Page 1

T H E U LT I M AT E M A G A Z I N E F O R C A M P E R S , P A R E N T S & FA M I L I E S

Vol. 8, Issue 1 | www.CampNavigator.com

The Benefits of DIABETES CAMP 3 REASONS WHY EXPLORING NATURE AND WILDLIFE IS AN ABSOLUTE MUST: HAVING FUN AT ZOO CAMP

THREE REASONS TO ENROLL YOUR YOUNG EINSTEIN OR CURIE IN A STEM-ORIENTED SUMMER CAMP

PARENTS - WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FOR IN A SOCCER CAMP? SUMMER CAMP: THE FUN WAY TO LEARN VALUABLE LEADERSHIP SKILLS THE PERFORMING ARTS ARE FUN! CAMP IS FUN! BUT LET’S DIG DEEPER!

INVITE COMMUNITY INTO YOUR DAUGHTER’S STRUGGLES

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

1

WWW.CAMPNAVIGATOR.COM


2

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1


EDITOR’S LETTER

Welcome! It’s hard to believe but spring is right around the corner. It’s time to start thinking about Camp again. Start asking ourselves some questions. Are you considering enrolling your child in a Spring or Summer Camp? Have you already secured your child’s spot for Camp? For those of you who have kids that are interested in spring & summer camp programs, now is the perfect time to start your search. Take a moment out of your busy day to sit down with your children and discuss the upcoming camp season, sessions, and activities that are most appealing to them. Create a search list, do some research, and contact your shortlisted camps. Have some fun with it and take advantage of early registration pricing in the process. In this issue we showcase an amazing Soccer Camp that caters to everyone involved in the game. We feature a Summer Camp that inspires confidence instead of competition. We showcase an amazing Performing Arts camp. We feature a wonderful Science camp that

lets kids explore their favorite science topics. We showcase a fantastic Animal Interaction that is both educational and inspirational. We feature an amazing Diabetes Summer Camp that offers fun and support for children and their families. We share some fantastic camp pictures, amazing camp videos, interviews with Camp Directors, and provide much more information about Summer Camp. CampNavigator gives parents accurate, insightful and valuable information, empowering them to make informed decisions about summer camp. CampNavigator Magazine shares knowledge to enrich the lives of children, youth and adults through the camp experience. Make your 2019 Summer Camp experience the best yet. We hope you enjoy this issue of CampNavigator Magazine! Jeff Nadeau

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

3


CampNavigator

R

EDITOR IN CHIEF

MAILBAG

Your rants and raves..

Jeffery Nadeau

ART EDITOR

Vol. 7, Issue 1

Wishesh Digital Media

T H E U LT I M AT E M A G A Z I N E F O R C A M P E R S , P A R E N T S & FA M I L I E S

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

www.CampNavigator.com

Peter Arch, Miriam Peretsman, David Brian Stuart, Ashley Napear, Dave and Aleaha Wacker, Ruby Draves, Maddie Cofer, Caroline Meyer, Heather Norton, Caroline Kern, Julia Hunt

TO CONTRIBUTE / ADVERTISE Jeffery Nadeau eMag@CampNavigator.com

BACK ISSUES & ENQUIRIES Jeffery Nadeau jeffn@CampNavigator.com

ISSUE PUBLISHED BY

Top 10 Ways to Raise an Innovator

Five Things to Look For When Choosing a Camp

Top Reasons to Send Your Child to Day Camp

Narrowing down your choices

3 Reasons to send your daughter to STEM Camp

Why a Theater Camp or Summer Program?

Camp for Autistic Spectrum Campers?

Wishesh Digital Media

WWW.CAMPNAVIGATOR.COM

DISTRIBUTED AND POWERED BY Venosft Inc

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 7, Issue 1

The entire contents of CampNavigator are copyright 2019 by CampNavigator. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part, or use without written permission of the publisher, of editorial, pictorial, or design content, including electronic retrieval system is prohibited in the United States & foreign countries. The trademark and tradename CampNavigator is owned by CampNavigator. The publisher does not assume responsibility for statements or work by advertisers. All submissions to CampNavigator are made on the basis of a license to publish the submission in CampNavigator. While every care is taken, neither CampNavigator nor its agents accept any liability for loss or damage. Our contributors offer a diversity of views; their opinions are their own and not necessarily shared by Wishesh Info Media.

Special thanks to our contributors, advertisers, and readers for making this magazine possible.

A Division of

R

About us: Headquartered and incorporated in Phoenix, AZ in 1996. Vensoft provides comprehensive, high quality, world class IT services to its clients. Our core portfolio comprises information technology, applications and business process services, as well as information technology transformation services.

4

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

1

Elsa

Wow, your website looks excellent. Great work developing everything.

Keith

Thanks so much. I deeply appreciate your offer of a listing and am sure it will provide us with exposure. Have a great day.

Erica Thank you for the email today. I like your site. The set-up is much easier than the pay sites I am on, the layout is also as good if not better than the other pay sites.

Matthew

Thank you CampNavigator.com, you made the listing process very easy! I appreciate it.

Chelsea

Thanks so much for all your help and I look forward to seeing how successful CampNavigator becomes.

Chris

I just checked out the listing that you did for our camp and it looks great!

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! EMAIL

info@campnavigator.com


Contents March 2019

06

12

18

06

CHALLENGER SPORTS CAMP

10

CAMP RIVERBEND

12

IMPROV PLAYHOUSE SUMMER CAMP

16

ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER SUMMER CAMP

18

KANSAS CITY ZOO CAMP

22

THE BARTON CENTER SUMMER CAMP

24

FOREST LAKE CAMP

28

YMCA CAMP FRANK A DAY

32

CAMP WE LOKI

34

CAMP WATONKA

36

RETRIBE SUMMER CAMP

24

36

32

28 www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

5


PARENTS What are you looking for in a soccer camp? In addition to helping develop your child’s skills and understanding of the game, summer camps are extremely valuable for young players to develop socially. Children have to learn how to separate from their families and become resilient and independent learners. Attending a summer soccer camp gives them a safe way to take safe first steps towards this goal. Whether it is a day camp or a residential camp, the experience broadens your child’s life experiences and often taps resources they have never had to call on before. Camp pushes children out of their comfort zone 6

and exposes them to new ideas, new activities and new experiences that they may not be familiar with. Players get the opportunity to experience different styles of coaching, different forms of motivation, and

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

can explore new areas of their game without the fear of making a mistake. To become happy, successful adults, children need certain social skills to develop positive


relationships with others. The camp environment can help children build these skills and encourages them to communicate, to work together as part of a team, to talk freely to each other, and also provides opportunities for them to take on leadership roles and even try to be a new kind of person for that week. The best camp operators provide players with the opportunity to receive a week of great coaching in a positive atmosphere from someone with a real passion for the game. At www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

7


CHALLENGER SPORTS CAMP the same time the child is immersed in an environment of learning where they are forced to communicate with people who are new to them. They are forced to develop independence and must be responsible for being in the right place at the right time, with the correct equipment and then must follow instructions from a new coach. As a result the child takes on responsibilities that they often do not have at school or home and they elevate their listening skills, reasoning and performance levels to impress their new coach and new friends.

