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CALIFORNIA WOMEN LAWYERS N E W S L E T T E R MARCH & APRIL 2018 1

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Letter from the CWL President Renée Galente

2018

continues to be a turbulent year. Since our last newsletter, we have suffered tragedy as we watched parents and students lose children and friends in a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. We’ve seen innocent people targeted in Austin, Texas by a serial bomber, possibly because of the color of their skin. We’ve also had reason to celebrate. Out of the horror of the Parkland shootings, we saw the youth rise up. It has been a great joy to watch as, strong, outraged, and flexing newly found power, these young women and men focus their anger and grief into political and civil action. #NeverAgain. Another victory comes after 168 years of statehood here in California. The California Senate will be led by a woman. Sen. Toni Atkins is not only the first woman but also the first openly gay leader elected as Senate president pro tem. She inspired when she said, “We must ensure that every person living in California – no matter how they look, who they love, or where their parents were born – can climb life’s ladder, live out loud, and be whoever they want to be without being demeaned, downsized or discriminated against.” In addition to being a powerful leader, Sen. Atkins is an engaging speaker. CWL was fortunate to feature her as our inaugural Elect to Run Keynote Speaker in 2014 and we are excited to announce that she will be rejoining us this year on June 23 at the Women’s History Museum in San Diego for the 2018 Elect to Run program.

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It is so appropriate that Sen. Atkins was elevated and made history during Women’s History Month. CWL chose to celebrate this month by spotlighting some remarkable women in the legal profession who were “firsts” in practice or on the bench. These women worked hard to break down barriers so that women of my generation and after can take for granted our education, our admission to the bar, and our practice. We still struggle, but we’re present and a force to be reckoned with because of their work. Please join me in thanking them and celebrating them. Some of that struggle in which we still engage in the legal profession is the aspiration of equal pay. April 10, 2018 marks the day that a woman must, on average, work to until she matches what a man made from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017. On average, women make 80 cents to a man’s $1.00. It’s worse for women of color. African-American women do not reach pay parity until August 7, 2018 (63 cents to the $1.00). Native American Women do not reach pay parity until September 27, 2018 (57 cents to the $1.00). Latinas do not reach pay parity until November 1, 2018 (54 cents to the $1.00).

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We are lucky that in California there are strong women working to end these disparities. The leader in that field is Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, who drafted SB 358, the California Equal Pay Act, which was signed into law in 2015, and who continues her work this year with SB 1284. We hope you enjoy reading about the progress being made. As California goes, so (hopefully) goes the country. Also working to break down barriers is CWL’s InHouse Counsel Network. The Network is about to kick off its annual programming with a fun and informative social April 26 in Los Angeles, Whiskey & Bites, which is free to IHCN members, followed by the kick-off of the Puzzle Series Program. Registration is already open for Puzzle Program Session One, set for June 7 at Google headquarters in Sunnyvale, which features Melinda S. Reichert and Lena Ryan speaking on #MeToo: A New Paradigm for Employers. The Puzzle Program Sessions are also free for IHCN members, thanks to generous sponsorship. Speaking of sponsorship (you had to know that was coming, right?), you or your firm can support the work of CWL at many different levels. If you don’t see something that works for your firm, please contact me, and we will custom-make a sponsorship that fits you. We are thankful to our 2018 Annual Sponsors Antonyan Miranda, Janssen Malloy LLP, White & Case & Trial by Woman. We also have individual event sponsorships available and are currently looking to highlight firms interested in our upcoming Annual MCLE Conference which will be held May 4 at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco. This year’s topics will range from Women in the Boardroom to Tips and Tricks for Courtroom Success to Women Entrepreneurs. It will be a fantastic opportunity to get your MCLE while surrounded by like-minded people, and finish the day with an inspirational reception honoring Pearl Gondrella Mann as the 2018 Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award recipient.

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If there’s one message that keeps coming through this year, it’s that we’re stronger united. In the face of tragedy, adversity, and even daily struggle, our community is better equipped to overcome when we work together and support each other. That’s what makes CWL so special. That’s part of what sets us apart from the great work local affiliates do. We bring everyone across this great state together. We unite voices. And we consider ourselves fortunate every day to be doing that work. Thank you to every single person who supports CWL’s mission of advancing women in the profession of law, to improve the administration of justice, to better the position of women in society, and to eliminate all inequities based on sex. I’d like to give a special shout-out to the men of CWL. Thank you. Men supporting women in our efforts to advance is crucial. We appreciate your firm support, your commitment to diversity and inclusion, and your advocacy and mentorship.


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CWL

NEWSLETTER MARCH & APRIL #8 2017-18 CWL Board Officers CWL President Renée Galente CWL President-Elect Amee Mikacich Immediate Past President Chris Chambers Goodman First Vice-President Jessica L. Rowe Second Vice-President Naomi Dewey Secretary Michelle Ialeggio Treasurer Summer Selleck Editors Amelia Burroughs - Janssen Malloy LLP Jodi Cleesattle - California Department of Justice Assistant Editor Vanessa Henderson Editorial Designer David Blue Garrison Additional Photography Pexels, Pixabay and Stocksnap CWL was chartered in 1974. It was organized “to advance women in the profession of law; to improve the administration of justice; to better the position of women in society; to eliminate all inequities based on sex; and to provide an organization for collective action and expression germane to the aforesaid purposes.” The purposes are limited to purposes meeting the requirements for exemption provided in Section 2370le of the Revenue and Taxation Code and Section 501(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code as the statutes may be amended from time to time. Thank you to all the authors in this issue for sharing with us their time and expertise. If you have an idea for a future article, please contact Vanessa Gonzales at the CWL office at newsletter@cwl.org Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of CWL. For more information on CWL or this newsletter, please contact the CWL office at 916.930.9020 or visit the website at www.cwl.org.


Editor’s Note Amelia Burroughs Welcome to CWL’s newsletter for March and April 2018. CWL and our Affiliates continue to advocate for women in our profession and society with networking opportunities, educational programs, legislative action, and amicus briefing. In this issue, we cover CWL’s recent “So You Want to Be A Judge” programs in San Francisco and Sacramento, which provided an invaluable look behind the scenes into judicial appointments at the state and federal level. Panelists of judges and review committees shared their experiences with the process and candid thoughts about what they learned and wish they’d known at the outset. The care and effort CWL puts into all of its programming and event planning was evident. Make sure you join us for our remaining events this year, including our Annual Conference this May. We’ve included a preview of the Annual Conference, with its topics and panelists. It’s worth making the time for this always-inspiring event. Sponsorship is another great way to become involved with CWL, with opportunities for small and large firms alike. Help us tell the legal community that you support CWL and its mission. It is also our pleasure to highlight the many accomplishments of our members in this issue. If you’re a current CWL member, please send us news of your recent awards or recognitions so that we can share your news. We’re also active on Facebook and Instagram, and we welcome your participation with us on social media. The month of March and Women’s History month is behind us, but our march onward continues. We’re looking forward to seeing you participate in April’s Equal Pay Day gatherings and at CWL and CWL Affiliate events throughout the state.

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CWL Member News BY AMELIA BURROUGHS CWL is proud of the work its members do on behalf and professionalism in the practice of law by legal of our organization and the profession, and we education, civics education, mentoring, or service to believe in sharing your achievements. Please help us the SDCBA. share your news. In this edition, we’re thrilled to share Michelle Ialeggio the recognition given to several CWL members. CWL secretary Michelle Ialeggio, of

Jessica Lynn Rowe the San Diego District Attorney’s Office, CWL first vice president Jessica Lynn will receive the SDCBA Service by Rowe, a shareholder with Aaron a Public Attorney Award, presented Riechert Carpol &Riffle APC, will receive to individuals who demonstrate a the Elinor Falvey award for 2018 from combination of excellence in the practice of law with the San Mateo County Bar Association’s service to the community, the profession, and the bar Women Lawyers Section on May 10. Established association or legal education. in 1986, the award recognizes women lawyers Jamie Quient of achievement practicing in San Mateo County. CWL member Jamie Quient, president Rowe receives the award as the result of her efforts and managing attorney of Free to on behalf of women’s and other bar associations Thrive, a nonprofit that empowers and her tireless work for gender equality in the survivors of human trafficking, profession. will receive the SDCBA award for CWL MEMBERS will take home four of nine service Outstanding Service by a New Lawyer, an award awards presented by the San Diego County Bar recognizing outstanding service by a new lawyer Association May 1 during the SDCBA’s celebration in his or her first six full years of practice who has of Law Week. demonstrated a significant commitment to serving the legal community via legal education, mentoring or Candace Carroll community service. CWL past president Candace Carroll, Of Counsel with Sullivan Hill Lewin Rez & Engel, will receive the SDCBA Outstanding Attorney Award. The award recognizes an exemplary attorney who provides outstanding community service above and beyond just service to the legal profession.

Wendy Behan CWL past president Wendy Behan, a partner with Casey Gerry Schenk Francavilla Blatt & Penfield LLP, will receive an award from the SDCBA for Service to the Legal Community. The award recognizes outstanding long-term or significant contributions to furthering the goals of the legal profession and promoting ethics, integrity,

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Christine Chambers Goodman CWL past president and current Foundation president Christine Chambers Goodman published an article on the nature of implicit gender biases and the evolution of such bias against female attorneys in the William and Mary Journal of Women and the Law in a special issue on “Enhancing Women’s Effect on Law Enforcement in the Age of Police and Protest.” Goodman’s article, “Nevertheless She Persisted: From Mrs. Bradwell to Annalise Keating, Gender Bias in the Courtroom,” is published at 24 Wm. & Mary J. Women & L. 167 (2017).

