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September 2020

Inside This Month... industry benefits from CCA Scholarship program ranchers and sun exposure keeping anaplasmosis out of your herd

September 2020 California Cattleman 1


Pedretti Ranches Consistency. Quality. Predictability!

...In performance, maternal, carcass and convenience traits! GB L1 DOM PRCS 536Y

These are the type of animals that we continue to build our program around. Low maintenance, easy calving, performance with strong maternal and carcass traits, without sacrificing soundness and genetic predictability.

GB L1 DOMINO 762E

Contact us today about bulls of this kind and quality to add heterosis to your cowherd!

A big Selection of Coming Two Year Old and Spring Yearling Bulls Available by private treaty Now! Complete performance and ultrasound tested with a powerful cowherd and generations of quality behind them.

They will produce baldy replacements built for longevity!

Pedretti Ranches Registered Herefords Since 1946 Gino Pedretti ����������������������������������������������������209/756-1609 Mark St� Pierre �������������������������������������������������209/233-1406 Gino Pedretti Jr� �����������������������������������������������209/756-2088 Gino Pedretti III������������������������������������������������209/756-1612 E-mail���������������������������GBL1domino@sbcglobal�net

1975 E ROOSEVELT RD • EL NIDO, CA 95317


e s e h t t a s u Join ng sales... i m o upc HAYTHORN RANCH HEADQUARTERS • OGALLALA, NE.

—THIS SALE WILL ALSO FEATURE SELECT OFFERINGS OF LAMBS — CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: AUGUST 27

WVM HEADQUARTERS

SILVER LEGACY RESORT CASINO

CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: OCTOBER 14

CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 12

COTTONWOOD, CA

RENO, NV.

WATCH, LISTEN AND BID ONLINE AT WWW.WVMCATTLE.COM

HONORED TO BE RECOGNIZED AS THE 2020 NATIONAL BEEF QUALITY ASSURANCE MARKETER OF THE YEAR! September 2020 California Cattleman

3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION ______________ Since 1917

1221 H Street Sacramento CA 95814 (916) 444-0845

CAMRADERIE AND OPPORTUNITY DURING FALL 2020 MARKETING SEASON by Matt Macfarlane, M3 Cattle Marketing, for the California Cattleman

As we work our way into bull sale season, it would be naïve to suggest it is “just” another fall marketing season. Nothing about 2020 has been normal. From a tumultuous calf market this spring, we also faced uncertainty about what the tail end of the spring bull sale season held in store for seedstock producers. Fortunately for most, we weathered the COVID-19 spring storm fairly well and calf prices this summer saw a rebound on the video and at the local sale barn level. Now we approach the fall COVID-19 storm and are again faced with uncertainty about crowds, school closures and an upcoming presidential election that has all of us on the edge of our seat. But even more than most years, fall is bringing with it much more than a change of seasons and cooler weather. For me personally, fall is always a fun and exciting time. Despite nights and long hours on the road, fall brings with it many rewards that come in the form of great cattle, world-class tri-tip lunches, familiar faces and handshakes at the close of a deal. I am blessed to work in an industry where payoffs like these outweigh any challenges of the job. As I’ve already illustrated, for me, this time of year is always a favorite but this year is different – for lack of a better term. While it is always a favorite season, the breath of fresh air for me personally, to see long time friends, catch up with business associates and serve my fellow producers is welcome more this year than any other in my 20-plus years of cattle marketing. Many of you fellow producers now have calves hitting the ground and are seeing the outcome of last year’s bull buying decisions. As you are well aware, this time of year is one of the most critical times of year for California ranchers. For the seedstock producer, it means having a marketing strategy to attract buyers and the bull selection to back that strategy up and keep customers returning in the future. For the commercial producer

it is a time to educate yourself on what the needs of your cowherd are, the bull selection that is made available to you and make decisions that will propel your herd for many breeding seasons to come. While I call Northern California home and haven’t had the opportunity to see what many other states are experiencing, what I have seen and read through all facets of the news lead me to believe Californians have been dealt a harder hand than many during this pandemic crisis. No matter where you stand on COVID-19 politically – pro-mask or not, social distancing or not, vaccine or not – it is clear that the ramifications of this virus go well beyond our health. From education to economy, the impacts felt by COVID-19 will be felt for years to come. While the cattle markets have held stable for the most part, fall marketing season still holds some unknowns. As I have worked with seedstock producers across the west, we feel we have prepared the best we can for the situation at hand. From crowd management to implementing Internet bidding opportunities in some of the most remote sale locations, I think buyers will be pleased with all of the efforts that have been made to appease our state leaders as well as ensure the safety of all customers and sales staff. The bottom line regarding this sale season compared to others is that the product being made available to commercial ranchers is every bit as exceptional as the offering of prior bull sale seasons. I hope to see you out to the bull sales to show you for myself. And if you can’t make a sale in person and would like assistance in making your purchases, I would be happy to assist you. All in all – and not for the better – 2020 has certainly been one for the record books. But as I witness the resilience of California’s cattlemen and women, I am optimistic about the days ahead. I hope you will join with me to make this sale season go down in history as one of the best.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. Periodical postage paid at Jefferson, MO. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman September 2020


ON THE COVER

SEPTEMBER 2020 Volume 103, Issue 8 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES WORKING RINGSIDE Ready for sale season

4

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN Understanding CCA’s view on PRIME Act

8

As the scenery changes from summer to fall, this Northern California image is a great portrayal of the excitement autumn bull sale and harvest season brings to the West Coast.

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 12 Working to defeat Prop 15 BUNKHOUSE 16 Fair or unfair: communities rally around youth NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 20 Standing united PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER 38 Lease management RANGELAND TRUST TALK 42 Conservation study gleans positive results

SPECIAL FEATURES

Understanding calving ease Scholarships bringing students back to industry Angus pounds and premiums Brangus sees new marketing approach Harsh reminder of sun’s impact on health Anaplasmosis and your herd Accessing rangeland research Cal Poly rolls with punches to hold 2020 bull sale Commerical heifer selection Bull survey results updated

22 28 32 44 48 54 58 64 68 74

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS Dec. 2-4

104th CCA & CCW Convention The Peppermill Resort & Casino, Reno, Nev.

AS CALIFORNIA SEEDSTOCK PRODUCERS GEAR UP FOR ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL BULL SALE SEASON, WE WANT TO REMIND EVERYONE THAT DURING THIS UNPRECEDENTED YEAR INDIVIDUAL SITUATIONS UP AND DOWN THE STATE REMAIN FLUID AND CAN CHANGE AT ANY MOMENT. PLEASE STAY TUNED TO SOCIAL MEDIA AND INDUSTRY PUBLICATIONS AS THESE SITUATIONS EVOLVE SO YOU CAN MAKE THE MOST OF THIS SALE SEASON AND YOUR PURCHASING DECISIONS.

READER SERVICES

Buyers Guide 78 Obituaries 84 New Arrivals 85 Advertisers Index 86

September 2020 California Cattleman 5


Angus ranch

Angus Female Sale Selling 100+ 100+ Angus Females

MON., OCTOBER 12

EZAR Lucy 8385 Sire: SydGen Enhance • Dam: Basin Lucy 4261

EZ Angus Ranch Headquarters, Porterville, CA Brunch at 10 a.m. Sale at 11 a.m.

This pair of fall-born heifer calves are sired by the extremely rare Basin Payweight Plus 6048 and out of the $105,000 DCF Ever Entense 5741 donor. They offer tremendous balance with calvingease, solid growth and balanced carcass merit. These females are broody-made, big-middled, and built for production and longevity.

This fall bred female will sell open and ready for immediate embryo production. She is a direct daughter of the $240,000-valued Basin Lucy 4261, the full sister to Basin Yuma 4286 featured at ORIgen. She has elite carcass figures with top 3% growth and ranks in the top 1% of the breed for $Beef and $Combined Values. CED +3

BW +2.5

WW +74

YW +137

MA +1.29

RE +.93

$M +67

$B +215

$C +346

Female sale offering highlights • Over 50 spring bred heifers and young cows serviced to GB Fireball 672, Sydgen Enhance, EXAR Guru 8719B, E&B Plus One 816, Basin Paycheck 5249 and the Vermilion Spur E143. Direct daughters out of the top donors will sell, including four daughters of the $220,000 Basin Lucy 4261 and three daughters of VAR Blackcap 1059 – maternal sisters to the $90,000 EZAR Gold Rush 6001 featured at ABS.

EZAR Ever Entense 9438 Sire: Basin Payweight Plus 6048 • Dam: DCF Ever Entense 5741

CED +9

BW +0.9

WW +94

YW +163

MA +.69

RE +.71

$M +72

$B +164

$C +285

EZAR Ever Entense 9474

• A large offering of fall bred females with calves at side by Sydgen Enhance, Basin Paycheck 5249, Vermilion Spur E143, and the ORIgen standout Basin Deposit 6249 with top 1% WW, YW and $Combined rankings. • More than 20 fall-born yearling heifers sell, sired by Basin Payweight Plus 6048, EXAR Monumental 6056B, VAR Power Play 7018, EZAR Gold Rush 6001 and more. The females in this group have an average $Combined Value of over $283. • 30 Elite spring heifer calves – many out of the heart of the ET program – sired by VAR Power Play 7018, Basin Payweight Plus 6048, EXAR Guru 8719B, GAR Inertia, Sydgen Enhance, EXAR Monumental 6056B and more. Tremendous EPD profile in this group that average +75 WW (top 5%), +134 YW (top 4%), +.89 Marbling (top 20%), +.75 Ribeye (top 25%), +174 $B (top 3%), and +287 $C (top 3%).

