre le premier jour de service naturel, la date de l’IA ou la date d’implantation pour les veaux ET.

Quelle est la différence entre les dispositions 12 et 15 ? • •

Code 12 - Ouvert, opportunité de vêlage manquée fera passer l’animal à l’année suivante, par exemple du printemps 2022 au printemps 2023. Code 15 - Déplacé vers la prochaine saison de vêlage : l’animal est déplacé vers la saison suivante, par exemple du printemps 2022 à l’automne 2022.

Que signifient les lettres CM et ? numéros ? • • •

Un numéro à sept chiffres signifie que l’animal est enregistré. Un numéro CM signifie que l’animal a été inscrit mais pas enregistré et qu’il peut être enregistré ultérieurement sur demande. Un numéro ?pending (en attente) signifie que des informations supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour compléter l’enregistrement de l’animal. Vous recevrez une demande d’informations (RFI) avec les détails.

Que signifie le certificat E-Store ? •

Cela signifie que vos certificats ne sont pas automatiquement imprimés ou envoyés par courrier électronique. Vous pouvez demander des certificats imprimés ou envoyés par courrier électronique à tout moment.

Avez-vous partagé un taureau ou vendu la semence d’un taureau ? •

188

Un formulaire d’autorisation de taureau doit être soumis pour permettre aux membres qui ne sont pas propriétaires d’accéder au taureau. Il y a des frais de 50 $ par autorisation de taureau (les troupeaux liés sont inclus dans les mêmes frais). Si un membre le préfère, il peut faire approuver le taureau pour l’accès public à l’IA moyennant des frais uniques de 100 $. Les frais d’approbation de l’IA pour les taureaux importés sont de 400 $.


Vous souhaitez poser des questions et obtenir de l’aide en français ?

Cynthia Jackson, secrétaire de Quebec Angus, offre un service personnalisé en français aux membres. Communiquez avec elle au 819-588-2311 ou à quebecangus@live.ca.

Vous importez des animaux, de la semence ou des embryons ? Nous vous proposons quelques conseils. • • • •

Les génétiques importées doivent répondre aux exigences d’enregistrement de la Canadian Angus Association. Pour éviter les retards dans le traitement : Soumettre la demande d’importation sur le formulaire de demande d’importation de la CAA avec le paiement des frais d’importation d’animaux de 75 $. Fournir une preuve de propriété et une preuve d’importation légale de la CFIA. La CAA communiquera avec l’association d’origine pour obtenir des renseignements sur la vérification de la parenté (des frais de 15 $ peuvent s’appliquer). Vous pourriez avoir à soumettre un échantillon d’ADN de l’animal ou de ses parents si les renseignements sont incomplets ou non disponibles.

Comment puis-je soumettre des échantillons d’ADN ? • • • • •

Les poils, le sang, les tissus et la semence sont tous acceptés. Tous les échantillons doivent être clairement étiquetés avec les informations complètes sur le tatouage pour éviter les retards de traitement et les frais supplémentaires. Les cartes de poils sont fournies gratuitement aux membres par la CAA. Les échantillons doivent être fixés à ces cartes à code-barres, sinon chaque échantillon de poil détaché se verra imposer des frais de traitement de laboratoire de 4 $. Les échantillons d’ADN non étiquetés ou soumis au laboratoire sans demande de test d’ADN par la CAA sont soumis à des frais de 54 $/échantillon. Ces échantillons ont un impact sur les délais d’exécution du laboratoire pour tous les prélèvements. Les cartes de sang et les unités de prélèvement de tissus (UTS) peuvent être commandées auprès de la CAA.

Mise à jour de la politique de vérification de la parenté de l’Association Canadian Angus

Tous les taureaux nés le ou après le 1er janvier 2019 doivent avoir un profil de parenté ADN enregistré auprès de la CAA montrant la vérification de la parenté (tant pour le père que pour la mère) avant que leur progéniture puisse être enregistrée.

Combien de temps faut-il pour obtenir mes résultats d’ADN ? •

• •

Notre laboratoire, Neogen Canada, s’efforce de communiquer tous les résultats des tests ADN, y compris les tests de condition génétique, les tests de vérification de la parenté, les tests GS Angus et les tests de couleur de robe, dans les 21 jours ouvrables suivant l’arrivée de l’échantillon au laboratoire. Les GEPD et les rangs percentile génomiques des tests Angus GS nécessitent un délai supplémentaire de 2 à 6 semaines pour être incorporés dans nos évaluations génétiques mensuelles une fois les tests terminés. Pour vérifier que votre échantillon d’ADN est arrivé au laboratoire et connaître la date estimée pour les résultats, consultez le portail ADN sur notre site Web à l’adresse www.cdnangus.ca/dnaportal.

Quand dois-je demander un extrait de pedigree ? •

Veuillez prévoir au moins deux semaines avant l’impression de votre catalogue. Pour éviter tout retard de traitement, envoyez par courriel à registry@cdnangus.ca une liste de tatouages, les numéros de lots et la date de votre vente. Nous ferons de notre mieux pour traiter votre demande dans les quatre jours ouvrables.

Comment puis-je obtenir des boucles Angus ? •

• •

Pour commander des étiquettes RFID Canadian Angus, pour vous inscrire à SimpliTRACE, veuillez communiquer par téléphone avec un agent du service à la clientèle d’Attestra. Pour joindre le service à la clientèle d’Attestra : composez le 1-866-270-4319 ou visitez en ligne à https://attestra. com/tracabilite/animaux-elevage/simplitrace/. Les étiquettes de gestion Allflex peuvent être achetées auprès de la CAA. Les étiquettes de gestion Leader Products peuvent être commandées sur www.leaderproducts. com ou en appelant le 1-833-549-1563.

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Instructions pour les échantillons de poils de Canadian Angus Retirez les échantillons de poils de la pointe de la queue. Les échantillons doivent être TIRÉ PAS COUPÉ. Prenez 50 à 60 poils, en vous assurant que les bulbes de la racine sont bien présents.

Soumettez votre demande de vérification au bureau de la CAA, puis envoyez les pièces justificatives générées par la CAA ainsi que la carte de poils à Neogen Canada.

6 5

Marquez la carte de poils de façon claire, précise et soigneuse et conservez-la dans un endroit propre et sec jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit acheminée au laboratoire.

Association Canadian Angus 292140 Wagon Wheel Blvd, Rocky View County, AB T4A 0E2

1

2

4

Placez les racines des poils sur la carte (il y a un rond au milieu de la carte qui indique “Placez les racines des poils ici” / “Place hair roots here”).

3

Coupez les poils excédentaires qui dépassent les limites de la carte.

Fixez les poils au bas de la carte avec du ruban adhésif. (il y a un rectangle qui dit “Placez le ruban adhésif ici” / “Place tape here).

Neogen Canada 7323 Roper Road NW Edmonton, AB T6E 0W4

Angus Central: (403) 571-3580 • Numéro sans frais: 1-888-571-3580 • registry@cdnangus.ca 190


Setting the bar for Rancher

Endorsed

Beef partners can qualify for the Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed program by meeting the following requirements: •

Apply through the Canadian Angus Association Animals must have a minimum of 50% Angus genetics; at least one of the parents must be registered Angus Cattle must use the Canadian Angus RFID indicator An audit process will be finalized in consultation with participants to ensure program integrity

Quality

TM

Some of the world’s finest Angus cattle are raised right here in Canada, under ideal conditions. The Canadian landscape, water and fresh air are a big part of what make them so great. It also takes a select group of hardworking Canadian ranchers to bring those elements together. The result is Angus beef that is as delicious as it is nutritious. Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed™ is a certification program that offers quality assurances and endorsements for Canadian Angus genetics. With the support of the Canadian Angus Association, Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed offers confidence that the beef will exceed expectations.

Our ranchers are true stewards of their land. They raise cattle in a humane fashion not only because they know it’s best for the animals and their customers, but also because they know it’s best for future generations. Their beef is processed in federally or provincially inspected facilities. These businesses are subject to regular audits that ensure a high standard of food safety.