Let us lift you up. Tell us when you’ve won an honor or award or attained a special achievement. Contact us at newsletter@cwl.org.


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CWL Welcomes Truckee-Tahoe Women Lawyers as Newest CWL Affiliate BY AMELIA BURROUGHS CWL is thrilled to welcome its newest Affiliate member Truckee-Tahoe Women Lawyers (TTWL). Comprised largely of women attorneys in Nevada and Placer counties, TTWL formed when Jo Ann Woodsum, a commercial real estate attorney out of Truckee, noticed the need for a network of women attorneys in the North Lake Tahoe area and sounded the call to action. The group has a solid 15 to 20 active members who can be counted on to participate. The group, which includes attorneys across the professional spectrum, meets quarterly for networking, community service programs, continuing education, and book groups. TTWL recently held a call-in discussion on the book, “Beyond Bias: Unleashing the Potential of Women in Law,” edited by Laura Slater and with essays featuring Patricia K. Gillette, Carol Frohlinger, Deborah Epstein Henry, Cathy Fleming and many others. TTWL Affiliate Governor Peggy Headley said the group’s members recognize the continued need for women’s bar associations, particularly in more rural communities where geography and population sometimes contribute to feelings of isolation. “It’s been a wonderful thing to come together as a group and recognize our individual talents,” Headley said. “And, we intend to impact more than the local legal community. Our leadership and efforts are really aimed at our larger business community.” TTWL also looks forward to partnering with CWL to be heard across the state. Welcome, TTWL! All of us here at CWL are looking forward to your invitation to winter and summer weekend programs.

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Founding members of Truckee-Tahoe Women Lawyers include (from left to right): Therese Hickey, Aparna Reddy, Peggy Headley, Emily Dubansky, and Alison Bermant. 11

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Notice of District Governor Elections: Call for Nominations DEADLINE: April 30, 2018 Election of several CWL District Governors, for two-year terms starting in October 2018, will commence over the next two months. CWL is accepting applications of candidates for election to vacant District Governor seats in the following districts. DISTRICT 1: One position. (Butte, Colusa, Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendcino, Modoc, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, and Yuba Counties.) DISTRICT 3: One position. (Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties). DISTRICT 4: One position. (San Francisco and Marin Counties) DISTRICT 5: One position. (Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, Monterey, San Benito, San Joaquin, Santa Cruz, Stanislaus, and Tulare Counties.) DISTRICT 7: Four positions. (Los Angeles County) DISTRICT 8: One positions (Orange County) DISTRICT 9: One position. (San Diego and Imperial County) HOW TO APPLY: Interested candidates should submit a current resume and a candidate’s statement of no more than onehalf (1/2)typewritten page in length via email to: teri@cwl.org or mailed to the: Nominating Committee, CWL, 700 R Street, Suite 200, Sacramento, CA 95811, no later than the close of business, April 30, 2018.

District Governor responsibilities: District Governors attend six Board meetings per year at locations throughout the state. They also participate in committees, help plan events, recruit new CWL members, and assist in running the organization. Why should you run: • Because CWL’s clout and effectiveness grow with every smart, energetic woman who gets involved; • Because you will get to know nice, smart, committed women from all over the state; • Because it is important that every district have a representative on the Board of Governors. • If you don’t run, who will? Don’t sit back and wait for other women to run. If you are committed to the future of women lawyers in California, send in your application. Who is eligible to run: To be eligible, you must be an active member of the State Bar of California, in good standing and also a Class 1 CWL member in good standing. Class 1 members must be: • A member in good standing of the State Bar of California; • A judge of a court of record in the State of California; • A full-time member of the faculty or a dean of a law school in the State of California; • A member in good standing of the Bar of another state; • A law student attending a California law school; or • A California resident who has graduated from a law school within the last three years and not yet admitted to the State Bar of California, but only upon written application to the corporation’s principal offices and upon timely payment of dues; • Governors are required to have their principal business office or residence in the geographical District the Governors represent.

For further information, or sample candidates’ statements, please contact Teri Anticevich at (916) 930-9020 or teri@cwl.org.

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California’s Leadership On Equal Pay BY SEN. HANNAH-BETH JACKSON The first Equal Pay Act was enacted over 50 years ago in our country, realizing equal pay has been elusive until just the past few years. When my SB 358, the California Fair Pay Act, was signed into law in 2015, our state became the nationwide leader in addressing pay inequity and its impacts on women, families and our economy. Because of the Fair Pay Act, women are now able to challenge pay discrimination based on wages paid to other workers who perform substantially similar work, and employees no longer risk retaliation for doing so. In addition, employers, not employees, are now required to show that a difference in wages is based on a specific factor that is legitimate, serves a business purpose, and is not based on or derived from a gender bias. We built upon that success last year when Governor Brown signed AB 168, designed to further break the cycle of pay inequity by prohibiting employers from asking about an applicant’s prior salary history. Yet despite our significant progress, pay inequity especially among women of color - persists. Latinas earn 43 percent and African-American women earn 63 percent of what white men earn, according to the 2017 Report on the Status of Women and Girls by Mount Saint Mary’s University. To address this disparity, I authored SB 1284 this year, which requires employers of 100 or more people to submit an annual pay data report by gender, race, ethnicity and job category to the Department of Industrial Relations. This information will allow California agencies to identify patterns of wage discrimination while encouraging employers to analyze their own pay practices.

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Ensuring that women are paid equally for doing substantially the same work as their male counterparts is not only right, it is critically important to a woman’s economic future. When a woman is paid less than a man for the same job, this disparity impacts her lifetime earnings, her highest wage and ultimately her retirement security. When women suffer economically, families suffer, our economy is weakened, and our society undervalues the hard work of half its population. This April 10 is Equal Pay Day, the time of the year when white women’s salaries catch up to men’s salaries from the previous year. But for AfricanAmerican women, Equal Pay Day is August 7, and for Latinas, it’s November 1. On this and all Equal Pay Days, I remain committed to continuing my work to ensure women are paid fairly, recognizing that our successes today are possible because of the work that has gone on before us. Together we are building a foundation for a future of economic opportunity and prosperity that our daughters, sons, granddaughters and grandsons will be able to benefit from equally. This foundation will ensure economic growth. Together we will continue to provide a model to the rest of the nation that economic equity is not only morally right but an economic imperative for ensuring a successful, sustainable and just world for all. Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson represents the 19th State Senate District, which includes all of Santa Barbara County and western Ventura County.


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What Is Equal Pay Day and Why Does It Matter? BY JODI CLEESATTLE Equal Pay Day is the symbolic day when women’s earnings “catch up” to men’s earnings from the previous year. Equal Pay Day actually falls at different times for white women and women of color, but the overall date used for the pay gap between women overall and men is April 10. Asian-American women have the smallest wage gap, and their Equal Pay Day is Feb. 22. White women catch up on April 17. For African-American women, Equal Pay Day is August 7, for Native American women, it’s Sept. 27, and for Latinas, it’s November 1. Equal Pay Day was started by the National Committee on Pay Equity (NCPE) in 1996 to highlight the gap between men and women’s wages – more than 30 years after the Equal Pay Act of 1963 required that men and women be given equal pay for equal work. NCPE’s current wage gap figure shows that women today earn 79.6 cents for every dollar men earn, based on the most recent Census data of the median salaries of all full-time, year-round workers in the United States. The wage gap figure is an aggregate. It does not show men and women doing the same work or in

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the same jobs. But it does show changes over time, with progress in narrowing the gap in the 1990s and little change in this century. In “The Status of Women in the States: 2015 – Employment and Earnings,” the Institute for Women’s Policy Research projects that if current trends continue, the wage gap will remain until 2058 and won’t close until the next century in some states. What causes the wage gap? Recent research blames the types of jobs women choose or are pushed into, as well as penalties for motherhood and discrimination. Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce published a 2018 study that analyzed how levels of education affect the gender pay gap – and found a woman needs one more college degree than her male peers to earn the same salary. In the report, “Women Can’t Win,” study authors concluded that, despite women outnumbering men in college, grad school and professional school, four factors keep women’s wages down, compared to men’s. The first is choice of field of study. Even though more women are studying and entering fields traditionally dominated by men, women are still

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disproportionately concentrated in the lowest-earning fields. For example, women have increased in the ranks of engineers from 1 percent in 1970 to 17 percent today. But women’s dominance in lowerpaying fields has remained steady. For example, women represented 75 percent of workers in the education field in 1970 and represent 76 percent today. The second factor is choice of majors within fields of study. The study authors found that, even when women study high-paying fields, they are still more likely to choose the least lucrative majors within those fields compared to men. For example, within the engineering field, women make up 32 percent of environmental engineering majors, the lowest-paying engineering major, but only 17 percent of petroleum engineering majors, the highest-paying engineering major. Choice of occupation is the third factor. Again, women are less likely to work in the highest-paying occupations compared to men. Only 27 percent of chief executive officers, 44 percent of lawyers, and 43 percent of physicians and surgeons are women. Women are found in greater numbers in lowerpaying fields – for example, 59 percent of market research analysts and marketing specialists, 85 percent of paralegals and legal assistants, and 89 percent of registered nurses are women. Finally, discrimination plays a role in the gender pay gap. “Even when they do everything ‘right’– choose a high-paying field of study, pursue a high-paying major within that field, and get a job in a highpaying occupation –women still get paid less than their male peers,” the study authors concluded. “If a man and woman who are equally qualified get the same job, the woman still only earns 92 cents for every dollar the man is paid –more than 81 cents [the 2016 gender pay gap], to be sure, but a far cry from earnings equality.” In “The Gender Wage Gap: Extent, Trends, and Explanations,” a January 2016 report from the National Bureau of Economic Research, study authors found that the largest factor in the persistent wage gap is the dearth of women in specific jobs and industries, but they also found that “Current research continues to find evidence of a motherhood penalty for women and of a marriage premium for men.”The