Sire: Basin Payweight Plus 6048 • Dam: DCF Ever Entense 5741 CED +12

BW +1.1

WW +78

YW +141

MA +.62

RE +.82

$M +85

$B +162

$C +295

LIVE SALE BROADCAST

Tim & Marilyn Callison ........................................... Owners Chad Davis ................................................ 559 333-0362 Travis Coy ................................................. 559 392-8772 John Dickinson ...............................................916 806-1919 6 California Cattleman September 2020 Justin Schmidt .......................................... 209 585-6533

Follow Us on Facebook or Visit Our Website for Links to the Sale Book and Videos: www.ezangusranch.com


Bred Cows

EZAR Henrietta 8308

Sire: EXAR Monumental 6056B • Dam: Deer Valley Henrietta 5193

Big-spread female with extra Marbling in this granddaughter of Sitz Henrietta Pride 643T. She sells bred to calve to BASIN DEPOSIT 6249.

CED +14

BW -1.7

WW +69

YW MA +122 +1.24

RE +.63

$M +50

$B +179

$C +282

EXAR Henrietta Pride 6637 Sire: EXAR EZX 3772B • Dam: Sitz Henrietta Pride 643T

A direct daughter of Sitz Henrietta Pride 643T that has great calving-ease with a stout, powerful look. She sells bred to EXAR GURU 8719B.

CED +11

BW +0.0

WW +53

YW +98

MA +.67

RE +.79

$M +56

$B +151

$C +252

Wilks Blackbird 5290

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 • Dam: BoBo Blackbird 2038

Deep, square-made female here with more ribeye and a top 2% $Combined Value. She sells bred to SYDGEN ENHANCE.

CED +3

BW +3.4

WW +70

YW +119

MA +.86

RE +1.03

$M +51

$B +177

$C +281

Bred Heifers

EZAR Lucy 9190

EZAR O Lass 9104

EZAR Duchess 9100

Sire: EZAR Gold Rush 6001 • Dam: Basin Lucy 4261

Sire: SydGen Enhance • Dam: Basin O Lass 235

Sire: SydGen Enhance • Dam: EZAR Duchess 6021

Moderate-framed, wide-based bred heifer out of the $240,000 full sister to Basin Yuma 4286. She sells bred to GB FIREBALL 672.

Big-hipped, high-Marbling female out of a maternal sister to Basin Payweight 1682. She sells bred to VERMILION SPUR E143.

CED +1

CED +8

BW +2.1

WW +70

YW +128

MA +.68

RE +.71

$M +48

$B +171

$C +270

BW +0.4

WW +67

YW MA +125 +1.01

RE +.69

$M +62

$B +177

$C +292

Heavy muscled Enhance daughter with top 1% ranking for $Beef and $Combined Values. She sells bred to E&B PLUS ONE 816.

CED +6

BW +3.6

WW +80

YW +148

MA +.64

RE +.76

$M +79

$B +188

$C +323

Fall Heifer Calves

EZAR Lucy 9427

EZAR Blackcap 9478

Sire: EZAR Gold Rush 6001 • Dam: EZAR Lucy 7451

Fall-born heifer with lots of power and look. She pushed extra Marbling with calving-ease and stems from the highly productive Basin Lucy tribe. CED +9

BW +0.1

WW +62

YW MA +121 +1.04

RE +.25

$M +44

$B +177

$C +274

Sire: SydGen Enhance

EZAR Joy 9494

Dam: Vintage Blackcap 4026

Sire: Jindra Acclaim • Dam: Crazy K Joy 7252

Big-hipped heifer calf with lots of depth and rib shape; Long, square-hipped female that is striking from the side profile. Excellent balance across her EPD profile puts her one of the heaviest weaning females in the in the top 20% $Maternal and top 2% $Combined. contemporary. Lots of carcass and a top 2% $C Index. CED -2

BW +5.5

WW +85

YW +156

MA +.90

RE +.99

$M +54

$B +191

$C +302

CED +7

BW +1.5

WW +69

YW +126

MA +.70

RE +1.01

$M +71

$B +178

$C +302

THD ©

ANGUS 21984 Avenue 160

RANCH September 2020CA California Porterville, 93257 Cattleman 7


CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

WHY THE PRIME ACT ISN’T A SOUND SOLUTION FOR CALIFORNIA’S CATTLEMEN by CCA President Mark Lacey I have received calls and emails about the Processing Revival and Intrastate Meat Exemption (PRIME) Act, and whether CCA supports the bill. PRIME would expand the federal inspection exemptions beyond personal use to allow meat to be sold directly to consumers, restaurants, hotels and other food service establishments. The short answer is that the CCA Executive Committee discussed PRIME, and voted not to support it. Before I explain why I want to preface the explanation by saying that I don’t think there is a CCA member or anyone on the executive committee who wouldn’t like to see a renaissance of regional packers, small processors or neighborhood butcher shops. But is PRIME the right path to get there?? The first reason PRIME wasn’t supported was a policy issue. CCA has Ag and Food Policy resolution 18-05 that says CCA supports the USDA Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) as having sole jurisdiction of the inspection of meat. I don’t know when that was originally passed, but I can tell you that even if you don’t consider FSIS the gold standard domestic consumers, other countries do. It’s not about “USDA Choice” it’s about humane slaughter standards, plant sanitation and safety, animal disease surveillance and contaminant testing. It’s about the “USDA Inspected” stamp that implies that meat is safe to eat because of the very rigorous process it went through. I have had people say the big packers have issues. True, but typically those products are recalled before they are sold because of plant testing and tracking. Think about the number of animals processed and pounds of beef sold annually, and then ask how many incidents have we had. The answer is not many because we have one uniform entity enforcing food safety guidelines. We learned these lessons with the help of the checkoff back in the 80s about consumer perceptions of beef. Then again when there were E. coli outbreaks, BSE in 2003, and what those kinds of events do to beef demand. Because of those events, we improved procedures like “test and hold,”and eliminating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) materials from entering the foodchain. So, if we allow product to be sold without USDA inspection, what does that say to the consumer? Now I would like to list a few other issues with eliminating federal inspection that range from political to ideological. First, from a political standpoint, while PRIME expands the federal exemption from personal use to allow meat to enter commercial trade, it does not preempt state law; meaning about half of the states offer meat inspection equal to federal standards. Theoretically, his would allow the states to relax those standards. It would also allow states to exceed those standards, and in the case of California that is typically the case (i.e. air quality and water quality) so we need to be real careful because once that horse is out of the barn...you know the saying. As an example of the risk for excessive regulation, in California last year, CCA helped beat back an attempt to have meat products labeled as carcinogenic under Prop. 65 the primary reason we prevailed was because of federal pre-emption. There is also court precedence because of a case brought by the one 8 California Cattleman September 2020

and only Kamala Harris plus a couple other cases that resulted in the court saying that California can’t impose additional or different requirements than USDA. Not only has California wanted to label meat under Prop. 65, the City of San Francisco wanted labels with any antibiotic treatments, and there has been talk of beef being required to carry carbon footprint labels. We really need to plan carefully if we want to move to a state inspection system, and if you are saying that because of PRIME there won’t be inspection, guess again. How likely do you think it is that California would allow meat to be sold without oversight? Sure, CCA would fight mightily to prevent onerous regulation, but every animal rights group, and don’t forget about the new plant-based food association whose lobbyist use to work for the Human Society of the United States (HSUS), that would descend on Sacramento like Burning Man on steroids to put the hurt on us. Now, from an ideological standpoint what is our goal? To give the consumer what they want, right? There has certainly been a movement to locally-sourced and specialty products (i.e. grass-fed and organic) over the last decade, and it has accelerated due to shortages caused by the pandemic. This is all positive, right? Selling more meat is great! The question is: Will the consumer trade access to specialty products for less stringent food safety standards? The research says NO. Over the last 30 years when consumers are surveyed, food safety is always a top concerns. The real question is how do we give consumers the specialty products they want, uphold safety standards and create opportunities to increase custom processing facilities in California? I am totally supportive of increasing custom processing capacity in our state but there are many hurdles that need to be cleared to make it happen, and it will take a lot of determination to get across the finish line. To that end, I think some research needs to be done to determine how much capacity can be supported, what is economically feasible and what is doable from a regulatory standpoint. I have worked with a friend that has experience with public/ private partnerships to develop a draft plan of how to get the ball rolling with county governments, but that is one small step. There are a mountain of issues, and details to address to move the ball forward that can only be achieved by the producers that have skin in the game, and an organization like CCA to help streamline the rules and regulations so it can happen. Frankly, PRIME would have little impact on increasing processing capacity in a state like California, but I do believe there are alternatives.


FARMING FOR OUR FUTURE

In these challenging times, remember the Farm Credit System is built for the long haul. We’re here for you today, and for all the tomorrows to come.

W E ARE FARM CRE DIT A nationwide network of customer-owned associations supporting rural communities and agriculture with reliable, consistent credit and financial services.

FarmCreditAlliance.com (855) 611-4110 toll free

American AgCredit

CoBank

September 2020 California Cattleman 9 Farm Credit West


Angus-On-Dairy Value Indexes Launched Angus Genetics, Inc. (AGI) launched two new indexes targeted to select profitable Angus sires to be utilized in beef-on-dairy breeding programs. A public index search for the Angus-On-Holstein ($AxH) and AngusOn-Jersey ($AxJ) indexes can be found on the AGI website. Members can also download any indexes on owned, active animals in their herd inventory through Custom Animal Reports in AAA Login. Angus-On-Dairy $Value Indexes are bioeconomic selection indexes that allow multiple change in several different traits at once pertaining to a dairy-beef crossbreeding objective. The indexes are an estimate of how future beef-on-dairy progeny of each Angus sire are expected to perform, on average, compared to beef-on-dairy progeny of other Angus sires if the sires were randomly mated and calves were exposed to the same environment. These indexes were designed as specific crossbreeding tools for Angus bulls being mated to dairy cows. Two indexes have been developed for the dairy market: Angus-On-Holstein ($AxH) index and Angus-On-Jersey ($AxJ) index to help dairy producers identify the most profitable Angus sires for those markets. Each index comprises several genetic traits weighted by the appropriated economics to serve this terminal beef-on-dairy sector including: calving ease, growth from birth through the feeding phase, feed intake, dressing percent, yield grade, quality grade, muscling and height (only included in $AxH). Using a search tool found at www. angus.org, any A.I. permitted bull, born in 2010 or later, can be searched using the index search functions. Any young bull not yet A.I. permitted can be searched using the individual’s American Angus Association registration number.