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Manitoba

MANITOBA

Events

JAN

Beef & Forage Week MB

Manitoba Beef Producers AGM Brandon, MB

President Dallas Johnson

Vice President Dylan Funk

FEB

Brookdale, MB (204 )354-2011 djcattleco@hotmail.com

Minto, MB (204) 245-0185 dylanfunk_31@hotmail.com

MAR

Secretary/Treasurer Mandi Fewings Pierson, MB 1-888-622-6487 mandi.mbangus@gmail.com

Manitoba Angus Producers Bull Sales Various locations, MB

SUMMER

MAA Pasture Tour MB

Board Representatives

Manitoba Junior Angus Emma Harms

Royal Manitoba Winter Fair Brandon, MB

SPRING

JUL Shawn Birmingham Brandon, MB (204) 573-6377 shawnbirmingham@yahoo.ca Expiry: 2022

18–20 Manitoba Ag Days Brandon, MB

Harding Fair (Gold Show) Harding, MB 27–29 Canadian Junior Angus Showdown Brandon, MB

OCT

MAA Fall Gold Show Ag Ex (Gold Show) Brandon, MB

DEC

Keystone Klassic Sale Brandon, MB

Manitoba Angus Association AGM MB

All events are subject to change and cancellation. Some events may be adjusted for virtual attendance.

www.cdnangus.ca/manitoba-angus-association For more information, please contact the Manitoba Angus Association for inquiries regarding events in 2022. 192


MANITOBA

Statistics collected from November 2020 through October 2021

4,254 7 1,489 33 Registrations

Transfers

Junior Memberships

Young Breeder Memberships

Annual Memberships

6

Total New Members

Active Life Memberships

5

22

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Genetic and Economic Implications of Teat and Udder Structure in Canadian Angus Cattle

By Dr. Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association

Canadian Angus Association Director of Science and Technology Dr. Kajal Devani recently completed her PhD at the University of Calgary School of Veterinary Medicine. We asked her to share a little bit about her thesis research with you. “Everything revolves around functional cattle.” Canadian Angus producers who completed an extensive survey that we sent out in 2019 clearly identified that fertility, feet and leg structure, and teat and udder structure are the most important factors within their operations. Our goal at the Association is to constantly evolve and improve our

Canadian Angus members and their commercial customers recognize that functional cattle, cow longevity, and good teat and udder structure are very important to profitability.

194

genetic evaluations to provide Canadian Angus members genetic selection tools for traits that improve production efficiencies and cow longevity. In beef herds, lifelong maintenance of good mammary structure is pivotal. Milk production and suckling are vital to calf growth and survival, particularly in commercial herds where producer assistance might not be available. Udders that lose their suspensory support become pendulous and sag below the hock. This makes them vulnerable to physical harm and mastitis infections, leading to blind quarters and compromised colostrum and milk. In addition, bottle shaped teats result in delayed calf suckling which significantly impacts access to colostrum and the calf ’s

survival, health and performance. Poor teat and udder structure are associated with early culling of cows and thus impact cow longevity. The aim of my PhD thesis was to develop genetic evaluations for teat and udder structure in Canadian Angus cattle. In 2008, the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF), an organization dedicated to advancing and coordinating genetic improvement for all segments of the beef industry, recommended that producers measure teat and udder structure and use that information when making selection decisions. BIF recommended a 1–9 scoring scale for measuring teat and udder structure. The


poorest quarter was scored within 72 hours of calving. Using these scoring guidelines, teat and udder scores were recorded for 2,912 Canadian Angus cows from 10 representative herds by three trained scorers. Scores ranged from 1 (pendulous udders and bottle shaped teats) to 9 (very tight udders and very small teats). In addition to cow age, time between calving and scoring, cow pedigree, cow genotype and performance information was also recorded. Using this data, genetic evaluations were developed and optimized. Estimates of heritability for teat and udder score in Canadian Angus cattle were moderate (0.32 (0.06) and 0.15 (0.04) respectively). To put this in perspective, these estimates of heritability are in the same range of the heritability for weaning weight and scrotal size. This tells us that a proportion of the variation in teat and udder structure is heritable (genetic), and that producers can successfully select for teat and udder score in our population. Estimates of phenotypic and genetic correlation between teat and udder score were also moderate (0.44 (0.05) and 0.58 (0.13) respectively). On a molecular level, few genes were significant for both the traits. This means that the two traits should be scored independently of each other. Some cows might have ideal udders but poor teat structure and vice versa. Also, estimates of genetic correlation between teat and udder score in young females and teat and udder

score in mature females was lower than expected. Genomic analysis confirmed that the genes driving teat and udder score in young females are very different than the genes significant for teat and udder score in mature cows. This analysis suggests that it is important to measure teat and udder score on cows annually. Additionally, estimates of genetic correlation between teat and udder score and growth (weaning weight and yearling weight) were close to zero. This means that selecting for improved teat and udder score will not have any unseen negative impacts on the genetics growth potential of the cow herd. Lastly, the economic impact of poor teat and udder structure was modelled. Canadian Angus members and their commercial customers recognize that functional cattle, cow longevity, and good teat and udder structure are very important to profitability. Our objective was to quantify this impact in terms of dollars. We modelled four of the primary impacts that teat and udder structure have in a commercial operation: 1. The probability and cost of mastitis due to teat and udder score 2. The probability and cost of culling a cow due to teat and udder score 3. The probability and cost of calf mortality due to dam teat and udder score 4. The probability and cost of calf morbidity due to dam teat and udder score

Based on these four factors only, it was estimated that an improvement of 1 score (on the BIF 1–9 scoring scale for teat and udder structure) in a commercial operation would be worth $16.91 per calf born, indicating that functional traits like teat and udder structure have a significant impact on profitability and should be included in genetic selection programs. The Canadian Angus Association, its members, and its cattle have provided me with a haven within which to work and learn. I am so grateful for this. Many thanks to Matt Bates for helping me get this project started a very long time ago. This project was funded by Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (now Alberta Agriculture and Forestry), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and the Canadian Angus Foundation. Without their generous support this work would not have gotten off the ground. Canadian Angus members continue to measure and record teat and udder scores during calving so that we might have enough data to include these traits in our routine genetic evaluations. For more information or questions about these, genetic selection, or the Canadian Angus Association Performance Program, please contact Kajal Devani at kdevani@cdnangus.ca or at 1-888-571-3580.

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HAMCO Quality genetics in volume C AT T L E C O .

24 ANNUAL BULL SALE TH

AT THE FARM SOUTH OF GLENBORO, MANITOBA

SATURDAY, MARCH 19 . 2022

SELLING 120+ YEARLING & 2 YR OLD RED & BLACK ANGUS BULLS Hamco Cattle Co. currently runs a purebred Angus herd of 525 mother cows of which 50% are Black Angus and 50% are Red Angus. We offer open and bred heifers and cows by private treaty. Contact us any time to view the cowherd or sale bulls!

The Hamilton’s

KYLE & LARISSA CELL (204) 526-0705 CALL (204) 827-2358 EMAIL: larissa_hamilton@hotmail.com DR. DAVID & SHELLEY CALL (204) 822-3054 CELL (204) 325-3635 hamcocattleco.com GLEN & CARLEEN CALL (204) 827-2002 FAX (204) 827-2000


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MARCH 9, 2022

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Blair, Lois & Melissa McRae H: 204-728-3058 B: 204-729-5439 L: 204-573-5192 marmacfarms1@gmail.com

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Feeder Sales Canadian Angus RFID Indicator Program

BRITISH COLUMBIA

B.C. Livestock Producers Co-Op (Kamloops) 250-573-3939 Okanagon Falls Stockyards 250-497-5416 Vanderhoof Auction Market Ltd. 250-567-4333 VJV Dawson Creek Auction 250-782-3766

Alameda Auction Market 306-489-2221

ALBERTA

Balog Auction Services Inc. 403-320-1980 Bow Slope Shipping Association 403-362-5521 Calgary Stockyards Ltd. (Strathmore) 403-934-3344 DLMS DLMS.ca 780-991-3025 Dryland Cattle Trading Corp. (Veteran) 403-575-3772 Foothills Auctioneers Inc. (Stavely) 403-549-2120 Innisfail Auction Mart 403-227-3166 Medicine Hat Feeding Company 403-526-2707 North Central Livestock Exchange Inc. (Clyde) 780-348-5893 (Vermilion) 780-853-5372 Olds Auction Mart 403-556-3655 Perlich Bros. Auction Market Ltd. 403-329-3101 Provost Livestock Exchange 780-753-2218 Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange (Fort Macleod) 403-553-3315 Stettler Auction Mart (1990) Ltd. 403-742-2368

Thorsby Stockyards Inc. 780-789-3915 Triple J VJV Westlock 780-349-3153

VJV Auctions | 780-336-2209 Beaverlodge 780-354-2423 Ponoka 403-783-5561 Rimbey 403-843-2439

SASKATCHEWAN

Williams Lake Stockyards 250-398-7174

TEAM Electronic Sale 403-234-7429

Viking Auction Market 780-336-2209

Assiniboia Livestock Auction 306-642-5358 ala@assiniboiaauction.com Cowtown Livestock Exchange Inc. (Maple Creek) 306-662-2648 cowtown.ls@sasktel.net Heartland Livestock Services Moose Jaw 306-692-2385 plister@hls.ca Swift Current 306-773-3174 info@hls.ca Yorkton 306-783-9437 info@hls.ca Kelvington Stock Yards 306-327-8325 Mankota Stockmen’s Weigh Co. 306-478-2229 mankotastockmens@sasktel.net Northern Livestock Sales brent.mlsstockyards@sasktel.net Lloydminster 306-825-8831 Meadow Lake 306-236-3411 Prince Albert 306-763-8463 Saskatoon Livestock Sales Ltd. 306-382-8088 ptellier@nbine.com Shaunavon Livestock Sales (88) Ltd. 306-297-2457 Spiritwood Stockyards 306-883-2168 ssy@sasktel.net Weyburn Livestock Exchange 306-842-4574 wle@weyburnlivestock.com

Market your 2022 Angus tagged calves at these Angus feature sales at participating auction markets. These auction markets are recognized supporters and sellers of cattle identified as Angus through the Canadian Angus RFID indicator.

