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June 2017

what’s new for you... the importance of rancher advocacy water regulation deadline nearing the latest in USDA lending June 2017 California Cattleman 1


THD ©

clM RepReSentativeS Jake Parnell ................................ 916-662-1298 George Gookin ........................ 209-482-1648 Mark Fischer ..............................209-768-6522 Rex Whittle................................ 209-996-6994 Kris Gudel ...................................916-208-7258 Joe Gates ................................... 707-694-3063 Abel Jimenez .............................209-401-2515 Jason Dailey .............................. 916-439-7761

Sale eveRy wedneSday Butcher Cows ........................................ 8:30 a.m. Pairs/Bred Cows ................................ 11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle .............................................12 p.m.

Special Sale Schedule Saturday, june 10

Cattlemen’s Special Feeder Sale, 10 a.m. Brunch, 9 a.m.

WedneSday, june 21

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

WedneSday, july 5 – no Sale Happy Independence Day

WedneSday, july 19

Special Feeder Sale, 12 p.m.

Saturday, july 29

Annual Bred Cow & Pair Sale, 11:30 p.m.

auction MaRket Address .....12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office.............................................209-745-1515 Fax ................................................. 209-745-1582 Website/Market Report ...www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast ...........www.lmaauctions.com

weSteRn video MaRket Call to Consign: July 10-12, Reno, Nevada 2 California Cattleman June 2017

If you can't make the sales, be sure to register and bid live on www.lmaauctions.com


r o f s u n i o J d e t a p i c i t n this a nt! eve MAKE YOUR WAY TO OUR BIGGEST EVENT OF THE YEAR!

THE NUGGET CASINO RESORT, SPARKS, NEV. CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: JUNE 22

bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

June 2017 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

The Power of Positivity by CCA Feeder Council Vice Chair Trevor Freitas Throughout life I have learned that the old adage “the squeaky wheel gets the grease,” more often than not rings true. In so many situations, especially when it comes to important business decisions and the outside influences that come along with running a business in this day and age, I must say some people are much too squeaky for me and it seems no amount of grease will ever suffice. All of this became very apparent during a trip to Washington, D.C., in March with fellow CCA officers and staff as we met with legislators, agency staff and lobbyist from other industries. As we and regulation, I realized how important it was to be there in front of these legislators and staff to help them better understand how issues created from legislation in D.C. directly impact producers on the other side of the country on a day-to-day and often long-term basis. Delivering your message in the allotted 15 or 20 minutes of time you have for some of the meetings seems like a daunting task when there is so much more of our story to tell. I myself enjoy talking to people who aren’t connected to our industry and who haven’t had the opportunity at some point in their life to better understand what those of us in the cattle industry really do, and in some instances, why some of the practices that might often be questioned are done a certain way. I will be the first to admit there have been some tough times when

I’ve been frustrated by a particular issue we are facing in the cattle industry and I have to keep myself from making the mistake of shutting someone out when asking a question no matter how valid that question really was. For the most part what I noticed during most of our meetings was that if you could just answer questions and address legitimate concerns, that in itself could be viewed as a small victory when it comes to telling our story. I obviously can’t guarantee success on every issue we addressed during our time in D.C., but I can only hope we made a positive impact for our industry on everyone that we had the opportunity to meet with. By the time this issue reaches you, the annual CCA Feeder Meeting in San Diego will have already taken place, but I would like to take the opportunity to invite those of you that have never attended to join us at next year’s meeting. I guess I might be a little biased but the feeder meeting in my opinion is one of the best annual CCA events I have had the opportunity of attending. We get a lot of topics covered in detail in just a two-day format and the feeder council has never shied away from addressing the hot topics in our industry. The CCA staff continually make this event a great success and I would like to thank them again for the hard work and dedication to our organization.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917

4 California Cattleman June 2017

Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


JUNE 2017

ON THE COVER

Volume 100, Issue 6 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE CCA always your advocate

6

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 10 More water regulation deadlines on the horizon HERD HEALTH CHECK Busting common mineral myths

20

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD U.S. beef center stage in South Korea

22

FUTURE FOCUS Passion fuels YCC officer team

32

CHIMES 44 Cattlewomen honored for committment to ag, community

SPECIAL FEATURES

Perdue sworn in as USDA Secretary Rancher shares value in speaking up CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting agenda ‘50s and ‘60s brought big changes for CCA CBCIA hosts educational event USDA gives farmers, ranchers lending options

14 16 24 26 28 34

This month’s cover photo was taken by Julie Cano, a member of the Glenn-Colusa CattleWomen’s unit from Williams. Cano’s photo, California Poppies, was a past entry in the CCA & CCW Photo Contest. To learn more about the 2017 contest, see upcoming issues of this publication or contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

UPCOMING CCA MEETINGS AND EVENTS June 21-23

CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting Harris Ranch, Coalinga

Sept. 22 Cattle-PAC Fundraiser Harris Ranch, Coalinga Nov 30-Dec. 2

101th CCA & CCW Convention The Nugget Resort & Casino, Sparks,Nev.

READER SERVICES

Buyers’ Guide 38 Obituaries 44 New Arrivals and Wedding Bells 45 Advertisers Index 46

June 2017 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE ADVOCACY AWARENESS CCA fights for all ranchers, even the “little guy” by CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin As a kid growing up I would always walk to school with my sister, Jennifer. Jennifer has been paralyzed from the waist down since birth and is confined to a wheelchair, so I was always her extra set of hands when she needed help. This was particularly the case when we moved to Atwater in 1991 and found that our short walk to school included a crosswalk with what seemed like the tallest curb in Atwater, but no ramp. All I could do was tilt her back onto her two back wheels and try to safely push her on to the curb. Most days this worked great, but there were the days that I would accidentally dump her on the ground. This was our routine for quite some time until the city of Atwater built a ramp. The city’s action was not coincidence or good fortune on our part; it was the result of my parent’s tireless advocacy on our behalf. The amount of time and effort required on their part to convince the city to build the ramp is proof that without their lobbying efforts there would have been no reason for the city to undertake or prioritize that project. This story and others like it throughout my childhood developed within me a passion for advocacy at an early age. Looking back on it now, I am even more amazed at what my parents accomplished because they were young parents that did not have a lot of money or political connections. They were the epitome of the “little guy.” But they never considered themselves little. What my parent’s showed me is that if you have ideas that are grounded in the truth and you work tirelessly to further those ideas, you can be successful. And 6 California Cattleman June 2017

while we are not guaranteed success, the opportunity for success exists for everyone – even the “little guy.” My passion for advocacy and the opportunity for success is what motivates me at CCA. I know that the tireless efforts of our members, our leadership and our staff are making a real difference and impacting the lives of ranchers throughout the state, big and small. In just the last month, CCA members and staff worked to successfully defeat legislation that would have reinstated the California Estate Tax and limited ranchers’ ability to protect livestock from mountain lions. Our advocacy made a difference for all ranchers. Last year, we successfully fought to exempt pickups and trailers from the Basic Inspection of Terminals (BIT) program administered by California Highway Patrol, which will save ranchers time and money. It’s a small victory that required our collective efforts for over 5 years. It was exhausting at times, but if CCA did not work for this change, it would not have happened. And while it doesn’t solve our industry’s larger transportation issues, it’s a step forward in that fight. CCA also scored a big victory with the defeat of the Grazing Regulatory Action Project, better known as GRAP. The defeat of GRAP can largely be attributed to CCA’s grassroots members showing up to Water Board hearings to express their opposition. Our members didn’t retreat with empty rhetoric, they engaged the Water Board in meaningful discussions. Again, our advocacy efforts made the difference. CCA’s advocacy efforts extend far beyond regulation and legislation.

BILLY GATLIN Thanks to the generous contributions and hard work of CCA members and the tireless efforts of Dr. Jeff Stott, Myra Blanchard and many others, we are on the verge of having a commercially-available vaccine for Foothill Abortion. A vaccine for Foothill Abortion would not exist without the collective advocacy efforts of CCA members. My parents were our heroes when they got that ramp built but the thousands of people that have used that ramp since have no idea what it took to get it built. Similarly, there are thousands of ranchers throughout the state whose lives have been positively impacted by the work of CCA over generations and have no idea what CCA has accomplished. But the great thing about advocacy is that it’s not about the recognition, it’s about making an impact. I am confident that this generation of CCA members and the next will continue to advocate for all of California’s ranchers and make an impact in the lives of our state’s producers. I continue to be honored to be a part of your advocacy team and look forward to advocating with and for all of California’s ranchers.


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

35TH ANNIVERSARY FEEDER SALES

CONTRA COSTA-ALAMEDA & SAN JOAQUIN-STANISLAUS SHOWCASE FEEDER SALES

SAT., JUNE 3 • SAT., JUNE 24 BRUNCH AT 9 A.M. • SALE AT 10 A.M.

SELLING SOME OF THE FINEST CALVES AND YEARLINGS FROM THESE COUNTY ASSOCIATIONS: MERCED-MARIPOSA, SANTA CLARA, NAPA-SOLANO, MADERA, CALAVERAS, TUOLOMNE, FRESNO-KINGS, SAN BENITO AND TAHOE.

CALL US TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CONSIGNING CATTLE TO UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALES!

JOIN US IN COTTONWODD JUNE 8 AND RENO JULY 10, 11 & 12!

FROM THE SIERRAS TO THE SEA, OUR TEAM IS ALWAYS HERE TO ASSIST YOU IN MEETING YOUR BUYING AND SELLING NEEDS! TLAY REPRESENTATIVES

MAX OLVERA................................ 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA ................................ 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES............................... 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI .............................. 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI .................................... 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ ..................................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA......................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT ................. 209 262-4019 TIM SISIL ...................................... 209 631-6054

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE:

209 634-4326 • 209 667-0811 10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 www.turlocklivestock.com

June 2017 California Cattleman 7


CCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Zone 2 - Peach

Zone 1 - Yellow

1

Zone 3 - Light Blue Shasta-Trinity Plumas-Sierra Tehama Butte Glenn-Colusa Yuba-Sutter Tahoe (Placer-Nevada) Yolo

3

2

Humboldt-Del Norte Mendocino-Lake Sonoma-Marin Napa-Solano

Siskiyou Modoc Lassen Fall River-Big Valley

Zone 4 - Pink

San Mateo-San Francisco Santa Cruz Santa Clara Contra Costa-Alameda

Zone 5 - Green

Zone 6 - Purple

Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento Calaveras

Merced-Mariposa Madera Fresno-Kings

San Joaquin-Stanislaus

Tuolumne

Zone 7 - Tan

5 4

Zone 8 - Turquoise Santa Barbara Tulare Kern Inyo-Mono-Alpine High Desert

Monterey San Benito San Luis Obispo

Zone 9 - Orange Southern California San Diego-Imperial Ventura

6 7

CCA committee leadership POLICY COMMITTEES AG & FOOD POLICY Chair: Jack Lavers Vice Chair: Ramsay Wood

CATTLE HEALTH & WELL BEING Chair: Tom Talbot, DVM Vice Chair: A.E. “Bud” Sloan, DVM

8

CATTLE MARKETING Chair: Col. Jake Parnell Vice Chair: Holly Foster

FEDERAL LANDS Chair: Mike Byrne Vice Chair: Buck Parks

9

PROPERTY RIGHTS & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Chair: Adam Kline Vice Chair: Clayton Koopmann