WHETHER IT IS A DAY CAMP, OVERNIGHT CAMP, HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE CAMP, THERE ARE SOME QUESTIONS THAT WE THINK EVERY PARENT SHOULD ASK:

Day camps are a good starting point for young players. They learn about being part of a new community and cope with temporary separation. They’re not only a good transitional step for kids but also for parents, who often need to learn these same separation skills!

How are the soccer coaches selected?

But with so many camps to choose from it is extremely difficult for parents to really know which would be the best camp program for their child.

How much time do the owners or camp directors devote to the camp?

Do they have comprehensive insurance coverage? What is the ratio of campers to coaches?

Is it a full-time pursuit or do they simply spend a few weeks a year on it?

Do they have a documented first aid and emergency plan?

Who are the coaches?

What is the refund policy?

What licenses or certification do they possess? Has every coach under gone a police background check? Do the soccer coaches receive any training or orientation prior to the start of camp? Do they have a printed curriculum for each age group within the program?

8

Do they have clear policies and procedures for Child Protection and Good Practice?

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

Many camps may not be able to provide you with much of the information above which should alert you to their reliability to look after your child for a week. You should also be prepared to do some additional digging, search the web for reviews and contact references to get a full picture of how they are viewed in the wider camp community. By Peter Arch Co-Founder of Challenger Sports Corporation


www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

9


Getting ready for Summer Camp Summer camp is a wonderful experience for children. Camp gives children the opportunity to run around and play and be outdoors. Camp will also bring lots of new experiences, and many children and parents may be nervous about that. Here are a few tips that can make your child’s summer experience a great one, distilled from over 50 years of experience at Camp Riverbend! If your child has not been away from home much, give her opportunities to do so, even with playdates where you will NOT be present. It’s sort of a practice separation. Realize that you may feel sad when your child is away from home all day. Separation can be as difficult for parents as it is for children. Give yourself permission to miss your child, but also give your child permission to enjoy his time away from home. If your child is nervous about Camp, you should acknowledge that it’s ok to be nervous! Talk to her about these concerns and try to role-play anticipated situations, such as what to do when she needs to go the bathroom. Remind your child that camp counselors will help if there is a problem! Be open with the Camp about any special needs that your child has. Also let the camp know right away if your child is having a hard time with something—making friends, swimming, finding a club….camp counselors can help!

CAMP TOUR

10

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

A few days before Camp starts, pack your child’s backpack together. Decide together what to pack. Show how everything is marked with your last name. Decide together what you will pack for lunch in the lunch bag or order for lunch. Pack clothes and shoes that are easy to change into. We recommend sneakers that slip-on or fasten with Velcro. Remember that your child will be tired and most likely hungry when he comes home. Give him time to get comfortable at home, and possibly have something to eat, before talking about the Camp day. Most children will answer the question “What did you do at Camp today?” with one word: “Nothing.” It’s better to ask a specific question—“Show me what you did in swimming today,” “Who did you sit next to at lunch?”, “What song did you sing this morning?” Remember that learning new skills and making new friends can be stressful. Just as muscles may ache when being worked hard, your child’s emotions may sometimes be bruised if a friend is mean or if she is frustrated while learning a new skill. Give your child lots of support and encouragement, but remind her that it takes time to learn new things. - By Miriam Peretsman


Where tradition meets tomorrow A summer day camp for 3-14 year olds

Warren, NJ 07059 campriverbend.com

Open houses every month January - May RSVP 908-580-CAMP www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1 11


PERFORMING ARTS DAY CAMP CHANGES CHILDREN ©2019

The Performing Arts are FUN! Camp is FUN! But let’s dig deeper! The performing arts in any camp environment affords campers with the opportunity to make friends, employ critical thinking skills, engage the body in physical expression and develop emotional and coping skills in a creative environment that nurtures team and community building.

Through practical training, creative brainstorming and performances, campers showcase skills on a stage, behind the scenes or onto a film screen. This creative process enables campers to 12

explore the diverse voices in the creative arts and stimulate them toward new discoveries and conduits of expression in theater, voice, film, fashion and dance. Performing Arts Camps

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

unlock opportunities to flourish in a collaborative environment that adds an “A” to the STEM standards of education. STEM represents an educational approach that emphasizes


the following fields: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. STEM curriculum and activities are cross-disciplinary and projectbased, whereas Arts subjects are often devalued due to the misunderstanding of art’s purpose and importance. STEAM integrates arts, innovation, and design into STEM education. At the “camp” level, we focus on specific disciplines in developmentally appropriate skills such as voice, drama, dance, fashion design/ modeling and film along with their many benefits to the mind, body and personality. Whatever their choice of path, we have seen thousands of children excel in every walk of life as a compliment to other skills in their developmental journey.

Here are SIX reasons why Performing Arts Camps are important: 1. INTERPERSONAL SKILLS In the camper’s personal life,

strong interpersonal skills can improve and build bridges in relationships. This is where “making friends” comes into play. These skills are developed through theater exercises and games which develop listening and nonjudgmental feedback. All campers engage in these games during various parts of their day. Empathy and listening to others is encouraged, and to be understood is critical to their success as maturing performers. Those with strong interpersonal skills are typically team players. Rather than focus on their own “spotlight” or success first, they are encouraged to help others develop and shine. Many have heard the phrase there are no small parts, just small actors. Performing Arts Camps nurture those that humbly accept their designated roles, serve one another and lead by example. This stands out as a model of leadership and creativity.

of our instruction. Games and exercises are incorporated at all levels reinforcing these habits. We encourage agreement (Yes) and transferring focus to other camper’s ideas or performance moments (Giving). For those performers offering new ideas/choices (And) we encourage granting the focus (Taking) as a regular, normative process. This instruction reinforces ensemble and acceptance. It creates an equitable balance between giving and taking. We operate on the philosophy of fairness; when we provide assistance and help to others, we are all protected by the principle of reciprocity. These soft skills translate directly into all of their relationships, with family, friends, present and future colleagues, so that they can build healthy and productive lives. Strive for a truly collaborative energy where everyone pitches in as an ensemble.

2. COLLABORATION Improvisational principles, such as Yes/And or Give And Take, are the foundation www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

13


IMPROV PLAYHOUSE SUMMER CAMP

3. PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS Elon Musk (Tesla), Steve Jobs (Apple), Sheryl Sandberg (Leanin.org/Facebook), Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), Sheila Lirio Marcelo (Care.com) and, yes, Lin Manuel Miranda (Hamilton) are considered six of the top innovators of the 21st Century. They are problem solvers who are constantly faced with discovering creative solutions to formidable tasks. Performing Arts campers excel at intelligence skills such as reasoning, insight, comprehension and problem solving through their activities. How do I create a character for a particular role? How does my movement reflect a particular emotion? How do I portray this

14

concept through dance and choreography? Does this camera angle communicate the character status within the frame? Performing Arts Camps are terrific places to nurture these abilities and talents.

4. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE According to Psychology Today, emotional intelligence refers to the ability to identify and manage one’s own emotions, as well as the emotions of others. Performing arts campers with high emotional intelligence, especially focused in theater or dance, are generally very self-aware AND highly emotional. Helping young

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

artists understand their emotions, manage their emotions, harness those emotions and, when necessary, cheer up or calm down the emotions of their peers preempts “drama” and helps them control their feelings. This self-awareness encourages campers to be “real” and truthful and cultivates self-acceptance and a welcoming environment in their camp groups.