VISALIA LIVESTOCK MARKET

CATTLEMEN’S SELECT BULL & FEMALE SALE

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 12 noon complimentary BBQ lunch 1 p.m. sale of females, followed by sale of bulls Bull buyers have an opportunity to win a custom-tooled cactus saddle at the conclusion of the sale, donated by Zoetis

100 top quality, hand-selected, long-yearling and coming 2-year-olds sell from these reputable producers... 60 angus 20 red angus • Furtado Angus • Azevedo Livestock • Eagle Grip Cattle Co. • Potter’s Emmett Valley • Garone Ranches • Rhoades Ranch • Manzanillo Catlle • Ficken Angus Ranch

• Ludvigson Stock Farm

15 herefords

• Mrnak Herefords West • P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co.

5 simangus No. 7 Simmentals

PLUS A SELECT GROUP OF FEMALES SELL AT 1 p.m.

Top quality open yearling heifers ready to breed Fancy, young later fall/winter calvers • fall cow-calf pairs

10 California Cattleman September 2020

733 North Ben Maddox Way | Visalia, CA 93292 (559) 625-9615 | www.visalialivestock.com Randy Baxley (559) 906-9760 James Grantham (805) 610-0641 • Blaine Ketscher (559) 905-1945


THD ©

CLM REPRESENTATIVES Jake Parnell .................916-662-1298 George Gookin .........209-482-1648 Rex Whittle.................209-996-6994 Mark Fischer ..............209-768-6522 Kris Gudel ................... 916-208-7258 Steve Bianchi ............707-484-3903 Joe Gates ....................707-694-3063 Jason Dailey ...............916-439-7761 Brett Friend ..................510-685-4870

CATTLEMEN’S FALL SPECIAL FEEDER SALES:

SELECT WEDNESDAYS AT 12 P.M.

Visit our Website for Dates and Details: www.clmgalt.com

ARELLANO BRAVO/DIABLO VALLEY ANGUS PRODUCTION SALE Saturday, September 12, 12 p.m.

Featuring Angus Bulls from California Seedstock Producers Arellano Bravo Angus, Diablo Valley Angus and Dixie Valley Angus

THOMAS ANGUS RANCH CALIFORNIA BULL SALE Tuesday, September 15, 12 p.m.

WEDNESDAY WEEKLY SCHEDULE Butcher Cows ................................... 8:30 a.m. Cow-Calf Pairs/Bred Cows ..... 11:30 a.m. Feeder Cattle ........................................ 12 p.m.

AUCTION MARKET Address 12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA Office........................................209-745-1515 Fax ............................................ 209-745-1582 Website/Market Report ..www.clmgalt.com Web Broadcast ......www.lmaauctions.com

CALL TO CONSIGN TO UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALES September 15: Ogallala, NE October 22: Cottonwood, CA December 1: Reno, NV

Featuring Angus Bulls from Thomas Angus Ranch, Baker City, Ore.

CLM ANNUAL BRED COW AND REPLACEMENT FEMALE SALE Saturday, November 7, 9 a.m.

New for 2020: Females Will Sell the Same Day as the Bulls

52ND ANNUAL CENTRAL CALIFORNIA ‘WORLD OF BULLS’ SALE Saturday, November 7, 12 p.m. Featuring Top Angus, SimAngus, Hereford, Red Angus and Charolais Bulls from throughout California and the West

Parnell’s Central California 52nd Annual

THD ©

W rld of

Saturday, November 7

bulls Galt, California

September 2020 California Cattleman 11


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

CCA WORKING TO DEFEAT PROPOSITION 15: HOW YOU CAN HELP by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur In the July/August edition of California Cattleman, CCA outlined some of the threats posed by the “split roll” initiative appearing on the November General Election ballot (“Taxes Could Take a Big Hike: November Split Roll Initiative Poses Threats to Agriculture”). Election officials have since announced that the split roll initiative will appear on the ballot as Proposition 15. To recap, 1978’s Proposition 13 dictated that property taxes for residential and business property are calculated based on 1 percent of the property’s purchase price, with annual property tax increases capped at 2 percent. Under Proposition 15, commercial and industrial properties would be removed from Proposition 13’s protections and be reassessed at current market value every three years— increasing property taxes statewide by as much as $12 billion annually. While the proponents of the split roll (and indeed the official summary for the proposition) claim that “agricultural properties” are “exempt” from this property tax hike, this claim is intentionally misleading. The proponents acknowledge that “Commercial or industrial structures on agricultural land would be taxed at market value,” including barns, feedlots, methane digesters and other improvements on agricultural lands. What’s more, voters in November may be duped into supporting Proposition 15: the official ballot summary authored by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra

12 California Cattleman September 2020

mentions nothing of the significant tax increase spurred by the Proposition—or the consequences of those tax hikes—only that it “Increases funding for public schools, community colleges, and local government services by changing tax assessment of commercial and industrial property.” That Proposition 15 is “changing” tax assessment is putting it lightly. To defeat Proposition 15, CCA has joined the “No On Prop 15” Coalition (which, as of press time, counts nearly 300 organizations among its ranks) and is working hard to educate the public on the devastating effects of Proposition 15. Below is a summary of CCA’s efforts in opposition to Proposition 15 and what you can do to help defeat the $12 billion tax increase. CCA’s Efforts to Defeat Proposition 15 Polling has shown that California voters look favorably to farmers and ranchers as trusted messengers about the impacts of Proposition 15. In light of this fact, CCA is working with the No On Prop 15 coalition to amplify ranchers’ voices in opposition to Proposition 15. CCA has been working to draft editorials in opposition to Proposition 15 and get them placed in priority publications. While these editorials address the devastating impacts that Proposition 15 could have for ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


46th Annual

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2020 1 pm PDT • Tehama Angus Ranch, Gerber, California

Stout, solid structured Angus bulls designed to build a cow herd!

150 Spring and Fall Yearling Angus Bulls

H471

(GE-EPDs current 8/12/20)

H436

H477

AAA 19601801

AAA 19599440

AAA 19599445

S S Niagara Z29 5 Tehama Upward Y238

Ellingson Homegrown 6035 5 Ellingson Identity 9104

Ellingson Homegrown 6035 5 Tehama Tahoe B767

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $M $W $B $C +13 –0.2 +76 +145 +33 +.72 +.88 +38 +84 +146 +227

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $M $W $B $C +4 +2.7 +58 +108 +21 +.75 +1.12 +85 +53 +160 +293

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $M $W $B $C +6 +1.4 +76 +138 +33 +.74 +.94 +95 +88 +170 +315

H596

H703

H690

AAA 19750206

AAA 19697397

AAA 19751663

Tehama Patriarch F028 5 KF Stonecutter 501

Tehama Patriarch F028 5 Tehama Titleist A203

Tehama Advancement E766 5 Tehama Tahoe B767

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $M $W $B $C +7 0.0 +75 +133 +30 +.90 +.74 +70 +86 +143 +255

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $M $W $B $C +9 +1.2 +71 +116 +25 +.88 +.65 +91 +81 +132 +262

CED BW WW YW Milk Marb RE $M $W $B $C +11 +0.6 +76 +132 +35 +.37 +.85 +75 +95 +123 +235

✓ Real World Data ✓ Structure & Phenotype ✓ Maternal Strength ✓ Since 1943 Let the Tehama Angus Ranch program work for you. Call or email today to request your catalog!

TEHAMA ANGUS Ranch 23820 Tehama Ave., Gerber, CA 96035

tehamaranch@gmail.com • www.tehamaangus.com

Ranch (530) 385-1570 Bryce Borror (530) 526-9404

Videos of bulls available on our website

“DRIVEN BY PERFORMANCE SINCE 1943” September 2020 California Cattleman 13


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 farmers and ranchers, the real focus is on the repercussions the Proposition could have for average Californians. For instance, CCA has sought to highlight the fact that increased costs for farmers and ranchers will be passed along to consumers during a time when most Californians can least afford it due to the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Given Californians’ views on environmental sustainability, CCA is also highlighting Proposition 15’s impact on environmental stewardship efforts. For instance, under Proposition 15 dairy methane digesters and solar panels would be taxed at a higher rate, effectively punishing ranchers for developing environmentally friendly improvements upon their lands and disincentivizing further adoption of these technologies on working lands. CCA has also sought to highlight that Proposition 15 could spur development of the open space Californians hold so dear. Proposition 15 gives local governments an incentive to rezone lands away from agricultural use in favor of more commercial uses in order to increase their tax base. Moreover, the substantially higher tax bills for farmers and ranchers may force some producers to make the tough choice to sell off their land to developers. With our social media presence on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (@calcattlemen on all three platforms), we are also working to amplify the No On Prop 15 coalition’s messaging in opposition to the split roll initiative. If you follow CCA on social media, you’ve probably seen some of this messaging in recent days. Our county affiliates are joining the fight, as well. The Alameda County CattleWomen, for instance, have been spearheading a local No on Prop 15 campaign, and along with the Contra Costa/Alameda County Cattlemen, have been developing campaign materials against Proposition 15. How You Can Help Defeat Proposition 15 The easiest step you can take to defeat Proposition 15, of course, is to vote NO on your ballot this November, and to encourage your family and friends to do the same. But to ensure that Proposition 15 goes 14 California Cattleman September 2020

down in defeat, CCA encourages members to take an active role in educating voters about the ills of the split roll initiative by visiting the No On Prop 15 website at https:// noonprop15.org/take-action/. The No On Prop 15 campaign’s website has a number of tools for CCA members to help defeat Proposition 15, including: • Sample social media posts and other tools for utilizing your social media platforms to speak out against the tax hike; • A guide for writing letters to the editor to your local publications; • A guide for creating a social media “selfie video” explaining why you believe Proposition 15 must be defeated (the campaign will even edit it for you!); • And much more. Additionally, you can do your part by amplifying the No On Prop 15 coalition’s voice on social media. Follow the No On Prop 15 campaign (@NoOnProp15 on Facebook and Twitter) and like, share and retweet their posts to your own followers to get the word out about the flaws of Proposition 15. Likewise, amplify CCA’s social media messages about Proposition 15 when they come across your feed. (If you post on social media, feel free to tag @ calcattlemen, and please share any letters to the editor you may get published in your local newspapers with CCA staff!) Over the coming months, CCA will be doing a fullcourt press to defeat Proposition 15. Stay tuned to California Cattleman, Hot Irons and Legislative Bulletin for news on our latest efforts and remember to vote NO on Proposition 15 on November 3!