2017 CCA BOARD OF DIRECTORS President Dave Daley

Zone Director 5 Gib Gianandrea

First Vice President Mark Lacey

Zone Director 6 Bob Erickson

Second Vice President Mike Williams

Zone Director 7 Anthony Stornetta

mbw61@aol.com • (805) 823-4245

anthony.stornetta@sbcfire.com • (805) 391-0044

Second Vice President Pat Kirby

Zone Director 8 John Hammond

pat.kirby@algilbert.com • (209) 604-3719

hamdawg66@gmail.com • (559) 623-1538

Second Vice President Mike Miller

Zone Director 9 Bud Sloan

western-beef@juno.com • (408) 929-8425

Asloan5119@aol.com • (805) 340-0693

Treasurer Rob von der Lieth

Feeder Council Member Paul Cameron

ddaley@csuchico.edu • (530) 521-3826 mjlacey@wildblue.net • (760) 784-1309

rvdlieth@aol.com • (916) 769-1153

Feeder Council Chairman Mike Smith

msmith@harrisranch.com • (559) 301-0076

Feeder Council Vice Chair Trevor Freitas

trevor@mendescalfranch.com • (559) 805-5431

Zone Director 1 Ramsey Wood

ramseywood83@gmail.com • (530) 680-8985

cgianandre@aol.com • (209) 256-3782 bobericksonequipment@yahoo.com • (209) 652-3536

Feeder Council Member Jesse Larios

lariosjess1@gmail.com •(760) 455-3888

At Large Appointee Myron Openshaw

openshaw4@gmail.com •(530) 521-0099

At Large Appointee Mark Nelson

kmarknelson@gmail.com •(916) 849-5558

At Large Appointee Rob Frost

Zone Director 3 Wally Roney

At Large Appointee Darrel Sweet

Zone Director 4 Mike Bettencourt

At Large Appointee Jerry Hemsted

bjr@billieweb.com •(530) 519-3608 mbteamroper@aol.com • (209) 499-0794

pcmesquitecattle@sbcglobal.net •(760) 427-6906

Zone Director 2 Hugo Klopper

hugoklopper@frontier.com • (707) 498-7810

CCA affiliate leadership

rbmaf@juno.com •(805) 377-2231 dsweet@cattlemen.net • (209) 601-4074 Jhemsted@att.net • (530) 949-6294

8 California Cattleman June 2017

ALLIED INDUSTRY COUNCIL Chair: Heston Nunes

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVMENT ASSOCIATION President: Cheryl Lafranchi Vice President: Rita McPhee Secretary: Celeste Settrini

YOUNG CATTLEMEN’S COMMITTEE Chair: Rebecca Swanson Vice Chair: Steven Pozzi Secretary: Rebecca Barnett Publicity Chair: Melissa Hardy

For more information about CCA’s Board of Directors or commiittees, please contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.


THINK ABoUT IT .... In what business would you make decisions that will financially impact your family and your business for the next 30 years without having an adequate amount of information? If you haven’t been buying feed efficiency tested bulls you’re doing it in the cattle business! Chances are you’ve only been exposed to half the profit equation, as most bull sellers provide you data reflecting output – but what about the input? Think about it this way – you wouldn’t buy a pickup to pull your trailer that only got 6 miles to the gallon if you could buy one that looked the same, performed the same, cost relatively the same and got 15 miles to the gallon would you? You might be making that type of mistake when you buy bulls!

a b s o lu t e

Powerful sons sell

THE BULL for the Western environment. Bigtime calving ease-to-growth spread, outstanding carcass merit, documented feed efficiency and moderate milk – all in one package.

After a decade of feed efficiency testing every bull we’ve sold at Byrd Cattle Company, we know there can be substantial differences in the amount of feed each bull consumes – even when they’re gaining the same amount of weight. Some of the most popular “mainstream” Angus genetics of today will only convert at 10:1 – meaning they need to consume 40 pounds of feed to gain 4 pounds. BCC genetics will convert substantially better, as we work with a genetic base that includes bulls that have been tested to convert better than 4:1 – or less than 16 pounds of feed needed to gain 4 pounds. That’s a difference that adds up in a hurry when you have a pen lot on feed!

D ec i s i o n

His sons sell

Calving ease in a “game-changing” efficiency package. He has proven to be an elite low intake sire, ranking in the best 1% of all Angus sires. -9.4 RFI and a feed conversion ratio of 3.9 to 1.

44 All In 4405

His first sons sell

This $50,000 sire ranks at the top of the breed for numerous traits. He’s tough to beat for calving ease, marbling, muscle, growth and feed efficiency.

call or email to be added to our mailing list Dan - 530-736-8470 Ty - 530-200-4054 byrdcattleco@hotmail.com

for more on the bulls, visit www.byrdcattleco.com P.o. Box 713, Red Bluff, CA 96080

The largest detriment to profitability for beef producers today is the cost of feed, accounting for almost 70% of the total cost of maintaining a cow. In keeping with our goal of making our customers more profitable, 2017 is our 11th year of testing every Angus bull for Residual Feed Intake (RFI) and in that time we’ve built one of the largest privately-owned databases of efficiency information in America. Today, we have customers with multiple generations of BCC genetics selling more pounds of calf than ever before and doing it with considerably less feed. At BCC, our only business is the purebred cattle business. We concentrate on problem-free, low maintenance cattle that won’t cost money – they’ll make it. Year after year, our customers’ calves top video, auction market and purebred sales from coast to coast and border to border. Our valued customers have access to the network of feeders, marketing cooperatives and other breeders who want cattle with BCC blood behind them. You don’t just buy a bull here – you buy a part of our program – and the added value and buyer confidence we have worked hard to establish for almost 40 years. Again in 2017, we have placed a significant portion of our loyal customers’ calves, and would like to work for you too.

If you’re interested in genetics to make your business sustainable for the future, plan to join us septeMber 1st

17th annual Byrd Cattle Company

‘It’s all about the genetics’ Angus Bull Sale

Friday, September 1 – 3:30 p.m.

At the ranch, los molinos, california 125 ANGUS BULLS SELL! All Bulls Sell Zoetis i50K tested with Residual Feed Intake (RFI), Dry Matter Intake (DMI) and Average Daily Gain (ADG) Data.

THD ©

June 2017 California Cattleman 9


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

MORE WATER DIVERSION REPORTING AND MEASURING REGULATIONS TAKE EFFECT JULY 1 On July 1, several regulatory deadlines will take effect that could impact ranchers who divert water under a water right filed with the state. Under emergency water diversion reporting and measurement regulations adopted by the State Water Resources Control Board in 2016, the following regulatory requirements must be met by July 1: • All water rights holders required to file Statements of Diversion and Use (e.g. those with pre-1914 and riparian rights) must file their 2016 Statements electronically on the Water Board’s electronic Water Rights Information Management System Report Management System (eWRIMS RMS), at https:// rms.waterboards.ca.gov. Because regulations requiring measurement of such diversions were not in effect in 2016, diverters may rely upon reasonable estimations in reporting their diversion and use of water. Failure to file Statements of Diversion and Use by the deadline can result in a $1,000 initial fine upon notice of failure to file by the Water Board and an additional fine of $500 a day thereafter. (Water rights holders filing under another claim of right, such as a registration, certificate, permit or license, were required to report their 2016 water use by April 1.) • All water rights holders with a direct diversion of 100 acre-feet or more per year or a diversion-tostorage of 200 acre-feet or more per year must install a measurement device at their point of diversion or place of use. The measurement device must be capable of recording the rate of diversion on at least a daily basis, and must be certified as accurate to within 10 percent. Additionally, under the regulations, the measuring device will need to be installed and certified by a California-registered Professional Engineer, a person employed and supervised by a Californialicensed Professional Engineer or a California-licensed contractor authorized by the State License Board for well drilling (C-57), limited specialty (C-61) or machinery and pumps (D-21). (Diversions of 1,000 acre-feet per year were to have a measuring device installed by Jan. 1; those with direct diversions smaller

10 California Cattleman June 2017

than 100 acre-feet/year or diversion-to-storage under 200 acre-feet/year have until Jan. 1, 2018 to install measurement devices.) • Those diverters unable to strictly comply with the measurement requirements listed above have the option of seeking regulatory relief, but such a request must also be filed no later than July 1. Requests for extensions of time, alternative compliance plans or measurement methods are available at the eWRIMS RMS website. It is important to note that any proposed alternative compliance plan or measurement method must also be signed off on by a qualified engineer or contractor (though a rancher may submit an extensionof-time request on his or her own). CCA encourages ranchers to work quickly to comply with the July 1 regulatory deadlines. Many who reported their water use by April 1 encountered difficulty obtaining information or assistance from Water Board staff in a timely manner, and the complexity of the reporting and measurement provisions may demand significant time. Additionally, those required to install measurement devices or seeking alternative compliance by July 1 will need to work within the schedules of available engineers and contractors, and will need to allow sufficient time for them to complete their work. Meanwhile, CCA continues to work hard to provide relief for ranchers impacted by the regulations. CCAsponsored legislation, AB 589 (Bigelow), would allow diverters to sidestep the requirement that an engineer install a measurement device and re-certify that device every five years, instead allowing ranchers to take a University of California Cooperative Extension course and self-certify that their measurement device is installed and operating properly. CCA is also pursuing a number of regulatory avenues for relief from the regulations. A robust explanation of the reporting and measurement requirements was previously published in the April 2017 edition of the California Cattleman. For further questions or comments about the regulations, please contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.


Second Annual

Female Sale

>> 2 flushes & 3 pregnancies >> 50 Elite embryos >> 12 spring pairs >> 20 spring bred heifers >> 10 fall bred heifers >> 10 fall bred Cows

s a t u r d ay

june 17 five star land & livest0ck

Wilton, California Watch for Details

This broody, maternal daughter of Waylon sells with a 3-18-2017 heifer calf by Musgrave Aviator and sells bred back to LD Capitialist 316.

five star 1015 lady 5006

Zoetis i50K • DOB: 4-4-2015 • Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34 Dam: Five Star 7089 Lady 1015 • Dam’s Sire: S A V Net Worth 4200 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B -3 +4.2 +59 +95 +21 +1.12 +.60 +47.94 +152.92

THD ©

Selling a Confirmed Heifer Pregnancy sired by the Plattemere Weigh Up K360 out of this powerful dam of Barstow Cash!

barstow queen w16

CED +11

DOB: 2-4-2009 • Sire: S A V Final Answer 0035 Dam: RCA Queen R42 • Dam’s Sire: TC Patriot 337 BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +.9 +51 +100 +26 +.38 +.80 +53.14 +98.01

Selling a flush to the bull of the buyer’s choice on this many-times champion, including Reserve Champion Owned Heifer at the 2017 Western Regional Jr. Show. 5339 is a maternal sister to the Grand Champion Female at the 2016 NJAS and 2017 NWSS.

This two-year-old daughter of VAR Generation 2100, sells with a February heifer calf at side by the $105,000 Midland Bull Test Sale topper – Basin Advance 3134. Don't miss this 3-in-1 package that sells bred back the same way!

