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Vol. 7, Issue 1

T H E U LT I M AT E M A G A Z I N E F O R C A M P E R S , P A R E N T S & FA M I L I E S

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Top 10 Ways to Raise an Innovator

Five Things to Look For When Choosing a Camp

Top Reasons to Send Your Child to Day Camp

Narrowing down your choices

3 Reasons to send your daughter to STEM Camp

Why a Theater Camp or Summer Program?

Camp for Autistic Spectrum Campers? WWW.CAMPNAVIGATOR.COM

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EDITOR’S LETTER

Welcome! It’s hard to believe but spring is right around the corner. It’s time to start thinking about Camp again. Start asking ourselves some questions. Are you considering enrolling your child in a Spring or Summer Camp? Have you already secured your child’s spot for Camp? For those of you who have kids that are interested in spring & summer camp programs, now is the perfect time to start your search. Take a moment out of your busy day to sit down with your children and discuss the upcoming camp season, sessions, and activities that are most appealing to them. Create a search list, do some research, and contact your shortlisted camps. Have some fun with it and take advantage of early registration pricing in the process. In this issue we feature an amazing Boys Summer Camp that never loses sight of the fact every day at camp should be fun. We showcase a terrific Girls Summer Camp that offers an amazing Leadership Program. We feature a wonderful Adventure Summer Camp that teaches

outdoor education and survival skills. We showcase a fantastic special needs camp that creates an environment that emphasizes the campers’ abilities and independence, as well as the development of their social skills and appreciation of the outdoors. We share some fantastic camp pictures, virtual tour links, and amazing camp videos, and provide much more information about camp. CampNavigator gives parents accurate, insightful and valuable information, empowering them to make informed decisions about summer camp. CampNavigator Magazine shares knowledge to enrich the lives of children, youth and adults through the camp experience. Make your 2018 Summer Camp experience the best yet. We hope you enjoy this issue of CampNavigator Magazine! Jeff Nadeau

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Jayme Cellitioci, Leslie Keller, Roberta Katz, Tammy Fortune, Gordon Felt, Darren Farrington Camp Riverbend

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The entire contents of CampNavigator are copyright 2018 by CampNavigator. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part, or use without written permission of the publisher, of editorial, pictorial, or design content, including electronic retrieval system is prohibited in the United States & foreign countries. The trademark and tradename CampNavigator is owned by CampNavigator. The publisher does not assume responsibility for statements or work by advertisers. All submissions to CampNavigator are made on the basis of a license to publish the submission in CampNavigator. While every care is taken, neither CampNavigator nor its agents accept any liability for loss or damage. Our contributors offer a diversity of views; their opinions are their own and not necessarily shared by Wishesh Info Media.

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Elsa

Wow, your website looks excellent. Great work developing everything.

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Thanks so much. I deeply appreciate your offer of a listing and am sure it will provide us with exposure. Have a great day.

Erica Thank you for the email today. I like your site. The set-up is much easier than the pay sites I am on, the layout is also as good if not better than the other pay sites.

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Contents February 2018

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TOP 10 WAYS TO RAISE AN INNOVATOR

11

5 THINGS TO LOOK FOR WHEN CHOOSING A CAMP

15

TOP REASONS TO SEND YOUR CHILD TO DAY CAMP

19

WHY A THEATER CAMP OR SUMMER PROGRAM?

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CAMP WA KLO

26

6 WAYS TO BRING SUMMER CAMP HOME

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3 REASONS TO SEND YOUR DAUGHTER TO STEM CAMP

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CAMP FOR AUTISTIC SPECTRUM CAMPERS?

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FUN THINGS TO BRING TO CAMP FOR MAKING IT MEMORABLE

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THE ALL INCLUSIVE PACKING LIST FOR SUMMER CAMP

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INTERVIEWS

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Invention Camp

Top 10 Ways to Raise an Innovator 1

Let Curiosity Be the Compass

Thomas Edison was curious about everything. His curiosity led to a model career in invention and innovation. When we empower children’s curiosity, we teach them to use their questions as a guiding compass. (Edison’s father once gave him a compass when he was sick in bed that served as a lifelong beacon of inspiration for him). 6

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Support Them in

Bringing

Their Ideas to Life If you speak with any inventor, they will highlight the importance of getting one’s thoughts and ideas into physical form. There are a million ways to make this happen— from sketching to modeling with clay to making 3D prototypes. The one critical aspect, however, is to move


an idea from a thought to reality, so that it continue to evolve in its novelty and usefulness.

3

5

Have Value

Grit-Building

Call it stick-to-itiveness, perseverance, or grit, children need to build skills in pushing past barriers and overcoming obstacles if they are to be successful in the 21st century. One of the best ways to do this is to identify projects that provide the right level of challenge—a balance of appropriate difficulty with the possibility for success.

Create Safe

Environments for Risk-Taking

It is so important that youth feel supported in taking chances with their thoughts and ideas. They need spaces where they can express themselves without fear of judgment—from others, as well as themselves. Additionally, they need to engage in activities where they employ creative and critical thinking—scenarios where there is more than one right answer.

Understand Their Ideas

Provide

Opportunities

4

Help them

The United States Patent System is built on a concept known as the Progress of the Useful Arts and Sciences (it is even featured in the Constitution). Inventors who have pursued patents have laid the stepping stones for innovation. Children should understand that their ideas are their Intellectual Property and they have the opportunity to help build the rich tapestry that has shaped our lives and society.

6 Use

from getting stuck?” You will be amazed at how this simple tweak in words invites solutions.

7

Invitational Language

In order to become a paradigm-shifting innovator, you must look at challenges as opportunities. As National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductee Garrett Brown (inventor of the Steadicam camera stabilizer) states, “Find the Gap!” Practice turning challenges into invitational questions. Instead of saying, “This door always gets stuck,” try saying, “How might we keep this door

Access to Role Models

Identity is a critical aspect of a child’s self-esteem. They need to see people who they feel they can emulate. By introducing children to a wide variety of inspiring individuals in the same role (e.g., scientists or innovators), the more likely they are to find role models with whom they resonate.

8

Give Them

Inspire Their

Entrepreneurial Side

It is not enough to have a great idea. It is critical to develop the skills to be able to communicate that idea and get others excited about it too—sometimes enough to invest in it. As children have opportunities to present (e.g., a school science project), log a little extra time helping them explore various methods of presenting. Entrepreneurs must be willing risk-takers who are able to hook the interest of others.

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Invention Camp

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How Have We Gleaned These Insights? Make Reflection

the Star

Innovation is about iteration. It is about getting ideas into the world, testing them out, gathering feedback, making changes and adaptations, and applying insights from the process. Facilitating youth to think about their key learnings is paramount to helping them build deep reflection skills. And these skills are imperative to being a successful innovator.

Willing to 10 Be Grow Alongside Them

The only way we can inspire our children to innovate is if we, ourselves, demonstrate a willingness to be creative problem solvers, risk takers, and change makers. We must model how to make observations, employ empathy, explore the value of ideas, and evolve those ideas based on feedback and learning. As we do so, we are preparing the nation’s youth for jobs and fields that do not yet exist and unique challenges and opportunities our imaginations cannot yet fathom.