5. CONFIDENCE Performing artists need confidence. They’re confident – because they trust their intuition and don’t let their emotions get out of control. We guide campers toward opportunities to shore up


their confidence, resilience and flexibility...to take risks. When performers go in front of a film camera, on stage or runway they take the risk of making a gaffe or embarrassing themselves. Persevering and pushing through these hiccups builds their confidence. This translates into classroom and life success in their interpersonal and academic skills.

6. SELLING IT What I mean by “selling it” is really another way of saying “commit to it”. Consistent rehearsals and private study develop intensity much like a sports team practicing play after play until it becomes second nature. Actors must “sell” their performances...

commit to excellence and playing it “big” on stage. In return for that consistency, performance opportunities open up from which the admiration of an audience and their peers is derived. So too, as practical application, the discipline performing arts campers achieve translates to the classroom and other roles in life. They find that their focus is rewarded not only by applause, but by recognition of their service, effort, and achievements.

and schools and engage in developmentally appropriate activities building tem into creative problem solvers and collaborators. The Arts is a universe of knowledge and creative activity. Send your kids to performing arts camp. They might grow up to change the world.

By David Stuart Improv Playhouse Performing Arts Camp Founder/Executive Director, Libertyville, Illinois

As I said in the beginning of this article, Performing Arts Camps are FUN! Camp is FUN! And through the fun of performing arts camp children will make new found friends from a myriad of backgrounds

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

15


Unleash Your Child’s Inn

Three Reasons To Enroll Your Young Einstein or Curie In A STEMoriented Summer Camp It’s no doubt that summer camps offer a plethora of benefits for your child. From meeting new friends and increasing their social skills to learning resilience and leadership. There is one type of camp that may be overlooked when it comes to planning your child’s summer activities – STEM Camps. Now, you might be thinking “my child is not interested in science, why would I pursue a STEM Camp?” which is exactly why you should pursue such a topic. Not only are STEM careers in demand, the “21st Century” skills needed for success in this field – critical thinking, creativity, communication and collaboration – are the same skills essential for success in every aspect of life. The reasons to enroll your child in a STEM camp are numerous, but here are three key motivators.

Improves confidence in Subjects That Can Be Intimidating In her research article, Psychologist 16

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

Christina B. Young described math anxiety as occurring in the “same part of the brain that responds to fearful situations.” If you have a child struggling in math and science, sending them to a STEM camp could be very beneficial. Studies show STEM summer camps can increase positive attitudes toward science, math, engineering and technology. Concepts are introduced in an engaging and non-competitive way with students usually working together in a relaxed environment. Whether it’s leaning on one another to help solve a problem, or creating something together, science summer camps show all participants “hey, you can do this too.”


ner Scientist

Photo Credit: Roberto Gonzalez Photography

Fosters interest, excitement and engagement in STEM Ever had so much fun you didn’t even realize you were learning something? From using 3D printers to turn an idea into a reality while learning how scientists and doctors are using 3D printers to create custom replacement joints, students absorb how science is changing lives while having a good time in the process. As mentioned earlier, these programs encourage 21st century skills necessary for our children to thrive. In an age dependent on innovation and creativity, STEM camps provide children with a platform for cultivating their interests while working collaboratively with their peers to develop useful lifelong skills. In addition, STEM camps can show students a new world of possibilities tied to exciting future careers.

Where else can your child use a 3D Printer or Dissect a Computer? Hands-on access to real tools and resources

are essential to learning. STEM summer camps provide access unavailable in other programs, including sometimes a student’s own school. A child enrolled in a science summer camp will be able to design their own robot, learn computer science through coding, build bridges, use software to animate and edit their own film and so much more. Registering your child for a STEM summer camp can be simple. Many communities have science museums and other STEM providers who possess the expertise necessary to engage young minds in these disciplines. STEM is not simply a checklist of subject areas but an interdisciplinary approach to learning that prompts children to apply knowledge to solve problems. When researching STEM camps, it is good to be informed on topics and curriculum used to make sure your camper is getting the most from the experience.

By Heather Norton Vice President of Education, Orlando Science Center www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

17


3

3 Reasons Why Exploring Nature and Wildlife is an Absolute Must: Reasons Why Exploring Having Fun at Zoo Camp

Nature and Wildlife is an Absolute Must: Having Fun at Zoo Camp

The great outdoors, nature, animals…. Oooohhhh s-c-a-r-y, right? Not at all. But for the vast majority of today’s youth, stepping beyond the TV, tablet or phone and exploring nature and wildlife can be a great source of anxiety. Many have termed this trend of spending less and less time outdoors as “Nature Deficit Disorder.” So how do we address this? Simple: spend more time outside, exploring the world around us.

The human experience requires a connection with nature. These experiences enrich our lives and inspire our choices. It provides wondrous places to play, to explore, to be creative, to learn and enjoy nature with friends and family. This is why the Kansas City Zoo is a huge proponent of environmental education. We believe that nature and wildlife is important to all of us and its right at our fingertips. All we have to do is make the conscience choice to engage. There’s no better way to do this than at Zoo Camp!

18

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1


Why Zoo Camp and Nature/Wildlife Exploration MAKING CONNECTIONS

Many youth are experiencing life through some sort of virtual reality. So why not experience it for real? Why not be in the moment- feeling it, smelling it, touching it? Summer is a prime time to be outdoors and “live.” Zoo Camp is where children can conquer any fears, misconceptions, and anxieties they might have in a fun and controlled environment. It’s where they can catch bugs, dissect owl pellets and learn about the awesomeness that is the natural world. With over 1700 different animals from around the world, our campers can feel the presence of a tiger, understand the magnitude of an elephant’s size, or relate to the playfulness of the otters. Through tours, animal shows, activities and observations, they are given the chance to experience nature and understand that life is about living things interacting with each other.

BECOMING EMPOWERED

Part of connecting is caring. It is our mission to instill in our campers a love and passion for nature and wildlife in the hope that they may be stewards of the natural world. From the earliest age, we strive to instill a sense of empowerment among our campers and encourage their kindness and empathy for ALL living things. Our science and nature based camps allows campers to take an active role in the world around them. Zoo Camp inspires leadership and selfawareness. We challenge our campers to take action, whether its through recycling, sharing what they learned with friends or

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

19


KANSAS CITY ZOO CAMP

supporting conservation efforts locally and worldwide.

HAVING FUN

Let’s face it, this is the BEST part. Where else are you going to learn about Bug Butts, the Scoop on Poop or Bellybutton Biology? With Zoo Camp, the sky is the limit. Sure we cover the basics‌ habitats, ecosystems, predatorprey relationships, and conservation but there is so much more to discover. Zoo

20

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

Camp offers fun and interesting topics every year that are going to inspire creativity, exploration, experimentation and hands on discovery. Campers will experience behind the scenes barn tours, animal feedings and encounters, shows and keeper chats, STEM activities, arts and crafts, games and lifelong lessons. Why nature and wildlife education? Simply stated: Because our kids need it. It inspires


them and aids in their development. Nature is a place to renew the human spirit and refresh our emotional and mental health. Studies have shown that children who are exposed to the outdoors regularly benefit from positive thinking, stress reduction, and confidence building. That is why the Kansas City Zoo strives to provide a fun safe environment in which our campers can explore, build relationships and encounter all the joy and wonder the natural world has

to offer. So come learn and play with us. Nurture your sense of wonder. Conquer the world. And discover life in the WILD!