Zoetis HD 50K • DOB: 4-7-2015 • Sire: EXAR Classen 1422B Dam: Silveiras Saras Dream 1339 • Dam’s Sire: Silveiras Style 9303 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +8 +2.9 +57 +93 +20 +.32 +.48 +58.02 +112.71

Zoetis HD 50K • DOB: 1-30-2015 • Sire: V A R Generation 2100 Dam: Mission Lady Eraline 2568 • Dam’s Sire: SAV Iron Mountain 8066 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $W $B +11 -.1 +54 +99 +22 +.84 +.94 +48.43 +149.88

silveiras saras dream 5339

sa l e m a n ag e r

matt macfaRLane 916.803.3113 cell

m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com

www.3cattlemarketing.com

auctioneer: Rick machado 805.501.3210

ezar lady eraline 5033

2017 wsaa sale c0mmittee david hoLden ..................... 530.736.0727 jim vietheeR ...................... 916.834.2669 gRaham hoopeR ................. 208.539.1712 BRad cox ............................ 541.840.5797

Watch and Bid Live

June 2017 California Cattleman 11


RaboBank REcaps state of Beef industry in first quarter of 2017 While treading softly, on supply and prices at the moment, driven by tighter-than-expected fed cattle supplies. there are a number of significant uncertainties in the global In Brazil, Rabobank expects a change in the cycle during beef market, which could put future pressure on prices, 2017. A build-up of cattle in the system and increased calf according to the Rabobank Global Beef Quarterly Q1 2017. numbers are leading to a fall in calf prices. With declining calf “The global beef industry faces uncertainties surrounding prices, cow-calf operators will look to reduce cow numbers, US trade policy with key beef export markets, and the risk and as a result, the number of female animals sent for slaughter of avian influenza (AI) outbreaks in the U.S. that could limit is likely to rise in 2017, increasing beef availability. Beef poultry exports, placing pressure on all U.S. protein markets,” supply is expected to grow between 2 percent and 3 percent, says Angus Gidley-Baird, Rabobank Senior Animal Protein compared to 2016. As a result, Brazilian cattle prices are likely Analyst. “Furthermore, the situation following accusations of to decline during 1H 2017. irregularities in meat inspection in Brazil illustrates how sensitive the market is to shocks.” Exports from Brazil in Q1 2017 will be pressured by a Brazilian federal police investigation into irregularities in meat inspection. In response, a number of regions—including Chile, China, Egypt and the EU—placed temporary restrictions on imports of Brazilian meat. One week after the announcements, many restrictions had been lifted, but short term impacts are possible, as a result of trade disruption and short-term loss of consumer confidence. With the Trans-Pacific Partnership all but over, questions remain around the U.S. position in NAFTA and its trade policy with China. Mexico has been preparing for a possible negative • CURRENT LISTINGS • outcome by approaching other • 800+/- pair summer ranch with district water and well water. Two sets of countries—including South American corrals, multiple modest residences, background lot. Siskiyou County. countries and Russia—to enter trade • 168+/- acres near the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevadas in Coleville, CA. Two agreements, and shore up export and residences both right on the Walker River with excellent fishing. Some irrigated import opportunities. pasture with a water diversion at the Walker River, as well as well water. The Rabobank Seven-Nation Beef Index, while moving around, has COMING SOON... bounced around a relatively stable figure • 2,000+ acre winter ranch of 160 since late 2016, indicating some • 1,200+ acre winter ranch degree of stability in the market. • 3,000+ acre winter ranch In other news across the globe, Japan’s beef landscape is slowly • 400+ acre irrigated pasture ranch with permanent planting potential changing. Japan has long been a major player in the global beef trade—over the last 20 years, it has been one of the top three importing countries (by volume) every year. Some subtle changes are Need help repositioning your agricultural assets? influencing the market, and while they We have over 40 years of experience in investment and commercial real estate. Let us are expected to change consumption, help you with your analysis and 1031 Exchange. Services provided include acquisition, overall, Japan is expected to continue disposition, and asset management. to remain a major beef importer. Furthermore, its import requirement is Put cattlemen to work for you! expected to grow. Indicators show the U.S. price RYAN NELSON, AGENT MARK NELSON, BROKER recovery may be short-lived. Since the (916) 804-6861 (916) 849-5558 low experienced in autumn, the U.S. fed BRE 01883050 BRE 00346894 cattle market has recovered 28 percent, with cash cattle in early March trading in a range of USD 124/cwe to USD LEARN MORE AT: WWW.5STARLANDCOMPANY.COM 127/cwe. The recovery has largely been

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL AG REAL ESTATE IN CALIFORNIA?

12 California Cattleman June 2017


SHASTA

LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD

Cottonwood, California

The Spring Run Is On! Friday, June 9 SUMMER KICKOFF & FALL CALVING COW SPECIAL SALE

• 2,500 HEAD FEATURING 300 BRED COWS AND HEIFERS • STAY TUNED TO WWW.SHASTALIVESTOCK.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION!

! y a d i r F y r Sale EveFor Information, Please Call Shasta Livestock (530) 347-3793

June 2017 California Cattleman or visit our website at www.shastalivestock.com

13


PERDUE SWORN IN AS USDA SECRETARY On Monday, April 24, the Senate confirmed former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as secretary of agriculture. Perdue was approved by a vote of 87 to 11. There are many issues facing agriculture that Perdue will need to deal with like a new farm bill, low commodity prices, immigration reform and trade agreements. “From growing up on a farm to being governor of a big agriculture state, he has spent his whole life understanding and solving the challenges our farmers face, and he is going to deliver big results for all Americans who earn their living off the land,” Presidenet Donald Trump said in a statement. Many agriculture lobbying and commodity groups and agriculturefriendly politicians were pleased to see Perdue approved as the leader of the USDA. As secretary, Perdue says he will champion the concerns of farmers, ranchers, foresters and producers, and will work tirelessly to solve the issues facing our farm families. Sen. Pat Roberts, (R-Kan.), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry said he was pleased by the bipartisan effort to confirm the former governor of the Peach State. “I have faith that Governor Perdue will put the needs of farmers and ranchers first, and I know that rural America is thankful to have such a qualified Agriculture Secretary on their side,” said Roberts in remarks to the Senate. Roberts also noted six former secretaries of agirculture representing presidents from both parties voiced 14 California Cattleman June 2017

support for Perdue, along with 700 agriculture and food industry groups. “Decisions made every day at the USDA have a significant impact on our ability to run our operations. We are excited to have a Secretary that comes from the industry, understands the complexities of our business and is willing to stand up and fight for the hard-working men and women in rural America. We are looking forward to working with Secretary Perdue in his new role leading the Department of Agriculture,” said Craig Uden, Nebraska cattle producer and president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “Today is a great day for American agriculture. Secretary Perdue is a strong friend of America’s farmers and ranchers, and I know he will work to ensure that agriculture is a top priority in the new Administration,” said House Agriculture Committee Chairman K. Michael Conaway (R-Texas). “Sonny Perdue is the kind of leader the pork industry, and the entire livestock industry, needs at the U.S. Department of Agriculture,” said National Pork Producers Council president Ken Maschhoff, a pork producer from Carlyle, Ill. “He’ll be very good for America’s farmers and ranchers.” “During the hearings, Secretary Perdue committed himself to working diligently with the Trump administration and the agricultural industry to ensure preservation of current trade benefits and creation of new trade opportunities in key agricultural markets,” says the American Feed Industry Association.

USDA SECRETARY SONNY PERDUE According to the USDA, Perdue’s policies as U.S. Secretary of Agriculture will be guided by four principles which will inform his decisions. “First, he will maximize the ability of the men and women of America’s agriculture and agribusiness sector to create jobs, to produce and sell the foods and fiber that feed and clothe the world and to reap the earned reward of their labor. Second, he will prioritize customer service every day for American taxpayers and consumers. Third, as Americans expect a safe and secure food supply, USDA will continue to serve in the critical role of ensuring the food we put on the table to feed our families meets the strict safety standards we’ve established. And fourth, Perdue will always remember that America’s agricultural bounty comes directly from the land,” a USDA press release said. Perdue was the second to last Cabinet position to be filled in the Trump administration. Alex Acosta is the final Cabinet nominee to be approved as secretary of labor.


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LAVERS RANCH The Legacy of a Strong Voice by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead

T

he cattle ranching history of the Lavers family dates back to 1858 when David Lavers purchased a squatters right to a ranch in Glenville. But the family’s journey there began when David was 14 in 1831. The journey began from Nova Scotia, Canada, by way of Rainham, Mass., and around Chile’s Cape Horn to San Francisco with several years and many journeys in between. Today, the ranch headquarters sits at 3,000 feet in elevation and is owned and operated by Jack Lavers, Glennville, the sixth generation to live and work on the ranch, raising the seventh with his wife, Jenny. The cowcalf operation is made up of predominately Red Angus cattle and gradually evolved from the ranch’s original Hereford and Shorthorn herd, and Lavers raises registered American Quarter Horses on the ranch, as well. Lavers looks back fondly on the memories spending time with his dad, also named David Lavers, Glennville, on the ranch as a kid when he was working cattle or buying horses. Working together with his dad as a young boy on the ranch instilled in Lavers a kind of work ethic he says you can’t get anywhere else except when growing up on a ranch. “Working on the ranch with my dad, he would always point something out like a spring and explain everything to me,” Lavers said. He tries to accomplish the same when his 5-yearold daughter, Reagan, and he are out on the ranch together. Lavers has served in leadership positions since he was a kid, which largely began when he served as his junior high school’s class president. He attributes his drive to lead to the encouragement his mom and dad gave him at a young age. Because of their encouragement, too, public speaking comes almost as a second nature to Lavers, and it is something he says he practices regularly. Now he can be heard on national radio programs and takes opportunities to keynote various meetings and events, like the Kern County Young

Republicans and the Frontier High School Business Fair. As Lavers began serving in his local cattlemen’s group, the Kern County Cattlemen’s Association (KCCA), his dad wanted him to become a member of the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) to become involved at the state level as well, like his dad, his grandfather and greatgrandfather did before him. Lavers served as KCCA vice president, KCCA president, CCA second vice president and is currently a KCCA director and on the CCA Executive Committee. Lavers follows in the footsteps of a long line of leadership in KCCA as his father, grandfather and greatgrandfather all served as KCCA president and on the KCCA board of directors and were honored as KCCA Cattleman of the Year; something Lavers hopes to be honored with as well someday. His father has influenced him the most in his ranching endeavors. David Lavers learned how to become a good horseman from his grandfather and took over Lavers Ranch when he was just 16, after his father passed away. Lavers says when he was a kid, if a neighbor needed help, his dad would drop anything to lend a hand. “Some days after school, he had my horse saddled and said, ‘We’ve got to – Jack Lavers go!’ and made me change quickly to go help a neighbor,” Lavers said. “Then, we would get up early the next day to do the work we missed on our own ranch the day before. Because he went to help other people. I strive to do things like he does.” Not uncommon within in the American ranching community, Lavers believes that U.S. cattle ranchers are in the greatest industry in the world. He said he remembers fellow Kern County cattleman Bill Rankin, Caliente, once saying, “I’ve never had to work a day in my life.” “Even when things seem bad and nothing goes right, it’s still a blessed life to live on a working cattle ranch,” Lavers said. “Everyone wants to know something about it, and I enjoy being able to share my knowledge with others and

“Keeping the beef industry alive is the challenge for us now. The challenge for my daughter’s future is whether or not I can make it now.”