70 PERFORMANCE-TESTED, ANGUS BULLS

SELL SAT., SEPTEMBER 12 • CLM, GALT, CA DIABLO VALLEY

ARELLANO BRAVO

Fall Yearlings

Fall Yearlings

&

Diablo Valley Angus

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 CATTLEMEN’S LIVESTOCK MARKET Galt, California, 12:30 p.m.

BRAVO 316 CAPITALIST 9052

LD Capitalist 316 x Connealy Right Answer 746 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $M $B $C +10 +.8 +66 +117 +29 +.45 +.48 +49 +134 +223

BRAVO 316 CAPITALIST 9041

LD Capitalist 316 x Connealy Black Granite CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $M $B $C +11 +.2 +63 +109 +26 +.53 +.45 +62 +135 +237

DIABLO MEGA HIT 9110

Jindra Megahit x V A R Discovery 2240 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $M $B $C +9 +.1 88 +166 +18 +.89 +.70 +25 +195 +278

DIABLO CAPITALIST 316 9105

LD Capitalist 316 x Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $M $B $C +12 -.6 +70 +111 +29 +.76 +.75 +60 +142 +244

Cuest - s

OFFERING A POWERFUL SET OF SPRING & FALL YEARLINGS

Dixie Valley Angus Montague, CA

Lee Nobmann, Owner Morgon Patrick, Managing Partner, 530-526-5920

BRAVO 316 CAPITALIST 9032

LD Capitalist 316 x Baldridge Breakthrough A091 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $M $B $C +6 +.8 +62 +107 +30 +.63 +.52 +53 +139 +233

SALE MANAGED BY

John Dickinson 916-806-1919 Jake Parnell 916-662-1298 www.parnelldickinson.com Catalog Requests: Text 916-806-1919

Adhemar Arellano: 916-996-9855 10365 Gilliam Drive, Elk Grove, CA

DIABLO CUT ABOVE 9116

High Point Werner Cut Above x Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36 CED BW WW YW MILK MARB RE $M $B $C +16 -1.8 +66 +129 +30 +.93 +1.10 +48 +174 +274

Diablo Valley Angus

Dennis Lopez: 209-814-2440 10000 Armstrong Rd., Byron, CA

September 2020 California Cattleman 15

THD ©


BUNKHOUSE

COUNTY FAIRS ACROSS THE STATE PRESS ON TO SUPPORT THEIR YOUTH by CCA Office Administrator Morgan Lyman When I sat down to write this, I reflected on all the changes that have occurred in the last few months, not knowing what state we will be in when this issue reaches your homes due to shifts in our lives almost daily. There is still so much unknown even with the overwhelming amount of information given to us by our state and local officials, front line medical personal, public safety and everyone in between. There still seems to be grey area with the one question we all have lingering in our minds; when will life go back to normal? I’ve heard it said that life will never go back to our version of normal. We are entering a new era in history and its time to start adapting to this way of life. Although we would all like to cling to a hope that we will again be together at large gatherings, grocery stores will not experience shortages and schools will be open again, we have continued to make do with our everchanging society. In recent months beloved county fairs across the state closed their gates to their communities and exhibitors, considering stay at home orders, restrictions on gatherings and non-essential functions coming to a halt. While local FFA, 4-H and Grange members continued to groom and prepare their livestock projects, fair boards and junior livestock committees worked hard to find a solution for their livestock shows. Many exhibitors worked hard for months, investing time and money, to bring their final projects to the county fair. Not wanting the kids to miss out completely on their fair experience, many counties, for the first time, prepared platforms for their exhibitors to show and sell their animals virtually. County fairs are a crowd favorite among communities during the summer months with corn dogs, carnival rides, bands and livestock shows bringing everyone together. Although we had to miss out on all of these favorites this year, what really matters showed 16 California Cattleman September 2020

through in difficult times. Although a virtual show and sale was a different experience, communities were still able to rally together to support the youth of their community. Some livestock auctions reached record sale numbers as buyers bid online in the comfort of their homes. Through the generous contributions made by community members, most FFA, 4-H and Grange members were able to squeeze by and sell their animals in this new scene. As we continue seeing changes in our lives, communites rallying together and supporting each other through this is what really counts. I have high hopes that we will all be able to attend our beloved county fairs in person next year, but until then we will continue to press on and continue to adjust to keep things as normal as we can.


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For Information, contact Shasta Livestock (530) 347-3793 Visit our website www.shastalivestock.com or follow us on Facebook and Instagram for updates. September 2020 California Cattleman 17


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September 2020 California Cattleman 19


NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

UNITED WE STEAK by NCBA Chief Executive Officer Colin Woodall While Labor Day may be approaching faster than any of us are prepared for, it is important we remember that one-third of summer grilling season still remains. “United We Steak” is the cornerstone of the checkoff-funded summer grilling promotion NCBA manages, and we are thrilled with the results. If you haven’t seen NCBA’s latest checkoff-funded campaign, head on over to www.unitedwesteak.com to check it out. The first thing you’ll see is a map of the United States where each state is cut out of steak. That isn’t a computer-generated image, but rather the result of diligent work by the NCBA team to hand-cut each of those steaks. Have you ever tried to cut the shape of Maryland out of a steak? Not an easy task, but it shows the innovative spirit of this campaign. United We Steak is more than just a unique graphic designed to get your attention. It’s meant to be a multipronged approach that draws our customers to the recipes and producer stories, and then leaves them with a passion to fire up their grills. The roll out of United We Steak included a satellite media tour where NCBA’s very own meat scientist Bridget Wasser started at 3:00 a.m. doing live interviews from the NCBA Culinary Center, funded by the Beef Checkoff, with media outlets across the country. We also put the steak map on one of the larger-than-life billboards in Times Square in New York City. We truly took this launch prime time. The campaign was also rolled out to key food bloggers, chefs, retailers and foodservice operators to help them support and promote beef. If you haven’t seen the campaign yet, don’t worry because it is headed your way. It’s another in the long line of Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. promotions from NCBA. Yep, you read that right, from NCBA, which is home to the Federation of State Beef Councils. The councils were critical partners in this campaign. Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. is the beef brand we manage as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. This checkoff-funded tagline is inarguably one of the most successful marketing efforts in history because of its uncanny ability to take sizzling images of beef, combine them with Aaron Copland’s “Hoedown” music, and instantly make mouths water. It’s also a brand that must evolve to stay relevant. Now, I’m personally partial to the television ads from the early 90s voiced by Robert Mitchum. To me, that will always be Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. As a society, though, we aren’t 20 California Cattleman September 2020

sitting around the TV on Sunday nights waiting for Mitchum’s iconic voice. The way Americans watch TV these days is much different. Fewer and fewer people are watching live TV. Many use a digital video recorder so they can watch at their convenience and fastforward through the commercials. Digital TV platforms are growing in popularity and that is why we have evolved our promotional campaigns to take advantage of today’s technology. The video of sizzling steaks is still there. The “Hoedown” music is still there. The distinctive voice is still there. Just the format has changed. We will continue to look at ways to keep Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. famous and relevant to the times. While NCBA may be the creativity behind these campaigns, we can only do it because of the checkoff financial investment. We have to earn the checkoff dollars we use. Contrary to the belief of some, these dollars are not “given” to us. The Beef Promotion Operating Committee is made up of cattle producers who decide which programs presented by contractors get funded. It is then up to us to deliver on our commitment, or we don’t get reimbursed, and we don’t get funded again. Most producers don’t appreciate that we do this work on a cost recovery basis. In short, we only get paid AFTER we’ve made the investment and done the work. If the work doesn’t pass muster from the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, we’re on the hook for the costs. That is a measure of accountability that few appreciate. We must defend our use of checkoff investments at multiple levels, and we are happy to do it because we have nothing to hide. On their first day at NCBA, each employee is schooled on compliance to the rules we must follow as a contractor, and that focus on compliance is a constant part of our work. In my role, I will not compromise the integrity of NCBA or the integrity of the checkoff. The work is too important, and your trust in us is at the heart of all we do. Let me be clear: checkoff money does not pay for any of our policy efforts…period. So, share your support of the checkoff with your friends, neighbors, and fellow cattle producers because…United We Steak!


The Council continues to work on your behalf to invest in critical projects that will have effective results. Thank you for your continued investment which targets consumers and policy makers, not producers. Below are key works the Council has done in 2020. Learn more at calcattlecouncil.org.

ADVOCACY Funded the “Resilience Campaign” highlighting California cattle production in a digital campaign that had over 12 million impressions & +20,000 viewers engaged to learn more.

RESEARCH

COMMUNICATION

Provided funding to calculate forage removed by cattle grazing from California rangelands to reduce the impact of devastating wildfires.

Hosted two press events resulting in 20+ articles run in major media outlets to reassure consumers cattle producers continue to provide a safe & abundant supply of beef & dairy.

RESEARCH

ADVOCACY

EDUCATION

Supported academic experts in their efforts to explore the true impact of cattle on climate. Research continues to prove cattle can be a climate solution.

Funded a campaign highlighting the benefits of livestock production on a billboard along Highway 101 in the Bay Area.

Committed to sponsoring the 2020 Dairy Sustainability Conference that will educate policy makers & regulators on the environmental leadership of California’s dairy families.

RESEARCH

ADMINISTRATIVE

ADMINISTRATIVE

Responded to food safety concerns that produce should not be grown near a feedlot or dairy by funding research that has generated early data demonstrating the opposite.

Developed a strategic plan that prioritizes advocacy & public affairs while ensuring projects have both clear objectives and measurable results.