Whitewood Livestock Sales 306-735-2822 whitewoodlivestock@sasktel.net

MANITOBA

Interlake Cattlemen’s Co-Op Assn Ltd. (Ashern) 204-768-2360 icca@mymts.net Gladstone Auction Mart 204-385-2537 auctmart@mts.net Grunthal Livestock Auction 204-434-6519 grunthallivestock@gmail.com Heartland Livestock Brandon 204-727-1431 info@hls.ca Virden 204-748-2809 info@hls.ca Killarney Auction Mart Ltd. 204-523-8477 killarneyauctionmart@gmail.com Ste. Rose Auction Mart Ltd. 204-447-2266 Taylor Auctions 204-522-3996 taylorauctions568@gmail.com Winnipeg Livestock Sales 204-694-8328

ONTARIO

Brussels Livestock 519-887-6461 Ontario Stockyards Inc. (Cookstown) 705-458-4000 Ottawa Livestock Exchange (Greely) 613-821-2634 Kawartha Lakes Community Sale Barn Inc. 705-439-4444 Keady Livestock Market (Blue Water) 519-934-2339 Ontario Livestock Exchange Ltd. (Waterloo) 519-884-2082

QUEBEC

Contact the Feeder Calf Sales Agency 450-697-0540

NOVA SCOTIA

Atlantic Stockyards Ltd. 902-893-9603

To order Canadian Angus RFID indicators, please order directly from CCIA at www.canadaid.ca or call 1-877-909-2333. www.cdnangus.ca

198



CAT TLEMAN’S CONNECTION BULL SALE ANGUS FARMS

1:00 PM

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, 2022

AT THE RANCH

OAK RIVER, MB

2021 HIGH SELLER TO PARKVIEW FARMS, FALLUN, AB

2021 HIGH SELLER JAYME CORR, BIRTLE, MB

2021 HIGH SELLER TO JAYME CORR, BIRTLE, MB

2021 HIGH SELLER CRESTVIEW LIVESTOCK, PANSY, MB

Sale Managed By T Bar C Cattle Co. Ltd. Chris: 306-220-5006 | Shane: 403-363-9973 Ben: 519-374-3335 View the catalogue online at www.BuyAgro.com

Watch & Bid Online

VISITORS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME! PLEASE STOP BY TO SEE THE BULLS AND HAVE A VISIT!

HBH Angus Farms Inc. Box 94, Oak River, MB, R0K 1T0

200

Like us on facebook HBH Angus Farm and on Instagram @hbhangus

Brayden Heapy Ph: 431-282-3085 braydenheapy19@gmail.com

Darcy Heapy Ph: 204-365-7755 dheapy@mymts.net

www.HBHAngusFarms.com


&

Annual Bull Female Sale

Timed Online Auction Starts March 24th, 2022 at 9:00 am Ends March 26th, 2022 at 6:00 pm

Scott, Cindy, Martina, Robyn & Parker Tibble Find us on Facebook

Swan River, MB 204-539-2570 (H) or 204-734-0210 (C) stibblemail@gmail.com

Bored of the usual fare? Nothing on TV? Looking for some quality shows to binge? Angus Broadcasting Canada has Canadian Angus Foundation videos on various topics including the living histories, historical events, Angus personalities and junior submissions for the Legacy Scholarships and Ambassador competitions.

Lots of different topics to choose from. Lots of things to learn. Lots of entertainment to be had. Stream anytime.

Visit www.cdnangus.ca/angus-broadcasting-canada-abc or subscribe to our YouTube channel today and never miss another episode www.youtube.com/CanadianAngusAssoc

201


SALE PACKAGE Canadian Angus Association

45

$

plus applicable taxes*

INCLUDED IN THE PACKAGE: • Upload of your sale catalogue to Canadian Angus Association website and promotion on at least one social media channel • Sale included on the online events calendar • Maximum three pictures of herd bulls uploaded to Animal Inquiry web page • Choice of three excerpts for sale catalogue • Access to Association program logos

*Sale package is provided FREE to members who provide sale results to the Canadian Angus Association within 24 hours of the sale. A template will be provided to assist with the reporting. **Sale package is also included at no additional cost for those who purchased ads in Angus Life magazine.

www.cdnangus.ca 202


What’s the Difference Between Contemporary Group and Management Group Information? By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association Anytime Canadian Angus Association members who participate on the Association’s voluntary performance program submit information on a trait, like birth weight information for example, we ask for three things: 1. That the information is measured and recorded accurately, 2. That the information is recorded on all the animals within that group or calf crop, and 3. That the information is submitted with management group information. Management group: This information helps us group animals that had the same opportunities to develop the trait being reported. Sticking to the example used earlier, all calves that had the same opportunity to develop birth weight should be grouped together in one management group. Since birth weight is primarily developed in the last trimester of pregnancy, calves should be grouped according to the management of their dams. For example, if a female was sick during the last trimester of her pregnancy, and the duration or severity of disease would have impacted her body condition and her calf ’s ability to grow to its fullest potential, then this calf should be

placed in a separate contemporary group when reporting its birth weight. Another example would be if a group of females were being fed extra. The calves from these females would have had access to extra nutrition through their dams and should be placed in a different management group from the rest of the calves for birth weight. Management group information should only reflect management differences between animals. Management group information and other factors that create inherent differences between animal performance like sex and age are combined to further group animals into contemporary groups. The objective in doing so is to create the most accurate group information possible. Group information is used to parse environmental influence out of phenotypic performance measurements. This allows us to describe the genetic potential of breeding animals more accurately. EPDs (estimates of genetic potential that breeding animals pass on to their progeny) are only accurate when the three requirements of the performance program are met. This is why the Association requires: 1. Accurate information 2. Information on all calves per calving season, and 3. Accurate management group information from those members that choose to participate in the performance program.

203


Hair samples can only be submitted using hair cards available through the Canadian Angus Association. Hair samples that are not affixed to a hair card (such as being wrapped in tape or loosely placed in a bag, envelope, or other package) will be charged an additional $4/sample processing fee.

Hair Cards for DNA Sampling Courtesy of your Canadian Angus Association

To order your hair cards for 2022, please contact the Canadian Angus office at 1-888-571-3580 or by emailing registry@cdnangus.ca. To ensure you are prepared for all your DNA tests please order enough hair cards for your 2022 season.

Other options for DNA sampling: • TSUs • Blood cards • Semen Straw (bulls) Neogen Canada is currently giving away a hand-held, easy-to-use scanner to all members who order more than 500 TSUs. These make it easy to scan a TSU into an Excel document and type the animal tattoo beside it. Mislabelled TSUs create a lot of delays and issues.

To order TSUs, blood cards, hair cards or if you need help with correctly labelling your TSUs please contact the Canadian Angus Association by calling 1-888- 571-3580, emailing registry@cdnangus.ca or texting 587-439-3440. 204


The Most Sophisticated Genetic Selection Tool: Economic Selection Indexes By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association

Balancing EPDs for numerous traits, some of which are positively correlated to each other and some of which are antagonistic (negatively correlated to each other), all of which have different impacts on producer profitability can be challenging. As well, genetic evaluations for new traits are continuously being developed. The most effective way to use EPDs for genetic selection is to include EPDs for all important traits into one number, based on the economic impact of each trait. This is called an economic selection index. The Canadian Balanced Index (CBI) is an economic selection index. It includes EPDs for the following traits, all weighted according to their economic impact in a commercial operation within the Canadian market. Traits included in the Canadian Balanced Index (CBI) Calving Ease Docility Foot Score Feed Efficiency Heifer Pregnancy Mature Weight Milk Weaning Weight Yearling Weight Back Fat Marbling Rib Eye Area