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researchers noted that discrimination, too, can play a role. When it comes to hiring and promotions, concerns that women will (or should) spend more time away from the office, or will somehow underperform can create a labor market rife with negative assumptions about women, making it difficult for women to advance to the most advanced and highly paid positions. The March 2016 report from Third Way, a national think tank that champions centerleft ideas, “A Dollar Short: What’s Holding Women Back from Equal Pay?” examines the pay gap through hourly wages, age differences, occupational categories, and evidence of lingering bias, and shows that women’s work is not valued as highly as men’s. The bottom line: “Achieving gender pay parity will require both determination and creativity among policymakers, employers, workers, and educators alike. ”The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank focused on including the needs of low- and middle-income workers in economic policy discussions, provides a fun guide to countering attempts to refute the gender wage gap –“You can’t mansplain away the gender pay gap,” published in April 2017. The Institute’s short “economic snapshot” shows that women are paid less than men in almost every occupation, even female-dominated fields like preschool and kindergarten teachers and nurse practitioners, and that women with advanced degrees earn less than men with only Bachelor’s degrees. Arm yourself with facts this Equal Pay Day. Understand what the numbers mean, speak out in favor of legislative efforts to narrow the gender pay gap, and promote employment policies that help eliminate the gap. Do women really still want to be observing Equal Pay Day in 2058? Jodi Cleesattle serves on the CWL Board of Governors as District 9 Governor, representing San Diego and Imperial counties. She is a Deputy Attorney General in the San Diego office of the Department of Justice, where she works in the Employment and Administrative Mandate Section.


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CWL Affiliates Recognize Equal Pay Day at Events Around State BY JODI CLEESATTLE Equal Pay Day may not exactly be something to celebrate – given that it represents the time it takes for women’s pay to catch up to men’s pay from the previous year – but women’s bar associations around the state are marking the day with programs to raise awareness of the gender pay gap. CWL Affiliate Lawyers Club of San Diego will observe Equal Pay Day with an April 10 luncheon featuring University of San Diego School of Law Professor Orly Lobel, who will discuss “The Future of Pay Equity.” Lobel is the award-winning author of several books and numerous articles, and her expertise includes behavioral law and economics, innovation policy, intellectual property, human capital, the sharing economy and the rise of the digital platform, regulation, and governance. A frequent speaker, she received her doctoral and law degrees from Harvard University, and has taught at Yale Law School, UC San Diego, Tel-Aviv University, and Harvard.

One cause for celebration at Lawyers Club’s 2017 Equal Pay Day Rally was the introduction of the San Diego Equal Pay Ordinance, which the City Council later passed unanimously in July, making San Diego the largest city to enact such an ordinance. The ordinance requires businesses seeking city contracts to offer equal wages for equal work to their workers regardless of gender identity or ethnicity and is intended to complement and ensure compliance with California’s Fair Pay Act. The legislation exempts public works contracts under $500,000 and all contractors with 12 or fewer full-time employees. In nearby Orange County, CWL Affiliate Orange County Women Lawyers Association (OCWLA) is hosting its second annual Equal Pay Day luncheon on April 10, with an inside look at the U.S. Women’s Soccer Team equal pay negotiations.

Whitney Unruh, Senior Director, Global Soccer, at Wasserman Media Group, who was involved in last year’s pay negotiations for the US Women’s Lawyers Club hopes to attract both male and female Soccer Team, will discuss the efforts that went into the negotiation of a historic compensation change attorneys to the program and is making an effort to recruit men as allies in the ongoing efforts to advance for its players, following the filing of an equal pay complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment the interests of women, CWL member and Lawyers Opportunity Commission, the team’s refusal to play Club president Olga Álvarez said. on an uneven field, and a social media campaign “No matter how we slice it, we need male partners waged to raise attention to the issue of fair pay in in this fight,” Álvarez said. “Women make up only sports. Unruh, who represented several of the team’s 34 percent of the bar. Most of our supervisors are players, will take a look back at the deal, the legal male. ...We need men on our side because they’re issues, the use of social media, and the current equal the policy makers; they’re sitting on Capitol Hill. We pay landscape in sports. need them to rise up.” CWL at-large board member Michelle Philo, This is Lawyers Club’s sixth year of celebrating Equal president-elect of OCWLA, said the bar association Pay Day. Most years, the organization has hosted wanted to focus on current events in its observation a luncheon with a focus on gender pay equity, but of Equal Pay Day. Philo initiated OCWLA’s Equal Pay last year, Lawyers Club members rallied in front of Day event last year with a program that explored the federal courthouse in San Diego, where speakers equal pay and how implicit bias affects the wage included two City Council members, the senior vice gap and included analysis of California’s new equal president and legal counsel for Qualcomm, and the pay laws from litigators and in-house counsel. legislative and political engagement manager at Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest.

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Philo said women often don’t realize how pervasive the gender pay gap is.

day more than their male counterparts, according to a 2014 study by Sky Analytics, a legal invoicing “I personally know attorneys who have been affected company that studied invoices from 3,071 law firms – by it,” she said. “The gender pay gap isn’t just about including 73 AmLaw 100 firms – totaling $3.4 billion over three years. salary. You have to consider bonuses and equity shares in law firms or companies. As you get closer The pay gap is even worse for women at the highest to the top, the percentage of women decreases ranks of the legal profession. drastically. That affects women not only in their “Female jurists make only 71.8 cents to the dollar paychecks, but in their retirement and their career of male jurists,” Álvarez said. “You would think that longevity. The pay gap really has a huge impact on once a woman made it to the big time, there would the end game of how women are represented in the be equality, but among big American firms, female legal profession.” partners still make only 56 cents on the dollar to In fact, the legal field sees some of the highest wage gaps not controlled by education or experience, and women are often viewed negatively if they seek higher pay or promotions.

male partners.”

“The problem is that women who ask for raises or promotions are seen as greedy or aggressive or not a team player,” Álvarez said. “Men, on the other hand, are seen as strong, reliable and great negotiators.”

“I would definitely recommend that women’s bar associations adopt Equal Pay Day events because it raises the awareness of the issue, and it provides camaraderie because you start hearing stories from other women in your community,” Philo said. “It opens your eyes to what’s going on out there as well as what remedies can fix it.”

Álvarez said Lawyers Club is organizing a workshop to train women to develop the skill of successfully asking for raises and promotions. But great negotiation skills aren’t always enough. “We can try to help women earn more by having them ask for more, but that information also has to be received,” Álvarez said. “The men who are supervisors have to do away with the double standard. We can’t fight it alone.” Álvarez noted that female law firm associates make only 77 cents to the dollar earned by male associates, even though women bill 24 minutes a

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Philo encouraged women’s bar associations to highlight equal pay issues in an effort to find solutions to the wage gap.

And don’t forget to wear red on Equal Pay Day – to symbolize how far “in the red” women and minorities are with their pay. Jodi Cleesattle serves on the CWL Board of Governors as District 9 Governor, representing San Diego and Imperial counties. She is a Deputy Attorney General in the San Diego office of the Department of Justice, where she works in the Employment and Administrative Mandate Section.


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Five Easy Ways To Recognize Equal Pay Day Looking for a way for your local women’s bar association to recognize Equal Pay Day? Consider these tips from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).

3. Launch an equal pay media blitz.

to support SB 1284, which requires employers of 100 or more people to submit an annual pay data report by gender, race, ethnicity and job category to the Department of Industrial Relations – allowing California agencies to identify patterns of wage discrimination while encouraging employers to analyze their own pay practices. Ask your members of Congress to support federal efforts, or pitch your local government on issuing an ordinance or proclamation to observe Equal Pay Day.

4. Host an issue forum in your community.

Write and submit letters to the editor and op-eds to a variety of publications throughout the state to gain broad coverage on Equal Pay Day. Recruit 1. Urge your elected officials to act on Equal Pay Day. your members and local law students to participate. Consider hosting a get-together for participants to Closing the gender pay gap requires strong, gather to write their letters and op-eds. effective legislation. Urge your state legislators Use Equal Pay Day as an opportunity to host a forum, panel discussion or even just an informal roundtable on fair pay. Speakers can be local lawyers, law professors, business leaders, or elected officials. Partner with diverse organizations to reach more people – and remember, Equal Pay Day comes at different times of year for women of color. 5. Put on a salary negotiation workshop.

Organize a salary negotiation workshop to empower women with the skills and confidence they need to Raise awareness and provoke conversation about successfully negotiate their salary and benefits. Use fair pay with a bake sale or happy hour that charges Equal Pay Day to train women how to attack the men full price while women get a 20 percent discount gender pay gap head on. – 1 percent for each cent of the gender pay gap. Want to learn more about gender pay equity or Even without special pricing, you can use a social need help finding resources for your program? Check event as an opportunity to invite members of the out the toolkits and resources available at AAUW’s public to learn about Equal Pay Day. website HERE, or visit the Gender Equity Task Force of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession HERE. 2. Host an “unequal” bake sale or (un)happy hour.