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For more than 27 years, the National Inventors Hall of Fame team has been developing programs that are inspired, informed, and shaped by our nation’s greatest innovators. Our flagship program, Camp Invention, is specifically designed to reach children in their vital, formative years. Youth engage with STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, and Mathematics), Creative Problem Solving, Teaming and Collaboration, Entrepreneurship, and Intellectual Property enrichment through the exciting lens of Innovation. This particular program has been running for more than a quarter of a century—annually partnering with more than 1,500 school districts across the country. To date, the National Inventors Hall of Fame, creators of Camp Invention, have impacted over 2 million children, teachers, parents, college students, and inventors through its outreach initiatives and have a presence in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. Next summer, children will have the opportunity to personalize, test and take home their own line-tracing robot in Optibot™;

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catapult cupcakes in Stick to It™; try their skills at being high-tech vets in Robotic Pet Vet™; and design their own smart, interconnected homes in Mod My Mini Mansion™. In this program series, children receive invention advice, insights, and direct challenges from National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees. In addition to Camp Invention, the National Inventors Hall of Fame also serves preschoolers (through Invention Playground), middle school youth (through Invention Project), and college students (through the Collegiate Inventors Competition). The organization has leadership opportunities for middle school and high school students to be CounselorsIn-Training and Leadership Interns. Visit us at www.campinvention.org to type in your zip code and identify opportunities near you to be part of the next great wave of innovation!

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Visit CAMPINVENTION.ORG by MARCH 23 to secure your spot and

SAVE $25

Promo Code: Navigator25 1,500+ programs nationwide throughout the summer. In Partnership with the United States Patent and Trademark Office

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DMD Camp

5 Things To Look For When Choosing A Camp Camp can have a formative impact on a child’s life. The right camp offers more than an opportunity to try new things and grow. It’s a place where friendships are like family, tradition and community are palpable, and kids can be their most genuine selves. Selecting a camp can feel overwhelming. There are tons of camps out there, each with a different personality and mission. Taking the time to explore options will be well worth the effort. The most important thing to keep in mind when choosing a camp is your child’s personality. Does the camp mesh with your child’s disposition, interests and needs? Does it meet your own expectations? You’ll know when you find the right place: that warm, inviting environment 10

where your child can stand out and be part of something awesome.

Where to Start Parents of young children often wonder if their child is ready for camp. For some children, taking a bus to camp outside of their neighborhood is a new experience. And, some are nervous about meeting and making new friends. Nerves are natural for first time campers and parents.

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Your child’s reactions to new experiences in the past can indicate how he or she will settle in at camp. Were they excited or nervous? Did they have fun after that initial adjustment period? Share your concerns with camp directors and ask how they support new campers. It’s normal to consult friends or classmates about their camp choice. Even if your child is young, it’s important to approach choosing a day camp the same way you


would a sleepaway camp. Be open to the camp that suits your child’s needs and personality. The place that feels right for your child is the place where he or she will flourish. To learn how the camp is run, get to know the directors and staff. Are they warm and inviting? Do they care genuinely about your child? Are they really hearing you and answering your questions? Directors set the tone for how staff and campers behave and treat one another. Then, look for the characteristics that make a camp a place you want your children to grow up:

1.Authentic1. 1. 1. Authenticity

Children have a real opportunity to flourish at day camp if it’s an environment where they can be themselves. When kids feel appreciated and understood for who they are, they make

true friends who like them for who they really are – the kind that last for life. Similarly, when children feel safe and accepted, they become more open – to new activities and new experiences. Children today often feel nervous to try things they don’t know how to do. They focus on winning and feeling successful. Yet, learning new skills involves the process of trying, failing and then trying again. Camp should be a place where

children feel safe to fall and get back up. Learning to embrace challenges and enjoying activities, even if they’re not “the best,” has profound takeaways. The process not only leads to learning and (sometimes) proficiency – in a pool, on a sports field or in the art studio. It also leads to resilience – a critical character trait for thriving in today’s world. Some questions to explore

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DMD Camp

include: How does the camp help new campers acclimate to camp? Who will be there to support him or her during this period? Who are the people who will get to know your child best? Who is your point person to keep you informed about how your child is doing at camp?

2.Community Camp teaches children important lessons in community – how to relate to and support people who have different perspectives and needs. Children benefit greatly from sinking into the relationships they form at camp, face to face, without the distraction of technology. Campers learn that friendships grow in many ways, and bumps in the road are usual. Learning to negotiate social situations and appreciating that some fellow campers will turn into life-long friends while others will remain friendly acquaintances is a life-skill that children develop at camp.

experience and approach issues when they arise? Who is on hand to help campers negotiate bumpy moments between friends? Camps rooted in strong tradition and routines, foster strong bonds and richer experiences. Daily gatherings and annual, camp-wide occasions, like Carnival or Olympics, are often what children look most forward to every summer. The commitment to coming together and celebrating tradition makes a community stronger while

Often, camps with experienced leadership offer the tightest-knit communities. Directors should not only have great values on paper, but speak and live them in person. How does the camp set the tone for a positive group www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 7, Issue 1 12

weaving children into a camp’s history and heritage.

3.Variety At camp, children explore and discover talents, hobbies and skills. Even if your child is young, camp offers a nurturing environment where children feel safe to try new things. Check out the camp’s activity roster to get a sense of its variety. Are the activities diverse? Do they have breadth and depth? From a young age, day camp should teach children


basic skills across many activities while allowing them to hone in on passions as they grow. Think long-term. Your child may go to this camp for years, through many stages of development. Can the camp continue to meet his or her needs? Will its facilities continue to accommodate? Does the program evolve and change as kids grow? Do older campers have some say in their schedule? These are all things to keep in mind now, even if they feel far away. 4.Supportive and Trained Staff Camp should be a place where kids feel understood and supported for their unique needs. Searching for a day camp is great because you can easily swing by and meet the directors! Visiting helps you get a feel for what defines a camp. Ask a ton of questions – and follow-ups! Do their responses resonate? Are safety and support priorities? Does it feel like right place for your child – and your family? Then, learn more about how staff is selected and trained. What are their hiring practices? Do they look for professionals? How involved are the directors? With experts running the show, kids have a chance to build skills that can turn into lifelong interests.

5.History and Track Record When a camp has continuous ownership and long history, you know they have the systems, culture and experience to consistently meet and support each camper’s needs. Consider asking how long has the camp been in operation? Has it been continuously owned? Is it an Accredited Camp, following American Camp Association standards? ACA Accredited camps are committed to meeting and/or exceeding the highest industry standards.

Choosing the right camp for your child can be overwhelming, but a lot of it is about following your gut. Does the camp look like a place your child can make friends, grow and be a part of something awesome as him or herself? Tune out the noise – and find what’s right for you. By: Roberta Katz

VIMEO VIDEO

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Top Reasons to

Send Your Child to Day Camp

As the American Camp Association proclaims,

kids a world of good.”

“Camp gives

Children at summer camp have an incredible opportunity to learn, grow, build confidence, interact with others and have fun.

Day camp are a great option for many children to have that opportunity.