16 California Cattleman June 2017


never stop learning myself.” Lavers says being able to keep learning is a key factor in advocating. As a member of CCA and KCCA, in addition to being heavily involved in politics, all beef industry issues are extremely important to Lavers, he says, especially when the beef cattle industry seems to be under constant assault in California. There are no issues that can be singled out, Lavers says, but they come up often and ranchers have to be ready. Lavers first got into radio as one of his favorite forms of advocating when he did a couple of promotions for a KCCA fundraiser and people told him he had a voice for radio after he emceed a few cattle events. He was asked to do an interview on a talk radio show and the opportunities grew from there. He was called on to guest host when one radio personality was out sick, and the producers liked him enough to ask him back. The rest, as they say, is history. Lavers says excitement is what draws people in to advocacy efforts. He recalls in junior college as part of the agriculture ambassadors, his club participated in an agriculture day for kids in the city. The auditorium was kind of quiet, and he could tell the kids weren’t interested, so he got louder and created some buzz to entice the kids to come by their booth and play their match the pizza ingredient to the animal it came from game. Soon, their excitement grew, and everyone wanted to see what was going on. Lavers says if you’re excited about what you do, generally speaking the people around you are going to be excited too. “Ranchers want to be intelligent and accurate, but sometimes we are too professional, and we become boring and lose audience members,” Lavers said. “Bringing energy to our industry is the next level of advocacy we need to engage with consumers.” Advocating now, for the next generation, is near and dear to Lavers’ heart. Lavers’ daughter has a pony and already loves her dad’s horses, and she wants to be a cowgirl. Lavers says she’s not old enough yet to really help out, but at brandings, she plays with her friends in the outdoors, and she’s getting more involved by helping feed horses and other chores, too. Children who grow up on ranches are fortunate, Lavers says, because they have room to explore and learn by doing what a lot of kids who grow up in the city don’t. Looking ahead, Lavers says urban encroachment is what worries him most for his daughter’s future in the beef industry. “Keeping the beef industry alive is the challenge for us now,” Lavers said. “The challenge for her future is whether or not I can make it now.” That’s why he is involved in the fight against putting ranchers out of business. Lavers says it’s up to his generation and the next to shape what is going to happen to the cattle industry. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

June 2017 California Cattleman 17


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 While Lavers encourages ranchers to bring a level of energy that entices consumers to want to learn about cattle ranching, he cautions folks just starting out to prepare for the days when there are no wild flowers or rain. Lavers says you have to be ready for the challenge. “When I had a new idea for our operation, my dad always told me, ‘Show me where you make a profit, and I’ll do it,’” Lavers said. Because he says treating the ranch like a business is key. Because it is a business first.” Lavers loves carrying on his family’s ranching heritage. He enjoys waking up to see the sunrise from his porch, take his daughter to school just a mile up the road, and then having the ability to jump on a horse to fix fence, trim trails or work cattle. “Ranching is a fulfilling job to have,” Lavers said. “I’m a steward of the land that God has graced me with, that I get to give to my daughter someday. We are a part of the beef industry and work hard to perfect our craft, and we are truly fortunate in that sense.” This CCA member profile and more than 100 others can be found in CCA’s commemorative coffee table book, Since 1917—A Century of Family Legacies in the California Cattlemen’s Association. To get your copy of this limited edition book, contact the California Cattlemen’s Association at (916) 444-0845. Cowboy • Rancher • Team Roper • Physician and Surgeon

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HERD HEALTH CHECK

MINERAL MYTHS

debunking reasons for not supplementing herds from Purina Animal Nutrition “It’s too costly.” “My cows won’t eat it.” “We don’t need it where I live.” These are just a few of the common objections to providing cattle with mineral supplementation. But are these objections fact, fiction or somewhere in between? Is a misconception holding your cattle back from unrealized potential? “By skipping mineral supplementation, you may be skipping out on performance and profit potential,” says Kent Tjardes, Ph.D. and cattle consultant with Purina Animal Nutrition. “Minerals are vital to cattle productivity, so it’s important to have the facts straight.” Here are four common mineral misconceptions debunked: Myth: Mineral costs too much “We often focus on the cost of feeding a free-choice mineral supplement,” says Tjardes. “But we should also figure out the cost of not feeding mineral because the impact on cattle performance can quickly stack up.” Research shows that providing cattle with an organic trace mineral source can lead to cows that breed back sooner, have higher conception rates, have enhanced reproductive performance early in the breeding season, improved calf average daily gain and reduced disease incidence in calves. “An investment in mineral is an investment in the performance of your herd,” adds Tjardes. Myth: My cows won’t eat mineral, or they eat too much mineral Some mineral products can taste metallic and bitter due to ingredients such as phosphorus or magnesium oxide. If those flavors are left unmasked, cows may under-consume mineral. On the other hand, overconsumption can occur when a mineral isn’t well-balanced. One example is a phosphorus imbalance. Because phosphorus is an expensive mineral ingredient, it’s common to see minerals with a lower phosphorus level. However, cows crave phosphorus and will

20 California Cattleman June 2017

overconsume it until they are satisfied. “A palatable, balanced mineral can help cattle consume at target intake levels,” says Tjardes. “Finding the right mineral can take a small time investment, but one that’s worth it.” You can also control mineral consumption through management. If cattle are under-consuming, place mineral feeders or tubs closer to loafing areas and water sources. If cattle are overconsuming, move mineral sources further away from these areas. Myth: My herd is too small or large to control intake Small herds often mean smaller, confined pastures. In these situations, cattle may eat mineral out of boredom and could overconsume. It can be helpful to evaluate different mineral forms. For instance, you may look at using a cooked tub mineral instead of a loose mineral to help control intake. Large herds often mean more spacious pastures. If pastures are too large and mineral sources are limited, cattle may not encounter mineral sources on a regular basis. It’s important to use the appropriate number of mineral feeders for the number of cattle. One feeder for every 20 to 30 head is ideal. Myth: We don’t need mineral in our area “You might think you don’t need mineral because you have great grass quality. Remember grass quality can change drastically from month-to-month and year-to-year,” says Tjardes. As grass dries down, mineral levels can shift dramatically. Grass also becomes higher in lignin as it dries down, and mineral availability decreases. “It’s also important to remember that a forage test showing you’re meeting basic mineral recommendations does not mean you’re meeting cattle mineral requirements,” says Tjardes. “Recommendations and requirements are two different things.”


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BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD

EVENT SHOWCASES U.S. BEEF’S SUCCESS IN RED-HOT KOREAN MARKET from the U.S. Meat Export Federation the challenge of rebuilding distribution in foodservice and Celebrating U.S. beef ’s growth and success in South retail channels. Yang noted that the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Korea while also recognizing the many partners that have Agreement has helped to lower barriers, but U.S. beef ’s helped the United States become the top beef exporter to market share achievements would not have been possible that country, the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) recently hosted a “World Class U.S. Meat Appreciation without a significant industry commitment to an aggressive Event” in Seoul. More than 250 importers, distributors, marketing strategy. retailers, packers and foodservice operators attended the “U.S. beef now has momentum across all sectors, celebration, which was funded by the USDA Market Access with expansion in the range of items moving through the Program (MAP) and the Beef Checkoff Program. channels, as well as an increasing number of end users in According to USDA data released less than a week the retail and foodservice sectors,” said Yang. “USMEF’s before the event, U.S. beef accounted for 49.4 percent of educational efforts have been extremely effective in changing Korea’s imported beef market in January and February, consumer perceptions, which was needed in order to achieve outperforming Australia (41.1 percent). The initial overtaking sales growth.” Yang noted Costco Korea’s recent decision to of Australian beef actually happened in October 2016 – convert its imported chilled beef selection from Australian capping an impressive comeback from the BSE case of 2003, beef to 100 percent U.S. product. The move follows a multiwhen U.S. beef lost access to the Korean market. year effort by USMEF to assure the chain’s executives and “The purpose of bringing everyone together in Seoul was store managers that sales of U.S. beef would match or exceed not only to celebrate the market share milestone, but also to Australian beef sales. share a vision with Korean meat trade stakeholders of deeper Yang also pointed out USMEF’s role in leading new cooperation in the future,” said Joel Haggard, USMEF senior food and meat trends in Korea, including the introduction vice president for the Asia Pacific region. of concepts such as dry aging, American steak, American The event started with a commemoration video barbecue and gourmet burgers. highlighting USMEF’s marketing activities in Korea, along Last year U.S. beef exports to Korea exceeded $1 billion with a brief history of USMEF’s efforts and strategy to for the first time. Through the first two months of 2017, rebuild the image and sales of U.S. beef after regaining exports to Korea were up 23 percent year-over-year in market access in June 2008. volume (28,287 metric tons) and 31 percent in value ($177.6 USMEF President and CEO Philip Seng shared his million). Exports of higher-value chilled beef nearly doubled appreciation for the efforts of U.S. packer representatives in last year’s pace, increasing 95 percent to 5,384 metric tons. Korea. Their strong contributions helped maintain trade relationships in Korea despite stiff challenges and secured the largest share of Korea’s imported beef market. “The growth of U.S. beef in Korea has been made possible because of the long-term relationships that were built over decades, and because of the passion and commitment of our Korean partners,” said Seng. Marc Knapper, chargé d’affaires in the U.S. Embassy in South Korea, made a congratulatory speech, noting the value of U.S.-Korea trade and the contribution of U.S. red meat exports. USMEFKorea Director Jihae Yang recited a narrative of the past, present and future of U.S. red meat in Korea, sharing how consumers and the marketplace have changed since 2003. U.S. beef, which captured nearly 70 percent of the imported beef market in 2001, was banned in December 2003 due to the first U.S. BSE case. After a struggle to regain access, consumer sentiment toward U.S. beef improved Left to right: U.S. Agricultural Counselor Ross Kraemer; Marc Knapper, and trade volumes slowly but steadily increased. chargé d’affaires of the U.S. Embassy in South Korea; Jihae Yang, USMEFUSMEF marketing programs addressed both Korea director; Philip Seng, USMEF president and CEO; Joel Haggard, consumer apprehension about U.S. beef safety and USMEF senior vice president for the Asia Pacific. 22 California Cattleman June 2017


Surviving Drought Risk Management Workshop Series hosted by the California Cattlemen’s Association United States National Institute Department of Food of Agriculture and Agriculture This material is based upon work supported by USDA/NIFA under Award Number 2012-49200-20030.

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June 2017 California Cattleman 25


1957-1967 IMPROVING A WAY OF LIFE

Cattlemen play defense to combat big change by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen

T

he 1950s and 1960s began a defensive era for beef producers in California. Not only were ranchers concerned that Americans were serving chicken at the dinner table more frequently, they were also taking note of the mass influx of people looking to make a home in California. With chicken consumption on the rise, cattlemen quickly put plans into action to ensure their product was better than ever. Cattle feeding was already making great strides. With ration formulation came greater efficiency and a bettertasting product. A big part of that equation was also genetics, which were become a bigger part of the key to consistency. As the number of feedlots increased in the 1950s and the scale of feeding enlarged in the 1960s, California’s Imperial Valley became a leading center of the feedlot industry in the United States. The capacity of feedlots for beef cattle was over 20,000 head and finished cattle were shipped to the beef packing companies in Los Angeles. As evidenced throughout the 20th Century, cattlemen in California paved the way for producers across the 26 California Cattleman June 2017

country in many regards. The California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) officially got its start in 1959 as the educational arm of the California Cattlemen’s Association. Like any organization, CBCIA didn’t come to fruition over night, but rather was the direct result of out-of-the-box thinking by beef producers who saw a need to help other producers improve their livelihood. Folks like Shasta County beef producers John and Mary Crowe and Tehama County Angus breeder Bill Borror, all of whom found great value in production recordkeeping within their own respective herds long before most other cattlemen or women saw the need, were among the early innovators of CBCIA, which has gone on to help countless ranchers view genetics and recordkeeping in a whole new light. While CBCIA started in 1959 as a partnership between CCA members and animal science professionals at the University of California, Davis, the national Beef Improvement Federation didn’t actually organize until 1966, again demonstrating the revolutionary minds within the California beef industry. As more and more people world

wide sought the beaches of sunny California, the population skyrocketed. The population of California more than doubled in the mid-century; from only 6.9 million residents in 1940 to 15.7 million in 1960. All this for good reason of course. The weather was great. The economy was exceptional. And the cost of land was affordable – for the time being. It wasn’t long before longtime residents of California realized what was happening to their land values, and subsequently, their property taxes. This was especially evident to those who made their living off the land. Farmers and ranchers quickly noticed the impact that the booming population was having on their bank account and knew that if the trend continued, paying their property taxes was going to be difficult. Thankfully, a rural assemblyman by the name of John Williamson came to the aid of farmers and ranchers. In 1965, an interim committee of the California Assembly generated Assembly Bill 2117, authored by Williamson, who was from cattlecentric Kern County. AB 2117 is a bill that, to date, has impacted cattlemen who own private property in California perhaps more than any other piece of legislation. The original purpose of the