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CWL Annual Conference Aims to Inspire BY JODI CLEESATTLE Join CWL for a full day of inspiration, networking, and practice and marketing tips, at the 2018 Annual Conference set for May 4 in San Francisco.

The panels and confirmed speakers include: Building Your Professional Brand Online

• Jeannine Yoo Sano, Partner, White & Case, Palo The conference, held at the Hyatt Regency Alto at Embarcadero, has the theme “Inspiration, • Renee Galente, CWL President; Founder of Achievement and Recognition – Rise by Lifting Galente Law APC, San Diego Others” and will feature programs focused on • Moderator: Tracy Hughes, Senior Deputy District building your professional brand, women in the Attorney, Orange County District Attorney’s Office boardroom, general counsel roundtable on how to rise in the ranks, tips and tricks for courtroom success, Women in the Boardroom and the #MeToo movement. • Olga Mack, Start-up Advisor, Organizer & Jessica Rowe, co-chair of the Annual Conference and Curator, TEDx Emerald Glen Park, Former CWL first vice president, was exuberant about the General Counsel of ClearSlide, San Francisco upcoming conference. • Moderator: Suzette Torres, Vice President & “It is not just the future that is female, the now is General Counsel, North American Title Company, female, and this year’s conference is going to knock it Concord out of the park,” Rowe said. “Our line-up of speakers Women Entrepreneurs is diverse, engaging and inspiring. I can’t wait!” • Mujdah Rahim, Founder, Law Office of Mujdah The program begins with a networking breakfast, Rahim, Walnut Creek with a presentation by legal recruiter Liz Stone, founder of Stone Legal Search and chair of the Board of Directors of the American Bar Association Legal Career Central.

• Amanda Riddle, Partner, Corey Luzaich de Ghetaldi Nastari, Millbrae

• Moderator: To be announced Break-out sessions fill out the conference line-up, Tips & Tricks for Courtroom Success (View from the with two tracks and a total of eight sessions. Jan Bench) Kang, Chief Legal Officer for Chronicle, the newest • Speakers to be announced independent company within Google-parent• Moderator: Susan Formaker, Presiding company Alphabet, will give the keynote lunch Administrative Law Judge, Office of Administrative presentation. Kang, who founded the Women’s Hearings, Los Angeles General Counsel Network in 2009, has served as General Counsel for various companies including X, the moonshot factory; Bromium; AOptix Technologies; Cupertino Electric, Inc.; and Asera.

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Women and their Bodies: Current Climate of Sexual Harassment and Policies • Alan Exelrod, Of Counsel, Rudy Exelrod Zieff & Lowe LLP, San Francisco • Melinda Riechert, Partner, Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP, Palo Alto • Moderator: To be announced Women In-House Counsel Institute • Michelle Banks, Senior Advisor & Executive Coach, Barker Gilmore LLC; Former Global General Counsel, Gap, Inc., San Francisco • Additional speakers to be announced • Moderator: Lloyd M. Johnson, Jr., Founder & Executive Director, Women’s In-House Counsel Leadership Institute; Founder, Minority Corporate Counsel Association, Oakland Rainmaking/Networking with a Feminine Twist • Arezou Kohan, Attorney-Mediator and Career Coach, Rolling Hills Estates • Additional speakers to be announced • Moderator: To be announced Getting Involved: State & Local Government as a Passion or Profession • Speakers to be announced • Moderator: To be announced The conference offers a full day of MCLE credits, and an opportunity to reconnect with friends and make new ones. CWL will conclude the conference with a networking cocktail reception honoring Pearl Gondrella Mann, the 2018 winner of the Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award. Mann, who has practiced trusts and estates, probate and elder law for more than 30 years. Mann is a past president of CWL, past president of the Orange County Women Lawyers Association, and past member of the State Bar Board of Trustees. Jodi Cleesattle serves on the CWL Board of Governors as District 9 Governor, representing San Diego and Imperial counties. She is a Deputy Attorney General in the San Diego office of the Department of Justice, where she works in the Employment and Administrative Mandate Section.

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CWL annual

conference

• INSPIRATION • ACHIEVEMENT • • RECOGNITION • RISE BY LIFTING OTHERS •

MAY 4, 2018

The CWL Annual Conference features inspirational speakers and multiple panels of top lawyers and judges addressing timely issues and offers participatory MCLE credits. The Conference is followed by a networking cocktail reception featuring the Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award. This years topics of interests include: Women in the Boardroom, Women Entrepreneurs, Tips and Tricks for Courtroom Success, General Counsel Roundtable: A Discussion with General Counsel About Rising in the Ranks, Current Climate of Sexual Harassment #metoo 2018 CWL Annual Conference: Inspiration, Achievement and Recognition: Rise By Lifting Others Friday, May 4, 2018 | Hyatt Regency San Francisco 7:30AM - 5:00PM 5:30PM - 7:30PM

Gold Sponsors

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Conference Reception featuring the Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award

Silver Sponsors

Bronze Sponsor

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Pearl Gondrella Mann To Be Honored at Annual CWL Conference BY JODI CLEESATTLE CWL will honor past president Pearl Gondrella Mann with the 2018 Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award at its annual conference May 4 in San Francisco.

“I am confident that if you looked up the word ‘volunteer,’ you would find a picture of Pearl Mann,” said Orange County Superior Court Judge Kim Hubbard, who has appointed Mann as guardian ad Mann, a CWL life member who served as president litem in numerous elder and dependent abuse cases from 2005 to 2006 and served on the CWL board with Soley, has a solo practice in Fullerton, where she in Probate Court. “Pearl’s dedication to advancing the cause of justice and making justice available for practices elder law, probate, and estate planning. She founded her practice in 1987, previously focusing all members of our society is legendary. She has fought for the indigent, the homeless, the elderly, and on civil litigation and criminal appeals. the disabled, and her advocacy on their behalf has Mann is well known for her pro bono work on behalf changed many lives.” of victims of elder abuse, her contributions to the Mann has given countless hours to state and local profession through service on bar associations, and bar associations, as well. She served on the State community service activities, and she has a long list Bar Board of Trustees from 2011 to 2014, on the of accolades. CWL Board of Governors from 1999 to 2007, and In 2013, she received the Orange County Bar on the Orange County Women Lawyers Association Association’s Harmon G. Scoville Award for her Board of Directors from 1998 to 2004, serving as commitment and significant contributions to the president in 2003. She has also served on the board OCBA, Orange County legal community, and the and chaired numerous committees and practice constitutional system of justice. She was honored sections of the Orange County Bar Association. as 2010 Attorney of the Year by the Public Law Mann also has been active in her local community, Center, a nonprofit providing free legal services to low income residents and other nonprofits in Orange serving on the board and as co-president of the League of Women Voters of North Orange County, County. That same year, Mann won the Spirit of on the board of trustees of the Fullerton Library, on Volunteerism Award from the Volunteer Center the board of directors of the Fullerton Public Library of Orange County. The Orange County Women Foundation, on the Fullerton Mayor’s Infrastructure Lawyers Association, which nominated Mann for CWL’s Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award, named Advisory Committee, and twice serving as president of her church council. her Attorney of the Year in 2004. In nominating Mann for the Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award, OCWLA president Jaimi Groothuis said Mann stands out for her championing of women.

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“What is particularly noteworthy and is not revealed on paper is Pearl’s advocacy for advancing women in leadership positions,” Groothuis said. “When she served on the State Bar Board of Trustees’ Appointments Committee, she encouraged women lawyers of all experience levels to apply for State Bar committee appointments. At local bar events, she welcomes new members, kindly offers introductions, and encourages involvement with board or committee activities to encourage new women leaders in the pipeline.” The Judith Soley Lawyer as Citizen Award is presented to a nominee who has made a significant contribution to her community, extending beyond the practice of law, to devote time and effort to the public good and values through the tradition of public service and involvement, and who exemplified the values and missions of California Women Lawyers. The award is named after Judith Soley, a longtime CWL board member who was killed by the husband of a client in 2011 and who is remembered for her involvement in her community and in many bar organizations, including being the first female president of the Fresno County Bar Association. “What makes Ms. Mann a particularly outstanding lawyer worthy of this award is her enthusiastic support of women lawyers,” said Karen Goodman, who served as president of CWL from 2007 to 2008

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and also served on the State Bar Board of Trustees with Mann. “She is consistently warm and inclusive to those she has worked with throughout her career. She has been instrumental in the advancement of CWL’s mission. Ms. Mann’s contributions to our community of women lawyers make her an ideal recipient for an award in honor of Ms. Soley.” A native of New Orleans, Mann received her B.S. from Louisiana State University, a Master’s of Library Science from the University of Illinois, a Master’s of Arts from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and her J.D. from Western University College of Law, which honored her with a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2016. Jodi Cleesattle serves on the CWL Board of Governors as District 9 Governor, representing San Diego and Imperial counties. She is a Deputy Attorney General in the San Diego office of the Department of Justice, where she works in the Employment and Administrative Mandate Section.