Day camp will offer many of the same benefits as a resident camp:

1

One of the most important gifts a child can be given is a sense of confidence in himself or herself; the knowledge that he or she will be able to meet a new challenge.  Camp is a key place for children to succeed and acquire this fundamental skill! 14

2

Even at a camp without academic instruction, campers are learning and growing every day. Of course children learn a lot at school, but in school children are constantly graded and evaluated in many ways.  At camp, however, children can try a host of new things, without having to worry if they “make the grade.”  This freedom, to experiment in a safe environment, is a major building block of confidence.

3

With a range of activities available at camp, kids

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have many opportunities to explore. Campers are taught the skills to meet physical challenges, like climbing to the top of the high ropes tower or being able to pass our Deep Water Test.  They are given opportunities to explore their creativity while decorating a clay pot or playing rhythm games in performance.  Campers can cook an unfamiliar dish and learn to appreciate new tastes and flavors.  And even when changing for swim, campers are learning how to take care of their


possessions and clean up after themselves–surely a very useful skill, parents will agree!

4

One of the most important ways to build confidence is by meeting new peers and making new friends. Camp is a great place for children to expand their social circles in a relaxed way, as they spend days together swimming, playing and having fun.

5

Camp counselors are great mentors and a crucial force in helping campers succeed.  Counselors can directly teach campers new skills (like how to make a bounce pass in basketball) but there are other important skills that they are teaching indirectly through their encouragement and support.  As counselors

encourage campers to keep trying, children learn persistence.  As counselors cheer on a camper’s achievements, children learn to trust themselves. 

Ok, so we agree that camp is a great experience for children. Why choose Day Camp? For children too young for traditional resident camp; many camps offer programs designed especially for children as young as 3 years old, where even pre-schoolers can reap the benefits of camp. For children with evening or weekend commitments, such as a sports league; day camp lets these children experience the joys of camp, while still being able to participate in other local activities.

For children (and parents!) who are not comfortable sending a child far away from home for a full week or more. Day camps are, by definition, local, and children come home every afternoon. For families who haven’t experienced camp in any format before, day camp is a way to “test the waters” and see if the camp experience fits their needs. Day camp is generally less expensive than resident camp. So when parents and children are considering summer camp, remember that day camp provides many of the same benefits as resident camp, just in a slightly different format!

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New Brittan Youth Theatre Camp

Why a Theater Camp or Summer Program? Someone once wrote, “All the world’s a stage.” William Shakespeare may have been a little biased, but he knew what he was talking about. Each of us, in everything we do, is living a story. In our actions. In our communications. In our emotions. In the way we move and speak and react to the world around us. In our just being. And the world is the stage on which this story plays out! For some kids, being on stage comes naturally. They’re the ones who are always singing or dancing or performing or improvising in some way— they’re the extroverts who get their energy from always being “on.” But every child can benefit from participating in the performing arts even if they’re quiet and reserved, aren’t sure whether they’ll like it, or just want the chance to try it out— some may even be secretly wishing to be performers! In many schools, arts classes and after-school programs have been reduced or cut altogether. 18

To make up for this, great out-of-school arts programs have grown to take their place, including many opportunities in summer camps and summer programs throughout the country. More than just learning new skills, rehearsing, or putting on a show, children who participate in the performing arts learn discipline, collaboration, participation skills, and empathy. Children even develop more selfesteem, self-confidence, and social and emotional skills from participating in the arts. They can become comfortable with public speaking and performance, and they’ll develop friendships in a supportive environment with others who share similar interests. In the end, they’ll all feel that amazing sense of accomplishment in a job well done as they take their final bows. By their nature though, it’s

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pretty difficult to “prove” that the arts do anything. In my experience, the proof isn’t really in any numbers or statistics, but in the children themselves. My work in theater involves producing and directing children’s performances and teaching children’s drama classes. I’ve been inspired by a first grader who began an after-school program with separation anxiety, and who soon volunteered to help lead warm-up exercises and take roles on stage. I’ve been motivated by a once quiet and solitary child on the autism spectrum who soon initiated conversations and collaborated with his classmates to create characters, stories, and performances. I’ve beamed from reports by parents and teachers alike that children in theater programs are less disruptive, participate more in class, and are more likely to improve their reading


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New Brittan Youth Theatre Camp levels and grades. And I’ve been proud to offer programs that accept a diverse group of children with different talents, personalities, backgrounds, interests, and ways of learning. Most of the kids I work with probably won’t grow up to be actors or directors any more than they’ll grow up to be princesses or superheroes. But

theater may still be important to them and something they’ll always remember and benefit from. They’ll take their performance skills into classrooms and jobs, and they’ll use them throughout their lives. At the very least, kids in the performing arts discover that all the world’s their stage. They’ll discover that they can be anyone

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and do anything. Is there anything more important than that?

- Darren Farrington

Executive and Artistic Director New Britain Youth Theater, New Britain, CT

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NEW BRITAIN YOUTH THEATER

For schedules, rates, and more

brings together the

performances and programs,

BEST of COMMUNITY and EDUCATIONAL THEATER for

visit www.NBYT.org,

email info@Nbyt.org,

children and teens in Connecticut.

or call 860-515-8115.

information about NBYT

Join in the cast of our summer musical production!

Enrollment for Summer begins in March! Half-day programs (9 am—1 pm) of rehearsal, music, arts, and fun! Four-week program for ages 7-18 (July 2-29) • One-week program for ages 5-6 (July 23-29)

The Lion King JR, 2017

Beauty and the Beast JR, 2016

The Wizard of Oz, 2015

Best Children’s Theater CONNECTICUT Magazine, 2017

860-515-8115 www.NBYT.org

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Picking a summer camp can be a daunting task. I’ve often compared it to the feeling of selecting a college. There is a plethora of camps out there: themed camps, traditional camps, theater camps, gaming camps, faith based camps, camps for those with special needs, and many more. It can be hard to know where to begin as you start your search for a summer camp for your child. A word to the wise; take their lead; don’t hand over the reins but they should have a say in the camp decision. Camp is a multi-year experience and your child’s buy-in is imperative to their camp experience. 22

Narrowing Down Your Choices

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These next few characteristics of camps can help narrow down your list quite a bit.

Accreditation The American Camp Association is the largest accrediting organization for summer camp experiences. Currently,

there are 3,657 camps and 12,276 programs accredited by the American Camp Association (ACA). However, there are numerous other organizations that camps can use for accreditation purposes. A camp does not have to be accredited to be an amazing camp; there are many out there that are


fantastic but are not accredited. If they aren’t accredited ask why and ask how they evaluate their program and most importantly, their safety practices.

Location and climate Campers can find and fall in love with a camp in any part of the World and with the ease of communication nowadays, camps and families can stay in constant contact even if a child is a plane ride away. This is something to consider though; what location or locations work for your family. Do you intend to drive to camp or will your camper fly there. Will you fly with them to and from camp or does the camp offer a service? Many camps offer gate side serves*. Different locations do offer different experiences in regards to climate. Take for example, a family from the south might look to send their camper to New England to get a reprieve from the summer heat. So think about what climate is the right fit for your family.

to a camp of sixty (or less) campers. Your family and your camper should decide what size is the right fit. Each size has its benefits and pitfalls. Like a college, there is the right size for each camper but a family can easily narrow down camps by deciding on size.

