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December 2015

First-Class Fencing & Facilities since 1999

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on i l t uaEdi n n A on th i t 9 9 en v n

December 2015 California Cattleman 1

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CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Billy Flournoy, Likely FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville

HERE'S TO A GREAT 2015 AND AN EVEN BETTER 2016! by CCA President Billy Flournoy

SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

Mark Lacey, Independence Jack Lavers, Glennville Mike Williams, Acton TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Malorie Bankhead

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Jenna Chandler

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net

It was good to see everyone at the 99th Annual CCA/CCW Convention in Sparks, Nev.! And quite a few new faces at that. It’s an important time to get involved in the policy side of the beef cattle business, and we were glad to see you. We had some new additions to this year’s convention, and from what we heard they were well received. I think the general session speakers were great and had a lot of significant things to share. We hope you’ll be able to make it next year to our 100th year celebration back at the Nugget. It was also good to have the Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) in full attendance – there were over 100 YCC members there – and that’s got to be a bright light for us in the near future as they prepare to enter the work force in, what we hope is, the beef industry. Of course, we were all hoping for rain leading up to convention, and while we have gotten some, we can use a lot more. But, maybe by the time this issue hits your mailboxes we will be a little better off that we were. The fall was a busy time for CCA officers and staff with numerous local tour meetings to attend. My favorite part of these tours up and down the state is that each meeting is a little different from the ohers. I know a lot of people at the convention, but I never knew where some of you call home. You never know where some folks will pop up, and sometimes it takes you off guard because

BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

when they shake your hand, they aren’t where you think they should be. Regardless, it was fun to see and meet everyone and put names to faces. I think CCA’s comments and efforts were well received by all of the audiences at the tour meetings. CCA staff members Justin Oldfield and Kirk Wilbur, our lobbyists, have done an outstanding job relaying issues to our members and updating us with what they’ve been working on and letting us in on the process. Everyone asked good questions, and it’s good to get involved that way. It was also nice to get a taste of good beef everywhere we went. Looking ahead to the New Year, I think we really need to enhance our Trichomoniasis efforts, and get a handle on it as it is a growing issue of concern. It seems to be one of the most costly issues facing cattle producers right now and we need to get a good plan in place to tackle the issues we face because of it. As always, CCA welcomes your input from the local level to help us strategize the best plan of attack. Hopefully this month will bring some much-needed moisture, and it won’t be too cold. Maybe with the moisture will come a little strength in our market. Until we meet again, keep ‘er steady.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman December 2015


DECEMBER 2015 Volume 99, Issue 11

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

ON THE COVER

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE Out with the old, in with the new

6

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 8 Trade deal to benefit U.S. beef producers HERD HEALTH CHECK Tips for getting your herd through a wet winter

10

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER Who is your extension go-to guy or gal?

16

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD Driving demand for U.S. beef across Europe

26

SPECIAL FEATURES

CCA & CCW 99th Annual Convention 2015 Photo Contest Winners Cattle Industry Convention comes to California So wet, yet so far from dought recovery

READER SERVICES

New Arrivals Cattlemen's Report Obituaries and Wedding Bells Buyers’ Guide Advertisers Index

18 22 28 34

36 38 39 40 46

Once again in 2015, the December cover highlights a ranch facility recently completed by Western Fence and Construction. This state-of-the-art facility is an example of the craftsmanship that ranchers can expect from Western Fence and Construction, Inc., Oakdale. Lance Harvey and his team at Western Fence and Construction, can handle everything from start to finish for your next project. Their expertise includes but is not limited to barns, corrals, arenas, livestock facilities, wire fencing, solar pumps, sale rings and more. No matter what corner of the state your ranch is in or what kind of livestock facility you are seeking, Lance and his team of experts is equipped to provide you with service and skill that is second to none. "We feel that our team can tackle any livestock fencing or facilities project ranchers may need," Harvey says. "Not only are we innovative an efficient when it comes to providing a facility you can't get anywhere else, but our prices are reasonable as well." Western Fence and Construction is known by their clients, who return time-after-time, for being reasonable in price, yet extremely high in quality. To learn what they can do for your, give them a call at the number below. Below are just a few photos of recent projects completed by Western Fence and Constuction.

FOR A FREE ESTIMATE ON YOUR NEXT FENCING OR FACILITY PROJECT, OR TO SEE WORK SAMPLES, CONTACT LANCE HARVEY AT (209) 456-3705. December 2015 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE

TAKING STOCK OF 2015 Seeking out the good

by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead As the end of each year approaches, time seems to move faster. December marks two years that I’ve been on CCA staff, and I can’t believe how quickly time has flown. Lately I’ve been reflecting on what 2015 has brought to the table and what 2016 will offer. December is an exciting month! We just wrapped up another successful CCA and CCW Annual Convention and are headed straight for the 100th anniversary! What an exciting time to be a staff member and member of CCA! I wonder what David Stollery, the first executive secretary of CCA imagined the 100th year would be like? Did they expect flying cars by 2016? Thoughts like that have me making a list of my expectations for 2116 and the 200th year of CCA. What fun to ponder! As the year-end nears and the fresh start of a new year encroaches, it’s a good idea to take stock of the year and make plans for the upcoming one. Just like taking inventory of your cattle and equipment, making a list of goals is just as important. Over the past two years at CCA, I have thoroughly enjoyed traveling to the far-reaching corners of the state, checking items off of my list of activities as I go. This past September took me the furtherst north I’ve ever been in California to Likely and January will take me as far south as I’ve ever been to San Diego for the 2016 Annual Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show. In fact, each time I leave the office on a trip, I gain more appreciation for the beef cattle industry. Whether it’s traveling to a Young Cattlemen’s Committee meeting or visiting a member on their ranch, I remain optimistic that the future of this industry looks bright. One of my favorite trips this year was the aforementioned trip this past September when I had the opportunity to help present a BQA training to the Modoc County Cattlemen and women in Alturas. The weekend before the training I was able to spend some time at Likely Land and Livestock, home of CCA President Billy Flournoy and Billy’s granddaughter and my friend, Gabriela DeSimone. While I grew up on a ranch, horseback riding wasn’t something I participated in often, so on this trip I was able to experience my first ever cattle gather on horseback. Atop Geronimo, my trusty steed for the day, we slowly made the journey together with Gabriela and Cruiser, who out-trotted us three miles to one, to gather some heifers that we would process later that day. Having a desk job has put me well out of practice getting my hands dirty, let me just put it that way. But spending time on the ranch in Likely reminded that we all have a lot to be thankful for. I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again, it is the people who make up the beef cattle industry in California and outside of 6 California Cattleman December 2015

our state’s borders so shiny. In the muddled mess of mainstream media reports and even social media that so often bogs down enthusiasm and dampers moods, it is my job to help remind you that good still exists, even in somewhat MALORIE BANKHEAD sticky situations. This year there have, as usual, been a myriad of issues presented to CCA, our members and the cattle industry as a whole. But you have a dedicated staff working on your behalf who genuinely care about your best interest. While it can be seemingly exhausting drudging the trenches that make up antibiotics, wild horses, wolves, GRAP, WOTUS and alleged cancer risks, it is important to remind each other that in a seemingly poor situation, good still prevails because of the work you do. Sometimes you’ve got to give up a little bit in order to reap the greater benefits. We’ve seen that with the ongoing drought and the increased consumer focus on antibiotics. But keeping the big picture in mind matters when the impossible intrudes our vision. It is my hope that among the issues that matter most to you and your operations, you can continue to find bright spots to get you through the tough times. It’s so easy to fall back on negativity and pessimism. Many times the severity and timeliness of the issues at hand do that for us. But have no doubt, here in the CCA office we work diligently on your behalf. My point remains that during this holiday season remember to take a deep breath and be proud of what you’ve accomplished in 2015. As we approach our 100th year, in 1917 and our 100th convention only 11 months from now, there is much to be thankful for. First and foremost we are thankful for you, our members, for continuing to fight the good fight. Consider this thank you a pat on the back. If the numbers don’t quite break even or you’ll have to sell another load of cows to get by this year, we have faith in you. As wise cowboys have often said, “There’s always next year.” Cheers to a plentiful holiday season to you and yours from all of us here at the CCA office.


wishes you and your family a

Representatives

Wed., December 2 – CLM Special Feeder Sale

Jake Parnell..............(916) 662-1298 GeorGe GookIn...........(209) 482-1648 Mark FIscher.............(209) 768-6522 rex WhIttle ...............(209) 996-6994 Joe Gates ....................(707) 694-3063 abel JIMenez..............(209) 401-2515 Jason DaIley ..............(916) 439-7761

Wed., December 16 – CLM Special Feeder Sale with Customer Appreciation Lunch at 11 a.m.

12495 stockton blvD., Galt, ca 95632 (209) 745-1515 office • (209) 745-1582 Fax

Website: www.clmgalt.com

Featuring a Large Run of Calves and Yearlings

Featuring a Large Run of Calves and Yearlings

Wed., December 23 – No Sale

Merry Christmas from All of Us at CLM

Wed., December 30 – No Sale

Wishing You A Happy & Properous New Year

Wed., January 6 – Regular Sale Don’t Miss Our First Sale of 2016

ARATA©

THD ©

December 2015 California Cattleman 7


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

ADMINISTRATION FINALIZES TPP NEGOTIATIONS CCA, NCBA support deal to benefit beef producers On Nov. 5, the Obama Administration released the full text of the trade deal negotiated under the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) between the United States, Canada, Mexico, Japan, South Korea, Australia, New Zealand and other countries in the Pacific Rim. The release of the full document for public review confirms the benefits this trade deal will have for U.S. cattle producers. In a statement released by NCBA, President Phillip Ellis, a cattle rancher from Wyoming said, “TPP represents the highest standard of trade agreements and provides the foundation for increased access and lower tariffs to the Pacific Rim markets. TPP member nations already account for over 60 percent of total beef exports, and lower tariffs will allow us to continue to grow our market share in that region. While the agreement is not perfect, it is a vast improvement over the current tariff rates, and the greatest market access that has ever been negotiated to Japan. "Clearly, working collaboratively we were able to achieve more than we could have alone. The TPP will immediately reduce the tariff to Japan, our largest market for U.S. beef, from 38.5 percent to 27.5 percent. And tariffs will continue to decrease, in some cases be eliminated, over the next 15 years. Every day that goes by before we pass this TPP costs U.S. producers market share in the Pacific Rim. And every day, competing nations continue to negotiate agreements benefiting their producers and domestic economies. "Since passage of the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership in late 2014, we have lost over 11 percent of our sales into Japan. Our market share will continue to erode until TPP is signed into law. America's cattle producing families produce the best beef in the world and deserve a level playing field to compete for global customers; TPP is an outstanding start." In 2014, Japan imported more U.S. beef than any other country with total sales exceeding $1.5 billion. In 2013, international exports of beef products from California accounted for $436 million in cash receipts. 8 California Cattleman December 2015

With multiple ports throughout California, California beef producers are well positioned to offer beef products to willing buyers overseas, especially to our trading partners throughout the Pacific Rim. Congress is likely to take up the approval of TPP following the New Year. Congressional approval will be largely expedited by Congress’ previous approval of Trade Promotion Authority supported by NCBA, CCA and other agricultural organizations across the country. That said, the Obama Administration will face a tough uphill battle of garnering the votes necessary in the House of Representative to pass the deal. NCBA and CCA will be working hard over the course of the debate to help pave the way for a majority in the House. The full text of the TPP can be accessed through the U.S. Trade Representative’s website at www.ustr.gov/ tpp.