The Council budget remains true to promises made to producers to ensure minimal overhead and maximize the use of project rt will funds. “Every effo e by the

Search “Rethinking Methane” on YouTube to watch & learn more.

be mad Council to limit administrative costs.” - January 2019

Governing Board: Sam Avila, Xavier Avila, Jennifer Beretta, Beverly Bigger, Sheila Bowen, Bill Brandenberg, Brian Coelho, Garrett Colburn, Dave Daley, Rodger Guess, Julie Belezzuoli-Hathaway, Jesse Larios, Chelsea Minor, Sarah Mora, Julie Morris, Jake Parnell, Brad Peek, Tyler Ribeiro, Brad Scott, Mike Smith and Cody Nicholson Stratton; Justin Oldfield, Executive Director

September 2020 California Cattleman 21


HOW MUCH CALVING EASE IS ENOUGH? from Genex Cooperative

C

alving ease is a desired trait. Most would argue it is not only desired but necessary, as calving difficulty can lower calf survivability and extend post-partum intervals for cows, which then lowers breed-back rates. Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) can be utilized to help manage this risk. Kelli Retallick, Genetic Service Director for Angus Genetics Inc. discusses this topic further. Often, producers ask, “Can we have too much calving ease?” To answer, it is important to reflect on the basis of the calving ease argument, the build of the EPD and what to expect when using these tools. Knowing this, cow/calf producers – both seedstock and commercial alike – can make informed decisions about their own herds.

Using the tool

Calving Ease Direct, or CED, is the most effective tool when deciding which bulls to mate to first-calf heifers. Expressed as a probability percentage, CED aims to predict the percentage of unassisted births a bull will produce when mated to heifers. Let’s compare two bulls. Bull A has a CED EPD of +2, and bull B has a CED EPD of +7. When mating these two bulls to similar groups of heifers, phenotypically and genetically, one would expect, on average, bull B to produce 5 percent more unassisted births than bull A. While no one can indefinitely state the perfect cut‑off to be used across the industry, producers can rely on the information available to them to make the best decisions. It gets even simpler when producers can rely on past records to benchmark the amount of calving difficulty experienced to understand where selection pressure should be placed.

Behind the EPD

Calving ease scores collected by breeders are utilized to predict CED. These scores range from 1-5, where 1 would indicate a birth with no assistance. For Angus cattle, only scores reported on first-calf heifers are used in the prediction of the CED EPD. Mature female scores, while they can be reported, are not used in the national cattle evaluation as not enough variation, or differences among reported scores, exists to add value to CED predictions. Birth weight is used as a correlated trait in the calving 22 California Cattleman September 2020

ease evaluation. The correlation, or strength of relationship, between calving ease and birth weight is -0.65 which is a moderately strong, negative relationship. A negative correlation suggests as one trait goes up the other goes down. Therefore, in most cases, as calving ease increases, birth weight tends to trend downward. When focusing on decreasing calving difficulty in first-calf heifers, it is most effective to focus on CED EPDs as this is the economically relevant trait. On the other hand, if the focus is to strictly increase or decrease birth weight, the BW EPD is the tool of choice and most effective to influence changes on actual birth weights of calves. These scores and weights are then evaluated together in a threshold model, but it is important to understand in a threshold model an underlying assumption is made about the amount of existing calving difficulty. Therefore, if the tool is predicting the decreased number of assisted births in a population, a percentage of assisted births is assumed. In the case of the Angus CED EPD, this threshold model was designed to help lower the level of assisted births present in a mixed breed commercial cowherd, which in most cases would have a higher incidence of calving difficulty than a purebred registered Angus herd. This is why patterns in the data representing the percentage of assisted and unassisted births of the purebred Angus herd are not always completely linear when tracking up or down the CED scale. Figure 1, shown on page 24, breaks out the percentage of assisted births recorded for each CED EPD possessed by the sire when bred to a breed average Angus female. As the CED EPD of the sire increases, the number of assisted births decreases. However, the decrease may not be by an entire percentage point as expected. The reason? Mating Angus sires to Angus females who are breed average for both calving ease direct and maternal is not the expected industry average mating. In a 2019 survey conducted by the American Angus Association, producers reported treating calving ease as a completely separate trait using independent culling levels when making genetic decisions. Independent culling is a selection strategy stating an individual animal will be culled ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 24


Celebrating All Black Gold Black Gold Bull Avg. % Ranking

Non-Parent Bull Avg.

CED

8

35%

6

BW

.7

35%

1.3

WW

67

15%

56

YW

118

20%

99

DOC

19

40%

17

CEM

10

35%

9

Milk

27

35%

25

Marb

.78

20%

.55

RE

.73

25%

.56

$W

72

15%

56

$F

89

25%

80

$G

63

15%

46

$B

152

15%

128

$C

255

15%

224

in 2020

SEPTEMBER 10

New Locations

BULLS ON DISPLAY Broken Box Ranch Feedlot, Williams, CA

SALE LOCATION Granzella’s Inn, Williams, CA

LIVE BROADCAST

EPD or $Value

Years

THURSDAY

BLACK GOLD VS. BREED AVG.

25

SALE BOOK AND BULL VIDEO LINKS POSTED ONLINE: BLACKGOLDBULLSALE.COM

BULLS SELL SIRED BY: EPDS AND $VALUES IN RED DENOTE TOP 25% OR BETTER FOR NON-PARENT ANGUS BULLS • Baldridge Colonel C251 Connealy Legendary 644L x Connealy Black Granite S S Niagara Z291 x Connealy Black Granite • S S Niagara Z29 DOB 7-26-2019 AAA *19707826 DOB 7-31-2019 AAA *19707693 • K C F Bennett Fortress • G A R Sunbeam $M $M • Werner Flat Top 4136 +80 +60 • KM Broken Bow 002 $W $W • Connealy Legendary 644L +68 +91 • Diablo Deluxe 1104 • D R Judgement $F $F • Baldridge 38 Special +98 +114 • BUBS Southern Charm AA31 $G $G • Spring Cove Reno 4021 +70 G253 +70 G302 • Jindra Acclaim $B $B • V D A R Hero 7072 +168 +184 • Connealy Capitalist 028 CED BW WW YW MILK CW MARB RE $C CED BW WW YW MILK CW MARB RE $C • VDAR Wulffs Cedar Butte 542 +9 +2.1 +66 +110 +23 +53 +.80 +1.20 +298 +10 +1.0 +80 +145 +34

Baldridge Colonel C251 x A A R Ten X 7008 S A

K C F Bennett Fortress x Basin Payweight 1682

$M +45 $W +63 $F +87 $G +84 G331 $B +171 CED BW WW YW MILK CW MARB RE $C +0 +2.8 +68 +128 +24 +51 +1.23 +.87 +267

$M +64 $W +82 $F +91 $G +58 9024 $B +149 CED BW WW YW MILK CW MARB RE $C +11 -.4 +65 +111 +31 +48 +.67 +.96 +257

SALE MANAGER

DOB 8-3-2019

MATT MACFARLANE MARKETING Matt Macfarlane • 916-803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com www.m3cattlemarketing.com

DONATI RANCH Tom & Rocky Donati Oroville, CA

530-693-1634 donatiranch.com

+69 +.84 +1.08 +299

AAA *19707813

V D A R Sonny Boy 1194 x Connealy Capitalist 028

O’CONNELL RANCH Dan & Barbara O’Connell Colusa, CA

530-632-4491

oconnellranch.com

WULFF BROS. LIVESTOCK Carl & Heidi Wulff Cheney, WA

916-417-4199

wulffbrotherslivestock.com

DOB 4-24-2019

AAA 19749878

DOB 7-5-2019

AAA *19657163

G A R Sunbeam x Basin Payweight 1682

DOB 7-2-2019

AAA *19704788

$M $M +85 +49 $W $W +95 +62 $F $F +124 +77 $G $G +67 +29 9014 9108 $B $B +191 +107 CED BW WW YW MILK CW MARB RE $C September CED BW YW MILK CWCattleman MARB RE $C 23 2020WW California +14 +.5 +61 +115 +25 +43 +.25 +.27 +188 +6 +.8 +82 +143 +30 +78 +.85 +1.09 +333


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22

used on first-calf heifers have averaged a +6 for the CED EPD for several years and you have yet to pull a calf, then a +6 CED bull is a safe option. On the other hand, if your bulls have averaged +10 CED and you have repeatedly pulled a higher percentage of calves from first-calf heifers than desired, then more calving ease may be necessary. Understanding the relationships in your herd is crucial to the overall success of the genetic program.

if it does not meet the specific requirement of a single trait, regardless of the levels of other traits. Using this method of independent culling, while efficient in making genetic change in that specific trait, can lead to drawbacks which can affect herds in the long term. Producers setting specific thresholds on any trait, ignoring a multi-trait approach, can lead to FIGURE 1. Percentage of assisted births when bulls of varying CED eliminating bulls for falling just under this EPDs are bred to registered Angus females of breed average calving ease culling threshold even though they may possess genetics (CED= +5, CEM=+8) other characteristics valuable to the operation.

Conclusion

The bottom line – not all cowherds are created equal. What can be utilized safely in one herd may cause problems in another. Knowing CED is designed to be a heifer mating tool, using different bulls to mate first-calf heifers and mature cows may be logical. The best advice may be to understand the cowherd these bulls will be utilized in. As a cattle producer, you know your cowherd better than anyone. If the bulls

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September 2020 California Cattleman 25


Oregon Junior showman wins top honors in tulsa in 1967. “I can’t think of a better way to end my junior experience and never dreamed of this actually happening,” Cox said. “It especially means a lot to be able to represent Oregon as a smaller organization. Hopefully it inspires younger juniors to believe in themselves and their potential as well.” Cox and other exhibitors were evaluated on their handling of their animal, their ability to follow instructions and courtesy and sportsmanship in the ring. Juniors were given preselected heifers and asked to switch multiple times throughout the contest to see how they would handle exhibiting an unfamiliar animal. Following Cox in the top five were: second place, Tyler Coleman, California; third place, Austin Ertzberger, Georgia; fourth place, Kassidy Bremer, Iowa; fifth place, Vada Vickland, Colorado. The National Junior Angus Showmanship Contest brings together the breed’s top young showmen, and it is considered an honor to be among those competing. The remaining top 15 showmen were: Elizabeth Voight, Pennsylvania; Mattie Harward, North Carolina; Kinsey Crow, Ohio; Megan Pelan, Maryland; Corrie Falleur, Oregon; Lauryn Mool, Illinois; Julia Weaber, Kentucky; Shelley Rowlett, Tennessee; Madelyn Gerken, Oklahoma; Josh Jasper, Kentucky. Visit www.angus.org for complete show results and news from the event.