Amenities and activities Does your camper want bathrooms and running water in the cabins? Or internet and air conditioning? When narrowing down your list, consider what amenities are important. Your camper might want a camp with a lake or maybe they prefer a pool. Some camps have both. Apply the same concept to activities. There are some activities that your camper wants to try but those activities might not be offered at every camp. Make sure to check the website or speak to the camp

to ensure that the activities and experiences that your camper is looking for is offered.

Sessions This is a controversial topic. A lot of families are under the impression that a shorter camp session is the best fit for a first time camper. This might be true for some campers but it is not necessarily true for the majority of campers. Seasoned camp professionals talk about an adjustment period at camp because homesickness comes with the territory and will happen no matter what session length you choose. With a shorter session, a camper tends to leaves camp at the point when they have finally adjusted or the camper counts down the days and waits to go home without putting much thought or effort

Size Camps run the gamut in regards to size. You can find a camp that has hundreds of campers all the way down www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 7, Issue 1

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Camp Wa Klo into adjusting to camp. When it is a short session, some go through the motions and have no incentive to work through their homesickness. A lot of families will say “oh my child is ready for a longer session but I’m not”. Make sure to listen to your child. If they are ready, congratulate yourself because you have developed their confidence and independence! And if they aren’t ready for a longer session, that’s ok too! Not every child is ready for the leap; the key is listening to your child, knowing them, and ultimately finding the right fit.

Onto the nitty gritty The next two areas are what can differentiate one camp from another on a deeper level.

Type of community Your child’s experience will be impacted by the type of community at the camp. A few things to consider is how new campers do at the camp. What is the retention rate of 1st year campers? Is the camp made up of transplants from specific communities? What are the priorities of the campers? What “type” of child does well at the camp? Like colleges, each camp has a different feel to them. One of the best ways to get to know a community is by visiting it. If possible, go on a tour of

the camp. Meet the campers and staff. See them in action!

Most importantly. Meet the director(s)! The director(s) is the one who oversees it all. The community ethos is determined by them. Find out the organization structure of the camp. At some camps, the director is hands on with the campers and interacts with each child daily (this is typically for smaller camps). For larger camps, it can be difficult for the director to intimately know each camper and their family. Find out who your child and your point of contact is. Who will your child go to if there is an issue and who do you call if you want an update. As you get to know the director, you’ll soon find out their priorities and philosophies. You’ll learn what they hope each camper gets out of camp and what their philosophy is behind child development.

Finally Once you’ve narrowed down your search and have picked a camp (or two) that you think is the right fit, ask for references. Talk to current or past families about their experiences. You should especially do this if you weren’t able to tour the camp. Last but not least, trust your gut! When you find a good fit, you’ll know. Have faith that your child is going to have the summer of a lifetime as well as a lifetime in a summer!

By: Tammy Fortune

VIRTUAL TOUR 24

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CAMP-LAKEHUBERT

6 Ways to Bring Summer

Camp Home

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For those who have a kid go to summer camp, you know of the remarkable growth campers go through each summer. By removing themselves from technology and the social pressures of the real world, kids are given an opportunity to make deep connections with their peers, practice face-to-face communication, push themselves to achieve goals, and develop an appreciation for the natural world.

Every summer we see the miraculous transformation campers make when they dive into the community, programming, and summer fun that camp offers. Campers become more responsible by taking initiative in daily chores or in assisting the counselors. They also become respectable and inclusive, by appreciating the diversity everyone brings to

the group and ensuring that every kid feels welcomed and included in the cabin, and more driven, by pushing themselves to succeed. Parents revel in the mature and responsible kid that returns home and can be amazed at the positive changes and initiative that is shown. Some parents may be stunned to say: “My kids want to set the table for dinner”, “Suzie wants to try out for a new sport”, or “Sam made friends with a new kid in school”. What is the reason for all this? Plain and simple: summer camp. There is one issue that most summer camps have – it is only during the summer. How can parents continue to foster their camper’s new skills and growth? We must find a way to stretch out the value of summer camp year-round,

so here are 6 ways to bring summer camp home. These activities are also great for families who have yet to find their summer camp. Use these tasks to bring the value home and have fun with the whole family.

1 Write a letter to a (camp) friend.

Many camps are technologyfree and rely on letter writing to communicate with friends and parents outside of camp. Writing a letter is a thoughtful way to connect with a longdistance friend, or a friend just down the street. Nowadays, receiving a letter is like receiving a special keepsake. Take a moment to help your camper pick out the perfect friend and write to ask them how their year is going. Make sure to provide a return

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CAMP-LAKEHUBERT address so your camper can receive a reply.

2 Build your own campsite indoors. There is nothing like the fresh air and natural wilderness to make you feel alive. That can be hard during the winter months. So, find the perfect camping spot in your home and build your own campsite right there. There are so many ways to build your own tent. You can use chairs, ropes, blankets, sheets, you name it. Once you have made your campsite, have a family camp out, sing songs and tell stories “under the stars”.

3 Unplug for a day.

Camp is about building connections without the help of your phone or social media. The all-natural world at summer camp opens kids’ eyes and ears to the wonder of nature. Nowadays, people are getting so used to talking through a screen that they become dependent. It is possible to go a day without your phone, so do it! Make a pact with your family to unplug for a day. Suddenly, you will find you have loads of free time.

4 Try something new.

Trying new things is a summer camp staple. Campers feel 28

safe and supported enough to push themselves outside of their comfort zone and grow in the process. Normally, campers can choose from loads of activities they would never be able to do at home, so this at-home activity requires some brainstorming. Think of something your family has never done before. Maybe you go to an art gallery, take indoor sky diving lessons, learn how to do a cartwheel, put on a sockpuppet show. The opportunities are endless.

5 Go geocaching in your neighborhood. There is a ton to explore at camp. Whether campers walk the paths to find hidden treasures or they sign up to learn about survival skills and foraging, you never know what camp magic may be lurking. While you wait for summer camp, take your family on a scavenger hunt in your own neighborhood. Go to www. geocaching.com to find your first clue.

6 Make a pizza pie, family-style.

Community is essential to a successful summer at camp. What better place to do that than at the dinner table. Meals at camp are served familystyle and provide the best opportunity to catch up with everyone. Take time to do this with your family at home, and

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why not take the opportunity to make a hands-on meal. Making a pizza requires skill and creativity. How thick will the crust be? How many types of cheese? Will the pepperonis be arranged in a smiley face pattern or a rocket ship? Have fun creating an edible masterpiece and do not forget to ask, “Who is setting the table?” After all these fun activities, I am sure we can all agree that it is not entirely the same as attending summer camp. The invaluable camp environment of positive reinforcement offers a platform for kids to explore the comforts beyond their safe space and achieve personal success, in the great outdoors. That is why every year campers return to their home away from home or hunt for the perfect one to start the adventure. Parents and camp administrators still work to bring the same lesson learning, values, and fun in the winter months. Your home may not have a high ropes course, or an archery set, but it does have the loving support of a family community, and the inner-gumption of a kid striving to be their best in their own way. With a little creativity, you can definitely find ways to bring the spirit of summer camp home, just to tide you over until next summer.