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HERD HEALTH CHECK Preparing your Cow-Calf Operation for Winter 10 tips for optimal success by Alan S. Vaage, Ph.D., Ruminant Nutritionist Now is the perfect time for beef producers to make management decisions that will affect the health, productivity and profitability of the herd over the next production cycle. The following are tips and guidelines to consider. Wean based on pasture quality and quantity When pasture quality declines below that required to support calf growth, and/or quantity declines to the point that calves cannot compete with cows for the available forage, calves will start to loose body weight. It is a myth that calf growth will be maintained by milk production; by the time calves reach 400 pounds, and especially when forage availability is low, milk intake will supply as little as 10 percent of the calf's nutritional requirements, and some cows will voluntarily dry off. When this occurs it is more beneficial and economical to wean the calves as it is easier and more economical to supplement the calves than the whole herd; it will extend grazing for the herd and will reduce weight loss in the cow herd, especially in first-calf heifers.

condition, illness or injury. Assess body condition and group cattle for winter feeding Target for a moderate body condition (4–6 on a 9 point scale) going into the colder weather of winter, as well as before calving. If possible, group thinner cows with bred heifers after weaning and place them on a higher plane of nutrition than the rest of the herd so that the higher nutritional requirements of the stillgrowing heifers will be met, and the thin cows will have an opportunity to gain weight before the coldest part of the winter sets in and thus be in better condition for calving. Research shows that cows in good to moderate body condition can lose weight equivalent to two body condition scores without affecting calving or reproductive performance as long as their nutritional requirements are fully met from four weeks prior to calving and onward. Therefore, by grouping animals according to nutritional requirements and feeding accordingly, there is tremendous opportunity to save feed and labor.

Preg–check cows and heifers At weaning, preg–check all animals that were bred, and cull those that are open or will calve late. Open cows are too expensive to maintain on limited and costly feed resources these days, as can be cows that will calve outside a 70 to 90 day calving window. Late calvers will generally wean small calves the following year and be even harder to breed back in time to calve within the target window. This is also a good time to check the cows to detect and deal with problems that might affect future health or productivity, such as age, teeth 10 California Cattleman December 2015

Deworm and vaccinate Cows should be treated at weaning for internal and external parasites picked up during the summer and fall grazing seasons, as these increase feed requirements and susceptibility to disease during the winter. This is also a good time to give semi–annual vaccinations for diseases such as lepto, vibrio, IBR and BVD, the risk of which also increases as animals are congregated for winter feeding and calving. Your local veterinarian should be consulted to determine what the cows need to be treated for and which products should be the most effective in your area. Obviously, there is little reason to treat animals that are to be culled, so save the cost. Lice are one of the most costly and underrated parasites of cattle, accounting for millions of dollars lost each year due to reduced feed conversion, weight loss, anemia and sometimes even death. During the last cold months of winter and into early spring, lice can be a constant cause of irritation putting additional stress on ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 12


World Health Organization Identifies Processed Meat as Carcinogen, 'red Meat Probably a Carcinogen' In late October, the World Health Organization's A 2009 California appellate court ruling upholds International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) federal preemption and restricts states from mandating identified processed meat as "causing cancer" and red labeling requirements from meat derived from animals meat as "probably causing cancer." The IARC defines harvested in federally inspected facilities. The ruling's processed meat as "...meat that has been transformed application to "processed meat" is more likely to be through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking or other questioned by state officials. CCA will continue to provide processes to enhance flavor or improve preservation. updates on this story as it evolves over the coming weeks While most processed meats contain pork or beef, and months. but processed meats may also contain other red meats, poultry, offal or meat by-products such as blood." Examples include sausage, hot dogs, bacon, corned beef, etc. The meat industry responded immediately condemning the announcement stating the ruling was based on weak and refutable science. The Central California Livestock Marketing Center Normally, decisions made by the IARC are unanimous; however in this case the 22 experts that reviewed the science for processed and red meat made the announcement without consensus. A large meta-analysis, published online in May in the Journal of the SPECIAL FEEDER SALE & 9TH American College of Nutrition, ANNIVERSARY CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY analyzed the relationship between red meat intake and risk for colorectal cancer and concluded "...red meat FEEDER CATTLE AT 9 A.M. does not appear to be an independent CHRISTMAS BUFFET AT NOON predictor of CRC risk," according to PAIRS AND BRED FEMALES AT 1 P.M. Dominik Alexander, Ph.D., MSPH, the epidemiologist who conducted the research on behalf of the Beef Checkoff. Cancer is a complex disease and not one food product can be directly linked to causing the disease. In the press release, the IARC even recognizes that red meat "... has nutritional value..." and cautions organizations to alter their dietary guidelines solely based on the IARC finding. While the Beef Checkoff, NCBA TLAY REPRESENTATIVES and CCA continue to confront this MAX OLVERA.................................. 209 277-2063 issue head on, questions remain as to STEVE FARIA .................................. 209 988-7180 what the IARC ruling will mean for EDDIE NUNES................................. 209 604-6848 California labeling standards under 209 634-4326 CHUCK COZZI ................................ 209 652-4479 Proposition 65. Proposition 65, passed 209 667-0811 BUD COZZI ...................................... 209 652-4480 by California voters in 1986, requires 10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA JOHN LUIZ........................................ 209 480-5101 the state to compile a list of substances P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 BRANDON BABA .......................... 209 480-1267 "known" to cause cancer and birth www.turlocklivestock.com JAKE BETTENCOURT....................209 262-4019 defects and in some instances requires those products to be labeled. December 2015 California Cattleman 11

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 cattle and draining energy reserves. Have feed analyzed It is not possible to make progress in reducing feed costs and ensuring nutritional requirements are met without having feeds, and especially forages, analyzed for nutritional content. At a minimum, they should be analyzed for dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), fiber (ADF) and the minerals calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), either by wet chemistry or Near Infrared (NIR) scan. Fiber analysis is essential for the lab to be able to estimate energy content as Total Digestible Nutrients (TDN) or Net Energy (NEm or NEg). Feed of different types, different cuttings and even from different fields should be analyzed separately. It may also be advisable to sample and analyze fall grazing materials such as stockpiled grass, crop residues, swath grazing, straws etc. if this has not been done before. Then, it will be possible to allocate specific feedstuffs according to stage of production and nutritional requirements over the winter feeding period. Develop feeding plan/ programs There is a tendency for beef cow-calf producers to over-feed cows between weaning and calving, and then underfeed them from late gestation through calving and rebreeding. This is very wasteful and costly. Post-weaning, cows have their lowest nutritional requirements and will do well on a diet of 48 to 50 percent TDN and a minimum of 7 percent CP. During the last month of gestation, calving and rebreeding, they require a diet with 60 to 62 percent TDN and a minimum of 10 percent CP to be healthy and productive. This is a difference in feed quality that requires planning to determine how it is to be achieved with the resources at hand, and to prevent over–feeding and fattening of the cows during the “dry” period. If higher quality feeds than required are available, they can be limit fed to save feed and cost, or diluted with lower quality purchased feeds if economical sources are available. Your local feed supplier or extension agent may be available to assist you in developing diets for each

stage of production. Waiting to “see what happens” is almost always more expensive and hard on the cattle. Evaluate feed inventory The fall is the best time to evaluate your feed inventory and its adequacy for the coming feeding season. Once the analysis has been done and your feeding plan has been developed, consider the length of feeding period(s) and the weather conditions being forecast, and then total up the amount of each class of feed you will

require to make it through the feeding season and compare it against the inventory on hand. Be sure to include a 10 to 15 percent margin for error and an appropriate value for spoilage in storage and wastage during feeding (these latter two may be greater than you think). If the feed inventory is not adequate to comfortably make it through the full calving season, Fall is the best time to make adjustments, by either limiting early season feeding rates, making arrangements to buy

It’s still the

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12 California Cattleman December 2015

WILD Doug Winnett 800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com General Insurance Brokers www.andreini.com

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more feed (greatest availability and lowest cost) or decreasing the size of the herd. Adjust feeding rates for cold weather Beef cattle feed (energy) requirements increase by roughly two percent for every degree Celsius that effective temperature (measured as wind chill) drops below their lower critical temperature (about 0ツーC or 32ツーF with a normal winter coat), when they must start to actively generate heat to maintain core body temperature. If feed intake does not increase to compensate for the drop in temperature, supplements will need to be provided to prevent loss in body weight and condition. Care must be taken when feeding poor quality forages like straw, as the drive for intake, along with poor digestion, can cause rumen impaction during cold weather. Check waterers and feeding areas Dry matter intake is dependent on water intake, and both are especially important during fall grazing and winter

feeding when poorer quality roughage is fed. The fall is a great time to ensure all water sources are operating, clean and will remain free of ice when cold weather arrives. It is also a great time to check and set up the winter feeding area (e.g. fencing and feeders) and feeding equipment to ensure that everything is ready when winter feeding needs to begin. This includes ensuring your TMR mixer receives its annual service, including changing the oil in the planetary gearbox, removing and cleaning under the auger of vertical mixers to check for wear and that oil lubrication parts are in good repair, checking and rotating or changing blades as required, and ensuring that the weigh bars and scale are working correctly. Reduce feed wastage One of the easiest ways to increase cow窶田alf profitability is to decrease feed wastage. Feeding on the ground has been shown to waste up to 60 percent of feeding value through selection and trampling. Hay and bale feeders will reduce wastage but it can still reach up to 30 percent in traditional feeders and

increases as forage quality declines. Bale feeding still presents a challenge on how to feed forages, supplements and opportunity feeds in a way that each animal gets what they require; over consumption by older and more aggressive cows is also a form of wastage. For this reason many producers are experiencing the benefits of using a vertical auger, TMR mixer for feeding. With a vertical mixer, hay can be processed into a ration that minimizes sorting and virtually eliminates waste. Intake of poorer quality forages can also increase by as much as 30 percent helping meet requirements on lower cost feeds. Finally, it is then easy to weigh the feed and mix in grain, supplements and mineral and vitamins, as required, to balance the ration for a given stage of production and to minimize feed cost while optimizing animal health and performance. Conservative estimates have shown that the value of a TMR mixer should be a minimum of the combination of 10 to 15 percent in annual feed cost, through feed savings, plus 10 to 15 percent of the value of the animals marketed annually, through improved animal performance.