The Canadian Balanced Index (CBI) includes both maternal and terminal traits. Thus, it is a great starting point for selecting genetics to use on a commercial operation, both to develop retained heifers and for terminal feeder calves. Each trait is weighted to optimize profitability on a commercial operation. The higher the Canadian Balanced Index, the more genetic potential for profitability. Using the Canadian Balanced Index (CBI) is easy. The EPD is expressed in terms of Canadian dollars such that when comparing two bulls the following example can be used: Bull A CBI = $250 Bull B CBI = $150 _________________ Difference = $100 On average, progeny from Bull A will bring $100 more value to a commercial operation than the average progeny from Bull B. Economic selection indexes are the most effective way to drive genetic improvement because they inherently balance antagonisms. For example, the Canadian Balanced Index (CBI) drives growth while maintaining calving ease. The Canadian Balanced Index (CBI) is unique and cutting edge in the way that these antagonisms are treated. For

example, calving ease and milk are included in the index. These traits are very beneficial, up to a certain point. After that optimal point there is no increased benefit to producers’ bottom line to add more of these traits; in fact more of these traits after the optimal point can actually cost producers. The index is designed such that bulls with higher Milk EPDs will have a higher Canadian Balanced Index, to a certain point. After that point, a higher Milk EPD will not equal a higher Canadian Balanced Index. The Canadian Balanced Index (CBI) is a great tool for commercial producers selecting Canadian Angus genetics. EPDs for individual traits are still available and recommended for producers that are targeting genetic selection for specific traits as well. There are many different ways for an animal to have a specific index number. Thus, producers can match EPDs for specific individual traits to their own breeding objectives, management practices, and environment. For more information on the Canadian Balanced Index (CBI), please visit our website (www.cdnangus.ca/canadianbalanced-index) or contact your Director of Science and Technology, Kajal Devani at kdevani@cdnangus.ca or 403-537-5604. 205


Saskatchewan SASKATCHEWAN

Events

JAN President Michelle Potapinski

1st Vice President Chad Hollinger

Hodgeville, SK (306) 677-7540 windy.willows@sasktel.net

Neudorf, SK (306) 331-0302 hollingerlandandcattle@gmail.com

2nd Vice President Jordan Sies

General Manager Belinda Wagner

Greyson, SK (306) 728-1299 sieser94@hotmail.com

Regina, SK (306) 757-6133 office@saskatchewanangus.com

18–20 Saskatchewan Beef Industry Conference Regina, SK

Saskatchewan Angus Association AGM

JUN

Livestock and Forage Centre of Excellence Field Day Clavet, SK

JUL

Ag In Motion Langham, SK

SUMMER

Annual Summer Tour SK

Board Representatives Sheldon Kyle Redvers, SK (306) 452-7545 sheldon@kenrayranch.com Expiry: 2023

Dale Easton Wawota, SK (306) 577-7456 eastondale.angus@sasktel.net Expiry: 2022

Rob Garner Simpson, SK (306) 946-7946 nordallimousin@sasktel.net Expiry: 2024 Saskatchewan Junior Angus Hillary Sauder Hodgeville, SK (306) 677-7542 hsauder12@gmail.com 206

NOV

Lloydminster Stockade Roundup (Gold & Junior Show) Lloydminster, SK Canadian Western Agribition (Gold Show) Regina, SK

All events are subject to change and cancellation. Some events may be adjusted for virtual attendance.

www.cdnangus.ca/saskatchewan-angus-association For more information, please contact the Saskatchewan Angus Association for inquiries regarding events in 2022.


SASKATCHEWAN

Statistics collected from November 2020 through October 2021

17,070 110 66 7,078 461 Registrations

Transfers

Junior Memberships

Young Breeder Memberships

Annual Memberships

Total New Members

Active Life Memberships

16

55

207


Getting the Best Results from Your Efforts During Calving Season

By Kajal Devani, Canadian Angus Association

L

ike newborns from many species, beef calves are born with naïve immune systems. This means that they have very low levels of protection right after birth. Unfortunately, calves have to start fighting potential diseases like scours, navel infections, arthritis and pneumonia immediately after birth. That is why it is so important for them to access colostrum within the first hour or two of birth. This is the critical time during which they best absorb antibodies, or immunoglobulins (IgG), from their dams in what is called transfer of passive immunity (TPI). Successful TPI is dependent on the total amount of IgG contained in the colostrum, the time between birth and consumption, how much colostrum they get, and how this consumption occurs. Typically, beef producers are very proactive about ensuring that calves get up and nurse. When this is not happening, most producers will feed calves colostrum. Unfortunately, we know that a third of calves have lower IgG levels than what is needed for health and fitness. This is called inadequate TPI. Studies show that calves with inadequate TPI have IgG levels below 24 g/L and this increases the odds of calf death and treatment significantly. Dr. Lisa Gamsjäger is a veterinarian, internal medicine specialist, and recently completed her PhD at the University of Calgary. She

208

conducted two randomized trials to determine the most effective amount, concentration, and method of feeding colostrum. This information can ensure that producers get the best possible outcomes when they have to intervene and feed colostrum to calves that have not nursed within an hour of birth. When to feed colostrum: Most of the beneficial components of colostrum, including IgG, are large molecules. At birth, calves’ intestines can absorb these molecules. Every hour after birth the intestine becomes less and less able to absorb large molecules. By 24 hours after birth, calves’ guts have developed complete closure to large molecules. This means that the sooner after birth calves get colostrum, the more of the good stuff in colostrum they can absorb into their systems. As such, intervening to get calves to suckle or intervening with colostrum sooner rather


than later will give producers the best results.

should ensure at least 100 g/L IgG concentration.

How much colostrum to feed: When it comes to colostrum, the volume and concentration seem to be important. Dr. Gamsjäger intervened at calving and fed three groups of calves either 1 litre of 100 g/L IgG concentration colostrum (group 1 calves), 1.4 litres of 70 g/L IgG concentration colostrum (group 2 calves), or 2 litres of 100 g/L IgG concentration colostrum (group 3 calves) within 60 minutes of birth. For all three groups, there were no significant differences in the group average IgG levels after 24 hours. Regardless of group, all of the calves achieved more than the recommended threshold of 24 g/L IgG concentrations in their systems. It is noteworthy though, that the calves from group 2 (who were fed 1.4 litres of colostrum that had the more moderate 70 g/L concentration of IgG) were three to four times more likely to get up and nurse their dams by hour 8 after birth than the calves from the other two groups. We know that calves that get up and nurse their dams have significantly higher likelihood of survival.

How to feed colostrum: Dr. Gamsjäger also measured the effects of feeding colostrum using either a nipple bottle or oro-esophageal tube. In this study, tubing calves resulted in lower calf IgG levels on average. In addition, several of the calves from this tubed group did not achieve that recommended threshold of 24 g/L IgG concentration in their system.

Colostrum collected on farm is rarely measured for IgG concentrations. So how do you best gauge the most effective volume and concentration to feed calves? Colostrum from the calf ’s own dam is always the preferred source. If this is not possible, mature cows typically produce higher volumes of colostrum than heifers, so select a mature cow with plenty of extra colostrum or one that has lost her calf. If it is not used within one hour of collection, cow colostrum can be frozen and kept in the freezer for up to one year. Once frozen, colostrum should be thawed in a warm water bath. Microwaving colostrum to thaw it will destroy the antibodies and make it ineffective. If commercial (powdered) colostrum is being used, then producers

I asked Dr. Gamsjäger what her main recommendations for producers would be given the results of these trials and her extensive background on the topic. Here are the primary actions producers can take to ensure that they are getting the maximum benefits for their efforts at calving: • Intervene quickly enough to ensure that all the vital components of colostrum can actually be absorbed by the calf. • Try to use colostrum collected from the calf ’s own cow or at least a mature cow from your herd. • If your stored colostrum was frozen, do not microwave it to thaw it. Instead, thaw it in lukewarm water. • Bottle feed at least 1 litre of colostrum within the first two hours of birth. • Ensure you are feeding at least 70 g/L concentration of IgG using a bottle. • If a bottle is not possible and you are using an oro-esophageal tube, ensure you are feeding at least 1.4 litres in that first intervention. • Get the calf nursing its dam as soon as possible.

“ The sooner after

birth calves get colostrum, the more of the good stuff in colostrum they can absorb into their systems.“

I hope these recommendations from Dr. Gamsjäger give you the best results possible if you do have to intervene at calving. 209


goals The journey journey Towards Towards our our The

requires bravery, bravery, courage courage & & requires

K e N R ay R a N c h P h o t o & d e S i g N © e l l a w R i g h t. c o m

commitment!

Mark your 2022 c alendar

Annual Open House at Kenray Ranch Saturday April 2nd, 2022 :: Annual ONLINE Bull Sale - April 6th & 7th, 2022 Agribition in “the Yards” Nov 2022 stop in for a visit :: Annual Fall Female Sale - Dec 2022

Kenray K Quality Red Angus for over 30 Years

The Kyles - RedVeRS, SK • Visitors Always Welcome

Sheldon Kyle: 306.452.7545 • Ray Kyle: 306.452.7447 Nolan Vandersluis: 431.771.4785 [e] sheldon@ kenrayranch.com • visit our website: www.kenrayranch.com facebook.com/KenrayRanch

twitter@ kenrayranch

kenrayranch


Ever heard “Out with the old and in with the new”? When herd sires perform and look like this we say Keep the OLD & add the NEW

HA Outside 5161C (iMP 5161C) W Alking bull At CCA @ 6 yeArs Old CAlving eAse & M ilking extrAOrdinAire

CresCent Creek ritO 133C (kOs 133C) PiCtured @ 6 yeArs

PurCHAsed bACk frOM A CustOMer After tHey used HiM suCCessfully fOr 5 yeArs.