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Celebrating Women’s History Month Since 1987 March has been recognized as Women’s History Month. It is a time for national recognition and celebration of women’s contributions to history, culture and society. CWL hopes that our members recognize and celebrate these contributions regularly, and that we play a part in that continued recognition. For Women’s History Month 2018, we celebrated by featuring a social media campaign on Facebook with a brief history of special “firsts” in the legal profession. We’ve compiled those vignettes here for you to enjoy. CLARA SHORTRIDGE FOLTZ. Foltz was born in 1849. In 1876 her husband deserted her and their five children. She began studying law in the office of a local judge. She wanted to take the bar, but California law at the time allowed only white males to become members. She authored a state bill which replaced “white male” with “person,” and in September 1878 she passed the examination and was the first woman admitted to the California bar. Foltz had many “firsts” including: the first female clerk for the State Assembly’s Judiciary Committee (1880), the first woman appointed to the State Board of Corrections, the first female licensed Notary Public, the first woman named director of a major bank, the first female deputy district attorney in the United States, and the first woman to run for Governor of California (at the age of 81!!)

in 1914, having already passed the California bar. In law school, she volunteered as a probation officer on the Woman’s Court, a division of the Los Angeles Police Court that dealt with female defendants. In 1917 she became a deputy district attorney. She cofounded the Women Lawyers Club of Los Angeles. In 1924 she was named by county supervisors to the Women’s Court, becoming the first female judge in California above the level of justice of the peace. In 1962, she became a Los Angeles County municipal judge. ANNIE COKER. Annie Virginia Stephens Coker was born in 1903. She attended the University of California at Berkeley and received a bachelor’s degree in science in 1924. Encouraged by her father to attend law school, she enrolled in Boalt School of Law at UC Berkeley and earned a degree in 1929. At that time she was only the second woman to receive a law degree from the school and the first African-American woman to complete the program. Coker passed the California Bar in the same year and became the first African-American female attorney in California. In 1939, she joined the State Office of Legislative Counsel as a junior deputy legislative counsel. She worked her way up to head of the Indexing Section. Coker retired in 1966, after 27 years of distinguished public service. At the time of her retirement, she was recognized as the attorney with the most longevity at the State Office of Legislative Counsel.

CHIYOKO SAKAMOTO. Born in 1912, Chiyoko Sakamoto was the first Japanese-American woman to practice law in California. She graduated from American University after studying for four years JUDGE GEORGIA BULLOCK. at night school while working as a secretary. She passed the California bar exam in 1938. She was Born in 1878, Georgia incarcerated during WWII at the Santa Anita and Bullock worked in a law Granada war relocation camps. When she was firm during the day and released, she returned to Los Angeles and was hired took shorthand and typing classes at night. In 1912 she by African-American attorney Hugh E. Macbeth as his associate. She later opened her own law enrolled in night classes at office in Little Tokyo and was one of the founders the University of Southern of the Japanese-American Bar Association and the California law school. She California Women’s Bar Association. earned her LLB from USC

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EMMA PING LUM. Emma Ping Lum was the first Chinese-American woman to practice law in California and the United States. During World War II, due to her fluency in various Chinese dialects, she served in San Francisco’s Office of Censorship, earning a certificate of merit for her service. As of 1952, she became the first Chinese-American woman to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court. By 1966, she had long established her legal practice at 745 Grant Avenue in San Francisco. Her affiliations included the California State Bar Association, San Francisco Bar Association, the Queen’s Bench, and the Kappa Beta Phi legal sorority. JUDGE VAINO SPENCER. Vaino Spencer was the third black woman admitted to the California State Bar in 1952. She was the first black woman in California appointed to a judgeship when she was appointed as a municipal court judge in Los Angeles in 1961. In 1976 she became a Los Angeles Superior Court Judge. She was appointed to the California Court of Appeal in 1980, the second black woman appointed to that court. That same year, she was named Presiding Judge of the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, Division One. She retired in 2007 as one of the longest-serving judges in California history. Spencer also co-founded the National Association of Women Judges with Hon. Joan Dempsey Klein in 1979, and was a founding member of Black Women Lawyers of Los Angeles in 1975. She died in 2016 at age 96.

MARY OROZCO. Mary Orozco was born to indigent Mexican immigrants. While attending high school, she elected to train as a legal secretary for a law firm. She received an undergraduate degree in psychology from California State University Los Angeles. She worked full time while attending law school and graduated from Loyola Law School in 1961. She was Loyola Law’s first Latina Alumna and the first Latina in California history to pass the state bar exam. In 1962 she became one of the founders of the Mexican-American Bar Association (MABA). She was also a founding member of the Latina Lawyers Bar Association.

JUSTICE ROSE BIRD. Born in 1936, Rose Bird graduated from UC Berkeley School of Law in 1965. She was the first female law clerk in the Supreme Court of Nevada, the first female deputy public defender in Santa Clara County, and the first woman to hold a cabinetlevel job in California (Secretary of Agriculture). She taught at Stanford Law JUDGE ABBY ABINANTI. Born in 1947, Abby Abinanti School from 1966-1974. In 1977, she was appointed grew up on the Yurok Indian Reservation. She graduated from University of New Mexico School of to the Supreme Court of California as Chief Justice. A controversial appointment, Bird was removed from Law and became the first Native American female the Supreme Court of California by voters in 1986. attorney in California in 1974. At the time, there She stood strong for her convictions and continued to was no tribal court for her to work for, so she joined champion the underdog throughout her career. After California Indian Legal Services, a nonprofit law leaving the state Supreme Court, Bird volunteered firm for the state’s tribes and tribal members. She for the East Palo Alto Community Law Project. She developed the first tribal program to help members passed away in 1999 after a long battle with breast clear their criminal records. Since 1990 she has cancer. Bird was a founding mother of CWL, which served as a commissioner for the San Francisco Superior Court. Since 2007, she has served as Chief named its Northern California Judicial Reception award after her, and honors candidates who share Judge of the Yurok Tribal Court. her qualities of excellence as a jurist, longstanding and groundbreaking public service, and serving as an inspiration to women lawyers in California.

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ELEANOR NISPEROS. Eleanor Nisperos attended UC Berkeley School of Law in 1969. She passed the bar in 1972 and became the first Filipino to be hired as a Deputy Attorney General in the California Attorney General’s Office in Sacramento. She later became an Administrative Law Judge and Chief Judge within her department. She is a cofounder of the Filipino Bar Association of Northern California and became its first president. JUDGE FRANCES MUNOZ. The fifth of eleven children, Frances Munoz was the first to graduate from college. After ten years of night school, she received her JD from Southwestern University School of Law. After graduation she worked for the Orange County Public Defender’s Office. She was appointed to the bench in 1978 as the first Mexican-American female judge in California. She has founded several organizations including the Hispanic Education Endowment and the Ralph Luevano Scholarship Foundation.

JUDGE MARY MORGAN. Mary Morgan graduated from New York University School of Law in 1972. From 1981-1993 she served on the San Francisco Municipal Court. In 2003 she was appointed to the San Francisco County Superior Court by Gov. Gray Davis. From 2006- 2010 she presided once a week over the Behavioral Health Court hearing the cases of mentally ill defendants. At the time of her appointment, she was the first openly lesbian judge appointed in California and the United States.

CHIEF JUSTICE TANI CANTIL-SAKAUYE. She received her undergraduate degree from UC Davis, then continued on to UC Davis, Martin Luther King Jr. School of Law, graduating in 1984. She worked as a deputy district attorney for the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office. She was appointed to the Sacramento Municipal Court in 1990, then was elevated to Sacramento County Superior Court in 1997. In 1997 she established the first court in Sacramento dedicated solely to domestic violence issues. In 2005, she was nominated to the Court of JUDGE LILLIAN LIM. Lillian Lim graduated from Appeal, Third Appellate District. She was nominated Western State University College of Law (now by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as Chief Justice in Thomas Jefferson School of Law) in 1977. She was 2010. She is the first Asian-Filipina American and the a California Department of Justice State Prosecutor specializing in fraud cases. When she was appointed second woman to serve as the state’s Chief Justice. to the bench in 1986, she was the first FilipinaJUDGE SHAHLA SABET. Shahla Sabet moved to the American Judge appointed to the bench in the United United States after receiving her bachelor’s degree States. She was a founding officer and member of from the University of Tehran. She then earned a the Asian Pacific Bar Association of California, Pan master’s degree from UCLA in 1972 and a Ph.D. Asian Lawyers of San Diego, and Filipino American from Claremont University in 1977. She earned her Lawyers of San Diego. She is also a past President of JD from Southwestern University School of Law in the California Asian-American Judges Association. 1985, after which she practiced as a Deputy District Attorney. She was appointed to San Bernardino JUDGE PATRICIA YIM COWETT. Patricia Cowett received her undergraduate degree from UC Berkeley County Superior Court in 1993, becoming the first and her law degree from UC Davis. After graduation Iranian-American judge appointed to the Superior Court of the State of California. she worked at the San Diego City Attorney’s Office, then the Department of Transportation and the San Diego Gas and Electric Company. She was appointed to the Municipal Court in 1979 and elevated to the San Diego Superior Court in 1999. She is the first Chinese-American female jurist in California and the United States. She is a founding member of California Women Lawyers, and helped found the National Association of Women Judges. She was the first president of Pan Asian Lawyers of San Diego and is a past president of Lawyers Club of San Diego.