By Ruby Draves

Special Experiences & Programs Asst. Manager

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

21


The Benefits of

Close your eyes. Now imagine you are four years old. You have been constantly drinking water, juice, or anything you can get your hands on, you constantly need to go to the bathroom, and you start wetting the bed for the first time. One of your parents or guardians brings you to the doctor, who runs a few blood tests, and diagnoses you with type 1 diabetes. This is not something you have ever heard of, but it will be a memory you will never forget. You must now prick your finger and take shots multiple times a day. If possible, you may get a 22

continuous glucose monitor, so you don’t have to prick your finger as much and an insulin pump that is always attached to you, so you don’t have to take shots. Now imagine not knowing any other kids with this diagnosis, only adults or perhaps a distant relative. That was my experience. At four years old, I was diagnosed with diabetes and suddenly my life changed. Parents of children with T1D understand this scenario all too well as oftentimes neither the parents nor the child know any other children with T1D. The

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

child often feels alone and different from their peers at school. Diabetes camp allows children to build a bond and share experiences with other campers who understand the daily rigors of T1D. No one questions the need to step out of a game to check glucose, to get a juice box or glucose tabs. Insulin pumps and tubing are all normal at camp with no questions asked. Everyone is checking their blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, and injecting insulin or using a pump. Diabetes camp is a place where kids with T1D feel normal. As one seven-year-old said, “I

loved meeting other kids who were just like me. I especially loved that no one asked me what my dexcom was.”

Diabetes camp is filled with all your typical fun camp activities and zany games along with diabetes education and camper firsts. Camper firsts are celebrated at camp, for instance, the first time a child gives themselves an injection or the first time a child tries a new pump site. According to a sixteenyear-old camper, “There’s


Diabetes Camp this fine balance between diabetes education and your everyday camp activities. I leave camp with new tips to help me manage my diabetes, but I also leave with a second family in my heart. It’s magic really.” Just as diabetes camp is beneficial for children, parents also need a break from the stringent daily diabetes management, the waking up at all hours of the night to check and treat blood sugars. Parents may watch blood sugars all day long just to check on how their children are doing and often have increased stress when something goes wrong. Diabetes camps provide a full health care team and at least one medical provider on-site, typically an endocrinologist or nurse practitioner. The medical team can care for a camper’s blood sugars, so parents can relax at home. This allows parents to have a vacation from diabetes and get rejuvenated for when their child returns home.

finally met other kids my age with type 1 diabetes. I didn’t feel different or like I was the only one who had to sit out of an activity to treat a low blood sugar. I returned the next summer to family camp, and one of my sisters also came with us. At seven years old, I started going to overnight diabetes camp on my own. Diabetes camp is where I met my best friend, mentors with type 1, and people that I could go to when I was struggling with things on my own. I felt like I had a whole new support network that I never had before. My mom and I had been to support groups, but it was not the same. At camp, I could be with my friends, without my parents, and completely be myself. As a teen, diabetes camp is where I learned about the effects of drugs and alcohol on my blood sugars by someone other than my parents or endocrinologist at home. Whether talking

with peers or in a facilitated program, these topics are much easier with those who understand diabetes. My camp network was who I listened to and relied on when I was in college and needed someone to talk to, so I never felt alone.

I can’t imagine my life without diabetes camp! If it had not have been for diabetes camp, my life would not be the same: I would not have

the confidence I do in myself, I would not be able to answer the many questions that people have about diabetes, and I most certainly would not have become the biggest advocate for sending children with diabetes to diabetes camp because of all the positive benefits that camp has on its campers and staff. By Ashley Napear Camp Operations Manager The Barton Center for Diabetes Education, Inc.

When I was five years old, my mom and I went to a diabetes family camp program which began my love for camp. I

CAMP VIDEO www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

23


Unplug and Get Ou Limiting Techn There’s a good chance that your kids will look at a screen in the next few minutes. For kids who use smartphones to communicate and to consume content, studies have shown that they spend nearly 4 hours each day on their phones. A recent Pew study found that teens themselves think they’re using their phones too much, with 54% of teens surveyed reporting their sense of worry about spending too much time with their phones. Social platforms like Snapchat have reported how most of their users are young, and use the app multiple times per day. This is not a surprise, and almost every parent has at some point struggled to find ways to limit their child’s screen time to one extent or another. There are tons of books and articles out there now about how and why to “unplug” yourself and your kids, and all agree that it’s important to do. Once you unplug, though, what’s the plan? What are your kids supposed to do once they unplug? Well, the most important thing they should do is get outdoors. Once you disconnect from technology, there’s no time to be bored when you go outdoors and engage with the natural world. Being outside in nature is also beneficial in ways that go beyond just exercise. While it’s still so important to have regular physical activity, especially for growing children, there’s a whole layer of health that’s connected to our exposure to natural environments, including for mental health. 24

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

In the 1990’s, researchers began to measure the improvement in cognitive and emotional performance among school children who were given more experiences in nature. Later studies in the mid 2000’s found similar results, and also found that kids with ADHD were more able to concentrate after walking in a park with greenery and trees. A Taiwanese study of 500+ kids aged 7-11 showed that the children with access to natural environments had a reduced occurrence of myopia (nearsightedness). Most recently, a German study found that just 8 days in the Norwegian wilderness gave teen participants their own sense of increased mindfulness and well-being. From treating conditions like ADHD and even nearsightedness, to preventing mental health issues and boosting cognitive ability, the science is clear that being outdoors is all-around good for you. As a summer camp in the Adirondack Mountains, we can certainly attest to the benefits of a summer of fresh air and pine trees. There’s even evidence that the smell of pines can have a positive effect on the immune system.


utside! The Health Benefits of nology and Being Outdoors

A study in Japan showed the positive health benefits of “Shinrinyoku”, or a “forest bathing trip” where you visit the woods for an extended period. They found that the smell of trees is actually a powerful mix of antimicrobial substances and organic compounds that work like aromatherapy. Breathing in forest air can boost immune functions and have health benefits that can last months after leaving the forest. Certain species of trees, especially coniferous species like our Adirondack pine trees, are more aromatic, showing that they’re releasing more compounds into the air. More recently we are beginning to understand not only the benefits of being outside but the cost of not doing so. Last summer the New York Times published an article

warning of a “nature-deficit disorder”. The article mentioned how pediatricians are now “prescribing” going outdoors for their young patients. The National Parks Service even has a Healthy Parks Healthy People program to promote the health benefits of the natural outdoors. There is a growing awareness of both the health benefits of outdoor experiences and on the importance of time away from technology, especially for children and teens. Many parents understand intuitively that all of the above are true, but feel helpless when it comes to actually making it happen for their children, either due to resistance to giving up the screen or the lack of opportunities once they do so. This is where summer camps provide a solution. Campers live together, play together outdoors, and learn about their natural surroundings through in-person activity. A large percentage of summer camps have a no technology policy, where connected