-IntroducingSitz DRY Valley 712H Co-owned with Chapman Cattle Co.

24th Annual Bull & Female Sale Saturday April 2, 2022 The Olynyk’s Box 192 Goodeve Sk. S0A 1C0 info@crescentcreekangus.com crescentcreekangus.weebly.com

Home: 306-876-4420 Wes: 306-728-8284 Wade: 306-730-7673


3 Decades of Angus Cattle

14th Annual Bull Sale MARCH 5, 2022 AT THE RANCH, SK

SALE MANAGED BY Chris Poley: 306-220-5006 Ben Wright: 519-374-3335 Shane Michelson: 403-363-9973

View the catalogue on www.buyagro.com

212

CLARKE & DENISE WARD G.S. 707 RR #7 Box 39, Saskatoon, SK S7K 1N2 P: 306.931.3824 C: 306.220.6372 www.wardsredangus.com


L Y IN

K

RA

G

F

Bull Sale H C N

at the Ranch

14 miles SW of Swift Current, SK Canada

80 Yearling

Red Angus Bulls

April 13, 2022 Breeding Quality Red Angus Since 1972

Brian, Christine, Dylan, & Shane Hanel

Home: 306-773-6313

Cell: 306-741-1582

www.flyingkranch.ca







J

Annual

PM Farms Bull & Select Female Sale

“Bred to keep you in the cattle Business”

Thursday March 17, 2022 Parkbeg, Saskatchewan Open House on Family Day Monday, February 21st at the Gravelbourg farm Sale Broadcast on

2021 Bull Sires include:

S A V 707 Rito 9969 – Old School Genetics Greenwood Gunslinger – A Hoover No Doubt son MAR innovation Image – Our Resident Herdsire JPM Woodrow 3D – A Maternal Powerhouse Producer


Established in 1950...

Wood Mountain, Saskatchewan

4th generation family operation backed by longevity and integrity...

Canada's Largest Source of Angus Genetics

Two Sales a Year...

Spring Bull Sale Wednesday April 6, 2022 Selling 200 Yearling Bulls

Fall Bull Sale

Saturday December 3, 2022 Selling 200 Coming Two Year Old Bulls We pay 4% of your Comprehensive Insurance. Developed Sensibly for Longevity Free Delivery 500 miles or $100 Pick up Discount Semen Tested and Ready for Immediate Service Sight Unseen Satisfaction Guaranteed Free Wintering and Boarding Available Volume Discounts Online Biding Cull Bull Program. Receive a $500 credit on each new replacement bull you buy. (eg: If you cull 5 bulls you will receive a $500 deduction for each of the 5 replacement bulls you buy.) Credits must be used on a per bull basis and you cannot use more than 1 credit toward a new bull.

View Sale Book at www.peakdotranch.com or phone Carson Moneo 306-266-4414 Clay Moneo 306-266-4411 Email:peakdot@gmail.com


Watch and Bid Online with

www.dlms.ca

BLAIRSWEST LAND & CATTLE LTD. Drake, Saskatchewan

SCOTT & CALLA BLAIr: 306.365.7799 maguire BLAIR: 306.360.7716 Blairswest.net


BULLS SIRED BY THESE EXCITING SIRES AND MORE Red Weber Reform 618 Red Six Mile Gentry 342G Red Wheel Stark 67G Remitall F Diesel 76D Schiefelbein Showman 338 Red Six Mile John Wick 882E

Six Mile 47th Annual Bull Sale Saturday, April 2, 2022 At the Ranch - Fir Mountain, SK 150 Ranch Raised Red and Black Angus Bulls Yearlings & Two Year Old Bulls Select Group of Open Purebred & Commercial Heifers

Where Customers Become Friends

Six Mile Ranch Tyson : 403-376-7284 Callie: 306-640-9275 Clayton: 306-642-8013 Corinne: 306-640-7970 Sebastien: 250-423-1375 sixmile@sasktel.net sixmileredangus.com


Justamere Farms Full Page


Brooking Angus Ranch tenth annual bull sale MONDAY AT THE RANCH

03.21.2022 brooking mercury

s a v renovation

brooking firebrand

SONS OF THESE SIRES WILL SELL | 90+ BLACK ANGUS BULLS Justin & Tawnie Morrison and family

Box 813 Radville, SK S0C 2G0 Justin (306) 536 4590 - Tawnie (306) 861 4155 brookingangus@outlook.com WWW.BR O OKING ANG USR ANCH.COM


Tuesday, April 5, 2022

W W F

Collin ♥ , Michelle & Hillary Sauder Box 55, Hodgeville, SK SOH 2B0 Michelle’s cell 306-677-7540 Hillary’s cell 306-677-7542 windy.willows@sasktel.net • www.windywillows.ca Check us out on Facebook at Windy Willows Farms

DELORME RANCH

r u e o c YChoi A pril 4 B ULL S A LE

2022

Don & Connie Delorme

Angus • A family tradition since 1948

dcdelorme@sasktel.net

Home-Raised Private Treaty Sales: • Commercial Replacement Heifers • APHA/AQHA Prospects

Box 28, Robsart, SK. S0N 2G0 HOME: 306.299.4494 CELL: 306.299.7778

www.DelormeR anch.ca

HOME OF SOUTH SHADOW, BOUNDARY & JAY EN DEE, KAY DEE & PRAIRIE PRIDE ANGUS HERDS

225


2021 results

GOLD SHOWS RED SHOW RED DMM RUMBLE 74J

BULL OF THE

YEAR

REG# 2227974 Breeder: Vern & Brenda Goad, Cole & Jolene Goad Owners: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Shiloh Cattle Company

RED SHOW

FEMALE OF THE

YEAR

Top 5 Heifer Calf Champions – Red 1. RED TER-RON LAURYN 40J

3. RED SIX MILE FRADO 687J

Keely Adams 2. RED SHILOH KURUBA 108J

Clayton & Corinne Gibson

REG# 2209562

REG# 2207143

REG# 2205108

3. RED CINDER BIEBIRD 583H

Kasey Adams 2. RED BLAIRSWEST DARLINE 33H

Brynne Yoder 4. RED TOWAW UCOLA 441H

REG# 2168724

1. RED TER-RON DYNAMINT 143G

3. RED BCC RENEE 44F

Rob Adams 2. RED SIX MILE MARIA 214G

Wynton Brandl 4. RED CINDER FREYJA 29E

REG# 2034111

REG# 2227974

Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Shiloh Cattle Company

REG# 1991417

Clayton & Corinne Gibson

4. RED GILLETT GOLD DUST 50J

Shiloh Cattle Company 3. RED TER-RON 6 MILE JOKER 84J

Jaynell Coglon-Pasichnuk 5. RED DOUBLE B RED WATCH 129

REG# 2206809 REG# 2209768

1. RED RAINBOW CONCORDE 28H

3. RED SHILOH HOLLYWOOD 129H

Dave & Rhonda Bablitz 2. RED CINDER BRAVO 683H

Shiloh Cattle Company 4. RED PIRO SRIRACHA 0111H

Kelly Feige

5. RED SIX MILE MARTA 928E

2. RED SHILOH JACKAL 20J

Top 5 Junior Champion Males – Red

REG# 2168400

Peyton Christman

Brynne Yoder & Brylor Ranch

Rob Adams

REG# 2194652

REG# 2154189

REG# 1987032

Top 5 Bull Calf Champions – Red 1. RED DMM RUMBLE 74J

5. RED SIX MILE MS DURUBA 18H

Ryder Nicklaus Wildman

Top 5 Senior Champion Females – Red

Clayton & Corinne Gibson

Eric Smith

REG# 2184756

Maguire Blair

REG# 2090611

REG# 2204148

Clayton & Corinne Gibson

1. RED TER-RON 6 MILE MISTY 131H

REG# 2093651

5. RED SIX MILE BCAR MS HAMI 260J

REG# 2204162

Top 5 Junior Champion Females – Red

REG# 2228672

REG# 2142321 Breeder: Rob Adams Owner: Kasey Adams

4. RED SIX MILE MS FRADO 344J

Shiloh Cattle Company

REG# 2142321

RED TER-RON 6 MILE MISTY 131H

REG# 2144157

REG# 2211503 REG# 2235559

Baxter Blair

5. RED DTA HIGH RISE 31H REG# 2179920

Arntzen Angus

REG# 2152163

Randy Tetzlaff

Top 5 Senior Champion Males – Red 1. RED U2 REVIVAL 147G REG# 2102143

Blairs West Land & Cattle

2. RED WRIGHTS COMBINATION 34G REG# 2125472

James Harold & Terry Wright

Please note: only three senior bulls were shown in 2021. 226

3. RED SIX MILE PARABELLUM 675G REG# 2105769

Clayton & Corinne Gibson


For 2021, the Canadian Angus Association removed the requirement that points are calculated on the best three shows across two regions. The 2021 winners are based on total points accumulation.