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TIC Summer Camp

3 Reasons to send your daughter to STEM Camp The other day I was going through a box of things from High School and found my first cell phone- a Nokia brick with a light blue case that I only used for emergency phone calls and playing “snake”. I remember deliberating for weeks on what ringtone to buy; I even sprung for the polyphonic version because it was the cutting edge of ringtones at the time. When I found it I immediately pulled out my iPhone and took a photo to send to the group of teenage girls that I coach, knowing this prehistoric device would shock them. They were, in fact, shocked and also asked me if I also still had any old photos of my pet dinosaur…ouch. We were communicating via a group messaging app- just one of the many apps those young women use via the technology products they consume. Women don’t use technology any less in their daily lives than 30

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men, so why is it that the technology field is so dominated by one gender over the other? Studies have shown that it is not a matter of capability as much as a discouraging and unwelcoming environment that is to blame. There are many groups working to create a systemic change in order to open up more viable opportunities for women in STEM, and summer camp is no exception. Here are 3 reasons to send the girls and young women in your life to STEM Camp:

1 Build confidence in a safe environment


The summer camp environment, even for camps that are education-based, tends to be vastly different from the school environment. Going to camp is a choice, as is the participation in learning at camp, so it is inherently a less competitive and more fail-friendly space. Creating something you are proud of at camp is not a necessity, it’s an intrinsic aspiration, which can be motivating in a less stressful, healthier way for our young women. The stigma that women are not suited for jobs related to engineering, math, and science reinforces the most negative impacts of failing in our girls and can lead to deep levels of discouragement and even quitting all together. At summer camp, however, our girls are in a setting where failure means another lesson learned and increased experience rather than a reason to give up. If girls can

learn to utilize their mistakes as a part of the process of education at camp, they are more likely to be able to transfer this skill into more high-pressure environments.

2 Build useful skills for any

interest One of the biggest problems with girls dropping out of STEM classes at a young age is that they miss out on

developing skills that are useful across all fields, even outside of math and science. These skills include critical thinking, problem solving, trial and error, and efficient research. Its no secret that STEM jobs are one of the fastest growing job sectors and more than half the jobs being created are STEMrelated, so even a job that does not seem like it would involve STEM now could

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TIC Summer Camp evolve to involve some aspect of STEM in the near future. It’s also important to note that jobs in engineering, coding, and science span an extremely broad set of interests and other skill sets. Even as 4-year college degrees appear to be on the decline in favor of more specialized degrees, a baseline of knowledge in STEM continues to be incredibly useful across a huge spectrum of lucrative, fulfilling careers. Pave the way for the next 3 generation of young women Women (and disproportionately

women of color) have notoriously been left out of history books for their contributions to the STEM field, among other things. You’ve probably heard of Marie Curie and Rachel Carson, but have you heard of Annie Easley, Alice Ball, or Jeanne Spurlock? With social media and the start of an increase in interest and support for underrepresented groups in entertainment and popular culture sharing their stories, there is an opportunity to give more visibility to the women who have helped shape and advance all the disciplines related to STEM. The concept of “if you can see

By Leslie Keller Communications Director, TIC Summer Camp

WATCH VIDEO

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it, you can be it” is not just a theory- studies have shown that visibility and perception have a huge impact on what young people feel interested in and capable of doing. The Internet has given access to many stories that would not otherwise be widely seen, but if we can share these stories and encourage our young women to share their own stories (with their excellent STEM skills and confidence that they developed at camp!) then we can all help pave the way for future generations of women to see and believe that the STEM field is a place where they can thrive and be successful.


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Northwood Camp

Camp for

Autistic Spectrum Campers? Summer vacation for students on the autistic spectrum can be extremely challenging at best. The lack of routine and structure during the summer increase general anxiety, while a lack of social and recreational programming can further isolate children already trailing their peers in social development. Yet, this traditional school break can also present a unique opportunity for socially anxious and isolated students to immerse themselves in the 34

socially rich culture of summer camp. As an added bonus, these same students develop their independence as they learn how to transition away from home. All too often, parents of autistic spectrum children are unaware of summer camps that strive to provide socially therapeutic programming to this unique population. The general inclination is to feel that their children are not ready or able

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to make the break from home in order to experience what thousands of neurotypical children experience each summer in the camp setting. Yet, there are camps out there that specialize in providing exactly what autistic spectrum campers need in order to maximize their summer camp experience. Social skills, just as independence, cannot be learned in a vacuum, or at


Provide direct and formalized social skill instruction as well as ongoing support to reinforce their curriculum in order to help students internalize social strategies? Emphasize social skill development as a critical goal for the camp community and use traditional activities as the vehicle for achieving social goals? Recognize and acknowledge the debilitating impact that anxiety has on the performance level of autistic spectrum children? Create a daily structure and routine to reduce anxiety and in doing so, maximize social engagement? Provide age appropriate social opportunities for campers so that they can apply social skills in structured and supervised settings? Maintain a continuous social dialogue between campers and their counselors designed to reinforce skills or redirect behavior in real time to provide immediate feedback?

home. With the appropriate supports in place, there is no better setting for social skill development than a summer camp.

Foster a community environment in which non-competitive and non-judgmental programming deemphasizes competition, reduces anxiety and celebrates unique interests and skills?

What are these supports and how should families gauge a camp’s ability to meet their child’s cognitive and socially developmental needs? The criteria in the following list are critical factors to consider when families are seeking an appropriate camp for their autistic spectrum child.

Does the camp, their administration and cabin counselors: Understand the developmental needs of children on the spectrum; in particular the non-verbal processing and other learning challenges experienced by this population of students? www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 7, Issue 1

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Northwood Camp

Age appropriate social skill development for students on the autistic spectrum is challenging at best. There are too many factors related to processing, anxiety, rigidity and immaturity to take your chances with programs not specifically prepared to provide the necessary supports and structure to foster success and growth. When researching camps to determine their ability to meet the needs of your child, don’t hesitate to ask plenty of questions and be honest and up front about your child’s strengths and weaknesses. It is in the family’s, camp’s and, most importantly, camper’s best interests to find the right summer camp community to meet their individual needs. There is no one camp out there that is able to meet the needs of every child. The community of camps is as diverse as the children we serve! Yet, there is a camp out there for every child! When a family finds the right match, their children find a second home that can provide a lifetime of wonderful memories as well as a community that they can call their own!

By: Gordon Felt

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Camp Article

Fun Things To Bring To Camp For Making It Memorable Summer camp is just a few weeks away and now is the time to start thinking, how to make it even more exciting, scintillating, dazzling and invigorating. Sharing some fun things to bring to camp for making it memorable.

1. Water Proof Camera:

3. Camp Journal:

2. Walkie-talkie:

4. Gel and glitter pens:

Specially if your little one will have some water splashing fun along with the summer camp, water proof camera is a must.

A cute little walkie-talkie makes summer camp fun even more exciting. The two way wireless thing is super involving and fun. 38

Double the keepsakes and cherish the memories. Let your little journalists write their day to day camping adventures in an enthralling way.

Send some gel and glitter pens for writing in the journal. The kids would love to blend art and adventure with literature.

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5. Stickers:

Add some goofy and cute stickers too, for making them enjoy their writing adventures.

6. Tattoos:

Now lets face it, we have disliked the idea of tattoos on our little ones, but that does make them happy and excited.


7. DIY art and craft kit: For those times during the day when they are let free for play. These little art and craft kits can be a good change.

8. Friendship bands or bracelets:

Buy or let your child use some DIY craft to make these cute friendship bands.