December 2015 California Cattleman 13


ANADA 200-591, Approved by FDA

For intramuscular and subcutaneous use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. BRIEF SUMMARY (For full Prescribing Information, see package insert.) INDICATIONS: Norfenicol is indicated for treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni, and for the treatment of foot rot. Also, it is indicated for control of respiratory disease in cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M.haemolytica, P. multocida, and H. somni. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Do not use in animals that have shown hypersensitivity to florfenicol.

American Angus ASSN NAMES NEW CEO Allen Moczygemba, a native of San Antonio, Texas, is the new chief executive officer of the American Angus Association (AAA), effective Dec. 1, 2015. Moczygemba will serve as the chief executive officer for the AAA and for each of the association’s subsidiaries: Angus Productions Inc., Certified Angus Beef LLC, Angus Genetics Inc. and the Angus Foundation. He will also be responsible for implementing the Association’s long-term strategic objectives and leading a team of more than 200 employees. “This is a great time for the American Angus Association and the Angus breed,” said Steve Olson, AAA president. “Allen not only brings a fresh, strategic vision to our organization, but also a detail-oriented, hands-on approach to leadership that will ensure our resources are focused on continuing to grow demand for Angus genetics and the Certified Angus Beef brand.” Moczygemba possesses nearly three decades of experience in the cattle business, managing business units, overseeing brands and building strategic relationships across the beef industry. He most recently served as vice president of marketing for Advanced Animal Diagnostics, a tech company developing on-farm animal-health diagnostic platforms. While serving as beef segment marketing director for Zoetis Animal Health, he developed partnerships with organizations such as the American Quarter Horse Association, CattleFax, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. He managed Progressive Beef, a program of standard operating procedures for the fed cattle sector that includes an independent third-party audit. The program’s standards align closely with major retailers, such as Performance Food Group. Moczygemba also was senior vice president for Farm Journal Database Strategies and vice president for Farm Journal Livestock Group, where he was publisher of Beef Today and Dairy Today magazines. “AAA enjoys a long and successful history in developing innovative ways to advance the Angus breed,” Moczygemba said. “I am excited about helping to write the next chapter for the breed and blazing new trails of opportunity for our members.” Moczygemba received his degree in 1987 in agriculture communications from Southwest Texas State University. He and his wife, Venetta, have two sons, Lane and Ross.

14 California Cattleman December 2015

NOT FOR HUMAN USE. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. Can be irritating to skin and eyes. Avoid direct contact with skin, eyes, and clothing. In case of accidental eye exposure, flush with water for 15 minutes. In case of accidental skin exposure, wash with soap and water. Remove contaminated clothing. Consult physician if irritation persists. Accidental injection of this product may cause local irritation. Consult physician immediately. The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk about Norfenicol with your veterinarian. For customer service, adverse effects reporting, or to obtain a copy of the MSDS or FDA-approved package insert, call 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: Not for use in animals intended for breeding. Effects on bovine reproductive performance, pregnancy, and lactation have not been determined. Intramuscular injection may result in local tissue reaction which persists beyond 28 days. This may result in trim loss at slaughter. Tissue reaction at injection sites other than the neck is likely to be more severe. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days of the last intramuscular treatment. Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 33 days of subcutaneous treatment. Not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows as such use may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. ADVERSE REACTIONS: Inappetence, decreased water consumption, or diarrhea may occur transiently. Manufactured by: Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland. The Norbrook logos and Norfenicol ® are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.


Shorter Sub-Q Withdrawal Time Than Nuflor Less Viscous and More Syringeable Than Nuflor* New Plastic Bottles Eliminate Breakage FDA-Approved for Sub-Q Use in Cattle at High-Risk of BRD Broad Spectrum Treatment and Control Against BRD Unique Formulation 速

orfenicol

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www.norbrookinc.com Observe label directions and withdrawal times. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. For use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. Not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days of the last intramuscular treatment or within 33 days of subcutaneous treatment. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Intramuscular injection may result in local tissue reaction which may result in trim loss at slaughter. See product labeling for full product information, including adverse reactions. The Norbrook logos and Norfenicol are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited. Nuflor is a registered trademark of Merck Animal Health.

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FOR VETERINARY USE ONLY

December 2015 California Cattleman 15


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

LOOKING FOR ANSWERS

Northern Cooperative Extension Advisors Serve Ranchers from the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association This article is the third in a series to showcase individuals within the University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) who bring practical, science-based answers to ranchers across the state. This article showcases the UCCE advisors in Southern California and along the coast.

Cooperative extension advisors work hand in hand with agricultural producers to address local issues and create a nexus between fellow extension advisors and the researchers at the University of California campuses. “I have had the opportunity to work with a handful of cooperative extension advisors in Northern California on different projects at the ranch, feedlot and rice farming operation,” said Jerry Maltby, Broken Box Ranch, Williams. “This series of articles on the cooperative extension network provides ranchers the opportunity to learn about the breadth of issues advisors are working on up and down the state and expand our resources to be more productive cattle producers. I encourage fellow cattlemen to contact their advisors about specific issues or ideas to improve their ranch.” This article features the eight cooperative extension advisors who work with ranchers to address animal welfare, livestock production and rangeland management issues to build prosperous ranching businesses. We are excited to introduce you to the coastal and southern advisors below, with contact information, areas of specialty, along with highlights from one of their recent projects. 1 Marin, Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino: David Lewis

Phone: (415) 473-4204 • E-mail: djllewis@ucanr.edu

16 California Cattleman December 2015

Office Location: 1682 Novato Boulevard-Suite 150-B, Novato, CA 94947 Area of Specialty: Water quality; conservation practice effectiveness; land use policy; and climate resiliency. Current Research and Topics of Interest: Documenting the carbon and nitrogen stocks in revegetated streams and rivers and the role of ranch stewardship in accomplishing these projects that have beneficial impacts for the environment and climate. Also, conducting long-term water quality data analysis for indicator bacteria in the Tomales Bay Watershed. This project complements more than 20 years of ranch water quality planning education and on-ranch implementation by analyzing in-stream water quality to identify changes over time in response to stewardship efforts. 2 Santa Clara, Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo and San Francisco: Sheila Barry Phone: (408) 282-3106 • E-mail: sbarry@ucanr.edu Office Location: 1553 Berger Drive, Building 1, San Jose, CA 95112 Area of Specialty: Working rangelands outreach, grazing management for biodiversity and special status species, conservation land management, watershed management and rangeland monitoring. Current Research and Topics of Interest: Promoting an understanding of beef production and the value of cattle grazing and the ecosystem services it provides to an urban public. 3 Stanislaus and San Joaquin Counties: Theresa Becchetti Phone: (209) 525-6800 • E-mail: tabecchetti@ucanr.edu Office Location: 3800 Cornucopia Way, Suite A, Modesto, CA 95358 Area of Specialty: Invasive species, ecosystem services, rangeland management and water quality. Current Research and Topics of Interest: Investigating practical management options for a variety of invasive species on rangelands. Working collaboratively with others in Cooperative Extension, we have been able to identify management practices that are cost effective at managing Medusahead on rangelands. 4 El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras, Tuolumne: Scott Oneto Phone: (209) 223-6834 • E-mail: sroneto@ucanr.edu Office Location: 12200B Airport Road, Jackson, CA 95642 Area of Specialty: Weed science, rangeland management, home horticulture and small farms. Current Research and Topics of Interest: Developing chemical control strategies for the invasive weed oblong spurge (Euphorbia oblongata).


5 Mariposa, Merced and Madera: Fadzayi Mashiri Phone: (209) 626-9449 • E-mail: fmashiri@ucanr.edu Office Location: 5009 Fairgrounds Road, Mariposa, CA 95338-9435 Area of Specialty: Rangeland ecology, grazing ecology and management, weed management, socioeconomic aspects of natural resources management and extension approaches. Current Research and Topics of Interest: Comparing the effects of different spring and fall application rates of Aminopyralid (Milestone) on medusahead. The goal is to evaluate if lower rates of Milestone application in spring can be as effective as higher rates in fall. 6 San Benito, Monterey, and Santa Cruz: Devii Rao Phone: (831) 637-5346, extension 14 E-mail: drorao@ucanr.edu Office Location: 3228 Southside Road, Hollister, CA 95023 Area of Specialty: Rangeland ecology and management, rangeland conservation; grazing management, conservation of biological diversity and watershed protection and management. Current Research and Topics of Interest: As a new advisor, one of my first projects is to identify areas in each county to set up forage production plots. This will help us understand how forage production changes between years and between regions. 7 Monterey and San Luis Obispo: Royce Larsen Phone: (805) 434-4106 • E-mail: relarsen@ucanr.edu Office Location: 350 North Main Street, Templeton, CA 93465 Area of Specialty: Water quality, watershed management, rangeland management, invasive species and natural resources. Current Research and Topics of Interest: The Rancher Sustainability Self-Assessment Project, a voluntary self assessment of all aspects of livestock operations to ensure the sustainability of production, lands and families. It is utilized by cattlemen to determine what they do well and find ways to ensure properstewardship of themselves, livestock and natural resources. 8 Kern, Tulare, and Kings: Julie Finzel Phone: (661) 868-6219 • E-mail: jafinzel@ucanr.edu Office Location: 1031 S. Mt. Vernon Ave., Bakersfield, CA 93307 Area of Specialty: Livestock production, range management, wildlife control and invasive species management. Current Research and Topics of Interest: Working on a project that will quantify the economic impact mountain lions have on livestock production.