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

25


FOREST LAKE CAMP Common Sense Media, “Teens and Tweens” Census 2017 Pew Research Center, “Teens and Screen Time” survey 2018. Omnicore Agency, “Snapchat by the Numbers”, Jan 6 2019. Hartig et al, “Restorative Effects of Natural Environment Experiences”. University of California, Irvine, 1991. Berman et al, “The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature”.University of Michigan, 20018. Taylor et al, “Could Exposure to Everyday Green Spaces Help Treat ADHD?:, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2009. Wu et al, “Outdoor Activity During Class Recess Reduces Myopia Onset and Progression in School Children”. University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, 2012. Mutz, Michael and Müller, Johannes, “Mental health benefits of outdoor adventures”. Department of Sport Science, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Germany, 2016. Qing, Li, “Effect of forest bathing trips on human immune function”. Nippon Medical School, 2010. Klass, Perri, M.D., “Writing Prescriptions to Play Outdoors”, The New York Times, July 16, 2018. devices are not permitted for campers or, in many cases, for counselors too for their entire stay at camp. At Forest Lake Camp, our no technology policy in the cabin puts all campers and counselors on an equal footing and makes it “ok” to be unplugged for days and weeks. The end result of course is that campers plug back in to interpersonal relationships that don’t rely on technology, but nature and activity. Many Forest Lake campers later admit to the relief they feel at not having to keep up constantly with their messages and digital activity. They gain the WATCH VIDEO AT

26

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

emotional reward of making lifelong friends without having their interactions anchored to technology. This summer, get your kids to put down their phones and have a dose of nature in the Adirondack Mountains, where the smell of the pines and the active lifestyle will have lasting health benefits. And who knows, maybe they’ll come home and teach you a thing or two about how to unplug. By Caroline Meyer


GIRLS CAMP & BOYS CAMP

AGE 8-16

SESSION OPTIONS FROM 2-7 WEEKS

JUNE 30TH - AUGUST 16TH SPEND YOUR SUMMER AT A TRADITIONAL SLEEPAWAY CAMP

ENJOY THE OUTDOORS AND MAKE LIFELONG FRIENDS ON OUR 823 ACRES OF LAND AND PRIVATE LAKE!

FORESTLAKECAMP.COM CALL (518) 623-4771

INFO@FORESTLAKECAMP.COM www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

27


Summer Camp: The Fun Way to Learn Valuable Leadership Skills We gather around the campfire for Opening Ceremony, where counselors perform skits, sings songs, and speak about the meaning of our Core Values of Respect, Responsibility, Caring, and Honesty. A session begins. Time flies, and we soon find ourselves back in the same spot for Closing Ceremony, only this time, it’s the campers who have the chance to stand in front of the fire and express what camp has meant to them. Kids young and old gush about newfound friendships, fond memories, and the impact of their role models--their “Beacon Lights.” After just fourteen days, campers are changed. Many find the confidence to do such a thing as publicly speak about their profound experiences 28

and emotions. I’ve been there myself; I came to camp as an anxious eleven year old, and now, ten summers later, I’ll be back on the shores directing the Leader in Training Program. Camp has shaped the person I’ve become in so many ways. That’s what it does-- it helps us sprout our wings and find our voices. It’s amazing to watch camp work its magic on every single camper each summer, to see them blossom into more confident, collaborative, and empathetic young people.

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

The skills, experiences, and lessons learned guide the development of these children into the leaders they were always meant to become.

Confidence Campers gain confidence through daily accomplishments, and come to realize that they are capable of so much more than they thought possible. Whether it’s learning a new game or hobby, sharing a talent, practicing


public speech, or problem solving among bunkmates, campers are supported and praised along the way. This environment also gives campers the autonomy to create something they are uniquely passionate about, be it something as small as a moth hospital made of sticks and leaves, or as big as a camp-wide soccer tournament.

has something important to say, regardless of age, background, nationality, gender, and all other perceived differences that can get in the way of socializing freely. Living communally in such an accepting setting makes children aware of each others’ strengths, as well as

Respect True leaders understand that everyone is worthy of respect. What may constitute “coolness” in the outside world does not decide your worth at camp. Being kind, creative, silly, and unapologetically true to yourself is what’s valued. Because of this, kids from all walks of life come together and create unlikely bonds. Campers learn to recognize that everyone

everyone is equally worthy of respect.

Independence Whether a child is away from home for a three-day mini camp or an entire summer, they naturally adopt a sense of personal responsibility. It may be as simple as learning to tie her shoes every morning without the help of a parent or guardian, or as significant as making healthier choices in the dining hall because he knows it’s important for his wellbeing.

Collaboration their boundaries or areas of sensitivity. Campers leave with a deeper understanding that no matter who you are,

Camp is all about teamwork. In daily sports, cabin activities, evening programs and free time, the spirit of collaboration is

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

29


YMCA CAMP FRANK A DAY constantly being cultivated. As demonstrated by their role models, campers learn how to include everyone and combine a variety of ideas into a collective plan or creation. After all, being a leader is much more than directing others; it’s also about knowing when to sit back and let other voices be heard. Color War is a phenomenal example of this: the camp is divided in two, and for an intense 27 hours the Green Team and the Gray Team go head-tohead in an array of contests. It is a time of designing, competing, and performing that requires every camper to be both a leader and a team member as they cheer each other on.

Leader In Training Program By the time kids have finished their last summer as campers, they often express the desire to “give back to camp”- to help recreate the joy, experiences, and relationships that were so formative to their early years. Those 15 and 16 year olds who seek to do so can participate in the LIT Program and learn more concretely about leadership skills like communication, responsibility, and delegation. The program

30

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

prepares them for what it takes to organize and run activities as staff, as well as to recognize and nurture campers’ emotional needs.

Beyond Camp “Be a Beacon Light” is the most important message that our camp aims to impart. A beacon light is someone who, like a lighthouse, will send out a beam of light and guide others away from rocky shores and in the right direction. It’s someone who embodies the core values of respect, responsibility, caring, and honesty, and who inspires people to be their best selves. Kids bring the leadership skills they gain at camp out into the “real world” and serve as true role models for their friends and family.

By Caroline Kern

Leader In Training Program Director, Camp Frank A. Day


CampNavigator

1-855-226-7628

Navigate the Camp Universe

eMagazine Advertising Specifications 1/2 w/out bleed Full page bleed

Ads w/out bleed

No trimming Width Height

Full page w/out bleed 1/2 bleed

Centre Spread bleed

Centre Spread w/out bleed

Full Page

7.5

10

1/2 Page (H)

7.5

5

1/2 Page (V)

3.75

5

1/4 Page

3.75

5

15

10

3.5

2

Centre Speread 1/4 w/out bleed

1/2 w/out bleed 1/2 bleed

(inches)

Business Card

Business Card 1/4 bleed

Ads with bleed SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS* All RGB, Pantone, Index, Lab, Grayscale, Bitmap, spot colors and images should be converted to CMYK. PDF, EPS, TIF, and JPG files are all accepted.

PDF file with all graphics, photos and fonts embedded. Preflight file prior to creating PDF.