Williamson Act, also known as the Land Conservation Act of 1965, was to counteract the tax laws that often led to the conversion of agricultural land to urban uses. If you were being taxed at urban rates, you might as well sell to urban developers. The Williamson Act enabled local governments to enter into contracts with private landowners for the purpose of restricting specific parcels of land to agricultural or related open space use. In return, landowners would receive property tax assessments which were much lower than normal because they were based upon farming and open space uses as opposed to full market value. The benefits of the legislation was multi-faceted. Not only did it help farmers and ranchers, who didn’t make a lot of money as it was, afford their property taxes, the program would also ensure that California’s open rangeland would continue to provide the scenic vistas that drew so many people to the Golden State to begin with. Early on, proponents of the legislation felt that contractual restrictions on development would cause property tax assessments to begin leveling off. In practice, however, landowners, assessors and local governments seemed unconvinced that the restrictive contracts could provide a basis for lower tax assessments. In the two years following passage of the Williamson Act, only 200,000 acres were enrolled under contract in six counties. According to the California Department of Conservation, the program might have remained small if not for the addition of Article 28 (now part of Article 13) to the state’s Constitution. Article 13 declares the interest of the state in preserving openspace land and provides a constitutional basis for valuing property according to its actual use. The amendment

had originated with groups interested in the preservation of open-space land. Interestingly enough, farming and ranching interests were not immediately on board with the Williamson Act legislation. Agricultural interests added their support after recognizing the importance of a constitutional backing for preferential tax assessments. State funding for the program was provided in 1971 by the Open Space Subvention Act, which created a formula for allocating annual payments to local governments based on acreage enrolled in the Williamson Act Program. In all, about 16 million privatelyowned acres have been enrolled in the Williamson Act, about 30 percent of the total privately-owned acreage in the state. Less than $40 million annually is required for the program to be fullyfunded. Unfortunately those who originally planned the program and saw it into implementation likely did not have the foresight to predict what the economic climate of the early 21st century had in store. As ranchers today know, the Williamson Act, though still one of the most vital programs California ranchers utilize, has seen more than its share of

near-death experiences. In 2009, during a budget crisis, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger pulled the plug on the subvention funding for the Williamson Act, leaving only $1,000 in the subvention account. This move left local governments on their own to honor any Williamson Act contracts. Today, while the Williamson Act is not fully funded, some funding has been restored, allowing cattlemen in many counties to still benefit from the forward-thinking of mid-century agriculture supporters and lawmakers who had the long-term success of California in mind. As CCA members and leadership recognized the challenges that lied ahead for the 50-year-old association, 1967 would mark the year that CCA would officially make its permanent move from San Francisco to Sacramento. From that point forward, the association would be poised to not just play defense but also get in a scoring position on the issues that would face ranchers over the next 50 years. EDITOR’S NOTE: As the California Cattlemen’s Association celebrates its centennial year in 2017, this article is part of a year-long series addressing each of CCA’s 10 decades.

UC Davis’ Vard Shepard, one of the very first CBCIA advisors, grading cattle at Crowe Hereford Ranch in the 1950s. June 2017 California Cattleman 27


ALWAYS LEARNING CBCIA South Valley Beef Conference by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead Hosted by the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA), in conjunction with Fresno State Animal Sciences Department, UC Cooperative Extension and the Fresno-Kings County Cattlemen’s Association, the 2017 Southern Valley Beef Conference in mid-May in Fresno provided useful education and a unique opportunity for ranchers to join together and learn from a plethora of industry professionals. The conference began Friday morning with a tour hosted by the Fresno State Young Cattlemen’s Association. Fellow Young Cattlemen Committee members from across the state and local ranchers loaded up into three vans and headed for the first stop of the morning: Cargill Beef ’s Fresno facility. The group enjoyed a tour of the facility, which harvests mostly cull dairy cattle in the valley, grinding nearly 80 percent of their product for ground beef. The plant harvests about 1,500 head per day, five days per week and has a separate grinding facility where they produce ground beef patties for McDonald’s in the Western United States. The plant employs approximately 1,000 people and calls them stakeholders to encourage a cohesive and cooperative work environment. The speed and accuracy with which they work is fascinating to watch as they offer a smile to members of the tour as they pass by. The next stop was 3H Cattle Company, where Bob Hansen shared a bit about his experience in the cattle feeding industry. There he explained that he has done a little bit of everything on his yard, including but not limited to a brief stint with some rodeo bucking bulls and some Mexican fighting bulls. Something he joked was probably a one and done type of deal. The group also got to take a look inside the “micro room” where the key component of the nutrition division of his operation is kept and managed. On the other side of the road, Hansen showed the group his processing chute, which has a remote controlled aspect that can allow three people to easily work a pen or load of cattle efficiently and quietly. To finish out the day, the group visited Boston Ranch in Exeter and met with Marty Williamson. After leading the group to a pasture with corrals and cattle off in the distance, the students and guests exited the vans to ask Williamson questions. One student asked about troublesome predators on the ranch. Williamson said that wild pigs, mountain lions and even bears roam the ranch, and of course, the rattlesnake population which seems to depend on the weather. Randy Perry, Ph.D., beef cattle professor at Fresno State and CBCIA advisor, opened the next morning’s educational session by welcoming everyone to the event. 28 California Cattleman June 2017

To start the morning, Burke Teichert of Teichert Management and Consulting from Orem, Utah shared his years of industry knowledge in his talk about profitable ranching. Pulling from his many winning experiences managing ranches like the Deseret Ranches, he said the main challenge in successfully running a ranch stems from dually attempting to balance a family relationship and a business relationship with the same people. Referring to Steven Covey’s quote about listening first to understand and then to respond, Teichert said there are many ways to work together to run a profitable ranch. Some of his recommendations include the more obvious tactics like reducing overhead and marketing well to increase profit, but he says improving three ratios can ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

Burke Teichert talked about profitable ranching.

Beef industry legend Bill Borror shared his experience in the Angus breed.

Col. John Rodgers, Western Video Market; Col. Dennis Metzger, Superior Livsetock; and Dave Thompson, Cargill Beef Solutions, all shared industry insight during a panel discussion.


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programs they are familiar with and specialize in. Other topics were touched on like trade, cattle health and how the format of a video sale works for the students who might have been unfamiliar with it in the room, especially the concept of a slide and what it does. Some audience members had specific questions for specific panelists, and the topic of the largest challenge in the beef industry came up. The answer was unanimous: consumer consumption of beef. “It only takes one bad experience to make a consumer leave beef behind,” Thompson said. “So, we’ve got to make sure their experience is great, every time.” As the afternoon wrapped up, folks said their goodbyes and headed back home with new inspiration and new information to utilize on their own ranches.

help you stay profitable quicker: acres/cow, cows/man and fed feed/grazed feed. “If I put a machine between the feed source and the cow’s mouth, I’ve just cost myself money,” Teichert said. He recommended working to get the most out of grazing land utilizing proper rotational grazing methods if feasible. Teichert encouraged a systems thinking approach when evaluating improvements to be made on the ranch and suggests working to improve the batting average, so to speak. “Ask yourself, ‘How can I make good decisions better?” Teichert said. “Strive for continuous improvement of key resources like land, livestock and people and you’ll be well on your way to profitable ranching.” Bill Borror, Tehama Angus Ranch, Gerber. took the group on a history lesson throughout the evolution of the Angus cattle breed, drawing on his 70 years of experience breeding Angus cattle. At the age of 10, he bought his first cow for $175 and credits most of the lessons he’s learned in cattle breeding to that one cow. He ran into a couple of problems like low milk and a lost calf with his first two cows After that his dad patted him on the shoulder and told him, “Son, now you’re in the cattle business.” So from then on, he carved his own path. As he navigated his way into the beef industry, he became extremely interested in the data cattle had to offer and worked with CBCIA in its early years to compile carcass data on his animals. In fact, years later, Borror began collecting his own key data beneficial to breeding, on a computer program and is said to have inspired and encouraged the American Angus Association to produce daily data; now immediately available on the Internet at the click of a button. A trendsetter of sorts, Borror has never been afraid to try new things. For example, he addressed various issues head on by breeding low birth weight bulls before it had been done. He even sold a show calf that didn’t quite look like the others of its time and was consequently named “Ugly,” but it win the champion award at an international show four months later. The set backs and doubt from others didn’t slow him down, as he learned from his experiences and pushed ahead. Borror shared his guiding principles for the young ranchers in the room: Set goals for your breeding program, pay attention to the maternal side, avoid single trait selection, cull open cows, and identify and stay on top of the needs of the industry and your customers. In the beginning of his talk, he showed a photo of an Angus bull painted on the inside of a cave. To wrap up his talk, he said he needs to go home and start digging so he can paint pictures of his Tehama Angus Ranch bulls, like Bando 155, so folks years from now will know what he did. The afternoon concluded with a panel discussion from marketing professionals Col. John Rodgers, The Stockman’s Market and Western Video Market; Dave Thompson, Cargill Beef Solutions; and Col. Dennis Metzger, Superior Livestock. While the panel was structured around adding value to YCC members and other cattlemen and women toured Boston beef calves at weaning, the time was also opened to the Ranch, 3H Cattle Company and Cargill Beef ’s Fresno facility audience to ask questions. to learn about some of the most noteable beef operations in the “Value added is a partnership of relationships,” southern part of the Central Valley. Metzger said, as each spoke a little bit about what kinds of 30 California Cattleman June 2017


Find listing videos at

Todd Renfrew Broker, Owner

BASIN RANCH

CORTINA RIDGE WEST

1,500+/- acres | Shasta County $8,750,000

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8550+/- acres | Colusa County $7,890,000

a cattle operation but also game and historically runs the season. Plenty of great a ranch home with views.

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Well set up for Cattle, hay, wild rice and hunting ranch. The ranch runs 350 spring and fall calving pairs, 50 loaded with wild 750-850 pair for replacement heifers and 12 bulls year-round. spots to situate

ELDER CREEK RANCH

5918 +/- acres | Tehama County $6,500,000

3+ miles of year-round Elder Creek and 3.5 miles of seasonal Digger Creek &12 reservoirs. This ranch would make a great all-natural cattle operation, or hunting retreat. Runs 500 pair for the season.

RON LAVER RANCH

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SOLDIER MOUNTAIN HAY RANCH

Beautiful ranch only 3.5 miles from the ocean with views of Morro Rock and the blue water bay. The ranch has run up to 200 pair yearround, and offers 60+ acres of Class 2 soil.

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MORRO BAY RANCH

2,240+/- acres | San Luis Obispo County $8,950,000

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Ample water from wells, creeks, and natural springs. Privacy, hunting, raising livestock, equestrian pursuits, or the development of a family ranch compound, retreat, or estate.

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WINTER FALLS RANCH

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A productive cattle ranch, hunting retreat, and private nature preserve. 10+ miles of yearround Bear Creek runs through the heart of the ranch.

5132+/-acres | Monterey County $9,900,000

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12,893+/- acres | Colusa County $10,325,000

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WEST VALLEY RANCH 355+/- acres | Shasta County $2,700,000

320 +/- acres in production growing high quality, high altitude timothy hay. Three wells, flood irrigation, underground main line and return ditch system.

3342 +/- acres | Modoc County $1,950,000

3+ miles of private spring fed streams, free water, easy irrigation and capacity to run 225 pair of cows from May to November. Located in the X3b deer zone, the ranch qualifies for 2 land owner tags.

1460.74 acres+/- | Lassen County $1,325,000

Off the grid, this ranch is well set up with solar generated energy. 130- acre pivot; wells produce 1500 GPM & 2500 GPM. Two MFH, 4 pole barns, equip barns, 3-stall horse barn. X5a trophy area.