BEEF IMPROVEMENT SYMPOSIUM The Food Animal and Reproduction Medicine (FARM) Club at UC Davis is hosting the 5th Annual Beef Improvement Symposium on Saturday, Jan. 9, 2016. Some of this year's speakers this year include: Chris Kerston A representative from the Allan Savory Foundation Dave Pratt Owner of Ranch Management Consultants Bennie Osburn, DVM Director of Outreach and Training at the Western Institute for Food Safety and Security ...and many more! Additionally, we are very excited to be offering a wetlab (for a select few symposium attendees)with Eric Davis, DVM, on Disaster Preparedness: Large Animal Restraint, so be sure to sign up if this interests you! WHEN: SATURDAY, JAN.9, 2016 WHERE: GLADYS VALLEY HALL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS, SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE Visit the FARM Club Webpage to register online: http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/clubs/farm/2016_beef_ improvement_symposium/index.cfm Please direct any questions to Sarah Tirrell at sctirrell@ucdavis.edu.

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December 2015 California Cattleman 17


California Cattlemen and CattleWomen Gather in Reno to celebrate tradition, embrace innovation by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead nother Annual Convention of the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) and California CattleWomen, Inc. (CCW) has come and gone with much success, making the 99th Annual Convention one of the most highly talked about conventions of years past. More than 600 cattlemen and women converged at the Nugget Casino Resort in Sparks, Nev., to attend the convention, and the California Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) had a near record attendance with over 100 YCC members who traveled from California State University, Fresno; California State University, Chico; California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, University of California, Davis; Reedley Junior College, Reedley; and Modesto Junior College, Modesto. To kick off convention, the Welcome Reception at Gilley’s, sponsored by Silveus Rangeland Insurance, allowed members to meet up with friends in a casual environment to ease into the business meetings taking place the next day. New activities and speakers were cause for positive buzz around the meeting rooms as JBS USA’s Cameron Bruett and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s Colin Woodall were highly regarded for their presentations in the new general sessions on Friday. The general sessions provided an opportunity for cattlemen and cattlewomen alike to attend their usual business meetings but not miss out on some of the most valuable information the beef industry has to offer. At the Cattlemen’s Breakfast Friday morning, Pacific Legal Foundation’s (PLF) Damien Schiff addressed the audience at the well-attended breakfast with an update on the Waters of the United States rule and PLF’s involvement in the suit filed against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Throughout the day, guest speakers included Bruett and Woodall at the two general sessions, Erin Borror of the U.S. Meat Export Federation at the Beef Promotion Lunch, sponsored by the California Beef Council, and the first Cattlemen’s College session speaker Daniel Shike, Ph.D., assistant professor in Animal Sciences at the University of Illinois, Urbana, Ill.,featured by the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association. The theme that seemed to resonate with all of the 18 California Cattleman December 2015

speakers was addressing the need to feed a growing population. “In 50 years, we will need to produce more food than has been consumed in the last 7,000 years,” Economist Duane Lenz of CattleFax said during the market update at Saturday morning’s breakfast. In his talk, Bruett pointed out that less than 2 percent of us are feeding the entire population. Bruett also helped define sustainability, which is a popular buzzword impacting the agricultural industry. “Sustainability is a journey, not a destination,” Bruett said. He also said sustainability is about doing better today what you did yesterday and to improve tomorrow in order to provide for the next generation and ensure they are responsible for their own needs. Over the course of convention, members met in their respective business meetings spending time reviewing expiring policy and entertaining new resolutions. The CCA Allied Industry Trade Show was, as usual, a popular place for ranchers and industry representatives to meet and discuss new tools available to them for their on-the-ranch needs comprised of over 45 booths for cattlemen and cattlewomen to visit. At the CCA & CCW Awards Banquet Saturday night, CCA members said thank you to outgoing second vice president Rich Ross, Lincoln, and welcomed Mike Williams, Acton, who was elected to fill the open second vice president position. Williams will serve for a two-year term. Jillian Casacca, Hydesville, president of the Chico State Young Cattlemen’s Association (YCA) was presented with the 2015 YCC Member of the Year Award for her outstanding efforts on behalf of the Chico YCA. Richard Breitmeyer, DVM, MPVM, was awarded the prestigious Gordon Van Vleck Memorial Award for his dedication to the beef industry. This award is bestowed upon someone who is not involved in beef production directly, but is a great friend and supporter of California cattle producers Breitmeyer’s friends and colleagues Jack Hanson, Susanville; Tom Talbot, DVM, Bishop; and Gene Harlan, DVM, Penngrove, had nothing but warm regards and praises for Breitmeyer and his support of the beef industry in California and beyond. After a 26-year career with the California Department of Food and Agriculture,


including 17 years as the California State Veterinarian, and the past five years serving as the director of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Lab at UC Davis, it is no surprise that Breitmeyer was selected by his peers to receive this award. Todd Phelps, Redway, was the lucky winner of the Livestock Memorial Research Fund (LMRF) livestock trailer, which collected over $20,000 to help support the LMRF YCC scholarship fund. To make good use of time while last minute tickets were sold for each raffle, several cattlemen approached the podium to offer a bit of entertainment with cowboy poetry and song. After the banquet concluded everyone departed for their respective corners of the state. CCA thanks those who traveled to the meeting as well as the sponsors who helped make this year’s convention possible and extends an invitation to attend next year’s 100th Annual Convention back at the Nugget Dec. 1-3, 2016!

Pictured (L to R): 2015 CCA Top Hand Award Winner Greg Kuck, Montague; CCA President Billy Flournoy, Likely; and third place Top Hand Winner Tom Talbot, Bishop. Second place Top Hand Winner was Col. Jake Parnell, of Cattlemen's Livestock Market, Galt.

2015 CCA Officers pictured here are (L to R): Treasurer Rob von der Leith, Copperopolis; President Billy Flournoy, Likely; Second Vice Presidents Mark Lacey, Independence; Jack Lavers, Glennville; and Rich Ross, Lincoln; Feeder Council Vice Chair Mike Smith, Selma; Feeder Council Chair Bill Brandenberg, El Centro; and First Vice President David Daley, Ph.D.

Presenting the 2015 Gordon Van Vleck Award to Richard Breitmeyer, DVM (second from left) is (L to R): Gene Harlan, DVM, Penngrove; Tom Talbot, DVM, Bishop; and Jack Hanson, Suanville. The Gordon Van Vleck Awarrd is the highesst honor given by CCA and is given to someone who is a strong supporter of the beef industry but whose main career is not in beef production.

2015 YCC Officers Kellie Mancino and Ashley Budde awarded the 2015 YCC Supporter of the Year Award to the Allied Industry Council, represented by Chair Heston Nunes, left; Tom Polich, second from right; and Bret Davis, far right.

California CattleWomen, Inc., units from across California each nominated an exempliary member from their unit for the 2015 CowBelle of the Year Award. All of the award recipients were honored at the CowBelle of the Year Luncheon. Pictured here are each of the 2015 honorees. December 2015 California Cattleman 19


Pictured here (L to R) are: John Lacey, Paso Robles; Sam Avila, Shandon; John Ascuaga, Sparks, Nev.; Col. John Rodgers, Visalia; Cindy Tews, Fowler; Neil McDougald, Friant; and Hal Stainbrook, Sanger.

Matt Byrne, Marysville; Sam Travioli, Visalia; and Lawrence Dwight, McKinleyville, got a chance to catch up at the CCA welcome reception.

Animal Health International's Janet Jones, Oroville; Steve Lambert, Oroville; Boehringer Ingelheim's Shane Strickler, Orland, at the trade show.

Pictured (L to R) are: Dan Macon, Auburn; UC Cooperative Extension's (UCCE) Leslie Roche, Ph.D.; Chet Vogt, Elk Creek; Tracy Schohr, Gridley; and UCCE's Ken Tate, Ph.D.

Silveus Rangeland Insurance's Aaron Tattersall, Parker, Colo.; with newlyelected CCA Second Vice President Mike Williams, Acton, at the welcome recption, sponsored by Silveus.

Allflex, USA's, Tom Pollich, Visalia, presented a scholarship check to Feeder Council Chair Bill Brandenberg, El Centro, right, and Feeder Council Vice Chair Mike Smith, left.

Pictured (L to R) are: CSU Chico's Sarah DeForest; with Kathy DeForest, McArthur; and Mike Byrne, Tulelake.

Santa Barbara CattleWomen President Linda Williams with San Luis Obispo CattleWomen President Sarah Kramer and Farm Credit West's Megan Huber.

Elanco Animal Health's Janel Fisher with California Beef Council's Jill Scofield in the Allied Industry Council Trade Show.

NCBA Policy Chair Kevin Kester, Parkfield; with NCBA's Colin Woodall, Washington, D.C.; and Interim NCBA Executive Vice President Kendal Frazier, Denver, Colo.

CCA Members ( L to R): Bud Sloan, DVM, and Kim Sloan, Santa Paula; with Richard Stanley, Livermore.

Longtime friends Geoff Gates, Zoetis Animal Health, Clovis; Celeste Settrini, Salinas; and Dick Nock, Templeton chatted in the trade show.

2015 YCC Officers Ashley Budde, far left, with Kellie Mancino, far right, and 2016 officers (L to R): Rebecca Swanson, Katie McDougald, Alise Azevedo and Crystal Avila.

Trade Show exhibitors Craig Bosworth, Merial Animal Health, Anderson; with Jonathan Beitia, Newport Technologies, Denver, Colo.

L to R are convention interns: Ashley Budde, Kellie Mancino, Danielle Wood, Jessie Theisman, Kameron Suggs and Crystal Avila.

20 California Cattleman December 2015


Pacific Legal Foundation's General Session 1 Keynote Damien Schiff spoke to Speaker was Cameron Bruett, convention attendees regarding from JBS. Waters of the U.S. litigation.

USMEF Economist Erin Borror spoke during the Beef Promotion Luncheon.