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JUDGE JACQUELINE NGUYEN. Jacqueline Nguyen grew up in South Vietnam, from which she and her family fled in 1975 after the collapse of the government. On arrival in the United States, she and her family spent months living in a refugee camp on Camp Pendleton in San Diego, sharing a single tent with two other families. She received her bachelor’s degree from Occidental College and her J.D. from UCLA. Starting out in private practice, she then transferred to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. She was appointed to the bench of Los Angeles County Superior Court in 2002, the first VietnameseAmerican woman judge in the state. In 2009 she was nominated by President Barack Obama to the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, and in 2011 she was nominated to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. She is the first Asian-American female to serve as a federal appellate judge, the first Vietnamese-American federal judge, and the first Asian-Pacific American female federal judge in California. JUDGE TAMMY CHUNG RYU. She graduated from UC Berkeley and UCLA School of Law. She was a Supervising Deputy Attorney General in the Health, Education and Welfare section of the Attorney General’s Office before being appointed to the Los Angeles County Superior Court in 2002. She was the first Korean-American woman ever to sit on a California court. She is a past president of the Korean-American Bar Association and served on the boards of the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Los Angeles County, the International Association of Korean Lawyers, the Korean-American Family Service Center, and the Korean-American Coalition.

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JUDGE VICTORIA KOLAKOWSKI. Victoria Kolakowski is the first openly transgender person to serve as a trial court judge of general jurisdiction in the United States, the first elected to a judgeship, and the first to serve as any type of judge in California. She graduated from the Paul M. Hebert Law Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1987. Kolakowski began her transition during her last semester at law school and actually had to sue to take the bar exam in Louisiana after coming out as transgender. She was elected to a seat on the Alameda County Superior Court in November 2010, joining the bench in 2011. Prior to being elected to the bench, Kolakowski served as an administrative law judge with the California Public Utilities Commission for four years, held positions with other state agencies, and had a career in private practice as a patent attorney. She was co-chair of the Bay Area Transgender Law Association from 1996-2000. She was president of the International Association of LGBT Judges from 2015-2017. These are only a few of the incredible women who helped pave the way for us and on whose shoulders we stand. Thank you for showing us that we could do anything we put our minds to. #sheroesinaction


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Heather Rosing Elected First President of California Lawyers Association BY JODI CLEESATTLE CWL member Heather Rosing was elected in January as the first president of the recently formed California Lawyers Association (CLA), the nation’s secondlargest professional association for attorneys and the largest voluntary state bar association. Rosing, a shareholder and CFO of Klinedinst P.C., who works in the firm’s San Diego office, will lead CLA, which was formed Jan. 1, following legislation that separated the professional development activities of the State Bar of California into CLA, a private nonprofit entity. CLA has more than 64,000 members, ranking it second in size only to the American Bar Association. CLA is the new home for the 16 State Bar Sections and the California Young Lawyers Association, and it provides continuing legal education programs and supports Sections in their efforts to propose new legislation to help the administration of justice. “With the launch of CLA, we are on an exciting path toward advancing the legal profession in California,” Rosing said. “Our goal is to become an indispensable resource for the legal community, and a tireless advocate for our lawyers and our courts. ”Rosing brings considerable leadership experience to her new post as president of CLA. She currently serves as president of the California Bar Foundation, the state’s largest scholarship resource for diverse law students. She previously served as a member and as vice president on the State Bar Board of Trustees. And, at home in San Diego, Rosing previously served as president of the San Diego County Bar Association and has been active in CWL Affiliate Lawyers Club of San Diego. She said CLA has big plans for its new role as an independent professional association. “We are continuing to do the very strong work of the Sections, which involves a lot of educational programming and advocacy for legislation,” Rosing said. “But now we can do more.”

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She said CLA, as a professional association, can do more now to advocate on behalf of lawyers than when it was part of a state agency. CLA already has taken positions supporting bringing international arbitrations to California and opposing taxes on legal services. “We’re hoping to do more of that thoughtful advocacy,” Rosing said. “We’re really looking to be the voice for the profession statewide in Sacramento.” Rosing said CLA will sponsor the annual meeting previously put on by the State Bar Sections. This year’s annual meeting will be held in San Diego in September, and next year’s annual meeting is set for Monterey. CLA expects to incorporate a Bar Leadership Conference into the 2019 annual meeting, providing high-level training about how to effectively lead bar associations. CLA also is reviving the Solo and Small Firm Summit, an annual program that brings together small firms and solo practitioners for networking and educational programs. Rosing said CLA is developing other projects, including a pro bono initiative that will provide a clearinghouse of pre-vetted pro bono opportunities, and a bar collaboration committee that will focus on ways CLA and local bar associations can work together on educational and networking programs and advocacy. Rosing will serve as president until the close of the 2019 annual meeting. Information about CLA can be found online at www.CALawyers.org. Jodi Cleesattle serves on the CWL Board of Governors as District 9 Governor, representing San Diego and Imperial counties. She is a Deputy Attorney General in the San Diego office of the Department of Justice, where she works in the Employment and Administrative Mandate Section.


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You Can Tame Perfectionism BY KATE MCGUINNESS Incessant perfectionism erodes the confidence of many women lawyers. It causes us to constantly question the quality of our work and gives fuel to our inner critic who’s ready to berate us for our shortcomings. Perfectionism has the potential to become a self-destructive addiction. If that sounds extreme, consider workaholics who put in extravagant hours to produce work satisfying their elevated standards. The price for the drive for perfection is increased depression and anxiety. If you’re ready to break out of this pattern, here are some strategies to tone down perfectionism: 1. Make a list of the benefits and drawbacks of trying to be perfect. Maybe the benefit is the approval of your boss or client. They can count on you to “get it right.”But getting it right may mean pulling an all-nighter or not seeing your kids before they go to bed. 2. Be realistic about the scope and precision requirements of your work. Overkill is the m.o. of a perfectionist. But overdoing a project until it meets elevated standards is unlikely to be a good use of your time. 3. Set realistic time parameters on your projects. If you work on large projects that typically run on for days, break your work into smaller pieces, and set a time budget for each. When the time has expired, move on to something else. Adhering to a time allotment may help you overcome procrastination, which is a typical problem of perfectionists. 4. Keep your eye on the big picture. When you’re agonizing over meeting your elevated standards, ask yourself: • Does meeting that standard really matter? • Will your performance on this project still matter next month? Next year? • What is the worst thing that could happen if you relax your standards? • If the worst thing happens, can you survive it? We perfectionists get shaken by the prospect of “the worst thing happening.” Realize that death and destruction are many steps down theline.

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5. Question your use of time. Ask yourself often, “Is this a valuable use of my time?” If you answer yes, then ask why?If the reason is concern about your self-image and others’ opinions of you, you may be indulging in perfectionism. 6. Lower your standards. That’s a revolutionary concept for a perfectionist, but it may be one that lets you breathe easier. Choose one project, experiment with lowering your standards, and see what happens. Are there any negative consequences? Does your client or your supervisor notice? Did anyone complain? If you can answer no to each of those questions, try lowering your standards again, and consider the results. 7. Do something unfamiliar. Learn something new that carries a risk of failure. I’m not suggesting paragliding, but how about a sketching or ceramics class? Maybe try baking bread, decorating a cake or knitting a stocking cap. Experience failure. You’ll find it’s not the end of the world. Failure may be the avenue to learning and, in all likelihood, it will increase your confidence. That may seem counterintuitive, but your confidence grows because you have learned to cope with your failure. You witness your own resilience. Taking some of these steps to defeat perfection may be difficult and even require courage. Heaven forbid I lower my standards! Indeciding whether to adopt them, remember the words of author Annie Dillard: “How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.” Kate McGuinness is a certified coach and the principal of Empowered Women Coaching. She offers results-oriented coaching programs for those looking to step up to leadership positions, those wanting to improve job performance, and those wanting a new job, a new career or a new way to thrive in today’s demanding workplace. Find her online at www.empoweredwomen.coach.


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So, You Want to Be a Judge, Part 2 Pathways to the State and Federal Bench BY MIKA DOMINGO State and federal judges and attorneys involved in the judicial nomination process shared insights into the path to the bench at CWL’s annual “So, You Want to Be a Judge” program March 9 at the State Capitol in Sacramento. The program, presented in partnership with the Litigation Section of the California Lawyers Association, was the second of a two-part “So, You Want to Be a Judge” program this year. Part 1 was held Jan. 23 in San Francisco and featured a conversation with Josh Groban, Senior Advisor for Appointments to Governor Jerry Brown, and David Fermino, vice chair and incoming chair of the State Bar’s Commission on Judicial Nominees Evaluation, more commonly known as the JNE Commission. Part 2 of the program featured current JNE Commission chair David Fu; David S. Casey, Jr., chair of U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s judicial advisory committee; Venus Johnson, a member of the California Commission on Access to Justice; and five judges – Ninth Circuit Judge Consuelo Callahan; Alameda County Superior Court judges Tara Desautels and Barbara Dickinson; Sacramento County Superior Court Judge Laurie Earl; and Contra Costa County Superior Court Judge Leslie Landau. CWL president Renee Galente gave welcoming remarks, and Gina Boer, co-chair of CWL’s “So, You Want to be a Judge” Committee, emphasized the importance of promoting greater diversity on the bench.