707-455-4444 | californiaoutdoorproperties.com | 707 Merchant Street, Suite 100 | Vacaville, CA 95688


Pettyjohn Ranch 16,000 cow/hunting ranch west side of tehama county miles of year-round cottonwood and cold fork creeks many reservoirs for livestock, game & fish

priced at $16,000,000 $10,000,000

Van Cleve Associates

David Van Cleve, Broker Oregon - California Ranch Brokerage 530-906-3978 • www.VanCleveRanches.com

Enrollment Period for Safety Net Coverage open through Aug. 1 Producers on farms with base acres under the safety net programs established by the 2014 Farm Bill, known as the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) or Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs, can visit their local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office to sign contracts and enroll for the 2017 crop year. The enrollment period will continue until Aug. 1, 2017. Since shares and ownership of a farm can change year-to-year, producers on the farm must enroll by signing a contract each program year. If a farm is not enrolled during the 2017 enrollment period, the producers on that farm will not be eligible for financial assistance from the ARC or PLC programs for the 2017 crop should crop prices or farm revenues fall below the historical price or revenue benchmarks established by the program. Producers who made their elections in 2015 must still enroll during the 2017 enrollment period. Covered commodities include barley, canola, large and small chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long grain rice, medium grain rice (which includes short grain and sweet rice), safflower seed, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed and wheat. For more information, visit your local FSA office or go to www.fsa.usda.gov.

Livestock Industry Shines Spotlight on Grazing to Prevent Wildfires The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Public Lands Council kicked off a media and advertising campaign in May that will shine a spotlight on how grazing on public lands helps to mitigate the risk of catastrophic wildfires – the leading threat to species like the greater sage grouse. The campaign will be centered around a new website, GrazingPreventsWildfires.com. “Coming off the wet winter we had across much of the west, ranchers are on the sidelines as new spring growth explodes and adds to residual grasses from prior grazing reductions,” said Ethan Lane, executive director of the Public Lands Council and NCBA’s Federal Lands. “These fuel loads are building at the same time that livestock numbers on federal grazing permits continue to shrink due to misplaced priorities, political pressure, and a lack of regulatory flexibility for Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Forest Service staff to make the right management decisions on the ground.” In addition to the launch of the new website, the campaign kicked off with a two-minute video that will be heavily promoted on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms. The video features Darcy Helmick, Land Manager for Simplot Livestock Company in southern Idaho. In the kickoff video, Helmick walks through a vast, dense BLM grass field in rural Owyhee County, Idaho, 32 California Cattleman June 2017

which she explains will turn into wildfire fuel as it dries out in the summer months. “What’s unfortunate is we’ve already grazed this allotment,” Helmick points out. “So no more of this forage will be removed prior to fire season. If we have the ability and the flexibility to bring cows out and stay long enough to remove some of this forage, we’re literally reducing the fuel load in these areas.” NCBA and PLC this week also released a Beltway Beef podcast with Lane discussing the lack of flexibility within federal agencies to allow more grazing after unusually wet spells. Over the coming weeks, NCBA and PLC will release additional videos, infographics, op-eds, and other materials aimed at educating policy makers, reporters, and other industry stakeholders in Washington and around the country. “The time to address this threat is now, while we still have a chance to get ahead of the game,” Lane said. “Congress and the Administration need to provide staff on the ground with the flexibility to use grazing as a tool to protect sagebrush and native forage before a fire, and make sure ranchers can get back into those burned areas quickly after a fire to prevent the spread of invasive weeds like cheatgrass.”


Linda Long Principal Broker/Owner

33550 Hwy 97 N PO Box 724 Chiloquin, OR 97624 541-783-2759

Licensed in Oregon

For visual tours, more info: www.CraterLakeRealtyInc.com

541-891-5562 Linda@CraterLakeRealtyInc.com “A WATER” IRRIGATION!

South Poe Valley 80 acres in alfalfa with immaculate 3 bedroom 2 bath home, beautiful landscaping, garage and shop/storage building. Small separate pasture for horses or 4-H animals. The majority of the ground is in the Klamath Irrigation District (A Water). Pumps, wheel line, hand line and main line included. Fenced, nice views and easy commute to Klamath Falls and Henley Schools. $585,000 MLS# 2969514

POE VALLEY IRRIGATED FARM

www.Facebook.com/klamath.real.estate.for.sale

CRYSTAL SPRINGS PASTURE RANCH

Pasture ranch lying along ¾ mi of Lost River in favored Henley area. 240 acres, approximately 195 acres irrigated with estimated stocking rate of 300 yearlings. Perfect for horses or purebred operation. Fenced, cross fenced, corrals, scale, livestock/hay barn & shop, pumps, mainline, 5 guns, much equipment included. 3 bedroom home overlooking the river valley. Abundance of waterfowl, cranes and birds of prey along peaceful & private Lost River frontage. Geothermal lease and wooded butte with beautiful buildings sites. $800,000 MLS# 86024

IMMAMCULATE IRRIGATED FARM

Peaceful setting in Poe Valley with 80 acres sprinkler irrigated pasture. 2 homes and garages, indoor riding arena, stalls, outdoor arena, corrals, hot walker, hay barn and storage building compliment this irrigated acreage. Includes pumps, wheel lines, new fencing, year old pasture seeding. A great set up for cattle and horse activities or training with recent repairs, home upgrades and field work that really shows! $650,000 MLS# 2969511

SEVEN BAR SIX RANCH

218 acre Bonanza cattle and hay ranch with well & district irrigation. 2502 sf farm house; big open rooms, large vinyl windows, cozy certified wood stove, decks, patio, beautiful garden and landscaping surrounding the garage, pump house and shop/equipment storage. Pole hay barn, horse barn, arena, storage bldg. and hay barn with feed bunks. Owner may carry OAC! $925,000 MLS# K88726

INSHALLAH RANCH

Spectacular hunting and cattle ranch located in the Blue Mountains of Eastern Oregon. The 12,000 acre Inshallah Ranch boasts 564 acres of water rights, over 1000 acres of meadows, 2 USFS grazing permits, 5 homes, multiple barns & outbuildings. A proven hunting track record 170 – 210 class mule deer. Elk in the 350+ class. REDUCED to $8,900,000! MLS# K82919 Contact M.T. Anderson, 541-377-0030

346 ac/325 irrigated plus drought well! Lovely 3141sf country home & garage, 3 hay barns, one Steel construction sized for indoor arena! Amazing Shop: heated floor, office, restroom with laundry, storage loft, 3 tall doors. Feedlot with electronic scale, irrigation pond & equipment, fenced X fenced for cattle & crop rotation. Immaculate, productive, ease of management! $1,950,000 and worth it! MLS# 2975076

3 IRRIGATION WELLS!

140 acre pivot, 14 wheel lines, variable speed pump, productive soils for grains, potatoes, alfalfa & specialty crops are features of this productive, immaculate 376.7 acre CERTIFIED ORGANIC farm! Add a stately 2154sf landscaped home with beautiful valley & mountain views, 2 hay barns, equipment shed, grain bins, shop, storage, garages and 35,714sf potato shed, all in a peaceful rural area making this a farming heaven. $2.25 million MLS# 2972557

SWAN LAKE RANCH

...gives new meaning to owning it all…as far as the eye can see this 5515 acre ranch offers some of the most secure water rights in Klamath County. The 7 irrigation wells, excellent sandy soils and 22 pivots create an efficient operation for organic & non organic alfalfa, grain, orchard & timothy hay. Two lovely newer homes built in 2012 have the bird’s eye view of the ranch. 7 hay barns sided to exclude the elk, huge shops, equipment storage, and multi-use buildings and grain bins, along with excellent cattle handling equipment. MLS# 2969516 $17M

WILLIAMSON RIVER FRONTAGE!

Blue Ribbon Trout fishing for ¼ mile of deep water with boat access to Klamath Lake! 106 acres with immaculate custom 2411 sf Redwood sided home. Vaulted ceiling, massive rock fireplace, rock entry, tile floors, oak cabinets, heat pump, huge master suite, oversized 3 car garage. Second 2 bdr/1 bth home, 700 ton pole hay barn, loafing shed/garage, shop. 96 irrigated acres of alfalfa & pasture, 7 tower Valley pivot & wheel line. $998,000 MLS# 2969102

MT SHASTA VIEW—IRRIGATION WELL! Private 167 acres, 2 pivots, 5 wheel lines with newer pump & boles. 108 irrigated acres; excellent soils for alfalfa, grain or pasture. Pole & livestock barns, corrals, fenced/cross-fenced. Gorgeous 3 bd, 2 ba 2706 sq ft MH w/high ceilings, hardwood floors, huge kitchen w/ island, grand master suite, granite counters. Views every direction, decking on 3 sides, garage/shop, beautiful landscaping, garden. MLS# K86927 $750,000

THE UNDERWOOD

612 productive fenced acres planted to Orchard and Timothy grass. Irrigated with two private, secure irrigation wells and 7 pivots. Homestead with mature trees, domestic well, septic and several outbuildings ready for your new home! Farm has 3 large partially enclosed hay barns, paved county road frontage, vast valley and mountain views 20+ miles from Klamath Falls all for $2.5 million. MLS# 2972884

FISHHOLE CREEK RANCH

An historic holding that has been in operation for more than 150 years, consisting of 14,000 total acres of deeded ground and US Forest Service permit. Included is the famous Aspen Ridge Resort that includes a 7,000 square-foot log lodge and five 1,250 square-foot log cabins, serving scrumptious meals, while providing a serene backdrop for horseback riding, hiking, or just relaxing. Make an appointment with Linda Long to take a memorable tour today! MLS# 2969372 $10,600,000

June 2017 California Cattleman 33


BRE# 00656930

Get social with CCA! Pete Clark, Broker

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Snap an action shot or a scenic photo on the ranch with your cell phone or digital camera and email it to Malorie Bankhead in the CCA office at malorie@calcattlemen.org to see it featured on CCA’s Facebook, Instagram and Twitter!

1031 Pine Street | Paso Robles, CA 93446 | (805) 238-7110 | Fax: (805) 238-1324

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June 2017 California Cattleman 35


FUTURE FOCUS

ROOTED IN AGRICULTURAL PASSION YCC leaders work to ignite interest in youth by California Young Cattlemen’s Committee Publicity Chair Melissa Hardy

Spring has long sprung and we are headed for summer! Spring calves, blooming flowers and warmer days have come and are here to stay, and Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) members are looking forward to the summer activities and YCC and CCA events. The YCC state officer team has been hot on the highway this spring attending events like the Young Cattlemen’s Day at the Capitol in Sacramento and the California State FFA Conference Trade Show in Fresno. At the State FFA Trade Show, our officer team set up a booth packed with beef industry information, membership forms, a make your own eartag activity and most importantly, smiling faces. As an officer team alongside our advisor, Malorie Bankhead, we happily greeted wandering FFA members at our booth and aimed to engage in meaningful conversations about their hobbies, talents, post-high school intent and their passion for agriculture. While one of our goals at the FFA Trade Show was to recruit new YCC members and spark their interest in the beef industry before they head off to college, our conversations were also something significantly part of a bigger picture. As FFA alumni, our FFA experiences are near and dear to our hearts, from all the competitions and projects to the life lessons, road trips and the ignition of a passion for the 36 California Cattleman June 2017

biggest industry that feeds and clothes the world – agriculture. After these experiences and moving onto college, we have emerged as young leaders in the agriculture industry, currently the YCC. This is a lifestyle founded on passion that encompasses many traditions and values we hold in esteem and wish to pass on to our following YCC leaders and incoming members. Through our conversations with FFA members, we were able to share with them an outlet in which to continue their leadership practices and agriculture passions after high school; furthermore, we hope to inspire students to pursue a college education or careers in the beef industry. At the end of the day, we learned from and were inspired by

the personal stories FFA members shared with us, but in return we hope they are on their way to becoming future YCC members and young leaders in the beef industry. This month the YCC state officer team is looking forward to attending the CCA & CCW Midyear Meeting. As we travel to these events, we look forward to meeting and learning from those who have long contributed to the beef industry. In order to continue providing opportunities for YCC members, the California YCC will be raffling a YETI Tundra 35 cooler at the CCA Midyear Meeting. Tickets will be $10 each or six tickets for $50. Find a YCC officer or member to purchase tickets to help raise funds for future YCC events!