Zoetis Cattlemen's College 1 Speaker Daniel Shike, Ph.D., spoke about feed efficiency in beef cattle.

Zoetis' Larry Gran spoke about genetic technologies in session 2 of the Cattlemen's College.

Michael Nicols, DVM, spoke about hybrid cow vaccines in session 3 of the Zoetis Cattlemen's College.

CattleFax Economist Duane Lenz spoke at the annual CattleFax Breakfast.

NCBA President-Elect Tracy Brunner, Romona, Kan., spoke at the annual CCA/CCW Dinner Friday night.

Californian and NFL Player Bear Pascoe addressed CCW members. He is pictured with his aunt and CCW President Sheila Bowen.

Young Cattlemen from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

California State University, Chico, brought the largest number of Young Cattlemen.

Young Cattlemen from California State University, Fresno.

Young Cattlemen from the University of California, Davis. December 2015 California Cattleman 21


Maggie Malson, Parma, Idaho

Born and raised in the beef industry, Maggie Malson has provided writing, photography and design services for the past 15 years as an agriculture communications professional, most recently completing 13 years as the publisher for the Idaho Cattle Association and the Line Rider Magazine. She graduated from Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan., with a degree in agricultural communications and journalism, and animal science. Maggie, who also owns Maggie Malson Photography, resides on a registered Angus and Hereford ranch outside of Parma, Idaho, with her husband, Josh, and their four children. When not writing or photographing clients, watching kid activities or helping with the family cattle operation, Maggie enjoys being creative through art, crafts, cooking and baking.

Anna Aja, Maricopa, Ariz.

Anna Aja was raised as the fourth generation on her family’s cow-calf ranch in Cottonwood, Ariz. Growing up she was active showing sheep and cattle in 4-H and FFA. She served as the Arizona State FFA President in 2003-2004. While attending the University of Arizona to earn a degree in Agricultural Economics she was a College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Ambassador, in Sigma Alpha and served as a 2005 National Beef Ambassador. Following graduation, she worked for the Arizona Beef Council as the Director of Public Relations & Marketing, did a short stint in Yuma at Gowan Company in Communications and has been the Director of Communications for the Arizona Cattle Growers’ Association (ACGA) since July 2010. At ACGA Anna designs and publishes a monthly membership magazine, the Arizona Cattlelog, and quarterly newsletter, oversees membership and is responsible for convention planning. She is active in her church, Our Lady of Grace Roman Catholic Church, as well as many cattle industry organizations and enjoys auctioneering, exploring new restaurants and spending time with family. Residents of Maricopa, Anna and her husband, Bass, have a three-year-old son, Basilio, and a two-year-old daughter, Andy Marie and are expecting another blessing in March 2016.

Deb Cockrell, Cedarville, Calif.

For Deb Cockrell agriculture is in her blood. Together with her husband and four children, the Cockrells run a family operation in the far north eastern corner of California, which consists of a cattle ranch and Cockrell’s High Desert Lodging. Using two of the extra homes on the ranch, which are over 130 years old, the Cockrells accommodate families, horse groups, recreationalists, hunters and travelers. This consumes most of Deb's time along with helping run the ranch. She is also involved in a variety of community organizations. A member of the Modoc County Cattlewomen for 25 years and very involved on the state level, Deb strives to continually promote the beef industry to city guests and takes great pleasure in helping turn their lack of knowledge into more informed positive thoughts. Deb has also been a 4-H leader for swine, horse, cooking and photography groups. What started as a photography hobby for Deb, has blossomed into a business: Whip and Spur Photography. Deb says her camera goes everywhere with her to capture daily ranch life. Her photographs have been placed on display in the family lodges and sold to guests and followers from around the country who have come to know and appreciate the western way of life.

Beef. It's What's for Dinner. Sponsored by the California Beef Council

1st

"TRI-TIP ON THE GRILL" TERRI ARINGTON, COLUMBIA

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"GET THE BBQ READY" LESLIE JOOST, EL DORADO

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"PORTERHOUSE ANYONE?" ANNA REED, NAPA

22 California Cattleman December 2015


Rural Life 1st

2nd

"BEWARE OF FREE HORSE" JULIE CANO, WILLIAMS

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"MODERN DAY COWBOY" CARISSA KOOPMANN RIVERS, MONTAGUE

"MOO-VING DAY" JACOB MCAFFERTY, DAVIS

People 2nd

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"SHIPPING" JESSICA GREER, EXETER

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"COWBOY SAM" JULIE CANO, WILLIAMS

"WHO'S CATCHING WHO?" LAURA TALBOT, BISHOP

California Landscapes 1st

2nd

"THE GREEN RANCH" JULIE CANO, WILLIAMS

3nd

"CALIFORNIA POPPIES" JULIE CANO, WILLIAMS

"SPRING GRAZING" AMANDA BARRETT, CALIENTE

Animals & Wilflife 2nd

1st

"MORNING GLORY" JULIE CANO, WILLIAMS

3nd

"THE TABLE LANDS" JANET JONES, OROVILLE

"WARRIORS" JANET JONES, OROVILLE

Young Guns (photographers under age 18) 1st

"PEEK-A-BOO" CARISSA ELLYSON, LOMA RICA

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"DOZER" CARISSA ELLYSON, LOMA RICA

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"IF THESE BOOTS COULD TALK" CARISSA ELLYSON, LOMA RICA

December 2015 California Cattleman 23


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BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD U.S. BEEF SHINES AT MAJOR FOOD EVENTS IN EUROPE from the U.S. Meat Export Federation The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) recently showcased U.S. beef at two major food events in Europe. In Amsterdam, chefs, restaurant owners, food bloggers and journalists joined meat importers for a workshop and tasting titled, “The Marbled Meat Club Goes Dutch.” The objective of the event was to educate foodservice professionals about the versatility of U.S. beef and provide media with information on the product’s high quality. Funding support was provided by state corn checkoff organizations. More than 100 people were welcomed to the Rijks Restaurant – part of the Rijksmuseum, a Netherlands national museum dedicated to arts and history – by U.S. Consul General to Amsterdam David McCawley. He pointed out that the setting was ideal for fostering relationships between Dutch food companies and the U.S. beef industry, as well as the California Wine Institute, which partnered with USMEF for the tasting. The event was attended by a large number of importers from the area, as well as their customers. John Brook, USMEF regional director for Europe, Russia and the Middle East, opened with an overview of the U.S. beef industry and highlighted the advantages of including U.S. beef on restaurant menus. “The Marbled Meat Club Goes Dutch” gained a great deal of media exposure, especially on social media. The hashtag #USBeefgoesDutch reached almost 20,000 Twitter accounts during the event and created more than 55,000 Twitter impressions. USMEF also provided journalists with audio-visual materials and a press release that included facts about U.S. beef that are important to the European audience, including references to the

Butcher Serge Bos demonstrates proper cutting of U.S. beef during a USMEF workshop and tasting event in Amsterdam. Attendees later dined on U.S. beef dishes paired with California wines.

26 California Cattleman December 2015

consistency of grain-fed U.S. beef. U.S. beef was also featured prominently at the biennial Anuga food fair, held in Cologne, Germany. Funding support for this event was provided by the USDA Market Access Program (MAP) and the Beef Checkoff Program. Anuga attracted 160,000 visitors from 192 countries. Brook reported that participating U.S. companies were pleased with the contacts they made and with business meetings held during Anuga, which continues to maintain its prestige as one of the world’s largest trade exhibitions. USMEF has participated in Anuga for nearly four decades. This year’s show provided important insights into existing markets, as well as information about emerging markets that could prove valuable to the U.S. beef industry. “Despite the current high prices for high-quality, grain-finished U.S. beef for the EU market, potential buyers from a wide range of sectors wanted to discuss prospects with suppliers,” said Philip Seng, USMEF president and CEO. Meanwhile, countries that make up the Greater Russia region were very much a focus for exporters, as were the Middle East, Africa and other emerging markets. “You want to make contact with companies and traders in these markets that are growing and have potential for growth, and Anuga is a good place to do it,” explained Seng. “Competition for these markets is huge, so it’s important to make them aware of the advantages of U.S. beef.” The next Anuga food show will be held in October 2017 in Cologne.

USMEF Senior Vice President for Trade Access Thad Lively and President and CEO Philip Seng discuss U.S. beef at the Anuga food show in Germany


Beau and Lindy Cruise H: (541) 462-3109 bar9angus@gmail.com

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Setting Sail

Cattle Industry Convention Offers Something for Everyone

T

he 2016 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in San Diego, Jan. 27-29, promises to be this year’s can’t-miss industry event. The nation’s oldest and largest convention for the cattle business will be celebrating its 118th year with an outstanding line-up of education, events, exhibitors and entertainment and it provides something for everyone with a stake in the business. This event, as always, centers around the annual meetings for NCBA, Cattlemen's Beef Promotion & Research Board, American National CattleWomen, CattleFax and the National Cattlemen’s Foundation, but the convention is about more than just business. The week kicks off with Cattlemen’s College, the industry’s premier education event with ideas and management techniques that will immediately benefit your ranch’s bottom line. Robert Fraley, Ph.D., Monsanto’s executive vice president and chief technology officer, will provide insights on the future of food production and how Monsanto is preparing to meet increased demand for agricultural products with fewer resources. As a part of his presentation, Fraley will explain how agriculture must embrace collaboration, sustainably intensify agriculture on arable land, take pressure off of marginal land and reduce food waste. Cattlemen’s College will also offer an exciting panel of experts who will give their opinions and perspectives of what the cow herd should look like in the next five years. The panel will also examine a set of cattle in the ring to help illustrate how the beef industry can move forward to capture premiums and capitalize on genetic advancements. Discussion topics will also examine the benefits of purchasing land versus leasing, use of DNA technology, health protocols and other emerging technologies. During the week in San Diego, general session topics will headline each day, offering attendees the opportunity to hear from exciting and innovative speakers who will offer their perspectives on the business landscape and how it will affect rural America. Headlining this year’s Opening General Session will be celebrity chef Robert Irvine and his new stage show. During the session the seasoned, celebrated, no-nonsense chef will take his signature culinary sensibilities to a whole new level, resulting in a high energy, interactive, multimedia and multi-sensory theatrical experience. The popular CattleFax Outlook Session will also offer attendees a look at what’s ahead in the cattle markets after 28 California Cattleman December 2015