Size after trimming

Width

Height

Full Page

8.5

11

1/2 Page (H)

8.5

5.5

1/2 Page (V)

4.25

5.5

1/4 Page

4.25

5.5

17

11

Centre Speread

TIF and JPG ads must be submitted at 300 dpi.

(inches)

Sizes listed in this box are the final trim size of the ads. PLEASE add 0.25 bleed all the way around the ad and save file with this bleed before sending.

*Note:

We cannot guarantee the results of files not sent as specified. An CampNavigator PDF job option is available upon request for Adobe software. Files may be uploaded to our FTP site. Information available upon request.

SEND ADS TO:

Jeffery Nadeau

Director of Business Operations

jeffn@campnavigator.com

Phone : 602-541-7845 Toll Free : 1-855-226-7628 www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

31


Invite Community into your Daughter’s Struggles In the past 28 years at Camp Weloki for Girls, we have sat in dozens of circles of girls who share their frustration at experiencing anxiety, depression, stress, feeling out of sorts, restless, and empty. They do not understand why they have these emotions or how to deal with them. Many get labeled and medicated, but still lack the awareness and tools for preventing and handling their emotions. These are often bright, powerful, and successful young women, and the frustration leads to a lot of negative self-talk and getting down on themselves.

32

down on myself and worry it will never get better, and I just spiral down into despair.”

Lauren, 17, has been a three-sport phenomenon all the way through high school, but has been finding it hard to get the energy to go to practices. “I don’t know why I’m not into lacrosse any more. Even if I score or we win, I don’t get any joy out of it anymore. Maybe I should quit.”

It is not uncommon for girls to be disappointed in the areas of their lives that are not as they pictured them to be, especially with the enormous external pressure they face. When we are stuck in a dark place, the solution is not to fight it; what’s required is to shine the light of awareness on it. One common reason behind these girls feeling out of sorts is that they are undergoing a touch point. Touch Points are times in our lives when we are about to undergo a big leap in development; think terrible two’s, middle school girls, high school and college seniors, the months before the wedding, etc. Just before and during the transition people tend to fall apart as they gather the energy needed to grow.

Ally, 18, has been having a hard time getting out of bed in the morning. “I’ve had this constant feeling of sadness in the past few months, and I don’t understand why. I’m getting along with my mom better, my boyfriend has been really supportive, my grades are fine. I get so frustrated because this thing is just not me. Then I get

High school girls are undergoing the transformation from being a girl to a woman. Fairy tales illustrate this heroine’s journey as time when girls experience solitude, suffering, the need to overcome challenges before the eventual triumph; think of the original

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1


versions of Cinderella, Rapunzel, and Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz. We need to normalize all of the angst and emotional turmoil adolescent girls experience instead of pathologizing it. This frame of reference allows girls to relax more and to know that this too shall pass.

When you come out of the storm, you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm is all about. Haruki Murakami Girls also need sacred spaces where they can share with their peers without fear of judgment or criticism. We founded Camp Weloki for Girls over 28 years ago to provide such a safe place where girls could let their hair down, be real, and be accepted for exactly who they are. Sharing their feelings in a safe circle of peers is incredibly healing for girls, and they become more open to learning tools to prevent and handle all of the feelings that come with their current touch point. Last summer we helped young women connect with their unbreakable inner core; that center space that knows what they are feeling and what’s best for them. They experienced

many self-quieting, mindfulness exercises that allowed them to be in the present moment in order to access this space, as well as practicing ways to express all of their emotions in healthy ways. Our high school campers learned how to use self-compassion when they become frustrated or start getting down on themselves. They also worked on forgiveness, which I will discuss in an upcoming blog. If you are living with an adolescent daughter who fits the above description, see her through the lens of her going through a normal, important touch point that requires awareness, tools, and support. Encourage her to read the original versions of fairy tales so she understands that she is undergoing an important leg of her heroine’s journey. Finally, provide her safe spaces like our camps to find a tribe of peers who understand, accept, and love her. There is so much incredible value that community brings in the process of normalizing this delicate, vulnerable stage of life that girls go through. By Maddie Cofer Camp Director WATCH VIDEO AT

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

33


Science Camp Watonka Science • Sports • Adventure

America’s Science Camp for Boys – Celebrating 54 years

THE CAMP WATONKA ADVANTAGE Camp Watonka is the only program in America offering the traditional overnight experience combining crafts, sports, dirt-bikes, adventure and waterfront with a Hands-On science program. This unique combination makes us the ideal program for all boys looking for fun summer focused on their personal interests. CAMP WATONKA VIDEO AT

34

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1


PO Box 127, Hawley, PA 18428 • www.watonka.com • 888.741.4336 • mail@watonka.com

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

35


Most spiritual life calls for times of sudden radical transformation brought about by powerful initiation and rites of passage. For modern young men and women this is a desperate need. If nothing is offered in the way of initiation to prove one’s entry into the world of men and women, it will be done unguided in the road or the street with cars at high speed, with drugs, with weapons. Jack Kornfield, Crossroads

I woke up excited. I was at ReTribe. I had a dangerous day ahead of me. I ate a hurried breakfast and ran up to the gazebo to hide. I had my sword, my cape, and the special pouch that all alchemists carry, with healing herbs, and truth-telling potions, the usual. But today, I was carrying something that made my body shiver. Underneath my cape I hid the eye of the dragon. It shone as brightly now as it did when we stole it from him in the battle lastnight. Everything depended on me now. Me. The youngest, smallest, and weakest one of my clan. The fate of the whole underworld. The fate of the elves, the men, the fae. I must get the eye to the wizard before the monsters killed me. I knew I was no match for them, and that I’d probably die before day’s end, but I was determined to complete this one last task. Wait,I hear a rustle in the milkweed ahead! Someone is coming up the hill towards me. I can’t tell if it’s friend or foe! “Who goes there?” I call out, sword drawn. At ReTribe the days are never ordinary. ReTribe is not an ordinary camp. It is a Rite of Passage experience. It has all the elements that other cultures have included in their Rites of Passage all over the world and throughout history. In fact, 94% of cultures have provided these experiences for their teens to assist them in moving, psychologically, from childhood to adulthood. But in our culture we lack this crucial experience. Daniel Siegel, M.D., eminent psychologist and author of Brainstorm: The power and purpose of the teenage brain , says “In modern culture, our Rites of Passage are often missing or minimized in importance. We seem to have lost many of our communal and sanctioned ways of taking risks and acknowledging the transition from childhood to adulthood.” At ReTribe, teens go deep into themselves,

36

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1


and connect deeply to others. Through the Adventure Game Theater (as described above), Breathwork, small groups, and Wilderness Solo, the teens can have the non-ordinary state experience that they search for by using drugs and other dangerous means. In the safe and supportive community of mentors and elders, they can heal childhood wounds, learn to connect respectfully and deeply with others, explore issues around sexuality and gender, and begin to identify their unique gifts to the world. Many teens today are becoming addicted to video gaming. Iowa State University and the National Institute on Media and the Family report that 1 in 10 gamers show signs of pathological use. It is sometimes difficult for parents to separate their teens from the computer, and the teens miss out on developing important social

skills. ReTribe’s Adventure Game is like a video game come to life! There is no script, and the cast creates the outcome as they go. Teamwork, planning, leadership, and issues of identity are all deeply explored as teens take on new personalities at will. While electronics are deposited at registration, the teens don’t miss them because the real life experience at ReTribe is so much more fun. Many teens say that ReTribe was the most fun they’ve ever had. Besides the transformative work, there is time to swim in the pond, to play big games of capture the flag around the meadows and forests of our land, make music and poetry, cook, journal, hike, and play games. ReTribe is a community. It is a culture. A culture that is intentionally created based on open acceptance of all of

us, including our differences. Come join us.