YCC Officers (L to R); Rebecca Barnett, secretary; Rebecca Swanson, chair; Melissa Hardy, publicity chair; and Steven Pozzi, vice chair.


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KEEPING YOUR OPTIONS OPEN

USDA FSA offers options and advice in ag lending

Communication is Key in Lending Farm Service Agency (FSA) is committed to providing our farm loan borrowers the tools necessary to be a success. A part of ensuring this success is providing guidance and counsel from the loan application process through the borrower’s graduation to commercial lending institutions. While it is FSA’s commitment to advise borrowers as they identify goals and evaluate progress, it is crucial for borrowers to communicate with their farm loan staff when changes occur. It is the borrower’s responsibility to alert FSA to any of the following: • Any proposed or significant changes in the farming operation; • Any significant changes to family income or expenses; • The development of problem situations; • Any losses or proposed significant changes in security In addition, if a farm loan borrower cannot make payments to suppliers, other creditors or FSA on time, contact your farm loan staff immediately to discuss loan servicing options. For more information on FSA farm loan programs, visit www.fsa.usda.gov. USDA Microloans Help Farmers Purchase Farmland and Improve Property Producers, including beginning and underserved farmers, have a new option to gain access to land. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is offering farm ownership microloans, creating a new financing avenue for farmers to buy and improve property. These microloans 38 California Cattleman June 2017

are especially helpful to beginning or underserved farmers, U.S. veterans looking for a career in farming and those who have small and mid-sized farming operations. The microloan program has been hugely successful, providing more than 16,800 low-interest loans, totaling over $373 million to producers across the country. Microloans have helped farmers and ranchers with operating costs, such as feed, fertilizer, tools, fencing, equipment and living expenses since 2013. Seventy percent of loans have gone to new farmers and ranchers. Now microloans will be available to also help with farm land and building purchases and soil and water conservation improvements. FSA designed the expanded program to simplify the application process, expand eligibility requirements and expedite smaller real estate loans to help farmers strengthen their operations. Microloans provide up to $50,000 to qualified producers, and can be issued to the applicant directly from the USDA FSA. Direct Loans FSA offers direct farm ownership and direct farm operating loans to producers who want to establish, maintain or strengthen their farm or ranch. FSA loan officers process, approve and service direct loans. Direct farm operating loans can be used to purchase livestock and feed, farm equipment, fuel, farm chemicals, insurance and other costs including family living expenses. Operating loans can also be used to finance minor improvements or repairs to buildings and to refinance some farm-related debts, excluding real estate.


Direct farm ownership loans can be used to purchase farmland, enlarge an existing farm, construct and repair buildings and to make farm improvements. The maximum loan amount for both direct farm ownership and operating loans is $300,000 and a down payment is not required. Repayment terms vary depending on the type of loan, collateral and the producer’s ability to repay the loan. Operating loans are normally repaid within seven years and farm ownership loans are not to exceed 40 years. Please contact your local FSA office for more information or to apply for a direct farm ownership or operating loan. Guaranteed Loan Program FSA guaranteed loans allow lenders to provide agricultural credit to farmers who do not meet the lender’s normal underwriting criteria. Farmers and ranchers apply for a guaranteed loan through a lender, and the lender arranges for the guarantee. FSA can guarantee up to 95 percent of the loss of principal and interest on a loan. Guaranteed loans can be used for both farm ownership and operating purposes. Guaranteed farm ownership loans can be used to purchase farmland, construct or repair buildings, develop farmland to promote soil and water conservation or to refinance debt. Guaranteed operating loans can be used to purchase livestock, farm equipment, feed, seed, fuel, farm chemicals, insurance and other operating expenses. FSA can guarantee farm ownership and operating loans up to $1,399,000. Repayment terms vary depending on the type of loan, collateral and the producer’s ability to repay the loan. Operating loans are normally repaid within seven years and farm ownership loans are not to exceed 40 years. Please contact your lender or local FSA farm loan office for more information on guaranteed loans. Youth Loans The FSA makes loans to youth to establish and operate agricultural incomeproducing projects in connection with 4-H clubs, FFA and other agricultural groups. Projects must be planned and operated with the help of the organization advisor, produce sufficient income to repay the loan and provide the youth with practical business and educational experience. The maximum loan

amount is $5000. Youth Loan Eligibility Requirements: • Be a citizen of the United States (which includes Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands) or a legal resident alien • Be 10 years to 20 years of age • Comply with FSA’s general eligibility requirements • Be unable to get a loan from other sources • Conduct a modest income-producing project in a supervised program of work as outlined above • Demonstrate capability of planning, managing and operating the project under guidance and assistance from a project advisor. The project supervisor must recommend the youth loan applicant, along with providing adequate supervision. Stop by your county FSA office for help preparing and processing the application forms. For more information on any of these programs, visit www.fsa.usda.gov.

June 2017 California Cattleman 39


CHIMES

California CattleWomen Honored at Annual Common Threads Event by California Young Cattlemen’s Committee Publicity Chair Melissa Hardy Four Northern California women were honored for their extraordinary contributions to agriculture and their communities during the 2017 Common Threads North Award dinner on April 19, at Butte Creek Country Club in Chico. Diane Avrit of Butte County and Linda Borror of Tehama County joined Tehama County’s Kelly Mora and Sutter County’s Nicole Van Vleck in receiving the award. All recipients have deep roots in agriculture, and each has demonstrated a history of service to agriculture and her community through volunteerism and philanthropy. Diane Avrit Diane Avrit is known throughout the Butte County agriculture community for her selfless service, leadership and dedication. As an active member of the Butte County CattleWomen for more than 40 years and a 4-H leader for some 25 years, Avrit delivers and promotes Ag in the Classroom, volunteers at agricultural functions and, together with her family, built a successful insurance agency that regularly supports community events and activities. Avrit and her husband, Stan, bred and raised polled Hereford cattle throughout their marriage, and they now farm walnuts in their retirement. Linda Borror Linda Borror is a voice for agriculture through her involvement in the Tehama County CattleWomen, Tehama County 4-H and the Presbyterian Church. She is also known as the voice and the face at Tehama Angus Ranch. Most recently, Borror served as the Tehama County CattleWomen 40 California Cattleman June 2017

President for the past two years. One of her proudest moments was getting the CattleWomen back in the classroom in celebration of Earth Day and to educate children about all of beef ’s benefits. Kelly Mora As owner of Heritage Ag Insurance Agency alongside her husband Steve, Kelly Mora feels a sense of responsibility to give back to the community that supports her family and livelihood. She has chaired the Capay Volunteer Fire Department’s annual fundraiser dinner dessert table for 20 years. She is a leader in the North Valley Chapter of the California Women for Agriculture (NVCWA), volunteering for school and community outreach, the Glenn County Fair Heritage Foundation, California Nut Festival, Farm City Celebration Harvest Festival and End of Frost Dinner. Kelly is an active agvocate on social media and uses her voice as an administrator for the Heritage Ag Insurance, NVCWA and Glenn County Fair Heritage Foundation Facebook pages to promote a positive image of farming and share local agriculture events. Nicole Van Vleck Nicole Van Vleck is the president and CEO of Montna Farms, a vertically-integrated, family-owned rice operation owned and operated by Van Vleck, her sister, Michelle Vogt, and her parents, Al and Gail Montna. Montna Farms also is a partner in American Commodity Company (ACC), and Van Vleck serves on the ACC board. She has served on the California Rice Commission (CRC) as a director

since 2000 and chair of the California Rice Producers Committee for the last four years. Van Vleck has also been an active member in the CRC’s communications committee, blogging and participating in videos to enhance the public’s understanding of rice farming and connected resources. She also sits on the Board of USA Rice Farmers. As a board member of the Northern California Water Association and the chair of the organization’s communication committee, she volunteers countless hours to maintaining Northern California’s water rights and advancing solutions to the state’s water needs for agriculture, our communities and the environment. She also serves as an officer for two local water districts. Van Vleck was the former chair of the State Fair Ag Advisory Board. She serves on the boards of River Valley Community Bank and the UC Davis College of Ag Advisory Board. She invests time and resources with Sacramento County Fair’s Livestock Auction and Sacramento Country Day School. She and her husband, Stan, have two high school children, Christian and Tori, who are currently keeping them busy with tennis, baseball, volleyball and market lambs.


White House Takes Important First Step to Reining in the Antiquities Act The Public Lands Council and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association applaud the executive order signed on April 26 that calls for a review of designations made under the Antiquities Act by previous presidents. Dave Eliason, PLC president, said while the Act was intended to preserve Native American artifacts and areas of historical importance, Presidents have instead used the Act to bypass Congress and local communities to place heavy restrictions on massive swaths of land. Most recently, President Obama boasted of using the Antiquities Act more than any previous president— locking up 256 million acres of land and water in 30 separate designations. “Western communities have been calling on Congress for years to address the continued abuse of the Antiquities Act. Elevating millions of acres to monument status without local input or economic analysis results in unrecoverable losses to the local communities.” In 1996, southern Utah faced a devastating reality when President Clinton designated 1.9 million acres as the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Livestock grazing was drastically reduced from 106,000 AUMs. Now there are only 35,000 AUMs in use. The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Oregon was initially created in 2000 by President Clinton and comprised 53,000 acres of public land. In the final days of his tenure in the White House, President Obama went on to expand the monument by another 48,000 acres. This expansion will effectively prohibit logging on approximately 35,000 acres, adding to the risk of wildfire as fuel loads increase, and negatively affecting the economy of multiple counties within the monument. “The Executive Order is an important first step to reining in past designations that were pushed through without local input,” said NCBA President Craig Uden. “However, in order to bring the Act back to its original intent, Congress must act. Sen. Murkowski’s bill S. 33 Improved National Monument Designation Process Act would require Congressional approval of new designations, taking the power away from the Administration and placing back into the hands of those most impacted.” The livestock industry, which supports many of the western communities, stands ready to work with the administration and assist in their review of designations and calls on Congress to pass Sen. Murkowski’s legislation without delay.

USDA Makes it Easier to Transfer Land to the Next Generation The USDA is offering an early termination opportunity for certain Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contracts, making it easier to transfer property to the next generation of farmers and ranchers, including family members. The land that is eligible for the early termination is among the least environmentally sensitive land enrolled in CRP. Normally if a landowner terminates a CRP contract early, they are required to repay all previous payments plus interest. The new policy waives this repayment if the land is transferred to a beginning farmer or rancher through a sale or lease with an option to buy. With CRP enrollment close to the Congressionally-mandated cap of 24 million acres, the early termination will also allow USDA to enroll other land with higher conservation value elsewhere. Acres terminated early from CRP under these land tenure provisions will be eligible for priority enrollment consideration into the CRP Grasslands, if eligible or intothe Conservation Stewardship Program or Environmental Quality Incentives Program, as determined by the Natural Resources Conservation Service. According to the Tenure, Ownership and Transition of Agricultural Land survey conducted by USDA in 2014, U.S. farmland owners expect to transfer 93 million acres to new ownership during 2015-2019. This represents 10 percent of all farmland across the nation.

June 2017 California Cattleman 41


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs M i d Va l l e y

6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

M i d Va l l e y

JOIN US AT THE MID VALLEY BULL SALE ON SEPT. 8 IN MODESTO!

M i d Va l l e y

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Join us Friday, Sept. 1 for our annual production sale and after-sale dinner!

42 California Cattleman June 2017


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2017.

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES! O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

THANK YOU TO OUR M“COMMITMENT i d V a l l e y TO 2016 PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

6th Annual GALT, CA SEPT. 17

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2017 bull sale!