a volatile fall marketing season. The past 18 months saw grazing and growing conditions in the majority of areas as good as they have been for two-to-three decades. Cattle prices were record-high during 2014 through 2015 and cow-calf producers were sent a strong signal to expand the nation’s cow herd. Now, expansion is in full swing and the January 2016 inventory numbers will show significant growth. Beef demand, meanwhile, has been on the increase, but analysts will examine what’s ahead in 2016 and beyond and how it will impact the bottom line for farms and ranches across the country. This year’s NCBA Trade Show covers nearly six full acres of exhibits, featuring the newest products and services for the beef industry. More than 250 exhibitors will be on hand to answer questions, demonstrate the newest and best products available and provide solutions that will benefit cattlemen and women on their operations. With a wide variety of products and services on display, there is certain to be something for everyone, whether you have a small cowherd or a large feedlot. Of course, no Cattle Industry Convention would be complete without a full week of entertainment options for participants, and this year is no exception. This year’s Thursday night event is a once-in-a-lifetime exclusive party aboard the USS Midway, the longest-serving Navy aircraft carrier of the 20th century, featuring a four acre flight deck and two enclosed hangar bays. Participants can relive 50 years of history, see historic aircraft, enjoy flight simulators, docent tours and the Battle of Midway Theater. This exclusive event will allow cattlemen and women to take a trip back in time to experience an authentic USO show complete with the “classic swing” sound. The week’s entertainment events conclude on Friday night with the Cowboy Concert Series, featuring the incomparable Martina McBride. Martina has been a steady presence on the country music charts, with many memorable hits including Independence Day and This One’s for the Girls. With nearly 20 singles reaching country music’s Top 10, there will be music everyone is sure to love. The 2016 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show is certain to be an outstanding event, with activities for the entire family and everyone on your farm or ranch. Entertainment, education and the opportunity to participate in the decision-making process that will shape the future of the industry are all reasons to make the trip to California. If you’re in the cattle business, you need to be in San Diego in January.


SET SAIL SAN DIEGO Soak up some sun and new ideas for your operation! CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION NCBA TRADE SHOW

January 27-29, 2016 San Diego, California

#BEEFMEET www.beefusa.org


Good for People, Pocketbooks and the Planet

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by Jacob McCafferty, student, University of California, Davis

omo Sapiens, the genetic species that defines us as human, possess canines and molars. This proves that people are structurally and biologically meant to be omnivores, which means we can eat both meat and plant materials for our necessary nutrition. Since we biologically have many options of what to consume, as well as many choices of products in modern times, the questions of what do we eat and why can become a dilemma. We want what we eat to taste good, but we also want to feel good about our choice. Beef is an excellent option for consumption as it is nutritionally superior, economically manageable and raising beef is good for the planet. Beef is nutritionally superior to many other food sources for various reasons. One excellent reason to guarantee that beef will be of high quality is the Beef Quality Assurance Program, which is a national program implemented on a state-to-state basis. Dee Griffin, DVM, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb., simply states, “The BQA [Manual is the] overarching [protocol], providing some consistency across the state programs. They are good production practices to guarantee the quality of beef products.” Therefore the nutrition, taste and production practices used are guaranteed to be of high quality.

30 California Cattleman December 2015

Along the lines of nutrition, beef contains a lot of vital heme iron, which is, according to author Chris Kresser (Red Meat: It Does A Body Good), “...a form that is absorbed and utilized much more efficiently than the non-heme iron found in plant foods.” Iron is used for numerous purposes in our bodies and one vital role is carrying oxygen in the blood stream; I would say that makes beef a great choice for making sure you get all the iron you need. Now the reason that beef is superior to other meats is that it is a red meat with additional vitamins and minerals that aren’t contained in white meat. Kresser adds that, "Red meats contain significantly more B12, iron and zinc than white meat.” These extra levels of B12 and zinc make it much easier for your body to get the amount of nutrients it needs. The nutritional advantages are reason enough to consume beef, and the added economic benefits make it so much juicier! The economic benefits of consuming beef are closely linked to nutrition. Well-known beef industry advocate Amanda Radke, who penned Six Reason Why I Eat Meat Every Day said, “Calorie-for-calorie, beef is more nutrient dense than . . . protein options like peanut butter, tofu, or beans." ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 32


        



  

  

    

     



        

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December 2015 California Cattleman 31


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 30 The fact of the matter is pound for pound beef is a smarter economic, and nutritional, decision. To obtain the same level of nutrition that beef contains you would have to buy a lot more of a different product. This can be costly, while beef is cost conscious. This is especially true since there are different cuts of meat to choose from; this makes beef a highly affordable option. Cattle also play a key role when it comes to impacting our environment. Cattle have a positive impact on our environment in the form of nutrients for the soil. They are vital components for restoring carbon to the soil, which is one of the world's most promising strategies to countering environmental change. Beef cattle in an extensive system, a system that requires lower labor input than an intensive system, are often times in a pasture rotation. This means that the cattle will graze in one pasture for a period of time before being moved to the next one. The grazing will stimulate the vegetation supporting its growth, while the cattle’s hooves and ruminant digestive tracks will promote seed germination. The drought in California has raised questions about the usage of water. A concern is that cattle cost too much in terms of gallons per pound. However, research from the University of California, Davis, shows that producing a typical pound of U.S. beef takes about 441 gallons of water per pound – only slightly more water than for a pound of rice. Keep in mind that beef contains far more nutrients than rice does. With that additional piece of knowledge, one gallon of water more for beef is quite a bargain! Furthermore, cattle do not necessarily compete with crops

for land. Cattle graze on steep hillsides, forested areas, rocky terrain and other land that is not arable-land that is not fit for crop production-which means cattle and crops do not conflict in terms of land usage. Beef is the logical choice for the consumer. The nutrition content is better than that of any white meats and it contains certain minerals and vitamins that cannot be found in plant-based proteins. Pound-for-pound, beef is also the more economical choice. Since beef contains more nutrients than plants and other choices of meat you would need to buy more of another product to reach the same nutrients as that of beef. This would be extremely expensive; making beef a great financial option, giving consumers more bang for their buck. In terms of the environment, beef has a low impact on water usage. It doesn't need to compete with crops for arable land. And, in turn, it puts carbon back into the soil to encourage further vegetation growth. If you weren't convinced already, beef is healthy for you, an economically viable option, and you also help the world a little bit each time you buy a beef product. Consumers of beef products should feel good knowing they are supporting an industry doing so much good for the consumer and the world in which we all live.

This article was the first place entry in the 2015 Young Cattlemen's Committee Writing Contest, a competition designed to help young agriculture communicators hone their writing skills while earning money to fund their education.

TATE honored for committment to university, science and industry

KEN TATE, PH.D.

University of California Cooperative Extension specialist and faculty member Ken Tate, Ph.D., received the James H. Meyer Distinguished Achievement Award Nov. 11 at the University of California, Davis. The UC Davis award recognizes a distinguished career of achievement by an Academic Federation member. A secondary but important consideration is voluntary service to the campus, UC community, or state, regional or

national bodies. Tate has compiled an impressive record of collaborative and solution-oriented research addressing agricultural and environmental issues across California’s 57 million acres of rangeland. He provides science and education leadership to California’s diverse rangeland stakeholders and the campus community and has been repeatedly recognized for his work on surface water quality on rangelands. He has given more than 400 extension presentations, published more than 100 journal articles, served as principal investigator on 37 research and extension grants ($6.3 million), and as coprincipal investigator on another 43 research and extension grants ($5.7 million). Tate works with private landowners, agency land 32 California Cattleman December 2015

managers, and regulatory agency staff to understand the fate and transport of surface water pollutants. Early in his career he helped identify management practices to reduce drinking water contamination risks by livestock-borne Cryptosporidium parvum and other pathogens, which enabled ranching families to continue sustainable grazing practices on watersheds east of San Francisco. He has also worked with these groups to identify and implement realistic management practices to reduce pollutants. Tate is known for his ability to build consensus among diverse audiences on controversial topics related to range livestock production. In 2011, he developed the biennial UC Rustici Rangeland Science Symposium that features scientists, policymakers and ranchers working on key rangeland issues. “Dr. Tate has advanced a remarkable and productive research and extension career in range management and environmental stewardship,” said Department of Plant Sciences chair Chris van Kessel in nominating Tate for the award. “His program has been exemplary in bringing together diverse research and management collaborations to evaluate scientific information relevant to targeted issues, contribute new scientific knowledge, and extend tools and knowledge to serve the needs of society.” Tate's research has been instrumental to cattlemen and women around the nation and CCA wishes to congratulate him on this well-deserved honor.


TODD RENFREW BROKER/OWNER • calBRE #01727574 707 Merchant St., Suite 100 Vacaville, CA 95688

Office: (707) 455-4444 • info@caoutdoorproperties.com

ESTERO AMERICANO RANCH

Marin County, California $17,000,000 *Video available on You Tube.

1,118 +/- acres. Only 50 minutes from San Francisco, the lands are USDA Certified Organic, producing Grass Fed Wagyu Beef Cattle. To the North, the land borders about two miles of the Estero Americano. To the South there are panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean. A ranch home within sounds of the ocean, barn, equipment garage, corrals, shop, natural spring ponds, reservoirs, quarry, & wildlife habitat.

12 MILE RANCH

Modoc County, California $4,500,000

12 Mile Ranch extends 5,980 +/- acres across Modoc County, CA, and Lake County, OR. Dotted with well-watered meadows, the ranch is suitable for a small-scale cattle operation. It would also make the perfect private oasis for the seeker of almost any type of adventure or recreation. Hunting, fishing, endless trails, old west artifacts, Eastern Warner Mountains. 3/bd 2/ba farmhouse, 3-car garage, large metal barn, old orchard. Runs 250-300 pair.

SUNSHINE RANCH

Shasta County, California $3,495,000 *Video available on You Tube

288 acres with 185 acres of irrigated cropland growing high altitude alfalfa hay. There are 3 wells, all tied together with underground mainline. Main home & 2 additional homes, hay barns, livestock barn, shop, equipment storage and several outbuildings. You can run about 50 pair for the summer in the east field, more or less depending on rainfall.