“The governor’s office has a strong interest in ensuring that the California bench reflects the public it serves,” Boer said. “Women make up 50 percent of the population, but only 33 percent of the bench. In addition, the governor supports diversity, which includes the advancement of women in employment. Appointing more women to the bench would be consistent with these principles.” The judges discussed their pathways to the bench, acknowledging challenges they faced as women. “The barrier for women is at the level of their legal career,” said Earl, who joined the Sacramento County Superior Court in 2005. “Women have to work harder at their job as a lawyer.” Landau, who was appointed to the Contra Cost Superior Court in 2003, said implicit bias is prevalent and negatively affects women, even affecting their own confidence in their abilities. “One of the challenges for women is not believing in the strength of their own resume,” Landau said. Callahan, who served as a Stockton Municipal Court Commissioner, San Joaquin County Superior Court judge, and a justice on the California’s Third District Court of Appeal before being appointed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal in 2003, recalled her own early challenges. “I had to start in the trenches,” Callahan said. “I did not have the connections as some might have, so I had to prove my gravitas. I had to establish myself first.” The panelists emphasized the importance of conveying a personal story during the judicial application process, sharing how one’s life has been shaped by adversity and other challenges that have contributed to an applicant’s strength and capacity to serve on the bench.

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The program included an overview of the state and federal nomination processes, as well as panels focusing on “Understanding the Written Application,” “Developing Your Career Towards a Candidacy,” and “The Interview Process.”

He said the JNE Commission interviews individuals listed in the applicant’s judicial application as well as individuals who are not listed, but who can attest to the applicant’s work ethic, temperament, and community involvement.

At the state level, judicial applicants must complete an exhaustive application that is submitted to the Governor’s office. The Governor’s office selects applications to forward to the JNE Commission for further evaluation, and JNE conducts a full written and oral investigation, including collecting written evaluation forms and conducting oral interviews of individuals who can rate the applicant’s suitability for the bench. Upon completion of its investigation, the JNE Commission provides a comprehensive letter to the Governor’s office, rating the applicant as Exceptionally Well Qualified, Well Qualified, Qualified, or Not Qualified. The applicant may then be invited for an interview with the Governor’s office, the last step before potential appointment to the bench.

The process for nomination to the federal bench is somewhat different. Federal judges are nominated by the president and must be approved by the Senate, and each state’s senators typically recommend candidates to the president for nomination to the federal district courts and circuit courts in their state. California’s two senators each have a judicial advisory committee, which operates somewhat like the JNE Commission, conducting a thorough investigation into judicial candidates.

JNE Commission chair David Fu advised applicants to exercise candor in their application. “If there’s something missing, we will find out,” Fu said. JNE’s evaluation process entails considers the applicant’s knowledge, capacity to serve on the bench, and, most importantly, integrity, Fu said.

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CWL first launched the “So, You Want to Be a Judge” program in 1985, focusing on providing information and insight into the judicial application and nomination process and promoting increased diversity on the bench. Mika Domingo co-chairs CWL’s Judicial Evaluation Committee, which evaluates candidates for judicial appointment. She is the founder of M.S. Domingo Law in Walnut Creek, Calif., a firm handling estate planning, probate, business, and civil litigation matters.


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Join CWL for Lobby Day at State Capitol in April BY SABRINA ASHJIAN Have you been looking for ways to make your voice heard? Interested in learning how to best advocate for important causes? Want the opportunity to meet with legislators and share your views?

Come learn the fundamentals of lobbying, learn about some of the legislation on our priority issues, and hear from inspiring individuals including keynote dinner speaker Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson. The CWL invites members to join in participating in Lobby program begins April 25 with afternoon training sessions followed by dinner, and participants will Day, a two-day event in Sacramento in April that spend April 26 meeting with legislators. provides training on legislative advocacy as well as opportunities to meet with representatives. Clicker here for more information or to register. As individuals, CWL members will partner with the National Council of Jewish Women in California (NCJW CA) and A Stronger California coalition for the phenomenal two-day lobby event April 25-26. Participants will advocate for bills that focus on issues of reproductive justice, violence against women, human rights and equality, court funding and access to justice, and economics.

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And stay tuned for information about CWL’s 2018 legislative agenda, which will be determined at our upcoming May 5 meeting. Sabrina Ashjianserves on the CWL Board of Governors as District 5 Governor, representing Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, Monterey, San Benito, San Joaquin, Santa Cruz, Stanislaus and Tulare counties. She is a deputy district attorney in the Consumer Fraud & Environmental Protection Unit at the Fresno County District Attorney’s Office.


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CWL Joins Amicus Briefs Addressing Labor Issues & Reproductive Rights BY ANNA-ROSE MATHIESON AND NICOLE SUGNET CWL’s Board of Governors recently voted to join amicus briefs in two cases pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. CWL joined an amicus brief filed Jan. 19 in Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, Council 31, a case in which the petitioner asks the Supreme Court to overrule its prior precedent validating the “fair share” rule. The fair share rule requires public sector employees who are not members of a union to nevertheless pay union fees to cover the costs of certain benefits they derive from the union’s activities. The amicus brief urged the Court to continue to validate the fair share rule and emphasized how the rule has long benefitted women. The brief was filed on behalf of the National Women’s Law Center, Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, and other amici. The Supreme Court heard argument in the case Feb. 26. CWL joined an amicus brief filed Feb. 27 in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra, a case challenging the disclosures required by California’s Reproductive FACT Act on the ground that they violate the petitioner’s First Amendment free speech rights. The amicus brief explained that the disclosures reasonably require crisis pregnancy centers to make minimal disclosures in order to prevent women from continuing to be mislead about the services such centers provide and to inform women of the low-cost or free family planning services California makes available to them. The brief was filed on behalf of Equal Rights Advocates, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California, and other amici. Argument before the Supreme Court is set for March 20.

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CWL declined to join another brief pending in a state’s high court. CWL’s amicus committee identifies and recommends issues to the CWL Board for potential amicus participation, organizes drafting of amicus briefs by CWL members, reviews requests that CWL sign onto the amicus briefs of others, and makes recommendations to the Board. The committee is co-chaired by Anna-Rose Mathieson, partner and co-manager of the California Appellate Law Group in San Francisco, and Nicole Sugnet, a CWL District 4 Governor and a senior staff attorney at the California Supreme Court. Click here to see all the amicus briefs in which CWL has joined this year.


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Scholarship Applications Are Available! BY CHRISTINE GOODMAN The CWL Foundation Board is proud to announce that the Nancy E. O’Malley Scholarship application is now available online, and applications are due April 18. The scholarship honors CWL past president Nancy E. O’Malley, and $5,000 will be awarded to a law student who is a member of CWL, is currently enrolled in a California-accredited law school, and who demonstrates both financial need a commitment to issues affecting women and children. Last year’s winner was from UC Berkeley School of Law. Applicants must submit the completed application; a resume; certified law school transcript; letter of good standing from their current school; one to three letters of recommendation; and a personal statement addressing their commitment to issues affecting women and/or children, how they will continue that commitment after law school graduation, why they need the scholarship, and how it will benefit them. Scholarship requirements and the online application are at http://www.cwl.org/page/NancyEOMalleySc. Students can apply online, by email, or by regular mail, and applications must be received by April 18. The CWL Foundation established the scholarship in 2016 in honor of Nancy O’Malley, who served as CWL president from 2009-2010. O’Malley is

CWL N E W S L E T T E R

the Alameda County District Attorney and is the first woman to hold that office. She is a nationally recognized expert in issues involving violence against women and persons with disabilities, as well as interpersonal violence including sexual assault, domestic violence, elder and child abuse, stalking, and human exploitation and trafficking. She created the Alameda County Family Justice Center, which brings resources for victims of violence together under one roof and now serves as a model for courts nationwide. She also has implemented criminal justice reforms in Alameda County, including drug courts and diversion programs that are designed to reduce prison incarceration rates. For more details, visit the scholarship page online or contact CWL Foundation President Christine Chambers Goodman at christine.goodman@ pepperdine.edu. Christine Chambers Goodman is president of the CWL Foundation Board and the immediate past president of CWL. She is a Professor of Law at Pepperdine School of Law.


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Why I Support CWL BY HOWARD K. WATKINS I applaud the work of California Women Lawyers in advancing equal opportunity and justice for all, with emphasis on the rights of women. Like Harry Burn (the deciding vote when Tennessee ratified the 19th Amendment), my views on social justice and equality were influenced by my mother, who was active in the Progressive Party in Orange County in the late 1940s.

my first CWL Board meeting. Some of the Board members knew me from my State Bar activities, but a few were kind of wondering who and why was this guy sitting at the Board table. However, any such wonderment seemed to evaporate by lunch time, and I always felt welcomed and treated as an equal. (I contrast this with the experience of the late Fresno attorney, Judy Soley, who was the first woman in Fresno to be

When I entered Hastings College of the Law in 1969, my class had about 10 percent female students. Now, over half of the law school’s students are women. There are many reasons for this, but I believe the work of California Women Lawyers in advancing women in the legal profession is an important one.

admitted to many all men’s groups and was not so warmly received by all their members.)

I was always active in Fresno County Women Lawyers. I joined CWL in the mid-1980s, as I liked what it was doing for women and the law and in helping men understand the sexism in our society and the law. In 1991, I became the FCWL Affiliate Representative on the CWL Board. I remember

I later became the District 5 Governor on the CWL Board and CWL’s first male Life Member. My tenure on the Board ended in 1999, due to work constraints. From its legislative and amicus work, to its “So, You Want to Be a Judge” programs, CWL rightly deserves its high regard in the legal community and beyond. I encourage more male attorneys to join and support this effective and important organization. It is the right thing to do. Who knows – your daughters, granddaughters, and beyond will benefit, too. Howard K. Watkins is a retired Fresno attorney and community photographer who is working on indexing his historic collection of over 300,000 photographs, including 27 years of CWL dinners and events www.watkinsphotoarchive.com.