BLACK SHOW DMM MAXIMUS 18G

BULL OF THE

YEAR

BLACK SHOW

REG# 2081754 Breeder: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Owner: Little Willow Creek Ranch

FEMALE OF THE

YEAR

Top 5 Heifer Calf Champions – Black

MERIT SOCIALITE 8196F

REG# 2066448 Breeder: Garrett Mac Liebreich Owner: Garrett Mac Liebreich

1. BLAIRSWEST ERICA 77J

4. DMM LADY 105J

4. PF BLACK LICORICE RLP 28J

Maguire Blair 2. BOSS LAKE MS WENDY 117J

Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) 4. FISK FAY 101

Rae-Lee & Devon Erickson 4. RLF MISS ESSENCE 7J

REG# 2235029

REG# 2233454

Kyle & Brittany Boss 3. GREENWOOD LUCY JJP 11J

REG# 2222389

REG# 2217576

Jennifer Jones

REG# 2201504

REG# 2224122

Luke Haggart

REG# 2227457

Jayden & Jaxon Payne

Top 5 Junior Champion Females – Black 1. DUSTY’S COUNTESS 22H REG# 2179243

Brooking Angus, Halley Adams & Jayden & Jaxon Payne

2. MERIT FLORA 14H

4. J SQUARE S ELLEN 18H

Carson Grady Liebreich 3. MERIT JILT 131H

Trent & Janelle Liebreich 5. BROOKING ROSE 0083

Garrett Mac Liebreich

Brooking Angus Ranch

REG# 2161650

REG# 2142321

Top 5 Senior Champion Females – Black 1. MERIT SOCIALITE 8196F REG# 2066448

3. CARPS MISS GOSSIP 841G REG# 2112365

Garrett Mac Liebreich Ethan Yaremko 2. GREENWOOD ENVIOUS BLACKBIRD 58 4. J SQUARE S KARAMA 922G REG# 2060512

Jayden & Jaxon Payne

REG# 2179599

REG# 2155774

5. EF SARAS DREAM 942 REG# 2118812

Morgan MacIntyre

REG# 2111735

GT Angus & Jordan Sies

Top 5 Bull Calf Champions – Black 1. BOSS LAKE THE KRAKEN 119J

3. DMM TRUE NORTH 62J

5. AVELYN BIG JOHNSON 72’21

Kyle & Brittany Boss 2. JUSTAMERE LM 7112 JAEGER 314J REG# 2222463 Justamere Farms Ltd.

Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) 3. SMW BUZZ 26J

Dave & Marilyn Hofstra 5. CARPS JESSE JAMES 841J

1. WILBAR GREENLIGHT 839H

3. EASTONDALE HIERARCHY 57’20

REG# 2233511

REG# 2215385

REG# 2217953

Sharon M. Wagner

Top 5 Junior Champion Males – Black REG# 2173433

Bryan & Tracey Willms 2. PF TJL HENDRIX RLP 8H

REG# 2161262

Fred & Violet Lansdall Dale Easton

REG# 2139610

REG# 2203009

REG# 2205316

Ethan Yaremko 4. GREENWOOD HIGH CLASS JJP 87H REG# 2173768

Jayden & Jaxon Payne 5. JEM COLOSSAL 41H REG# 2155867

Rae-Lee & Devon Erickson

Top 5 Senior Champion Males – Black

Ernest Mutch

1. DMM MAXIMUS 18G

3. BOSS LAKE BELLAGIO 911G

Little Willow Creek Ranch 2. SHILOH GUNNERY 25G

Kyle & Brittany Boss, Clint & Anna Collins Chris Bushey & Marilyn Mastine 4. CHESTNUT TURNING HEADS 29

REG# 2081754

REG# 2082389

Shiloh Cattle Company

REG# 2123620

5. AF ANDERSON’S SA SNIPES REG# 2007743

REG# 2173995

Michelson Land & Cattle, Chestnut Angus Farm, Wheatland Cattle Co. 227


GOLD SHOWS 2021 results

Farmfair International — BLACK, Edmonton, AB Champion

Reserve Champion

DMM MAXIMUS 18G REG# 2081754 Breeder: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Owner: Little Willow Creek Ranch

WILBAR GREENLIGHT 839H REG# 2173433 Breeder & Owner: Bryan & Tracey Willms

Farmfair International — RED, Edmonton, AB

2021 CHAMPIONS IN ALL THE GOLD SHOWS – MALES

Champion

RED CINDER BRAVO 683H REG# 2168400 Breeder: Tavianne Yoder Owner: Kelly Feige

Expo Boeuf, Victoriaville, QC Champion

Reserve Champion

AF ANDERSON’S SA SNIPES REG# 2007743 Breeder: Anderson Farms Ont. Inc. Owner: Chris Bushey & Marilyn Mastine

COVEY HILL CAPTAIN 12H REG# 2138399 Breeder: U-2 Ranch Owner: Emmanuel Chenail & Dave Sample

Fall Finale Beef Show, Lindsay, ON Champion

Reserve Champion

PREMIER RIP 29H REG# 2138399 Breeder: Peter Frijters Owner: Scott & Sandra Honey, Rob Hasson & Peter Frijters

MAPLEVIEWS JAGER BOMB 1J REG# 2202102 Breeder & Owner: Mitch McCrady

Heritage Beef Classic, Windsor, NS Champion

Reserve Champion

JEM COLOSSAL 41H REG# 2155867 Breeder & Owner: Ernest Mutch

RED OLTN JACK DANIELS 18J REG# 2195643 Breeder & Owner: Wyatt & Victor Oulton

Manitoba Ag Ex, Brandon, MB Champion

Reserve Champion

EASTONDALE HIERARCHY 57’20 REG# 2161262 Breeder: Dale Easton Owner: Fred & Violet Lansdall, Dale Easton

MERIT RANCH WATER 1067J REG# 2211703 Breeder & Owner: Garrett Mac Liebreich

New Brunswick Beef Expo, Sussex, NB Champion

Reserve Champion

JEM COLOSSAL 41H REG# 2155867 Breeder & Owner: Ernest Mutch

RED LORCAIN JAGGER REG# 2209120 Breeder & Owner: Barbara Higgins-Larkin

Olds Fall Classic — BLACK, Olds, AB Champion

Reserve Champion

DMM MAXIMUS 18G REG# 2081754 Breeder: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Owner: Little Willow Creek Ranch

SHILOH GUNNERY 25G REG# 2082389 Breeder & Owner: Shiloh Cattle Company

Olds Fall Classic — RED, Olds, AB

Reserve Champion

Champion

RED RAINBOW CONCORDE 28H REG# 2194652 Breeder & Owner: Dave & Rhonda Bablitz

Canadian Western Agribition — BLACK, Regina, SK Champion

DMM MAXIMUS 18G REG# 2081754 Breeder: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Owner: Little Willow Creek Ranch

Canadian WesternAgribition — RED, Regina, SK Champion

RED RAINBOW CONCORDE 28H REG# 2194652 Breeder & Owner: Dave & Rhonda Bablitz

RED DMM RUMBLE 74J REG# 2227974 Breeder: Vern, Brenda & Cole Goad Owner: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Shiloh Cattle Company

Reserve Champion

CHESTNUT TURNING HEADS 29 REG# 2173995 Breeder: Chestnut Angus Farm Owners: Michelson Land & Cattle, Chestnut Angus Farm & Wheatland Cattle Co.