KEENE RANCH

BRISCOE CREEK RANCH

Kern County, California $11,635,000 – Price Reduced! *Video available on You Tube

The 8,940±-acre ranch has beautiful valleys tucked into the hills with springs and wildlife. The ranch is optimally set up for a substantial cattle operation, yet offers much more. A hunter’s paradise, attracting wildlife such as deer, elk, quail, black bears, foxes and much more. Located just two hours from downtown Los Angeles, between Golden Hills and Bear Valley, make this a prime development opportunity.

SHILLING YOSEMITE RANCH

Mariposa County, California $4,499,000 – Price Reduced! *Video available on You Tube.

This magnificent recreational playground is located just 25 miles from Yosemite National Park. Build your dream home and live on this beautiful fenced & cross-fenced ranch with springs and ponds supplying year round water. Raise livestock, go hunting and horseback riding, great camping, mountain biking, and even do a little gold mining.

HUMPHREY RANCH

Lassen County, California $3,500,000 *Video available on You Tube

Glenn County, California $6,250,000 *Video available on You Tube.

8184 +/- deeded-acre property is located in Glenn County about 5 miles from Stonyford, CA. The ranch has 7 year round ponds and in the northern end of the property you have over one half mile of Briscoe Creek, a year round creek with trout. The headquarters has a great barn, shop, guest cottage, and caretaker home. Runs 200 pair for the season or 100 pair year round.

CROOK RANCH

Tehama County, California $ 3,999,500 *Video available on You Tube.

This is your classic California winter grass ranch. 5,101 deeded acres that usually run 300 pair from Nov. 15 to May 15. It is 21 miles from Red Bluff, CA and is currently in the Williamson Act. The ranch sits at 1,000 ft. elevation and rises to a high of 1520 ft. Miles of trails and beautiful scenery make the camping, hunting, fishing, swimming and horseback riding fantastic experiences, all without ever leaving your own ranch!

SHASTA SHADOW RANCH

2,291 acres, offered for sale for the first time in 113 years! The ranch runs in one unbroken block from USFS lands in the Sierra’s down to the shores of Honey Lake. 1½ man, 400-cow operation. Great irrigation well, 3,000 GPM, and the pivots are on some of the valley’s best sandy loam soils. The ranch owns all the water from McDermott Creek, and the ranch comes with 2 landowner deer tags. The 1900’s home could use TLC.

Siskiyou County, California $2,990,000 *Video available on You Tube

997 +/- acres with gorgeous custom home, immaculate equestrian facilities; 9 stall barn w/indoor arena, office, tack room, heated wash racks, guest apartment, shop, two more barns, shop/garage, manufactured home, outdoor arena, round pen, irrigated horse pastures and several dry lot turnouts w/ water, 3 large outdoor run in shelters, hundreds of acres to ride, & beautiful views of Mt. Shasta!

OVER 160 LISTINGS AVAILABLE AT WWW.CALIFORNIAOUTDOORPROPERTIES.COM December 2015 California Cattleman 33


STORMS ON THE HORIZON

CALIFORNIA MAY FINALLY SEE RELIEF by Meteorologist Brian Bledsoe I have been speaking to a lot of folks locally about what is likely to occur this winter. I think of "winter" as starting in late November and not being over until the end of April and sometimes longer. So, humor me during this article when I speak of "winter." There has been a great deal of talk regarding the strong El Niño that continues in the Pacific Ocean. I have shared my thoughts on the subject with you in a similar article earlier in the fall. There has also been an ample amount of misinformation shared about this El Niño, including what it is and what it could mean. The fact is, every El Niño is different despite it possibly looking the same on paper as another event. Blanket statements about such a phenomena are just irresponsible, especially without science and history to back up such statements. This article is comprised of my thoughts, supplemented with some history and model data. I am not the smartest person in the world on this subject, nor do I claim to be. People often ask my thoughts on the matter, so here they are. This is the second strongest El Niño since 1950 (only one stronger is the 1997-98 event) and is likely going to get a bit stronger in the next month or so. In Figure 1, below, is a look at the global sea surface temperature anomalies. All that red is water that is warmer than normal. Given what is going on in the Pacific, this El Niño event should continue to strengthen a bit more. Table 1 illustrates what various models are forecasting in terms of El Niño strength and timing of weakening. You can see that most of the models have this event maxing out in the late fall and early winter, before really weakening as we head into spring and summer of 2016. Various models are forecasting different specifics for California during this El Niño event. The figures on the following page illustrate just one of the models that we use, and it looks to have a “decent” handle on how things may play out. Now, I will be the first to admit that the CFSV2 Model (displayed on page 37) does have problems from time to time. However, I think the forecast that it is putting out makes a lot of sense. While the wet season may take a bit to get started, it sure looks to go gangbusters during the core of the winter and early spring. History suggests this is likely too, with California traditionally getting pretty wet during a strong El Niño. I have been telling folks not to put all of their eggs in the 34 California Cattleman December 2015

FIGURE 1.

TABLE 1. MODEL OF EL NIÑO PREDICTIONS

“El Niño basket” for the reasons I suggested above. Every El Niño is different and the associated impacts can be quite different too. However, I am cautiously optimistic going forward that some much needed moisture is on the way. In some cases, it will likely be too much moisture at one time and flash flooding and mudslides may become an issue. However, at the very least this winter and subsequent spring likely won’t be nearly as dry as the previous two years.


FIGURE 2. CFSV2 PRECIPITATION MODEL FORECAST DECEMBER 2015

FIGURE 3. CFSV2 PRECIPITATION MODEL FORECAST JANUARY 2016

FIGURE 4. CFSV2 PRECIPITATION MODEL FORECAST FEBRUARY 2016

FIGURE 5. CFSV2 PRECIPITATION MODEL FORECAST MARCH 2016

FIGURE 6. CFSV2 PRECIPITATION MODEL FORECAST APRIL 2016

CFSV2 Model Precipitation Forecast Green = Wetter Than Normal Brown = Drier Than Normal White = Normal

Meteorologist Brian Bledsoe, based in Colorado Springs, Colo., is a source of information who farmers and ranchers across the country turn to for their weather updates. This weather forecast is brought to you by Silveus Insurance Group's Rangeland Division - CCA's official Rangeland Insurance provider. December 2015 California Cattleman 35


ANADA 200-495, Approved by FDA

速 Enroflox 100 (enrofloxacin) 100 mg/mL Antimicrobial Injectable Solution

For Subcutaneous Use in Beef Cattle, Non-Lactating Dairy Cattle and Swine Only. Not for Use in Female Dairy Cattle 20 Months of Age or Older Or In Calves To Be Processed For Veal. Brief Summary: Before using Enroflox速 100, consult the product insert, a summary of which follows. CAUTION: Federal (U.S.A.) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal (U.S.A.) law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: Each mL of Enroflox 100 contains 100 mg of enrofloxacin. Excipients are L-arginine base 200 mg, n-butyl alcohol 30 mg, benzyl alcohol (as a preservative) 20 mg and water for injection q.s. INDICATIONS: Cattle - Single-Dose Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni and Mycoplasma bovis in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle; and for the control of BRD in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M. haemolytica, P. multocida, H. somni and M. bovis. Cattle - Multiple-Day Therapy: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Histophilus somni in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle. Swine: Enroflox 100 is indicated for the treatment and control of swine respiratory disease (SRD) associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida, Haemophilus parasuis and Streptococcus suis. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Cattle: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Swine: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 5 days of receiving a single-injection dose.

NEW ARRIVALs ALEXANDRA GATLIN Alexandra Marie Gatlin, daughter of Billy and Hillary Gatlin, Herald, was born on October 22, weighing 6 pounds, 8 ounces. She joins three-year-old-sister Catherine. Billy currently serves as CCA's executive vice president and Hillary is employed by Kaiser Permanente. Grandparents are Michael and Denise Van Horn, and Bill and Barbara Gatlin, all of Atwater.

RENLEY NUNES Renley Claire Nunes was born on August 6, weighing 7 pounds, 10 ounces. She was welcomed by first time parents Heston and Kendal Nunes of Hughson. Heston is a cattle buyer for Cargill and the Chairman for the CCA Allied Industry Council. Kendal is a dairy pharmaceutical representatvie for Elanco Animal Health. Grandparents are Greg and Yvette Nunes of Modesto; Kerin Blasingame and Duane Metzger of Sanger; and Jim Britton of Firebaugh.

36 California Cattleman December 2015

HUMAN WARNINGS: For use in animals only. Keep out of the reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. In case of contact, immediately flush eyes with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes. In case of dermal contact, wash skin with soap and water. Consult a physician if irritation persists following ocular or dermal exposures. Individuals with a history of hypersensitivity to quinolones should avoid this product. In humans, there is a risk of user photosensitization within a few hours after excessive exposure to quinolones. If excessive accidental exposure occurs, avoid direct sunlight. For customer service, to obtain a copy of the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) or to report adverse reactions, call Norbrook at 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: The effects of enrofloxacin on cattle or swine reproductive performance, pregnancy and lactation have not been adequately determined. The long-term effects on articular joint cartilage have not been determined in pigs above market weight. Subcutaneous injection can cause a transient local tissue reaction that may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Enroflox 100 contains different excipients than other enrofloxacin products. The safety and efficacy of this formulation in species other than cattle and swine have not been determined. Quinolone-class drugs should be used with caution in animals with known or suspected Central Nervous System (CNS) disorders. In such animals, quinolones have, in rare instances, been associated with CNS stimulation which may lead to convulsive seizures. Quinolone-class drugs have been shown to produce erosions of cartilage of weight-bearing joints and other signs of arthropathy in immature animals of various species. See Animal Safety section for additional information. ADVERSE REACTIONS: No adverse reactions were observed during clinical trials. ANIMAL SAFETY: In cattle safety studies, clinical signs of depression, incoordination and muscle fasciculation were observed in calves when doses of 15 or 25 mg/kg were administered for 10 to 15 days. Clinical signs of depression, inappetance and incoordination were observed when a dose of 50 mg/kg was administered for 3 days. An injection site study conducted in feeder calves demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue and underlying muscle. In swine safety studies, incidental lameness of short duration was observed in all groups, including the saline-treated controls. Musculoskeletal stiffness was observed following the 15 and 25 mg/kg treatments with clinical signs appearing during the second week of treatment. Clinical signs of lameness improved after treatment ceased and most animals were clinically normal at necropsy. An injection site study conducted in pigs demonstrated that the formulation may induce a transient reaction in the subcutaneous tissue. Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland I01 March 2015 The Norbrook logos and Enroflox速 are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.