“Studies confirm that when youth lack a rite of passage experience, there are extraordinary consequences related to such problem behaviors as violence, substance use, gangs, bullying, and delinquency. Citations in professional literature and popular media ascribe risk-taking behavior of youth (Lewis and Lewis 1984; Merten 2005) as their attempts to create rites of passage for themselves.” -Rites of passage during adolescence. Scott D. Scheer* | Stephen M. Gavazzi | The Ohio State University. David G. Blumenkrantz | Center for the Advancement of Youth, Family, and Community Services, Inc.

- Julia Hunt

WATCH VIDEO

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

37


CAMP CAT

SUMMER CAMPS SUMMER CAMPS PROVIDE ENRICHING PROGRAMS, CARE, AND ACTIVITIES FOR CHILDREN DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS.

ADVENTURE CAMPS ADVENTURE CAMPS PROVIDE KIDS AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN ABOUT THE OUTDOORS AND BE INVOLVED IN ACTIVITIES LIKE CAMPING, CANOEING, HIKING,& BACKPACKING.

ARTS CAMPS ART CAMPS HELP CHILDREN SHOWCASE AND GROW THEIR HIDDEN TALENTS IN DANCE, FILMMAKING, PHOTOGRAPHY, PERFORMING ARTS, ETC.

38

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

ACADEMIC CAMPS ACADEMIC CAMPS HELP CHILDREN BROADEN THEIR HORIZONS IN THEIR CHOICE OF STUDIES.

AFTER SCHOOL CAMPS AFTER SCHOOL CAMPS ARE GENERALLY HELD FOR ELEMENTARY & JUNIOR HIGH STUDENTS. THESE CAMPS PROVIDE QUALITY EDUCATION ACTIVITIES, AS WELL AS LOTS OF FUN.

FANTASY CAMPS SPORTS FANTASY CAMPS ARE A CROSS BETWEEN VACATION AND TRAINING CAMP. YOU’RE PAYING FOR THE PRIVILEGE TO SPEND A FEW DAYS HANGING OUT WITH YOUR IDOLS .


TEGORIES

RELIGIOUS CAMPS RELIGIOUS CAMPS DEVELOP SPIRITUAL KNOWLEDGE, PHILANTHROPIC QUALITIES, AND A SENSE OF DEVOTION.

SPORTS CAMPS SPORTS CAMPS NURTURE THE ATHLETIC TALENTS IN CHILDREN AND BUILD CONFIDENCE AND SELF ESTEEM THROUGH TEAMWORK AND FRIENDLY COMPETITION.

TRADITIONAL CAMPS TRADITIONAL CAMP ACTIVITIES INCLUDE SWIMMING, CANOEING, ARCHERY, ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION, COOKOUTS, ARTS AND CRAFTS AND MORE.

SPECIAL NEEDS CAMPS

SPECIAL NEEDS CAMPS PROVIDE AN EMPHASIS ON HUMAN VALUES, A SENSE OF BELONGING AND COMMUNITY, AND HELP CHILDREN DEVELOP SELF CONFIDENCE AND SELF ESTEEM.

STUDY ABROAD CAMPS STUDY ABROAD CAMPS PROMOTE THE RICHNESS AND DIVERSITY OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES AT UNIVERSITIES & PLACES OF HIGHER LEARNING ACROSS THE WORLD.

TEEN PROGRAM CAMPS THESE CAMPS TYPICALLY INCLUDE STUDY ABROAD, ACADEMIC & COLLEGE PREP, TOURS AND TRAVELS, OUTDOOR & ADVENTURE, AND VOLUNTEER & COMMUNITY, ETC.

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

39


SUMMER CAMPS

DIRECTORY

Picking the perfect retreat for your little campers doesn’t have to be a daunting task. Help your kids gear up for a great camp experience with our detailed Camp Directory.

SUPERCAMP - CAL STATE LONG BEACH 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA, 90840 Ph: (800) 228-5327 www.supercamp.com

SUPERCAMP - VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY 800 Lancaster Ave, Villanova, PA, 19085 Ph: (800) 228-5327 info@supercamp.com

CAMP INVENTION AT NORTH RIDGEVILLE ACADEMIC CENTER 34620 Bainbridge Road, North Ridgeville, OH, 44039 (800)968-4332 campinvention@invent.org

40

CAMP LAKE HUBERT FOR GIRLS PO Box 1308, Lake Hubert, MN, 56459 Ph: (800) 242-1909 rachel@lincoln-lakehubert.com

ROCKY MOUNTAIN DAY CAMP PO Box 270608, Louisville, CO, 80027 Ph: (720) 369-8042 tyler@rockymtndaycamp.com

FRENCH INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE SUMMER CAMP 97 Rue de la Poste, MEGEVE, Rhone-Alpes, France, 74120

Ph: +41 (0) 22 548 01 05 & +33 (0) 77 884 76 77. info@iscmegeve.ch

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

TRUE FRIENDS

10509 108th St. NW, Annandale, MN, 55302

ADVENTURE CAMP

391 Moorefield Memorial Highway, Sunset, SC, 29685 Ph: (864) 878-1103

KYRENE ADVENTURE TOURS

777 N. Desert Breeze Blvd. East #2, Chandler, AZ, 85226 Ph: (800) 222-8152


SUMMER CAMPS DIRECTORY

SMOKY MOUNTAIN ADVENTURE CAMP 246 Incline Way, Cosby, TN, 37722

CHARLOTTE FINE ART GALLERY 7510 Pineville-Matthews Rd, 9A, Charlotte, NC, 28226

CARRIE CURRAN ART STUDIOS SUMMER FINE ART CAMP 8300 N Hayden Rd Suite A100, Scottsdale, AZ, 85251

JUNIPER INSTITUTE FOR YOUNG WRITERS

810 Campus Center, 1 Campus Center Way University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003.

ALASKA FINE ARTS ACADEMY

12340 Old Glenn Hwy, Suite 200, Eagle River, AK, 99577

DEVINE PERFORMING ARTS

17013 New College Ave #100, Wildwood, MO, 63040

LAWSON ACADEMY FINE ARTS DAY CAMP

BIAC ADVENTURE CAMP P.O. Box 236, Robards, KY, 42452

580 E Main St, Spartanburg, SC, 29302

CARRIE CURRAN ART STUDIOS SUMMER FINE ART CAMP

HOLT SCHOOL OF FINE ART 118 E. Kingston Ave, suite 11, Charlotte, NC, 28203

8300 N Hayden Road Suite A100, Scottsdale, AZ, 85258

SUMMER ARTS CAMP

FINE ARTS DAY CAMP

One East Main Street, Mesa, AZ, 85211

580 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC, 29302

ARTS DELIVERED

SITKA FINE ARTS CAMP

123 MCDOWELL ST., MATTHEWS, NC, 28105

PO Box 3086, Sitka, AK, 99835

SCOTTSDALE ARTISTS SCHOOL - SUMMER FINE ART CAMP 3720 North Marshall Way, Scottsdale, AZ, 85251