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Exclusive Member Benefit the CWL Listserv CWL is all about connection, contacts and camaraderie! As the only state-wide bar association dedicated to advancing women in the law and society, we are uniquely situated to connect our members and provide a strong network across a large distance. Our Listserv allows professionals from around the state to network and exchange ideas, make referrals, discuss best practices, survey peers on various issues or get information for appearances, depositions or trial in different locations. CWL will also share job openings and pertinent information it receives with its membership through this Listserv. Our members, minus members of the judiciary, have been opted in to the Listerv. The default setting is that each member will receive a daily digest of emails sent. If you are an active member and are not receiving the digest and want to please let us know! Contact info@ cwl.org.

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2018 CWL Signature Events April 26

WHISKEY & BITES CWL claims a traditionally male drinking experience and pairs it with tasty morsels in this In-House Counsel Community Building event. LINE Hotel, Gramercy Gardens, 3515 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles CA, 90010

May 4 CWL ANNUAL CONFERENCE CWL’s Annual MCLE Conference features inspirational speakers and multiple panels of top lawyers and judges addressing timely issues, a full-day two-track offering of MCLE participatory credit. This year’s keynote speaker is Jan Kang, Chief Legal Officer for Chronicle, the newest independent company within Google-parent-company Alphabet. Hyatt Regency, San Francisco June 7 IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PUZZLE PROGRAM SESSION 1 The four-part Puzzle Program builds relationships in teams of in-house counsel women covering sensitive issues, shared experiences and common goals in a confidential intimate setting. Session 1 features Melinda Riechert, Partner, Employment Group, Morgan Lewis, and Lena Ryan, Associate General Counsel, Labor & Employment, Facebook, discussing “#MeToo: A New Paradigm for Employers.” Mountain View June 22

ELECT TO RUN CWL’s award-winning non-partisan program that seeks to educate and encourage women to run for public office. This year’s keynote speaker is President pro Tempore Toni Atkins. Women’s History Museum of California, San Diego

July 13 NORTHERN CALIFORNIA JUDICIAL RECEPTION CWL will present the Rose Bird Memorial Award to Hon. Claudia Wilken, Senior U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of California. Location TBD July 26

IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PUZZLE PROGRAM SESSION 2 Box, Inc., Redwood City

August 17 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA JUDICIAL RECEPTION CWL will posthumously honor Hon. Beverly Reid O’Connell, who was a U.S. District Judge for the Central District of California, with the Joan Dempsey Klein Distinguished Jurist Award. Location TBD August 23

IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PUZZLE PROGRAM SESSION 3 Concept 190, San Francisco

September 13

CWL ANNUAL DINNER CWL’s Annual Dinner celebrates each step made towards gender equity during the year, honors women in the legal profession, and highlights the achievements of CWL and its members. Past speakers include Sen. Wendy Davis and Janet Napolitano. Mingle with friends and colleagues at the CWL Foundation Silent Auction preceding the dinner to help fund the Nancy E. O’Malley Scholarship, which recognizes a deserving California law student whose prior and current activities and future plans demonstrate a commitment to issues affecting women and/or children in the community. Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina

September 18 IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PUZZLE PROGRAM SESSION 4 Southern California October 5-6 IN-HOUSE COUNSEL PUZZLE PROGRAM RETREAT CWL’s In-House Counsel Puzzle Program culmination, this retreat is invitation-only. Napa/Sonoma

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CALLING ALL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

IN HOUSE COUNSEL! Some women are made of sugar & spice But some are made of whiskey on ice!

Join us for an evening of networking and whiskey tasting with fellow women in house counsel! This event is a wonderful opportunity to meet new and existing members and learn more about CWL’s oneof-a-kind In House Counsel Network. Attendees will learn tasting notes from an expert, followed by an informative legal update from exclusive sponsor Haynes Boone!

APRIL 26, 2018, 6-9 P.M. LINE Hotel, Gramercy Garden 3515 WILSHIRE BLVD LOS ANGELES CA 90010 Attendance is free to IHCN members. $25 for non-members. REGISTER HERE!

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Affiliate Events BLACK WOMEN LAWYERS OF LOS ANGELES

LAWYERS CLUB OF SAN DIEGO

BWL’s Community Action Committee’s “Lawyers in the Library” Clinic April 20, 2018, 12:30 p.m. - 4 p.m. L.A. Law Library 301 W. First Street Los Angeles, California Register at: bme@emgelmanlawfirm.com

Clearing a Path to Freedom for Human Trafficking Survivors through Criminal Vacatur April 3, 2018, 5 p.m. DLA Piper 401 B Street, Suite 1700 San Diego, California Info at: Allison@lawyersclubsandiego.com

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION – WOMEN’S SECTION Annual Wine Tasting and Silent Auction Fundraiser April 19, 2018, 5:15 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Crowne Plaza Concord 45 John Glenn Dr. Concord, California CLICK HERE Happy Hour May 8, 2018 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. MoMo’s Walnut Creek 1444 N. California Blvd Walnut Creek, California For info: Ariel@BrownellLegal.com FRESNO COUNTY WOMEN LAWYERS MCLE Luncheon April 25, 2018, 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. The Palms 7550 N. Palm Ave., #101 Fresno, CA For info: fcwl.vp@gmail.com

Law Student Outreach Committee Speed Mentoring Event April 5, 2018, 5:30 p.m. – 8 p.m. Thomas Jefferson School of Law 1155 Island Ave San Diego, California For info: Allison@lawyersclubsandiego.com The Future of Pay Equity April 10, 2018, 12 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Westin San Diego 400 W. Broadway San Diego, California For info: Allison@lawyersclubsandiego.com MARIN COUNTY WOMEN LAWYERS Check for events here: mcwlawyers.org ORANGE COUNTY WOMEN LAWYERS Equal Pay Day Luncheon April 10, 2018, 11:45 a.m. – 1:15 p.m. Grand Catered Events & The Orange Banquet Center 300 S. Flower St. Orange, California To Register: CLICK HERE Book Club Meeting to review “The Great Alone,” by Kristin Hannah April 30, 2018, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Mimi’s Café 17231 E 17th St. Tustin, California To Register: CLICK HERE QUEEN’S BENCH BAR ASSOCIATION Juvenile Hall Project April 4 and 18, 2018, 7 p.m. Juvenile Justice Center 375 Woodside Ave. San Francisco, California To Register: CLICK HERE

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SAN MATEO COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION WOMEN LAWYERS’ SECTION Book Discussion for “What Works for Women at Work,” by Joan C. Williams April 26, 2018, 12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Crowne Plaza Concord RSVP by April 20 to: jrowe@arcr.com Spring Gala May 10, 2018 More information to come SANTA BARBARA WOMEN LAWYERS

WOMEN LAWYERS OF SACRAMENTO April Luncheon featuring Michael Hunter Schwartz, Dean of the University of Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law April 26, 2018, 12 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. Lucca Restaurant 1615 J St. Sacramento, California For info: Administrative@womenlawyers-sacramento.org WOMEN LAWYERS OF VENTURA To Check For Events, CLICK HERE

Scholarship Luncheon featuring State Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson “Harassment, Hashtags, & Hard Choices: Legislating in the #MeToo Movement” April 6, 2018, 12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. University Club 1332 Santa Barbara St. Santa Barbara, California RSVP to: sbwlfoundation@gmail.com TRUCKEE-TAHOE WOMEN LAWYERS Women in Business Networking event May 23, 2018 For info: peggyheadley@gmail.com WOMEN LAWYERS ASSOCIATION OF LOS ANGELES A Night at the Magic Castle April 11, 2018, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. The Magic Castle 7001 Franklin Ave. Hollywood, California To register: CLICK HERE For info: info@wlala.org WLALA SCGA Golf Club April 15, 2018, 9:30 a.m. Penmar Golf Course 1233 Rose Avenue Venice, California For info: info@wlala.org WOMEN LAWYERS OF ALAMEDA COUNTY 2018 Margaret A. Gannon Legal Education Application Deadline April 10, 2018 For info: CLICK HERE

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Renew Your CWL Membership for 2018! CWL is the only statewide bar association dedicated to the advancement of women in law and in society. Join CWL and make a difference - for yourself and the community. What you can expect with your membership: • CWL statewide network • Leadership training and opportunities • Annual (MCLE) Conference • Legislative advocacy for the advancement of women in law and society • Judicial evaluations • Lifelong friendships • One-of-a-kind award winning programs including So, You Want to be a Judge?, Elect to Run and the In-House Counsel Puzzle Program • Amicus activity

BE A PART OF SOMETHING BIGGER

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CALIFORNIA WOMEN LAWYERS N E W S L E T T E R Thank you to our Annual Sponsors:

Statewide Bronze Sponsor T R I A L

B Y

W O M A N Northern California Gold Sponsor

Southern California Title Sponsor

Annual Newsletter Sponsor

Learn about all of our Annual CWL Sponsorship Opportunities HERE

CWL N E W S L E T T E R

www.cwl.org

CWL Newsletter March-April 2018  

California Women Lawyers promotes the advancement of women in the legal profession and is an active advocate for the concerns of women in so...

CWL Newsletter March-April 2018  

California Women Lawyers promotes the advancement of women in the legal profession and is an active advocate for the concerns of women in so...