9. Indoor Camp games: There are ample camp games specifically designed for camps the kids are up to.

10. Glow in the dark sticks:

This probably is as hilarious and fun as it sounds. Let the fireflies shimmer at night with glowing sticks all around their hands, neck and legs.

11. Autograph and slam books: This has to be a part of every child’s

packing list. For anywhere they would go from the age they start reading till….well! i still have my middle school slam books as a keepsake in my treasure store.

12. Summer camp specific beddings: Use camping special pillows, bedsheets and blankets.

13. Summer Camp tees:

Buy a few camp scribbles tees for your little ones. they look great and make their summer camp even exciting. Also if theres a gang of your little one,

14. Outdoor games:

ring toss. I have always found the game reaching altogether different level of madness with bigger crowd.

15. Specific for own sake: This has to be a part of every child’s packing list. For anywhere they would go from the age they start reading till….well! i still have my middle school slam books as a keepsake in my treasure store.

16. Summer camp specific beddings: Use camping special pillows, bedsheets and blankets.

The best and most exciting one which is easy to pack and easier to organize is

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Camp Article

The All Inclusive Packing

List For Summer Camp

Sending your child to a summer camp is exciting and overwhelming at the same time. As a mother, you cant but wonder about the many days your little one will be away from home. Specially because you don’t want to miss anything important to pack.

Clothes: Based on the camp requirements pack the clothes. But make sure to pack ample extra clothes. Comfortable and easy to wear clothes must be opted. Check with the climate and weather updates and plan for rainy or windy outdoors.

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Footwear: Be sure to pack slip-ons and sneakers too. There would be ample outdoor and rest time indoor so don’t miss these important foot wears. For rainy day muddy puddle fun, pack rain boots. Aqua socks, sandals, crocs, pack a few extra for the kid may loose some.

Snacks: Meals may be provided at the camp. But check with camp organizers for there must be some mid-meal snacks too. Be sure to buy small travel packs.

Toiletries: Toiletries must be very carefully packed, small travel packs must be given.

Bedding: Read the camp registration kit and information on their website. Bedding must be very nicely organized and packed as a good nights sleep is critical for happy and healthy day ahead. Include camp mats for outdoor kind of place.

Miscellaneous: Miscellaneous items include all the other items related to health and safety of our kids. Also include amusement and fun toys for the child.

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Interview

Westcoast Connection

Travel Camp

Camp Director for Westcoast Connection Travel Camp Ph:

Interview With

mail: jared@westcoastconnection.com

Mitch Lerner Q: What is your camp’s philosophy? 30 years ago, we began with a simple philosophy of “Each & Every” – a determination to balance exceptional individual attention within a positive group experience. It is not simply a trip but an experience. We understand something far more important than where to go and what to see and that is YOU. We use our 30 years of experience to make sure that every day of every program is socially comfortable and truly fun-filled for every single participant.What travelers love so much about our programs is the opportunity to make new friends. 42

(914) 835-0699

Q: What does your camp specialize in? We are celebrating our 31st summer running incredible programs for teenagers between the ages of 13 and 18. Trips range from 10 to 40 days with travel in the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, Costa Rica, Ecuador & the Galapagos Islands and 12 other amazing countries.

Q: What activities do you offer? We offer different types of programs depending on what you want to accomplish this summer Our Active Teen Tours combine the

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excitement of travel with visits to National Parks, exciting cities and the best recreation. Imagine skiing and snowboarding in Whistler Blackcomb, surfing in San Diego, SCUBA diving the Great Barrier Reef or visiting unforgettable cities like Paris, Rome San Francisco and Chicago. Our Community Service programs offer teens the chance to volunteer with well-established organizations like Habitat for Humanity and the Boys & Girls Clubs. These trips feature a great balance of service, adventure and touring! Our Language


Our Community Service programs offer teens the chance to volunteer with well-established organizations like Habitat for Humanity and the Boys & Girls Clubs. These trips feature a great balance of service, adventure and touring! Our Language Programs will help you improve your Spanish or Mandarin by immersing you in the local culture thus improving your ability to communicate and your confidence speaking. Programs will help you improve your Spanish or Mandarin by immersing you in the local culture thus improving your ability to communicate and your confidence speaking. We offer programs with and without classes. Our PreCollege Enrichment programs offer the perfect balance of study, immersion and activity highlights in Barcelona or Florence. You’ll study at an internationally renowned school while living in the heart of a major city. You can choose from incredible electives ranging from digital photography to sports marketing or SAT Prep with the Princeton Review while at the same time enjoying weekend excursions throughout Spain and Italy. Lastly, our Global Adventures provide a more intimate dynamic and allow for more challenging adventures in Western Canada and New Zealand or for more spontaneity and flexibility on our Backpacking programs throughout Europe.

Q: Why shold parents send their kids to your camp? Collectively, our full-time team has traveled to over 100 countries.

We have a combined 268 summers working in teen travel not to mention another 103 total summers working in camps. This wealth of experience combined with our incredible depth and reserve of resources enables us to maintain the highest quality in student travel. We’ve put a smile on the faces of over 24,000 students who’ve chosen to spend their summers with us. But don’t just take our word for this being your best summer ever; we encourage you to reach out to our alumni to hear about their unforgettable experiences.

Q: What is the best way for parents to reach you to register for Camp? You can visit our website at westcoastconnection.com to complete our online registration or if you prefer, you can download the application for enrollment and mail it to our New York office. To speak with one of our directors, please don’t hesitate to call us at 800.767.0227 or e-mail us at info@ westcoastconnection.com. We look forward a wonderful summer experience with your family.

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Interview

Camp Horizons

Interview With

Chris Smith Camp Director for Camp Horizons Ph: (540) 896-7600 mail: Camp@HorizonsVA.com

Q. How long has your camp been operational? A: Camp Horizons has been in operation since 1983, and has been accredited by the American Camp Association since our first year. We are a private, co-Ed sleep away camp for children ages 6-16. 44

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Q. Where are you located? A: We are located in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley just outside of Harrisonburg, Virginia. We are less than 2 hours from Washington DC and Richmond Va.


Q. What is your camp’s philosophy? A. We are a traditional camp who provides opportunities for children to try new things, meet new people, and have a fantastic camp experience with other children from around the world.

Q. What does your camp specialize in? A. We specialize in building close-knit communities at camp!

Q. What activities do you offer? A. We offer more than 40 activities in the areas of sports, creative arts, aquatics, outdoors, and equestrian.

Q. What are the typical session lengths and approximate pricing for your camp? A. Sessions are 1 and 2 weeks, with pricing starting at $1100 for a 1-week session and $1950 for a 2-week session. Additional options are available.

Q. How much staff do you have and how do you select your staff? A. We have approximately 50 staff including our directors, leadership team, and counselors. We recruit at colleges/universities around the US as well as through international camp staff recruitment agencies around the world.

Q. Why should parents send their kids to your camp? A. We have a fantastic tradition of safe, wholesome camp experiences!

Q. When does your camp enrollment start and finish? A. Enrollment is ALWAYS open!

Q. Is there anything else that would be helpful for parents to know about your camp? A. Our normal office hours are 830-500 ET Monday thru Friday, though our website and registration system is always available.