Albert Conlin | 209.652.2783 Craig Edling | 209.531.7037 craig.edling@aol.com Inquire about full truckload pricing and ranch deliveries.

NEW GENERATION SUPPLEMENTS Anna Bavor 650.575.5612 annab@newgensupplements.com www.smartlic.com

26 California Cattleman September 2020

60

90 80

60

FlaxLic

FlaxLic

FlaxLic

Feed: Gain – 84 days

FlaxLic different from Control, P < 0.01

Control

59.9

Control

Plasma Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Day 56 of Trial Period 150 125 100 75 50 25 0

81.8

70

50

Control

Kansas State University Bull Study

72.7

Normal Sperm, %

80.7

70

Feed: Gain

FlaxLic ® contains a high level of Alpha-linolenic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid. Fatty acids are used by cattle for energy, cell membrane structure and integrity and regulating the hormones that support fertility.

80

Normal Sperm

50

Omega-3 Fatty Acids, ug/mL

FlaxLic: Improving Bull & Heifer Performance

Sperm Motility, %

Sperm Motility 90

8.5 8.0 7.5 7.0 6.5 6.0 5.5

FlaxLic different from Control, P < 0.01

Improved 7%

Control

FlaxLic

}

Kansas State University Heifer Study

Angus juniors across the country grow up dreaming of the opportunity to be named Champion Showman at the National Junior Angus Show (NJAS). Madison Cox of Eagle Point, Oregon, is no exception and saw this dream come to fruition when she was named the 2020 NJAS showmanship winner. “I remember watching every single heat of showmanship at my first NJAS,” said Cox. “To have this chance to compete in such a prestigious contest against some of the best in the nation was so humbling.” There are a few factors that make this arguably the most prestigious showmanship contest in the nation. Not only must a junior qualify to compete in their home state before making it to the NJAS, but they also only have one year of eligibility. After competing in her respective heat and being selected as one of the top 15 showmen and women, Cox competed in showmanship finals on Wednesday, July 22. The top five winners were selected by Judges Cheramie Viator, Lindsey Hall and Lydell Meier after thorough consideration. Surrogate Judge Parker Henley assisted in the contest, carefully directing contestants. In closing comments, each agreed on the impressive caliber of showmen competing. Annually, the champion showman at NJAS is honored with the Dean Hurlbut Award, named after the man who organized the first national Angus showmanship contest


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RETURN ON INVESTMENT Past CCA Scholarship Program Recipients Excel in California’s Cattle Industry by CCA Director Communications Katie Roberti

Every fall, the CCA Scholarship Program invests in students and plays a role in fostering a community for those working towards becoming future leaders in California’s cattle industry. In 2019 alone, CCA awarded almost $50,000 in scholarships, including the CCA Allied Industry Scholarship, the CCA Feeder Council Scholarship, the Tom Grimmius Memorial Scholarship, the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association Hank Stone Memorial Scholarship and the Livestock Memorial Research Fund Scholarship. The road to receiving a CCA scholarship is by no means easy, and the competition continues to be strong year after year. To apply, applicants must have graduated from a California high school or be an out-of-state student currently attending a California college, have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a four point scale, be a current CCA member and participate in an interview with a panel of industry representatives, among other requirements. Additionally, applicants must be studying a major consistent with their career goals in the beef cattle industry, such as cattle production, genetics, nutrition, trade, law, agricultural communications, agricultural education, marketing, lending, policy, etc. As the 2020 scholarship deadline approaches, hear from a few past recipients about the work they are now doing to advance California’s cattle industry further and how the CCA Scholarship Program helped in achieving their career goals. Marissa Fisher, Beef Operations Manager CCA Scholarship Recipient, 2013-2015

Q

: When did you graduate and what have you been doing since entering the workforce?

A

: I graduated from Texas Tech University with my bachelor’s degree in animal science in May of 2016. In the 28 California Cattleman September 2020

early fall of 2016, I accepted the position of Range Beef Manager with the University of California (UC), Davis, where I managed the commercial cow herd in the foothills of Northern California. I was responsible for day to day operations of the herd with the added components of research and education. I helped shape and carry out research projects, teach labs, host interns and hold industry outreach events. In March of this year, I accepted the promotion to Beef Operations Manager at UC Davis. Since June of 2017, I have been on the board with the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) and am currently serving as an officer. I am also involved with other private ranching operations and run some cows of my own.

Q A

: What’s your current job and through it how are you helping further California’s cattle industry?

: I oversee both registered and commercial cattle herds, as well as the feedlot and feedmill. Not only do I strive to be the best steward of the land that I can and to provide for the cattle in my care to the best of my ability, but I am blessed with the opportunities to be involved with truly groundbreaking research that will better our industry for years to come. I am also able to influence, educate and provide hands-on experience to our upcoming generations who will someday be the pillars of the California cattle industry. UC Davis also offers a unique program to California ranchers called the Ranch to Rail program. This program provides ranchers the opportunity to receive feed and carcass data on their calves without the risk of retaining ownership. It is a great program that offers detailed cattle performance data to ranchers and provides the opportunity to create and foster relationships.

Q A

: How did the CCA Scholarship Program make a positive impact on your time as a student?

: The CCA Scholarship Program provided me with so much more than just financial assistance during my college career. Knowing that the people I had grown up admiring so much, in the industry I love most, believed in me and saw me as a worthy investment meant more to me


(and still does) than I’ll ever be able to put into words. The support I received was often the encouragement I needed to continue to put in the hard work to achieve the goals I set for myself and find my place in this great industry and community.

Q

: Having interviewed scholarship recipients last year, how do you think the program is continuing to provide support to future leaders in California’s beef industry?

A

: I am truly honored to have had the opportunity to sit on the other side of the table next to other outstanding California cattle industry members to interview the upcoming leaders of this industry. I genuinely believe the CCA Scholarship Program makes such a positive impact not only through financial means to some amazing students, but it provides moral support and the opportunity to connect brilliant young minds with years of experience. I think we all know creating relationships is one of the most important factors in being successful in the cattle industry, and this scholarship program is a great way to do that for the future leaders of our industry. Growing up in the California cattle industry, I knew from a very young age, I wanted to make this industry, this lifestyle, my home forever. I went off to the Midwest for school and vowed I would someday make it back out to California to be a part of California’s cattle industry and give back to the community that had given so much to me. Thanks to the CCA Scholarship Program, I have been able to do just that. And that is something I will always be thankful for.

Q

: How can ranchers interested in learning more about the Beef Operations Program at UC Davis reach you?

A

: You can often find me at the feedlot! I can always be reached via e-mail mfisher@ucdavis.edu, or my office phone is (530) 752-1200. Elizabeth Vanherweg, Professional Service Embryologist CCA Scholarship Recipient, 2016

Q

: When did you graduate and what have you been doing since entering the workforce?

A

: I graduated from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo in

2017 with a bachelor’s degree in animal science and started at Trans Ova Genetics immediately as a Professional Services Embryologist (PSE). As a PSE, I traveled with our veterinarian, who does the ovum pick-up (OPU) and conventional flush procedures on cattle. Primarily I was behind the microscope on farms doing the lab work that goes along with the collection procedures. I also assisted our vet with embryo transfers and pregnancy checks. I mostly traveled throughout California, but I have also spent some time working in Washington, Utah, Montana, Iowa, South Dakota, Colorado and Texas.

Q A

: What’s your current job and through it how are you helping further California’s cattle industry?

: Recently, I transitioned roles within the company, and I now work chiefly in our In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) lab in Turlock performing fertilizations, although I do still get to go on to farms some days. I enjoy interacting with our clients, hearing about their goals and helping them advance and extend superior genetics through the use of IVF and embryo transfer.

Q A

: How did the CCA Scholarship Program make a positive impact on your time as a student?

: The CCA scholarship program gave me the support I needed to focus on pursuing my passion for the cattle industry and bovine reproductive technology. I still fondly remember my CCA interview process, and the panel made me feel very welcome and valued as a part of the future of California’s cattle industry.

Q A

: Anything else you want to add about your career goals related to California’s beef industry?

: I attended the CCA convention every year I was at Cal Poly and it was a great way to meet and interact with industry professionals and make connections that would further my career goals. I learned about different aspects of the cattle industry through college and CCA, and I was able to find my niche. Young cattlemen’s associations are a vital part of our industry’s future, and I would not be where I am today without the support from my professors, advisors, peers and CCA.

Q A

: How can ranchers interested in learning more about Trans Ova Genetics reach you?

: Anyone interested in learning more about our services can visit our website, https://transova. com or call (712) 722-3596 to talk with our client service representative. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

September 2020 California Cattleman 29


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 Nathan A. Yerian, DVM, Associate Veterinarian CCA Scholarship Recipient, 2016-2019

Q

: When did you graduate from vet school and what is your current job role?

A

: I graduated in May 2020 from UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. I am currently working as an Associate Veterinarian at Lander Veterinary Clinic in Turlock.

Q

: How will this job allow you to help play a role in furthering California’s cattle industry for years to come?

A

: My goal is to be an advocate for animal agriculture and act as a resource for both producers and consumers as we work to ensure the quality, safety and sustainability of our food supply. As an active member of associations, like the American Association of Bovine Practitioners and CCA, I stay up to date on current issues facing the livestock industries and can collaborate with professionals to propose solutions to on-going issues. As the number of farms continues to decrease, and the average size of herds increases, herd-based approaches to medicine and continually striving for higher standards in terms of animal welfare and farm management will be key in preventing disease and providing a wholesome food supply.