Reserve Champion

RED DOUBLE B RED WATCH 129 REG# 2235559 Breeder & Owner: Baxter Blair

Lloydminster Stockade Round-Up — BLACK, Lloydminster, SK Champion

WILBAR GREENLIGHT 839H REG# 2173433 Breeder & Owner: Bryan & Tracey Willms

Reserve Champion

PF TJL HENDRIX RLP 8H REG# 2139610 Breeder & Owner: Rae-Lee & Devon Erickson

Lloydminster Stockade Round-Up — RED, Lloydminster, SK Champion

RED WRIGHTS COMBINATION 34G REG# 2125472 Breeder: Laurie Morasch Owner: James Harold Terry Wright 228

Reserve Champion

RED U2 REVIVAL 147G REG# 2102143 Breeder: U-2 Ranch Owner: Blairs West Land & Cattle

Reserve Champion

RED U2 REVIVAL 147G REG# 2102143 Breeder : U-2 Ranch Owner: Blairs West Land & Cattle


TOP MALES 1. DMM MAXIMUS 18G REG# 2081754 Breeder: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Owner: Little Willow Creek Ranch

11. JUSTAMERE LM 7112 JAEGER 314J REG# 2222463 Breeder: Justamere Farms Ltd. Owner: Justamere Farms Ltd.

2. WILBAR GREENLIGHT 839H REG# 2173433 Breeder: Bryan & Tracey Willms Owner: Bryan & Tracey Willms

12. RED SHILOH HOLLYWOOD 129H REG# 2144157 Breeder: Shiloh Cattle Company Owner: Shiloh Cattle Company

3. BOSS LAKE THE KRAKEN 119J REG# 2233511 Breeder: Kyle & Brittany Boss Owner: Kyle & Brittany Boss

13. EASTONDALE HIERARCHY 57’20 REG# 2161262 Breeder: Dale Easton Owner: Fred & Violet Lansdall, Dale Easton

4. SHILOH GUNNERY 25G REG# 2082389 Breeder: Shiloh Cattle Company Owner: Shiloh Cattle Company

14. BOSS LAKE BELLAGIO 911G REG# 2123620 Breeder: Kyle & Brittany Boss Owner: Kyle & Brittany Boss Clint and Anna Collins

5. RED DMM RUMBLE 74J REG# 2227974 Breeder: Vern, Brenda & Cole Goad Owner: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Shiloh Cattle Company

15. DMM TRUE NORTH 62J REG# 2215385 Breeder: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Owner: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus)

6. RED RAINBOW CONCORDE 28H REG# 2194652 Breeder: Dave & Rhonda Bablitz Owner: Dave & Rhonda Bablitz

15. GREENWOOD HIGH CLASS JJP 87H REG# 2173768 Breeder: Jayden & Jaxon Payne Owner: Jayden & Jaxon Payne

7. RED U2 REVIVAL 147G REG# 2102143 Breeder: U-2 Ranch Owner: Blairs West Land & Cattle

15. SMW BUZZ 26J REG# 2217953 Breeder: Sharon M. Wagner Owner: Sharon M. Wagner

8. PF TJL HENDRIX RLP 8H REG# 2139610 Breeder: Rae-Lee & Devon Erickson Owner: Rae-Lee & Devon Erickson

18. AVELYN BIG JOHNSON 72’21 REG# 2203009 Breeder: Dave & Marilyn Hofstra Owner: Dave & Marilyn Hofstra

9. RED SHILOH JACKAL 20J REG# 2206809 Breeder: Shiloh Cattle Company Owner: Shiloh Cattle Company

18. CARPS JESSE JAMES 841J REG# 2205316 Breeder: Ethan Yaremko Owner: Ethan Yaremko

10. RED CINDER BRAVO 683H REG# 2168400 Breeder: Tavianne Yoder Owner: Kelly Feige

18. JEM COLOSSAL 41H REG# 2155867 Breeder: Ernest Mutch Owner: Ernest Mutch 229


GOLD SHOWS 2021 results

Farmfair International — BLACK, Edmonton, AB Champion

Reserve Champion

GREENWOOD ENVIOUS BLACKBIRD 58 REG# 2060512 Breeder & Owner: Jayden and Jaxon Payne

MERIT SOCIALITE 8196F REG# 2066448 Breeder & Owner: Garrett Mac Liebreich

Farmfair International — RED, Edmonton, AB

2021 CHAMPIONS IN ALL THE GOLD SHOWS – FEMALES

Champion

230

Reserve Champion

RED TER-RON 6 MILE MISTY 131H REG# 2142321 Breeder: Rob Adams Owner: Kasey Adams

RED TER-RON DYNAMINT 143G REG# 2093651 Breeder & Owner: Rob Adams

Expo Boeuf, Victoriaville, QC Champion

Reserve Champion

EF SARAS DREAM 942 REG# 2118812 Breeder: Sean Enright & Barry Enright Owner: Morgan MacIntyre

BAR-J-M 545 BETH D 11J REG# 2205548 Breeder: Kathy, Ray, Colin & Kaitlin Cavanagh Owner: William Armitage

Fall Finale Beef Show, Lindsay, ON Champion

Reserve Champion

EF ANNIE K 793 REG# 2118561 Breeder: Shady Brook Angus Farm Owner: Sean Enright & Barry Enright

BLACK LANE GEORGINA 2003H REG# 2211990 Breeder & Owner: Ryan Currie

Heritage Beef Classic, Windsor, NS Champion

Reserve Champion

JEM FLORA 20F REG# 2024343 Breeder & Owner: Ernest Mutch

JEM BLUEBELL 48H REG# 2155866 Breeder & Owner: Ernest Mutch

Manitoba Ag Ex, Brandon, MB Champion

Reserve Champion

MERIT SOCIALITE 8196F REG# 2066448 Breeder & Owner: Garrett Mac Liebreich

J SQUARE S KARAMA 922G REG# 2111735 Breeder & Owner: GT Angus & Jordan Sies

New Brunswick Beef Expo, Sussex, NB Champion

Reserve Champion

JEM BLUEBELL 48H REG# 2155866 Breeder & Owner: Ernest Mutch

JEM FLORA 68J REG# 2200656 Breeder & Owner: Ernest Mutch

Olds Fall Classic — BLACK, Olds, AB Champion

Reserve Champion

MERIT SOCIALITE 8196F REG# 2066448 Breeder & Owner: Garrett Mac Liebreich

Olds Fall Classic — RED, Olds, AB Champion

RED TER-RON 6 MILE MISTY 131H REG# 2142321 Breeder: Rob Adams Owner: Kasey Adams

REMITALL F TIBBIE 61H REG# 2137388 Breeder: Gary Latimer & Richard Latimer Owner: Ella Latimer

Reserve Champion

RED SHILOH HEAVENLY 43H REG# 2143745 Breeder: Shiloh Cattle Company Owner: Kylie Willms

Canadian Western Agribition — BLACK, Regina, SK Champion

GREENWOOD ENVIOUS BLACKBIRD 58 REG# 2060512 Breeder & Owner: Jayden & Jaxon Payne

Canadian Western Agribition — RED, Regina, SK

Reserve Champion

DUSTY’S COUNTESS 22H REG# 2179243 Breeder: Dusty Rose Cattle Co. Owner: Brooking Angus, Halley Adams & Jayden & Jaxon Payne

Champion RED TER-RON 6 MILE MISTY 131H REG# 2142321 Breeder: Rob Adams Owner: Kasey Adams

Reserve Champion RED SIX MILE MARIA 214G REG# 2090611 Breeder & Owner: Clayton & Corinne Gibson

Champion

Reserve Champion

Lloydminster Stockade Round-Up — BLACK, Lloydminster, SK GREENWOOD ENVIOUS BLACKBIRD 58 REG# 2060512 Breeder & Owner: Jayden & Jaxon Payne

DUSTY’S COUNTESS 22H REG# 2179243 Breeder: Dusty Rose Cattle Co. Owner: Brooking Angus, Halley Adams & Jayden & Jaxon Payne

Lloydminster Stockade Round-Up — RED, Lloydminster, SK Champion RED TER-RON DYNAMINT 143G REG# 2093651 Breeder & Owner: Rob Adams

Reserve Champion RED SIX MILE MARIA 214G REG# 2090611 Breeder & Owner: Clayton & Corinne Gibson


TOP FEMALES 1. MERIT SOCIALITE 8196F REG# 2066448 Breeder: Garrett Mac Liebreich Owner: Garrett Mac Liebreich

12. RED SIX MILE MARIA 214G REG# 2090611 Breeder: Clayton & Corinne Gibson Owner: Clayton & Corinne Gibson

2. GREENWOOD ENVIOUS BLACKBIRD 58 REG#2060512 Breeder: Jayden & Jaxon Payne Owner: Jayden & Jaxon Payne

12. RED TER-RON LAURYN 40J REG# 2236037 Breeder: Terry Adams Owner: Keely Adams

3. RED TER-RON 6 MILE MISTY 131H REG# 2142321 Breeder: Rob Adams Owner: Kasey Adams 4. DUSTY’S COUNTESS 22H REG# 2179243 Breeder: Dusty Rose Cattle Co. Owner: Brooking Angus, Halley Adams & Jayden & Jaxon Payne 5. BLAIRSWEST ERICA 77J REG# 2235029 Breeder: Maguire Blair Owner: Maguire Blair 6. MERIT FLORA 14H REG# 2161650 Breeder: Trent & Janelle Liebreich Owner: Carson Grady Liebreich 7. RED TER-RON DYNAMINT 143G REG# 2093651 Breeder: Rob Adams Owner: Rob Adams 8. BOSS LAKE MS WENDY 117J REG# 2233454 Breeder: Kyle & Brittany Boss Owner: Kyle & Brittany Boss 9. MERIT JILT 131H REG# 2149395 Breeder: Garrett Mac Liebreich Owner: Garrett Mac Liebreich 10. J SQUARE S ELLEN 18H REG# 2179599 Breeder: Jordan Sies Owner: Trent & Janelle Liebreich 11. CARPS MISS GOSSIP 841G REG# 2112365 Breeder: Ethan Yaremko Owner: Ethan Yaremko