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CAMP CAT

SUMMER CAMPS SUMMER CAMPS PROVIDE ENRICHING PROGRAMS, CARE, AND ACTIVITIES FOR CHILDREN DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS.

ADVENTURE CAMPS ADVENTURE CAMPS PROVIDE KIDS AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN ABOUT THE OUTDOORS AND BE INVOLVED IN ACTIVITIES LIKE CAMPING, CANOEING, HIKING,& BACKPACKING.

ARTS CAMPS ART CAMPS HELP CHILDREN SHOWCASE AND GROW THEIR HIDDEN TALENTS IN DANCE, FILMMAKING, PHOTOGRAPHY, PERFORMING ARTS, ETC.

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ACADEMIC CAMPS ACADEMIC CAMPS HELP CHILDREN BROADEN THEIR HORIZONS IN THEIR CHOICE OF STUDIES.

AFTER SCHOOL CAMPS AFTER SCHOOL CAMPS ARE GENERALLY HELD FOR ELEMENTARY & JUNIOR HIGH STUDENTS. THESE CAMPS PROVIDE QUALITY EDUCATION ACTIVITIES, AS WELL AS LOTS OF FUN.

FANTASY CAMPS SPORTS FANTASY CAMPS ARE A CROSS BETWEEN VACATION AND TRAINING CAMP. YOU’RE PAYING FOR THE PRIVILEGE TO SPEND A FEW DAYS HANGING OUT WITH YOUR IDOLS .


TEGORIES

RELIGIOUS CAMPS RELIGIOUS CAMPS DEVELOP SPIRITUAL KNOWLEDGE, PHILANTHROPIC QUALITIES, AND A SENSE OF DEVOTION.

SPORTS CAMPS SPORTS CAMPS NURTURE THE ATHLETIC TALENTS IN CHILDREN AND BUILD CONFIDENCE AND SELF ESTEEM THROUGH TEAMWORK AND FRIENDLY COMPETITION.

TRADITIONAL CAMPS TRADITIONAL CAMP ACTIVITIES INCLUDE SWIMMING, CANOEING, ARCHERY, ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION, COOKOUTS, ARTS AND CRAFTS AND MORE.

SPECIAL NEEDS CAMPS

SPECIAL NEEDS CAMPS PROVIDE AN EMPHASIS ON HUMAN VALUES, A SENSE OF BELONGING AND COMMUNITY, AND HELP CHILDREN DEVELOP SELF CONFIDENCE AND SELF ESTEEM.

STUDY ABROAD CAMPS STUDY ABROAD CAMPS PROMOTE THE RICHNESS AND DIVERSITY OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES AT UNIVERSITIES & PLACES OF HIGHER LEARNING ACROSS THE WORLD.

TEEN PROGRAM CAMPS THESE CAMPS TYPICALLY INCLUDE STUDY ABROAD, ACADEMIC & COLLEGE PREP, TOURS AND TRAVELS, OUTDOOR & ADVENTURE, AND VOLUNTEER & COMMUNITY, ETC.

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SUMMER CAMPS

DIRECTORY

Picking the perfect retreat for your little campers doesn’t have to be a daunting task. Help your kids gear up for a great camp experience with our detailed Camp Directory.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS 26900 Peters Canyon Rd., Tustin, CA, 92782 Ph: (714) 731-1779 www.cdicdc.org

BROADREACH SUMMER ADVENTURES FOR TEENAGERS 806 McCulloch Street, Suite 102, Raleigh, NC, 27603 Ph: (919)256-8200. www.gobroadreach.com

CAMP OF THE RISING SON 444 Lake Road, French Camp, MS, 39745 Ph: (662) 547-6169 campoftherisingson.com

CAMP EDMO - SF RICHMOND PARK 855 27th Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94121 Ph: (415) 282-6673 www.campedmo.org

62 Alumni Drive, Canaan, NH, 03741 Ph: (603) 523-3526 www.cardigan.org

PENN STATE ABINGTON KIDS TEEN COLLEGE

ROCK-N-WATER CHRISTIAN CAMPS

FRENCH INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE SUMMER CAMP

ABC SEATTLE PRO SUMMER BASEBALL CAMP

1600 Woodland Road, Abington, PA, 19001 Ph: (215) 881-7400 www.abington.psu.edu

126 Route de Rochebrune,

MEGEVE FRANCE, Rhone-Alpes, France, 74120

Ph: (022) 548-0105 & (778) 847-7677 http://www.internationallanguagecamps.com/

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CARDIGAN MOUNTAIN SCHOOL SUMMER SESSION

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6580 State Highway 49, Lotus, CA, 95651 Ph: (530) 621-3918 www.rocknwater.com

6046 Westlake Sammamish Pkwy NE, Redmond, WA, 98052 Ph: (800) 222-8152 www.baseballcamps.com


SUMMER CAMPS DIRECTORY WORLD CUP SOCCER CAMPS

CASTILLEJA SUMMER DAY CAMP

SUPERCAMP - STANFORD UNIVERSITY

1310 Bryant St, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 Ph: (650) 470-7833 www.castilleja.org

450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305 Ph: (800) 228-5327 www.supercamp.com

CLASSROOM ANTICS - SUMMER TECHNOLOGY CAMPS

4-H SUMMER CAMP

698 CONCORD CHURCH ROAD, PICKENS, SC, 29671

P.O. Box 681, Los Gatos, CA, 95031 Ph: (408) 354-4949 www.orldcupsoccercamps.com

Multiple Locations Throughout the Area, Cincinnati, OH, 45236 Ph: (800) 595-3776 www.classroomantics.com

8001 MW Rickenbaker Road, Summerton, SC, 29148 Ph: (864) 878-1103 www.4hsummer.camp

8001 MW RICKENBAKER ROAD, SUMMERTON, SC, 29148

CAMP SEWEE

8001 MW Rickenbaker Road, Summerton, SC, 29148 Ph: (864) 878-1103 www.ildlifesummer.camp

PROSPECT PARK ZOO CAMP

PARADISE VALLEY SCHOOL OF KARATE

BOSTON SOCCER ACADEMY

32405 N. US Highway 12, Ingleside, IL, 60041 Ph: (847) 546-8086 www.ymcachicago.org

391 Moorefield Memorial Highway, Sunset, SC, 29685 Ph: (864) 878-1103 www.adventuresummer.camp

COMMUNITY ASTHMA PROGRAMS ASTHMA CAMP

METALMARK KIDS CAMP

4042 N CEDAR AVE, FRESNO, CA, 93726 Ph: (559) 229-7900 www.touchstoneclimbing.com

YMCA CAMP DUNCAN

ADVENTURE CAMP

7407 Doar Road, Awendaw, SC, 29429 Ph: (864) 878-1103 www.seweesummer.camp

450 Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, 11225 Ph: (718) 399-7322 www.prospectparkzoo.com

3851 E. Thunderbird Rd. Suite B117, Phoenix, AZ, 85032 Ph: (602) 867-9204 www.pvkarate.com

698 Concord Church Road, Pickens, SC, 29671 Ph: (864) 878-1103 www.voyagersummer.camp

593 Eddy Street, Providence, RI, 02903 Ph: (401) 444-8340 www.hasbrochildrenshospital.org

USBA ST MARYS CITY SUMMER CAMP 18952 E. Fisher Rd St. Mary’s City, Maryland , Saint Marys City, MD, 20686 Ph: (866) 622-4487 www.usbaseballacademy.com