Q A

: How did the CCA Scholarship Program make a positive impact on your time as a student?

: CCA has played a major role in contributing to my success and supporting me with scholarships throughout my veterinary education. CCA has supported me with nearly $17,000 over the past four years! This money has contributed to everything from tuition, rent and supplies, to flights across the U.S. for cattle and veterinary related events which have brought about outstanding networking opportunities. I am honored and humbled to have had the support of CCA over the past four years, and I am excited to give back through my career as a livestock veterinarian.

Q A

: Anything else you want to add about your career goals related to California’s beef industry?

: I was very active in 4-H and FFA and I am passionate about the positive impact showing livestock has on our youth. I plan to continue raising cattle for young livestock exhibitors, and to contribute time 30 California Cattleman September 2020

throughout my career volunteering at livestock shows and encouraging a passion for agriculture and livestock industries. My dreams of becoming a veterinarian started in the barns, and I intend to share my time mentoring students who aspire to join the field of veterinary medicine.

Q A

: How can cattle ranchers in your area reach out to you moving forward?

: Feel free to call into the clinic at (209) 634-5801 to get in touch with me. I am also happy to arrange meetings on farms to see animals, go over/create treatment protocols, or discuss management strategies. You can learn more about the products and services we offer at landervet.com. Additionally, you can follow us on Facebook and Instagram. Grace Woodmansee, Siskiyou County Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor CCA Scholarship Recipient, 2018 and 2019

Q

: What degree are you graduating with this winter and what are your plans after graduation?

A

: In December, I will graduate from UC Davis with a master’s degree in horticulture and agronomy. I will begin my job as the University of California Cooperative Extension, Siskiyou County Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor on Jan. 4, 2021.

Q

: How will this job allow you to help play a role in furthering California’s cattle industry for years to come?

A

: The sustainable management of California rangelands is closely tied to our economic, ecological and social resilience, and ranchers are an integral part of facilitating this management. California cattle producers are uniquely engaged in rangeland research and policy development and it has been a pleasure to learn from CCA and its members as a student. As a cooperative extension advisor, I look forward to working with ranchers to conduct research that builds resilience at the ranch, community and policy level. I am excited to continue collaborating with CCA to sustain ranches and rangelands for generations to come.

Q A

: What are you most looking forward to in this new position?

: All of my experiences in agriculture have been centered around community, and I believe that a truly special part of this industry is how connected and supportive its members are. As a scientist, I have also seen


how much community contributes to making progress on important, complex issues that impact grazing lands. I am very excited to join the community of Siskiyou County and to work with ranchers and land managers to identify research priorities, develop projects and address challenges related to livestock production and natural resource management.

Q

: How did the CCA Scholarship Program make a positive impact on your time as a student?

A

: I am so grateful for the support I received from the CBCIA Hank Stone Memorial Scholarship and the Livestock Memorial Research Fund as a graduate student—these scholarships were a tremendous support for my graduate education at UC Davis. In addition to supporting my education, CCA scholarships provided me the opportunity to travel to conferences and industry meetings to present my research and network with fellow students, scientists and ranchers. I always gain so much from attending these events, and really value the opportunity to learn about applied research and production from experts who are passionate about ranching and rangeland management. CCA scholarships allowed me to make the most of my graduate education, and I will be forever grateful for the support of the CCA

in achieving my career goals.

Q

: Anything else you want to add about your career goals related to California’s beef industry?

A

: I am truly humbled by the support I have received from CCA as a student. I look forward to continuing my involvement in CCA as a professional and helping to support the next generation of students entering the California cattle industry. Thank you! CCA is proud of these past recipients and dozens of others, as they work to further advance ranching and beef production across all segments of the cattle industry. If you are currently studying agriculture, consider applying for a 2020 CCA Scholarship today to receive assistance towards your education and to join this community of leaders. Or if you are a friend, parent, grandparent or coworker of someone you know studying agriculture, please pass this information along and encourage them to apply too! The application deadline for this year’s scholarships is Oct. 1, 2020. For a complete list of application requirements and to download the application, visit calcattlemen.org/scholarship. Contact Katie in the CCA office at katier@calcattlemen.org with any questions.

APPLICATIONS FOR THE 2020 CCA SCHOLARSHIPS ARE BEING ACCEPTED NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 1, 2020!

In 2019, CCA awarded almost $50,000 in scholarships to students studying agriculture. CCA Allied Industry Scholarship • CCA Feeder Council Scholarship • Tom Grimmius Memorial Scholarship • Hank Stone Memorial California Beef Cattle Improvement Association Scholarship • Livestock Memorial Research Fund Scholarship

Learn more about the 2020 requirements for applying & download the CCA Scholarship application at calcattlemen.org/scholarship.

September 2020 California Cattleman 31


BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

Opportunity for a bottom line filled with pounds and premiums by Abbie Burnett for Certified Angus Beef Would you rather have AC or heat? Only meat or vegetables for dinner? Do you want the profit from your cattle to come from pounds or quality? These are decisions you don’t have to make. Brian Bertelsen, U.S. Premium Beef (USPB) vice president of field operations, addressed cattle questions with data at the Beef Improvement Federation’s recent online symposium. He began by defining premium as the difference between the amount paid on USPB’s value-based grid and the previous week’s USDA-reported average cash market. “Last year, we had a record-high quality grade premium,” he said, noting some groups earned record high total premiums above cash late in 2019 when the rewards for quality were especially high in the marketplace. “Prior to that, premiums were hanging around $50 per head.” Marbling and dressing percent were the two key profitability traits, the latter of importance because the grid pays on hot carcass weight (HCW) rather than live weight. Bertelsen showed the 22-year span of company grade and premium data, commenting on the mostly steady increase in HCW and average premiums paid. Drought caused zigzags in 2006 and again six years later. The introduction of such technology as ultrasound and genomic testing stimulated quality grade improvement early in this century and 10 years later, respectively. More pounds have been a familiar feature. “We’ve been increasing carcass weight and live weight ever since we learned how to build fence and selectively breed cattle,” Bertelsen said. “That’s obviously one of the first things we’re focused on because that’s our pay weight.” Increasing HCW is nothing to be ashamed of. “This is our competitive advantage,” he said. “We’re really not increasing cow numbers. We’re allowing our

32 California Cattleman September 2020

industry to feed more people with a lot of pounds of total product from less animals.” Adding weight can be a key to profit. “My job is to coach our producers and give them some suggestions, things to do and try,” Bertelsen said. “One of the things I’m talking to them about lately is, ‘Hey, the better your cattle are for genetics, for carcass traits, and let’s say for specifically marbling, really the longer you ought to feed those cattle… if I don’t feed him very long, I don’t allow him or her to maximize their genetic potential.’” Studying data and trends over the years, Bertelsen watched dynamic shifts develop. “Remember the drought year in 2006 led to lower grades and there was a high Choice-Select spread. That’s logical, right? But also remember how high the grades have been the last couple of years and the Choice-Select spread has also been pretty high. Well, that doesn’t make a whole lot of sense,” he said. Until you look at the steeply declining share of fed cattle grading Select across those 22 years. “The whole industry went from 37 percent down to 14 percent Select. Such a huge decrease in availability pushed some large meat customers out of Select and into Choice ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 34


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Casino Bomber S161

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Reg No. 19696653 • DOB: 08/11/2019 Casino Bomber N33 X Connealy Black Granite CED BW WW

YW

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+.81 +71 +94 +139 +251

CED BW WW

+8

+2.7 +101 +167

DOC CW MARB RE +22

+88

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YW

+10 +0.3 +83 +141

DOC CW MARB RE +15

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CED BW WW

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CED BW WW +5

YW

+0.9 +88 +156

DOC CW MARB RE +24

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DPL Foxy Erica 7260

Reg No. 19544169 • DOB: 08/16/2018 Connealy Confidence Plus x EF Commando 1366 $C

YW

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Casino Isabel R150

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+.72 +1.10 +77 +104 +169 +296

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DOC CW MARB RE +13

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Plus 20 Hereford bulls from Hoffman Herefords, Thedford, Nebraska Online viewing and bidding available sale day at

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 32

HCW. “Each year, yield grade 3s are the maximum price per hundredweight, but 4s are usually the most total dollars whether they wanted to or not,” Bertelsen said. Today’s per head,” Bertelsen said. wider spread is all about the discount for an increasingly He compared the top eight ranches (4,000 head) to the irrelevant grade. Looking again at drought years like 2006 and 2012, he USPB grid average. Those eight averaged just 13 lb. lighter HCW, but graded 99 percent Choice and Prime compared noted increases in yield grade discounts. to 87 percent company average. They also qualified “If we’re in a period of time when we have a higher more than 80 percent for the Certified Angus Beef® percentage of yield grade (YG) 4s and 5s, it’s really more (CAB®) brand, with 51 percent Prime or CAB Prime. The attributable to changes in muscling,” he said, “which I company average was 6 perecentPrime. attribute to environment.” Those numbers show what people can do with Data indicate YG3 is a gateway to premium Choice. modern genetics, focused management and grid marketing Summaries show quality grade, HCW and YG all moving incentives, Bertelsen said. higher together. While noting all the company data deals with cattle “It’s rather challenging, even with good genetics to phenotypes, he closed with an example from one USPB produce a lot of Prime cattle with a really low yield grade,” member that compared progeny from two bulls with Bertelsen noted. “They’re both fat – marbling and back above-average Angus $B, but one significantly higher than fat – so we need to allow these cattle some time again to the other. If used on both spring and fall herds to generate express their genetic potential.” 50 progeny per year for five years, the better bull could The relationship between yield grades and HCW are add more than $39,000 on the grid. part of the increase in dollars per head on the USPB grid No balancing needed. Benefits await for pounds and premiums. versus the cash market. As yield grade increases, so does

34 California Cattleman September 2020


September 2020 California Cattleman 35


It takes Sierra Ranches Bulls Like These That Sell 9/25/20

SR W49 Belleman 9006 ET

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From Sierra Ranches Females Like These That Sell 9/25/20