M i d Va l l e y

M i d Va l l e y THANK YOU TO OUR 2017 PERFORMANCE PLUS BULL BUYERS! JOIN US ON OCT. 6 FOR OUR ANNUAL SALE BY THE SEA IN PISMO BEACH!

Join us on Sept. 15 for the 43rd annual “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale.

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

(530) 385-1570

THURSDAY, SEPT. 14, 2017

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

June 2017 California Cattleman 43


Thank you to our buyers at the annual “Partners for Performance” Bull and Female Sales! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

The Best of Both Worlds Phone 707.448.9208

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

JOIN US IN LAGRANGE9/7/17

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2366

THE DOIRON FAMILY Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Thank you to our 2016 bull and female sale supporters! 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Progressive Genetics for over years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

GELBVIEH

h 44 California Cattleman June 2017

THANK YOU TO OUR BULL BUYERS AT OUR INAUGURAL MODOC SALE! WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN NEXT YEAR!


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby (707) 876-3567 (707) 876-1992

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

June 2017 California Cattleman 45


“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

1,7OO± HEAD RANCH PRICE REDUCED! 2,830± Irrigable acres. 5,285± Deeded acres. 41,000± Acres with seller’s interest in BLM Grazing Permits. $8,500,000 (Includes Real Estate, some cattle & equipment) $7,500,000 (No cattle or equipment)

KNIPE LAND COMPANY 208-345-3163 • www.knipeland.com

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

46 California Cattleman June 2017

THD ©


Corn Belt Classic Auction

june 14-15, 2017 Ameristar Hotel & Casino Council Bluffs, Iowa

Consignment Deadline: May 30 Consignment Deadline: June 19

“Superior has a relationship with buyers and a whole bunch of sellers. That network of people is so huge, that creates a perfect venue to market calves.� Todd Olson

Olson Ranch

June 2017 California Cattleman 47


IN MEMORY Gary Foster

Gary Leon Foster, lovingly known as “Butch,” peacefully passed in his Brawley home with family by his side on April 4, after a 4 and half year fight with esophageal cancer. He was a proud cattleman, a loving and generous brother, husband, father, grandfather and friend. He loved his family and enjoyed his friends. Gary was born Jan. 29, 1943 in Brawley. He attended Brawley elementary schools and graduated from Brawley Union High School in 1961. He was a talented athlete in track, baseball and football for the Brawley Wildcats. He received “Outstanding Player” for varsity football in 1960 and was inducted in the Imperial Valley Football Players Hall of Fame in 2005. He was a true Wildcat, attending the University of Arizona and graduating with a Bachelor’s Degree in Ag. Science in 1965. Gary was a proud member of KAPPA SIGMA Fraternity, GAMMA RHO Chapter. The fraternity honored him with the A.L. Slonaker Hall of Fame Award in 1989-90. It was through his fraternity where he made long and lasting friendships. He adored his friends and fraternity brothers and had many great stories to share. Gary married his high school sweetheart, Glenda Johnson and returned home to work in the family cattle feeding business, Foster Feed Yard where he had worked since a young boy. He was president of Foster Feed Yard and operated cattle ranching businesses in Arizona and at The Correlitos Ranch in Las Cruces, N.M. He was a member of the Brawley Elks Lodge, Los Rancheros Vistadores, California Agriculture Leadership Program, Del Rio Country Club and president of Stockmen’s Club of Imperial Valley. He was a generous supporter of the community. He enjoyed traveling and the outdoors, but his fondest memories were deep sea fishing with friends in Baja, Mexico. Gary was an avid and gifted story teller, he seldom remained seated when relating his unique versions of “Little Johnnie” jokes, his renditions of Shakespeare of the pranks he played on his brother, Rod; instead he would walk around the room mimicking and exaggerating the facial expressions of those involved in the stores. He always left his audience roaring with laughter. At the feed yard he could be found among the cattle just as easily as he could be found in the office. Having been raised around cattle he personally sorted many tens of thousands of head, keeping four or five cowboys busy bringing up cattle and penning multiple cuts. He would often relax by washing water troughs and was known to reflect how, in many ways, his employees had more opportunity to enjoy working than he did. That is

doubtful to those that knew him: he loved what he did more than most! His mother, Blanche Baskins Foster and father, Howard A Foster preceded him in death. He is survived by wife, Glenda of Brawley; children: Brian Foster of Las Cruces, N.M.; Stacy (Jim) Koegel, of Las Vegas, Nev.; Joanne (Manuel) Castro, of Brawley and five grandchildren, Maxximus, Gigi and Bridgett Castro, Cooper and Christian Koegel; sister, Charlotte Ann Kovach of Yorba Linda; brother, Rodney Wayne Foster of Brawley and numerous nieces and nephews. Gary was laid to rest in a private family ceremony at Riverview Cemetery in Brawley on April 8. A celebration of life was held at The Stockmen’s Club of Imperial Valley on May 23.

It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

48 California Cattleman June 2017

WILD Doug Winnett 800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com General Insurance Brokers www.andreini.com

License 0208825


NEW ARRIVAL

Levi Abate

Atascadero.

Levi Reagan Abate, son of Jared and Kayleen Abate, joined big sister Keslee when he was born April 20 at 3 pounds, 15 ounces and was 18 inches long. Levi’s grandparents are Kevin and June Kester, Parkfield; Chris and Laura Abate, Santa Margarita; Brad and Janet Archer,

Wedding bells

SHARE YOUR FAMILY NEWS WITH US! Send birth announcements, wedding announcements or obituaries to us at magazine@calcattlemen.org or fax information to (916) 444-2194.

Scheller & Maehling

Jensen & Koopmann

Natalie Jensen and Clayton Lauren Scheller and Gregg Koopmann were married at a Maehling were married April ceremony at the Koopmann Ranch 22 at the Mission Santa Inés in in Sunol on May 6. The bride is Solvang. Parents of the bride are currently employed by Zoetis and Carson and Sherry Scheller, Los is the daughter of Karen Jensen, Alamos and Dave and Carolyn Sloughhouse and Lynn Jensen of Maehling, Yuma, Ariz. The Burbank. The groom is a certified bride is the assistant executive rangeland manager at Koopmann director for the Arizona Beef Rangeland Consulting, and is the Council and the groom works in roofing construction. They have made their first home in son of Tim and Melinda Koopmann, the couple has made their home in Sunol. Goodyear, Ariz.

IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann 530.218.3379

jimv@wsrins.com Lic #0B48084

Matt Griffith 530.570.3333

matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com Lic #0124869

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When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! June 2017 California Cattleman 49


Amador Angus............................................................................................42 American Ag Credit....................................................................................21 American Hereofrd Association ���������������������������������������������������������������44 Andreini and Company..............................................................................48 Bar R Angus...........................................................................................15, 42 BMW Angus................................................................................................42 Bovine Elite, LLC.........................................................................................46 Broken Arrow Angus..................................................................................42 Broken Box Ranch.......................................................................................45 Buchanan Angus..........................................................................................42 Byrd Cattle Company.............................................................................9, 42 California Beef Council..............................................................................29 California Outdoor Properties �����������������������������������������������������������������31 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc. ���������������������������������������������������������������45 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market ���������������������������������������������������������������������2 Charron Ranch............................................................................................42 Cherry Glen Beefmasters...........................................................................44 Clark Company Ranch Real Estate ����������������������������������������������������������34 CoBank........................................................................................................21 Conlan Ranches California........................................................................45 Conlin Supply Co, Inc.................................................................................37 Corsair Angus Ranch..................................................................................42 Crater Lake Realty.......................................................................................33 CSU Chico College of Agriculture �����������������������������������������������������������45 Dal Porto Livestock.....................................................................................43 Donati Ranch...............................................................................................42 Edwards, Lien, & Toso, Inc.......................................................................46 Farm Credit West........................................................................................21 Five Star Land and Livestock...............................................................15, 46 Five Star Land Company............................................................................12 Freitas Rangeland Improvements �������������������������������������������������������������39 Fresno State Ag Foundation.......................................................................45 Furtado Angus.............................................................................................43 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ������������������������������������������������������������������46 Genoa Livestock..........................................................................................44 Gonsalves Ranch.........................................................................................43 Harrell Hereford Ranch..............................................................................45 Harris Ranch Beef.......................................................................................35 HAVE Angus................................................................................................43 Heritage Bull Sale........................................................................................15 Hone Ranch..................................................................................................44

50 California Cattleman June 2017

Hufford Herefords.......................................................................................45 J-H Feed Inc.................................................................................................46 Knipe Land Co.............................................................................................46 Lambert Ranch............................................................................................44 Lander Veterinary Clinic............................................................................46 McPhee Red Angus.....................................................................................44 Memory Ranches.........................................................................................41 Noahs Angus Ranch....................................................................................43 Norbrook Animal Health...........................................................................37 O’Connell Ranch.........................................................................................43 ORIgen........................................................................................................46 Orvis Cattle Company................................................................................44 Pacific Trace Minerals.................................................................................46 Pitchford Cattle Co......................................................................................45 Producers Livestock Market, Madera ������������������������������������������������������16 Ray-Mar Ranches........................................................................................43 Ropin’ Doc....................................................................................................16 Sammis Ranch.............................................................................................43 Schafer Ranch..............................................................................................43 Schohr Herefords.........................................................................................45 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard ������������������������������������������������������������������13 Sierra Ranches..............................................................................................45 Silveira Bros..................................................................................................44 Silveus Rangeland Insurance ��������������������������������������������������������������������49 Skinner Livestock Transportation ������������������������������������������������������������46 Soanish Ranch.............................................................................................44 Sonoma Mountain Herefords �������������������������������������������������������������������45 Stockmanship & Stewardship �������������������������������������������������������������������29 Superior Livestock.......................................................................................47 Tehama Angus Ranch.................................................................................43 Teixeira Cattle co.........................................................................................43 Tumbleweed Ranch.....................................................................................44 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard �����������������������������������������������������������������7 Van Cleve & Associates...............................................................................32 Veterinary Services, Inc..............................................................................46 VF Red Angus..............................................................................................44 Vintage Angus Ranch...........................................................................44, 52 Western States Angus Association �����������������������������������������������������������11 Western Stockman’s Market.......................................................................19 Western Video Market..................................................................................3 Wulff Brothers Livestock............................................................................43


2017 BULL BUYERS GUIDE Reach your

direct target audience with our most anticipated issue of the year!

share your products & services in one of the most respected beef magazines in the business and the only publication that works exclusively for the California beef industry and puts your ad dollars back to work for you! Reach 6,000+ readers in California plus thousands more across the west, including Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, Arizona, Utah and Washington!

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M3CATTLEMARKETING@GMAIL.COM • (916) 803-3113 DEADLINE: JUNE 5, 2017 June 2017 California Cattleman 51


A special “Thank You” from

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH to a committed and long-time buyer

SANTA MARGARITA RANCH

Pictured (L to R): Doug Filipponi, Cash Filipponi, Mike Massey, Joseph Sill, Karl Wittstrom, Cody Sill and Jeff McKee

“We have used Vintage Angus bulls for nearly 10 years and exclusively for the past five years. It is easy to see the maternal traits that we have added to our cow herd of over 700 head. Today our cows are moderately built, deep bodied and easy fleshing. The carcass traits also show up in our GeneMax Advantage scores and in the fact that we have had a repeat buyer the last seven years. Drought has forced sales earlier than usual the last couple years, but we had a consistent buyer that will give us top dollar at any time or weight because they know how the cattle will perform in the feedlot and on the rail.”

24 Annual th

“Carcass Maker” Bull Sale Thursday, Sept.7, 2017 LaGrange June 2017 , CA

52 California Cattleman

– Jeff McKee, manager

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES (805)748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

(209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET

California Cattleman June 2017