14. BROOKING ROSE 0083 REG# 2155774 Breeder: Brooking Angus Ranch Owner: Brooking Angus Ranch 14. J SQUARE S KARAMA 922G REG# 2111735 Breeder: Jordan Sies Owner: GT Angus & Jordan Sies 16. EF SARAS DREAM 942 REG# 2118812 Breeder: Sean Enright & Barry Enright Owner: Morgan MacIntyre 17. GREENWOOD LUCY JJP 11J REG# 2227457 Breeder: Jayden & Jaxon Payne Owner: Jayden & Jaxon Payne 18. DMM LADY 105J REG# 2222389 Breeder: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) Owner: Lee & Dawn Wilson (Miller Wilson Angus) 18. FISK FAY 101 REG# 2217576 Breeder: Jennifer Jones Owner: Jennifer Jones 18. PF BLACK LICORICE RLP 28J REG# 2198874 Breeder: Rae-Lee & Devon Erickson Owner: Rae-Lee & Devon Erickson 18. RLF MISS ESSENCE 7J REG# 2224122 Breeder: Luke Haggart Owner: Luke Haggart Please check our Gold Show web page for full points totals: www.cdnangus.ca/buyers-sellers/gold-shows 231


All Black Bull Sale

THURSDAY MARCH

» 3rd Thursday in March

17

th

Nesset Lake Angus

2022

306-236-6058 Cell: 306-236-8086

Ivan & Julie Demmans & Family

Box 225, Meadow Lake, SK S9X 1Y2 nessetlakeangus@littleloon.ca

Nesset Lake Angus

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232



ROAD MAP to SUCCESS ANGUS LIFE PARTNERS

Advertising

Index

We value our partnerships from across the industry and cannot achieve growth and success without your support. Our mandate is to ensure our partners continue to thrive and gain exposure through our network; and in turn, the value brought to our industry in products, services, research, education and support are vital. To be included in our Road Map to Success the only requirement is your support for the Angus breed by advertising in Angus Life magazine. We look forward to showcasing our partner brands in our Road Map to Success in 2022 and beyond.

Advertiser Name

Page Number

Alta Genetics

61

ARDA Farms & Freeway Angus

63

Belvin Angus

Inside Back Cover

Benchmark Angus

Back Cover

Blairs West

221

BMB Brewin Angus

49

Bohrson Marketing/Canadian Sires 18–21

Blairs West

224

Camo Cattle Co.

199

Canadian Cattlemen Magazine

15

Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society Cantriex Livestock International Inc.

Brooking Angus

234

Brooking Angus

Freeway Angus

52 44

Certified Angus Beef

93

Chapman Cattle Co.

17

Crescent Creek Angus

211

Cudlobe Angus

46

Cudlobe Angus West

62

Diamond T Cattle Co.

41

Delorme Ranch

225

DMV Genetiq Services

182

Dwajo Angus

40

Eastondale Angus

218


Advertising

Index

Naturally developed, 2 year old bulls for sale by private treaty. Look for our catalog on issuu.com in December

Heart Valley Angus

Mac 17th Angus

All Black Bull Sale

THURSDAY MARCH

» 3rd Thursday in March

Nesset Lake Angus

2022

306-236-6058 Cell: 306-236-8086

Ivan & Julie Demmans & Family

Box 225, Meadow Lake, SK S9X 1Y2

Advertiser Name

Page Number

Easy Ray Angus Ranch

49

Ellsmere Farms Ltd.

113

Excel Ranches

48

Flying K Ranch

213

Garvie Mountain Angus

113

Gemstone Cattle Company

37

Gillett Angus

48

Gurney Land and Livestock

33

Hamco Cattle Co.

196

Hamilton Farms

56 & 57

Harprey Angus Farms

78

Hazel Bluff Angus

48

HBH Angus Farms

200

Heart of the Valley Farms

99

Heart Valley Angus

44

Heinz Cattle Co

30

JAS Red Angus

199

JPM Farms

219

Justamere Farms Ltd.

223

Kenray Ranch

210

KT Ranches

97

Lazy S Ranch

14

Leeuwenburgh Angus

3

Mac Angus Farms

183

Mar Mac Farms

197

MJT Cattle Co.

Inside Cover

Moose Creek Red Angus

214 & 215

Nesset Lake Angus

232

nessetlakeangus@littleloon.ca

Nesset Lake Angus

235


Advertising

Index

Advertiser Name

Page Number

Nordal Limousin & Angus

217

Norfolk Cattle

79

Ole Farms

46

Peak Dot Ranch Ltd.

220

Poplar Meadows Angus

98

Pugh Farms

31

Rainbow Hills Ranch

34

Ravenworth Cattle

7

Rebel Creek Angus

65

Reid Angus

55

Remitall Farms

32

Rivercrest Angus

51

Rodgers Red Angus

34

Scotia Wealth Management

16

Scott Stock Farm

29

Semex Beef

81

Shiloh Cattle Co.

35

Six Mile Ranch

222

Spruce View Angus

60

Standard Hill Livestock

233

Swan Hills Ranch

201

Thistle Ridge Ranch

45

Tullamore Farms

83

Project1_Layout 1 11/17/21 10:21 AM Page 1

Ward’s Red Angus Tullamore Farms Whiskey Lane Ladies

Wheatley River Farm

113

Wheeler’s Stock Farm

216

Whiskey Lane Livestock

83

Windy Willows Farms

225

Proud of our past, passionate about our future.

WLL 19W

Windcroft Farms 236

BLACK ANGUS BULLS FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY -at the farm-

WLL 2D

Scott, Paula, Windcroft Jason and Shelby Cornish 2295 Hwy 7 Indian River, Ontario K0L 2B0 705-341-3220

BRED FOR SUCCESS from field to rail

WLL 32H

212

Farms

89

Yarrow Creek Farm & Ranch

33

Visitors always welcome.

WLL 37E owned by Golden Oak Livestock


Join us on March 1, 2022 for our tenth annual Belvin

ANGUS*BULL*SALE You are invited to a complimentary prime rib dinner before the sale at noon.

1 : 30P M AT T H E FARM IN N IS FAIL , AL BE RTA

100+

Selling yearling and long yearling bulls and 12 open heifers Gavin & Mabel Hamilton • Colton Hamilton Quinn, Brendyn & Ivy Elliot

P.O. Box 6134, Innisfail, Alberta, T4G 1S8 EMAIL belvinangus@xplornet.com

FARM 403.224.2355 COLTON 403.507.5416 GAVIN 403.556.5246 BRENDYN 250.449.5071

www.belvinangus.com


RIBBONS AWARDED FOR QUALITY GRADE OUR GENETICS GUARANTEE OUR END PRODUCT CONTINUES “MAKIN’ THE GRADE” USING ONLY THE BEST OF GENETICS

Our Bull Power Benchmark Quantum 185’19

GAR Inertia 200J

Reg # 2173115 Marbling: Ribeye: Carcass Weight: Fat: Weaning Weight: Yearling Weight: Canadian Balanced Index: Calving Ease:

Reg # 2203399 Marbling: Ribeye: Docility: Canadian Balanced Index: Calving Ease: Weaning Weight: Yearling Weight: Carcass Weight:

Top 1% Top 1% Top 1% Top 4% Top 1% Top 1% Top 6% Top 10%

Red Benchmark Platinum 83’18

HPCA Identified 80

Reg # 2062227 Canadian Balanced Index: Heifer Pregnancy: Yearling Weight: Marbling: Weaning Weight: Ribeye:

Reg # 2203391 Marbling: Weaning Weight: Yearling Weight: Canadian Balanced Index: Heifer Pregnancy: Ribeye: Calving Ease: Carcass Weight:

Top 1% Top 1% Top 2% Top 6% Top 7% Top 25%

Any Angus Bull Will NOT Do!

Benchmark Ashland 229’18

Top 1% Top 1% Top 1% Top 1% Top 2% Top 3% Top 3% Top 5%

Reg # 2145957 Marbling: Weaning Weight: Yearling Weight: Ribeye: Carcass Weight:

Top 1% Top 1% Top 1% Top 2% Top 8%

Red Benchmark for Profit 68H Top 1% Top 1% Top 1% Top 1% Top 1% Top 3% Top 3% Top 7%

Reg # 2159491 Marbling: Milk: Canadian Balanced Index: RADG: Docility: Yearling Weight: Carcass Weight: Ribeye:

Top 1% Top 1% Top 2% Top 2% Top 3% Top 9% Top 10% Top 20%

Doug Munton: (403) 328-6966 Mike Munton: (403) 394-4903 Dale Fehr: (403) 359-3274 lane DouD: (403) 308-4131 www.benchMarkangus.coM