4 UPPER RIVER RD, IPSWICH, MA, 01938 Ph: (617) 797-6619 www.bostonsocceracademy.com

CUTTING EDGE MARTIAL ARTS 215 Haggerty Lane, Bozeman, MT, 59715 Ph: (406) 570-1844 www.cemartialarts.com

ROUGHING IT DAY CAMP P.O. Box 1266, Orinda, CA, 94563 Ph: (925)283-3795 www.roughingit.com

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SUMMER CAMPS DIRECTORY WET & WILD ADVENTURE CAMP Austin, TX, 78749 Ph: (512) 983-6100 www.wetwildcamp.com

ISOLA BELLA

410 Twin Lakes Road, Taconic, CT, 06079 Ph: (860) 524-5558 & (860) 570-2300 www.asd-1817.org

TEEN SUMMER FASHION DESIGN & SEWING CAMP

21 West 39th Street, New York, NY, 10018 Ph: (646) 329-6663 www.campfashionnyc.com

PEAK VOLLEYBALL CAMPS

Mike Welch,P.O. Box 9740, Truckee, CA, 96162 Ph: (530) 448-0519 & (530) 448-0519 www.peakvolleyballcamps.com

EASTERSEALS TENNESSEE CAMP 750 Old Hickory Blvd. #2-260, Brentwood, TN, 37027 Ph:(615) 292-6640 www.easterseals.com

MINDSTRETCH TRAVEL ADVENTURES 3124 Landrum Road, Columbus, NC, 28722 Ph: (828) 863-4235 www.mindstretchadventures.com

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KIDS N COMEDY

208 w 23 st, New York, NY, 10011 Ph: (212) 877-6115 & (212) 877-6115 www.kidsncomedy.com

CAMP LINCOLN BOYS CAMP 23416 Camp Lincoln Rd, Lake Hubert, MN, 56459 Ph: (800) 242-1909 www.lincoln-lakehubert.com

HIDDEN VALLEY CAMP

KIDS SUMMER FASHION DESIGN & SEWING CAMP

161 Hidden Valley Road, Freedom, ME, 04941 Ph: (800) 922-6737 www.hiddenvalleycamp.com

21 W 39th Street 4th Floor, New York, NY, 10018 Ph: (646) 329-6663 www.midtown.thefashionclass.com

JUNIPER INSTITUTE FOR YOUNG WRITERS

PIANO DISCOVERIES SUMMER CAMP

810 Campus Center, 1 Campus Center Way University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003 Ph: (413) 545-8988. www.umass.edu

RED PINE CAMP FOR GIRLS

P.O. Box 69, Minocqua, WI, 54548 Ph: (715) 356-6231 www.redpinecamp.com

NORTH EAST RIVER YC LEARN TO SAIL 0 Bayside Dr, North East, MD, 21901 Ph:(410) 287-6333 www.neryc.com

CAMP HOBE

PO Box 520755, SLC, UT, 84152 Ph: (801) 631-2742 www.camphobekids.org

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 7, Issue 1

University Ave. & Old Taylor Rd., University, MS, 38677 Ph: (662) 915-1282 & (662) 915-7268 www.music.olemiss.edu

CAMP ROCK

1607 Cromwell Bridge Road, Baltimore, MD, 21234 Ph: (410) 665-7461 www.camprockmd.com

LAKE TAHOE FAMILY CAMP

P.O. Box 8406 So. Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, CA, 96158 Ph: (408) 207-0121 & (408) 207-0123 www.diabetessociety.org

ROAD’S END FARM

149 Jackson Hill Road, Chesterfield, NH, 03443 Ph: (603) 363-4900 www.roadsendfarm.com


SUMMER CAMPS DIRECTORY SWIFT NATURE CAMP

W7471 Ernie Swift Rd., Minong, WI, 54859 Ph: (715) 466-5666 & (630) 654-8036 www.swiftnaturecamp.com

SUMMER LIFE

157 Game Farm Road, Schwenksville, PA, 19473 Ph: (610) 296-6725 www.vfes.net

STRONGHOLD CAMP AND RETREAT CENTER

HURON FOREST CAMP CEDARRIDGE

1154 W River Rd, Oscoda, MI, 48750 Ph: (989) 739-3571 & (989) 739-3571 www.campcedarridge.org

1922 Illinois Route 2 N, Oregon, IL, 61061 Ph: (815) 732-6111 www.strongholdcenter.org

CAMP CAROLINA

HAPPY HOOF CAMP

Lambs Creek Rd, Brevard, NC, 28712 Ph:(828) 884-2414 www.campcarolina.com

8087 Pokorny Rd. NE, Saint Paul, OR, 97137 Ph: (503) 678-3071 www.spottedcrowstables.com/

CHILDREN’S CHORUS OF GREATER DALLAS

CAMP BAUERCREST

THE INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

CAMP KIPPEWA

CAMP PINEHURST

CAMP SIERRA VISTA FOR GIRLS

THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED

175 Rio Vista Rd, Ingram, TX, 78025 Ph: (830) 367-5353 www.vistacamps.com

2331 North Elston Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60614 Ph: (773) 342-5200 www.theroadlesstraveled.com

UW - GREEN BAY SUMMER ART STUDIO

SAMBICA

CAMP EASY BREATHERS

WATERSHED NATURE CAMP

31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington, NJ, 08534 Ph: (609) 737-3735 & (609) 737-3735 www.thewatershed.org

THE GODDARD SCHOOL DAYTON, NJ 399 Ridge Road, Dayton, NJ, 08810 Ph: (732) 274-9631 www.goddardschool.com

23 Curtis Road, Raymond, ME, 04071 Ph: (603) 880-6287 www.camppinehurst.com

Green Bay, WI, 54301 Ph: (920) 465-2267 & (920) 465-2267 http://www.uwgb.edu

6121 E. Lovers Lane, Dallas, TX, 75214 Ph: (214) 965-0491 www.thechildrenschorus.org

025 SW Sherman Street, Portland, OR, 97201 Ph: (503) 226-2496 www.ntlschool.org

4114 W Lk Sammamish Pkwy SE, Bellevue, WA, 98008 Ph: (425)746-9110 & (425)746-9110 www.sambica.com

17 Old County Road, Amesbury, MA, 01913 Ph: (508) 251-9811 www.bauercrest.org

1 Kippewa Drive, Monmouth, ME, 04259 Ph: (800) 547-7392 & (207) 933-2993 www.kippewa.com

3533 S Alameda St, Corpus Christi, TX, 78411 Ph: (361) 694-4580 www.driscollchildrens.org

www.CampNavigator.com Vol. 7, Issue 1

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JOIN A SUMMERTIME TRADITION 109 YEARS IN THE MAKING

Enroll Now for Summer 2018! • Brother-Sister camps, ages 5-17 • 40+ land and water activities • Life skills and character development in the Minnesota Northwoods

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Campnavigator magazine vol7 issue1  

CampNavigator gives parents accurate, insightful and valuable information, empowering them to make informed decisions about summer camp. Cam...

Campnavigator magazine vol7 issue1  

CampNavigator gives parents accurate, insightful and valuable information, empowering them to make informed decisions about summer camp. Cam...

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