GATEWAY CENTER FOR PERFORMING ARTS 8045 Big Bend Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63119

HARAND CAMP OF THE THEATRE ARTS 2001 Alford Park Drive, Kenosha, WI, 53140

ONSTAGE SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS 8129 Ardrey Kell Rd, Charlotte, NC, 28277

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

41


SUMMER CAMPS DIRECTORY ASHEVILLE PERFORMING ARTS ACADEMY 376 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, NC, 28804

SOUTH DAKOTA PARENT CONNECTION

3701 West 49th Street,Ste. 102, Sioux Falls, SD, 57106

SOLID ROCK COMMUNITY SCHOOL

1350 East Lake Road North, Tarpon Springs, FL, 34688

I9 SPORTS

FUNKY DIVAS & DUDES PERFORMING ARTS CAMP 3002 Main St., Santa Monica, CA, 90405

226 SOAR Lane, Balsam, NC, 28707 Ph: (828) 456-3435 lynne@soarnc.orgcom

CHALLENGER NEXT LEVEL TRAINING CAMP - MCLEAN 1239 Spring Hill Road, McLean, VA, 22102 Ph: 800-878-2167 info@challengersports.com

MICDS RAMS SPORTS CAMP 101 North Warson Rd, Saint Louis, MO, 63124

DANIEL DHERS ACTION SPORTS COMPLEX

PLEX INDOOR SPORTS

PHOENIX SUNS BASKETBALL CAMPS 201 E. Jefferson, Phoenix, AZ, 85004

42

548 Brookhill Ranch Road, Hot Springs, AR, 71910

SOAR

4857 Vermilion Dr, St. Louis, MO, 63128

171 Tradition Trail, Ste. 207, Holly Springs, NC, 27540

HIGH POINT

741 Fashion Dr, Columbia, SC, 29229

ARIZONA BASEBALL CAMPS WINTER PRO CAMP BY AMERICA’S BASEBALL CAMPS

1802 N 64th Street, Phoenix, AZ, 85008

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

EASTERSEALS TENNESSEE CAMP 750 Old Hickory Blvd. #2-260, Brentwood, TN, 37027

NBC BASKETBALL CLINICS - ALBERTA 150 AMBROSE CIRCLE SW, CALGARY AB, ALBERTA, CANADA Ph: (800) 406-3926 jennifer@nbccamps.com

PRO 3:5 SPORTS ACADEMY

3201 Northside Drive, Suite 119, Raleigh, NC, 27615

PINNACLE SPORTS SUMMER CAMP, 313 Medina Road, Medina, OH, 44256

PARADISE VALLEY SCHOOL OF KARATE 3851 E. Thunderbird Rd. Suite B117, Phoenix, AZ, 85032


SUMMER CAMPS DIRECTORY SI-LA-MEO

161 Klevin St., Suite 100, Anchorage, AK, 99508

IMAGINARIUM EXPLORER CAMP 625 C Street, Anchorage, AK, 99501

ALASKA YMCA CAMPS 5353 Lake Otis Parkway, Anchorage, AK, 99507

CAMP INTERNET EXTREME

4000 E. , 68th Ave, AK, 99507

ADVANTAGE BASKETBALL CAMPS 4351 South Ranch House Parkway, Gilbert, AZ, 85297

THE GODDARD SCHOOL OAKVILLE, MO 6040 Telegraph Road, St Louis, MO, 63129

CAMP JOE

PENINSULA PUFFERS ASTHMA CAMP

16 Joe. st., Joe City, AK

PO Box 201927, Anchorage, AK, 99520

CAMP TOGOWOODS

3911 Turnagain Blvd. East,, Anchorage, AK, 99517

BIRCHWOOD CAMP

ANCHORAGE MUSEUM

ADVENTURE TREKS

17161 David Blackburn Drive, Chugiak, AK, 99567

625 C Street, Anchorage, AK, 99501

PO Box 1321, Anchorage, AK, 99501

STUDIO 3 PERFORMING ARTS ACADEMY - PRESEASON PREP AUDITION WORKSHOP 511 W Guadalupe Rd Suite 12, Gilbert, AZ, 85233

SHOWBIZ KIDZ MUSICAL THEATRE MINI’S CAMP 3244 E Guadalupe Rd. Ste 108, Gilbert, AZ, 85234

MATHNASIUM OF GILBERT SUMMER MATH PROGRAM

ADIDAS TENNIS CAMPS @ CHRISTIAN BROTHER HS COLLEGE

756 S Gilbert Road, Gilbert, AZ, 85296

1850 De La Salle Dr., St Louis, MO, 63141

OFFENSE - DEFENSE ST LOUIS FOOTBALL CAMP

MISSOURI CHILDREN’S BURN CAMP

520 Garden Ave, St Louis, MO, 63119

11710 Administration Dr., Suite 2B, St Louis, MO, 63146

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

43


L D W I Go

s p m a C r e at Summ Immerse your children in an unforgettable educational adventure packed with hands-on learning, outdoor exploration, exclusive tours, crafts, new friends and over 1,700 animals from around the world! Missing Act Like An Animal Camp? Animal Antics Zoo Theatre camp offers zoo exploration, improvisational techniques, character development, and storytelling opportunities for ages 5-9.

Summer Break Half Day Camp Single Days: Weekly: Ages: Times:

Single Day Rates: Weekly Rate:

July 1, July 2, July 3, & July 5 May 28–August 9 4–5 years old Morning: 8:30 am–11:30 am Afternoon: 12:30 pm–3:30 pm $25/session $125/session FOTZ Members receive a 10% discount

Junior Zoologists

Summer Break Full Day Camp Single Day: Weekly: Ages: Times: Single Day Rates: Weekly Rate:

July 1, July 2, July 3, & July 5 May 28–August 9 5–12 years old 8:30 am–3:30 pm $50/session $260/session FOTZ Members receive a 10% discount

Animal Antics Zoo Theatre Camp Ages/Weekly: 5–6 years old June 24–28 7–9 years old July 15–19 Times: 8:30 am–3:30 pm Weekly Rate: $280/session FOTZ Members receive a 10% discount

Weekly: Ages: Times: Weekly Rate:

June 17–21 & July 22–26 13–15 years old 8:30 am–3:30 pm $260/session FOTZ Members receive a 10% discount

Before & After Care Rates: Before Care:

After Care:

available from 7:30am–8:30am additional $10/day (available for Full Day & Half Day Morning sessions) available from 4:00pm–5:30pm additional $15/day (available for Full Day & Half Day Afternoon sessions)

Book a program or inquire about scholarships at kansascityzoo.org or call 816.595.1765 to learn more.

44

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 8, Issue 1

Profile for CampNavigator

Campnavigator magazine vol8 issue1  

CampNavigator gives parents accurate, insightful and valuable information, empowering them to make informed decisions about summer camp. Cam...

Campnavigator magazine vol8 issue1  

CampNavigator gives parents accurate, insightful and valuable information, empowering them to make informed decisions about summer camp. Cam...

Advertisement