THE WAIT IS OVER ENROFLOX速 100 NOW APPROVED FOR SINGLE-DOSE BRD TREATMENT & CONTROL enrofloxacin

ENROFLOX 100 速

enrofloxacin

Single-Dose BRD Treatment & Control Same Active Ingredient & Dosing Regimen as Baytril速 100 in Beef & Non-Lactating Dairy Cattle Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Federal law prohibits the extra-label use of this drug in food-producing animals. Cattle intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days from the last treatment. This product is not approved for female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Use with caution in animals with known or suspected CNS disorders. Observe label directions and withdrawal times. See product labeling for full product information.

www.norbrookinc.com FOR VETERINARY USE ONLY The Norbrook logos are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited Enroflox is a registered trademark of Norbrook Laboratories Limited Baytril is a registered trademark of Bayer Animal Health

0815-495-I01B

December 2015 California Cattleman 37


Cattlemen’s Report RECENT RESULTS & AVERAGES SHASTA BULL SALE

NOV. 4, COTTONWOOD Col. John Rodgers

Managed by Greg & Maureen Thomas 60 BULLS ....................................................$5,393 WORLD OF BULLS NOV. 7, GALT

The Champion Hereford Bull at the 50th Annual Shasta Bull Sale in Cottonwood was consigned by Oak Knoll Herefords, Flournoy. He sold to Elworthy Ranch, Willows, for $5,750. Pictured at (L to R): Sale Manager Greg Thomas, Shasta Livestock's Mason Peek, Oak Knoll Hereford's Cathy Tobin and Shasta Livestock's Brad Peek.

Zoetis Employees Lend Support to those Impacted by Valley Fires Following four years of extreme drought conditions, California's vulnerability to wildfires fires has drastically increased. In mid-September, the Valley fires of Northern California destroyed an estimated 1,238 single-family homes and hundreds of other structures, making it the third most destructive wildfire in California history, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Sadly, hundreds of residents have been displaced including some of our customers, pet owners and the animals in their care. Over the past month, Zoetis employees have been doing everything they can to lend support on the ground. From fundraising and promoting product donations to providing comfort and counsel, members of the Zoetis field force have informally partnered with customers to help facilitate recovery – particularly in regards to fostering and caring for animals injured or displaced by the fires. "The Middletown and Lake County area is still dealing with the aftermath of the fires. I recently visited a practice and it was truly heartbreaking to see the devastation to this community," said Mike Hartman, Territory Business Manager at Zoetis. "I've been trying to help these customers in any way I can like coordinating requests for product donations. I’m proud to work for an organization that encourages us to operate with a strong moral compass." Grant Miller, DVM and Director of Regulatory Affairs at the California Veterinary Medical Association, said the following about his relationship with Zoetis, "I am an equine practitioner by trade but in relation to the Valley Fire emergency response, I am functioning to provide logistical support to area animal hospitals. Thanks to support from Zoetis employees, we are actually adequately meeting the needs of an entire displaced population - quite an endeavor, but it is happening! [Zoetis’] response efforts in this situation reflect that same high level of professionalism and commitment to the community which you serve, and it does not go unnoticed by the tight-knit profession." Zoetis is committed to serving the communities where we live and work, especially in times of need. To learn more about our community efforts, visit http://www.zoetis.com/making-difference-our-communities. 38 California Cattleman December 2015

Col. Jake Parnell

Managed by Parnell Dickinson, Inc. 65 BULLS ....................................................$5,148 RICK MACHADO LIVESTOCK'S "THE MAIN EVENT" HORSE SALE NOV. 7, PASO ROBLES

Col. Rick Machado & Col. John Rodgers

68 HORSES..................................................$8,405


IN MEMORY

HAROLD FOSTER Harold Ellis Foster, known to many as Papa, passed away Oct. 15, 2015, from a brain injury, which was the result of a protective momma cow butting him. Up to the day of his passing, Harold was actively involved everyday on the ranch. Harold was born Aug. 30, 1934, in Yreka to John and Edith Foster. He attended Bogus Elementary, Cottonwood Elementary (seventh and eighth grade) and graduated from Yreka High School with the class of 1952. Harold married his high school sweetheart, Marianna Brown, on Sept. 11, 1954. For the first four years of their marriage, Harold was in the US Navy, serving most of his time on the USS Piedmont (AD-17). Of Harold and Marianna’s five children, John and Cheryl were born during the Navy years in Napa, while Julie, Charlotte and Pam were born in Yreka. Harold and Marianna returned to the ranch in 1959. He is a member of the fifth generation to live and work the Bogus Creek Ranch, which traces its roots back to 1871. In 1997, Harold lost Marianna to cancer. After her passing, he and Sherrie Akkerman were companions for a number of years. This relationship brought many eventful times for the couple. Harold enjoyed attending various functions and started dating his dance partner, Marilyn Pope. He and Marilyn had a short but sweet relationship, one that was enjoyed by each other and those around them. Harold has continued the family tradition of supporting local schools. When the state condemned the old school house

at the confluence of Bogus Creek and Cold Creek, Harold donated land for the new school to be built. Harold has served on the Bogus School Board, was a 4-H leader and a member of the Yreka Elks Club. He served several terms as a director of Siskiyou County Cattlemen, and was named Cattleman of the Year in 2010. Harold was truly happiest when he was operating his equipment, be it an excavator, Cat or backhoe. He was always thinking of ways to improve the cattle herd, irrigation, cattle trails and watering spots. Harold was a true conservationist. He strongly believed in improving the quality of the streams on the ranch. Due to his efforts, Bogus Creek is highly rated for its fish habitat. Harold loved to gather family and friends for a party. Family reunions were very important to him. He wanted a big birthday party every year so he could visit with family and friends and dance to his favorite band, Tulsa. Harold was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Marianna; his sister, Adelaide Hagerman; and his companion, Sherrie Akkerman. Harold is survived by his five children, John Foster (Angela Dougherty), Cheryl Foster (Dennis Donnelly), Julie Kimball (Scott Kimball), Charlotte LeGallee (Dale LeGallee) and Pam Willey (Howard Willey); his two sisters, Marcia Allen and Bev Foster; 13 grandchildren; 16 great grandchildren; three great great grandchildren; many nieces, nephews and cousins; and his dear friend, Marilyn Pope. A memorial of Harold’s life was held, Nov. 6, at the Montague Hall. Memorial donations may be made to the Marianna Foster Memorial Scholarship Fund, c/o Siskiyou County Cattle Women, 9900 Ager Beswick Road, Montague, CA 96064, to the United Scholarship Fund, established for John Neville Foster, or a charity of your choice.

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December 2015 California Cattleman 45


Advertisers’ Index All West/Select Sires.............................................................38 Amador Angus......................................................................40 American Hereford Association ........................................42 Andreini & Co......................................................................12 Bar 9 Angus...........................................................................27 Bar R Angus..........................................................................40 Bar Six Charolais..................................................................27 Blagg Herefords....................................................................24 BMW Agus............................................................................40 Broken Arrow Angus...........................................................40 Broken Box Ranch................................................................44 Buchanan Angus...................................................................40 Byrd Cattle Co. .....................................................................40 California Custom................................................................44 California Outdoor Properties...........................................33 Cattlemen's Livestock Market...............................................7 Charron Ranch.....................................................................40 Cherry Glen Beefmasters....................................................42 Conlan Ranches California.................................................44 Conlin Fence Company.......................................................44 Conlin Supply Co., Inc.........................................................13 Corsair Angus Ranch...........................................................40 CSU, Chico College of Agriculture....................................43 Dal Porto Livestock..............................................................41 Diamond Back Ranch..........................................................44 Donati Ranch........................................................................40 Edwards, Lien & Toso..........................................................44 Farm Credit Alliance............................................................25 Five Star Land Company.....................................................44 Freitas Rangeland improvements.......................................36 Fresno State Ag Foundation................................................43 Furtado Angus......................................................................41 Furtado Livestock Enterprises............................................45 Genoa Livestock...................................................................42 Gonsalves Ranch...................................................................41 HAVE Angus.........................................................................41 Hogan Ranch.........................................................................42 Hone Ranch...........................................................................42 Hufford's Herefords..............................................................43 J/V Angus..............................................................................41 Lambert Ranch.....................................................................42 Lander Veterinary Clinic.....................................................45 Little Shasta Ranch...............................................................43 McPhee Red Angus..............................................................43 National Cattlemen's Beef Association..............................29 Noahs Angus Ranch...................................................... 14, 41 Norbrook Enroflox........................................................ 36, 37 Norbrook Norfenicol.................................................... 14, 15 O'Connell Ranch..................................................................41 ORIgen...................................................................................45 Orvis Cattle Company.........................................................43 Pacific Trace Minerals................................................... 44, 46 Pitchfork Cattle Co...............................................................43 Priefert...................................................................................13 Quail Valley Performance Bull Sale...................................31 Ray-Mar Ranches.................................................................41 Razzari Auto Center.............................................................45 Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale...............................................3 Sammis Ranch......................................................................41 San Juan Ranch.....................................................................42 Schafer Ranch.......................................................................41 Schohr Herefords..................................................................43 Sierra Ranches.......................................................................43 Silveira Bros...........................................................................42 Silveus Rangeland Insurance...............................................39 Skinner Livestock Transportation......................................44 Sonoma Mountain Herefords.............................................43 Southwet Fence & Supply Company, LLC.........................44 Spanish Ranch.......................................................................42 Tehama Angus Ranch..........................................................42 Teixeira Cattle Co.................................................................41 The Cowman's Kind Bull & Horse Sale............................27 Tumbleweed Ranch..............................................................42 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard.........................................11 Universal Semen Sales.........................................................45 Veterinary Service, Inc.........................................................44 VF Red Angus.......................................................................43 Vintage Angus Ranch................................................... 42, 48 Western Fence and Construction, Inc...................... 1, 5, 44 Western Stockman's Market..................................................9 Western Video Market...........................................................2 Windermere Commerical Real Estate...............................17 Wulff Brothers Livestock.....................................................41

46 California Cattleman December 2015

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erry M hristmas C

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December 2015 California Cattleman  
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