SR Miss Montana 9020 ET

SR 5153 3065 21Walex 8210

Mated to Sierra Commercial Females Like These That Sell 9/25/20

36 California Cattleman September 2020


To Produce Top Quality Replacement Heifers Like These That Sell 9/25/20

And Steers That Feed and Grade Like This

Cattleman’s Choice Feedyard is an industry leader in feeding GAP, Verified Natural and NHTC cattle. I have fed a lot of western type cattle and Sierra Ranches is one of the top. The cattle gain, convert, and grade all in the same package. That’s very important when you take out all the implants and feed additives that conventional feedyards use. That speaks highly of the genetics these cattle carry. The cattle always stay healthy and are very easy to handle. There’s nothing in the cattle business that makes you more money than Good Genetics. Dale Moore, Owner/Manager Cattleman’s Choice Feedyard

***NOTE*** The set of 115 head of Sierra Hereford Bull sired, black baldy steers, we fed that were killed on 1/19/20 paid on a live weight of 1,312 lbs. after gaining 3.58 lbs. per day with no implants with a dry matter conversion of 5.97 and a cost of gain of $0.84 and earned a $289.29 per head premium after grading as follows... QUALITY GRADES % 28.10% - Prime 71.90% – Choice 0% - Select 0% - Standard 0% - Conformation

Western Treasures

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Volume IV

Modesto, California

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September 2020 California Cattleman 37


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

BASICS OF BUILDING FUNCTIONAL GRAZING LEASES: ADAPTING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION by Tim Koopmann and Carissa Koopmann Rivers As fourth and fifth generation ranchers where our family has been on the same ranch since 1918, it’s easy to assume that the ranching heritage will continue without a hitch through the fifth and into the sixth generation. No matter how hard we as the ranching industry try to make this a reality, unfortunately, it just is not a given. It’s not a simple choice anymore when the time comes to seek an outside career or stay home and merge into management of the family operation. Today, we have much more to take into consideration and a unique set of challenges, especially in California. Many families struggle to keep the interest of the next generation on the ranch, but what about those multigenerational ranches where everyone wants to be involved, but the operation just plain cannot support more family members and their families? It’s such a proud moment to realize that each kid and their kids want to be part of our legacy and want to remain on the ranch as a viable member of the team, but there’s no room physically or financially. Then what? We have some options which likely include seeking outside grazing leases. Grazing leases on public or private ground are common practice to fulfill the cattle business reverie. The first step is finding an available lease, second step is securing that lease and the final step is stocking it with livestock. Easy enough, right? For some, maybe, but not everyone. It’s not always enough to be the best cattleman or operator around or the person who can sweet talk the most challenging landlord. We can have one or both of these characteristics and land a grazing lease, but we need to be able to communicate successfully and build a trusting relationship with the landlord in order to maintain the lease long enough for it to pencil out. This is especially true when considering capital improvements and time invested in the property. Finding and securing a lease opportunity that fits

38 California Cattleman September 2020

can seem like finding that needle in the haystack. Once you secure a lease, there are many conversations and responsibilities to sort through with the landowner to create a manageable agreement and successful, long-term lease experience. The most successful lease relationships require mutual trust. Trust is established when two way communication is clear and timely and the landlord understands that the cattle enterprise is a business with a reasonable expectation of profit. Part of communication is being clear about the need of longer-term leases to provide stability and allow business planning strategies that benefit the natural resources and production goals of all parties. The landlord should understand the basic essentials of annual beef cattle operations in California and should have an understanding of the business expenses and challenges that are incurred. Reflecting back, years ago as a landowner representative for a public land agency, we (myself and the public land agency) had engaged in the process of acquiring tenants for two parcels totaling 16,000 acres. The selection process was rigorous and very time consuming as a new process for the agency. Screening the applicants, interviewing, parcel walk throughs and credit reference checks through multiple levels of bureaucracy consumed eleven months. Tenant selections were finally determined in early October. The new tenants were notified at that time, giving them a couple of months to increase their capital base and obtain cattle for the new lease. The stated goal of the agency to the new tenants was for all documents to be executed and occupation allowed by November 15. As expected, the new tenants began an orderly business expansion plan. Additional equipment, supplements, vet supplies and labor were arranged. Most importantly, bred cows and pairs were accumulated (700+/-). The ranchers stockpiled the cattle on their existing lands, ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 40


We have got it ALL for you at McPhee Red Angus! ALL the calving ease you will need! ALL the growth you will need! ALL the carcass quality needed for added premiums! ALL born and bred on our family ranch! ALL in one genetic packed package! We at McPhee Red Angus are passionate and proud of raising cattle. We have worked hard at selecting cattle that will thrive in the harshest of environments. The McPhee cow herd has been bred and selected inherently for calving ease, fertility, soundness, growth and carcass performance. Our cows work for us, to make bulls that work for you!

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This set of bulls and heifers spent the winter on only mom in the Sierra foothills. They were weaned off in May, and both sets were turned out to irrigated pasture here on the home ranch with the bulls being added a 80% roughage TMR. At first weight check, bulls are off to a great start averaging 3.71lbs ADG.

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As Good As The Best Better Than The September 2020 Rest California Cattleman

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 38 over stressing existing resources. November 15 slipped by with no lease documents presented for signatures. Early rains followed by unusually cold fall temperatures began to cause real deterioration of resources and excessive supplemental feed requirements. Every day, I called and complained, I went to head offices and raised hell with a lot of fellow employees. Christmas and New Year’s Day soon passed and then Valentine’s day. By March 1st, documents had not yet been prepared. The situation can be described simply as a complete disaster, could have been avoided with communication and if the agency had even an inkling of the dynamics of the grazing business. Trust and communication are the key tools necessary for successful lease relationships. Conversely, the rancher/tenant must understand the landowner’s goals and priorities. If the landlord/owner is a public agency, likely species habitat management, water quantity and quality yield and public users (e.g. hikers, birders) are the greatest priorities. As the rancher/tenant, it is our responsibility to understand the biology and habitat management and enhancements that the landlord expects. It is our responsibility to help educate the landlord representatives and visiting public as to the ecological benefits of a managed grazing program and the nutritional benefits of beef to a healthy lifestyle. If we are reluctant to play this role, or consider all of the ecological concerns, then there are leases that will not work. When a landlord offers a lease, there must be transparency established as to their expectations. The lease must be a “no-surprise” agreement. Provision for potential changes to lease terms, season of use,

stocking rate and class of livestock to be grazed should be established in writing. Any management changes must be based upon an extraordinary change of conditions such as severe drought or wildfire forage loss. It is the responsibility of the rancher to provide the landowner with an operating plan. Any changes should be made together by the tenant and landowner and be based upon an analysis of conditions and an allowance for a reasonable time frame for achieving the changes – implementing “Adaptive Management.” Many times we have heard Dr. Lynn Huntsinger, Ph.D. Wildland Resource Science at UC Berkeley tell land owners, both public and private, that cattle cannot just be “put on the shelf ” until needed. It is essential that landowners understand that changes to a lease can carry major implications for ranchers. While the publication, A Guide to Livestock Leases for Annual Rangelands (Barry et al, 2020) is written from the perspective of a landowner seeking a grazing tenant, it is useful in outlining commonalities in successful lease agreements. Often times as producers grazing leased land, we are, unfortunately, interacting with individual landowners or organizations with little livestock grazing experience especially as it pertains basic livestock management practices. Yes, we’re busy when we’re gathering cows, putting supplement out or avoiding another jaded conversation, but we believe it is in our best interest to take advantage of these interactions that may provide positive and educational experiences for these folks. We have an opportunity to educate the public recreating on the public lands we graze and increase the awareness of the intricacies of livestock husbandry when implementing a grazing program on public or private leased land. Some simple acts that may help convey our message may look like an invitation to a branding, or BBQ afterwards, or even sharing photos taken at the ranch of cattle grazing or anything that could spark good conversation or be used on the organizations’ website. In our experiences as both the lessee and the lessor, taking this time to explain what we’re doing and why it matters goes a long way in building a functional relationship. In conclusion, we can’t stress enough the value to invest time to achieve trust and develop long term relationships with your landlords. Additionally, as ranchers we need to continue to educate ourselves on sustainable grazing practices, healthy beef and the vast ecological values of managed grazing so we can communication these facts to landowners and public lands managers. We agree that it is a two-way street, both landlord and tenant must strive to understand how the land resources may be managed to meet their combined goals. These key tools will aid in successful lease opportunities for the next generation.

Carissa and Vic Rivers, Rivers Red Angus have been leasing Save Mount Diablo’s Curry Canyon Ranch since 2013. Save Mount Diablo and Rivers Red Angus have worked with the local Natural Resources Conservation Service and Resource Conservation District on several projects aimed at protecting and enhancing natural resources for numerous plant and bird species, along with the California Red Legged Resources have been developed by UC Cooperative frog, California Tiger Salamander, Alameda whipsnake and the Pacific Extension livestock and natural resources advisors across Pond turtle. They have also completed projects specifically benefiting the state and specialists with UC Rangelands that ranchers cattle production such as livestock water systems and instillation of can access at http://rangelands.ucdavis.edu/. new fencing has helped improve livestock distribution. 40 California Cattleman September 2020


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RANGELAND TRUST TALK

BERKELEY STUDY SHOWS BENEFITS OF LAND CONSERVATION by Alyssa Rolan for the California Rangeland Trust The California Rangeland Trust is thrilled to announce the release of a new study conducted by scientists from the University of California, Berkeley, showing the long-term benefits of land conservation. This groundbreaking research could transform the way Californians look at working landscapes in the Golden State. California’s ranchlands contain intact plant and wildlife communities that provide valuable ecosystem services – such as habitat, carbon sequestration, food, fuelwood, open space, views and watersheds – to communities across the state. These ecosystem services offer myriad benefits to Californians, but their monetary value is often overlooked. The study found that working lands conserved by the Rangeland Trust provide between $900 million and $1.44 billion in environmental service values annually, and the Rangeland Trust’s conservation efforts return between $3.43 and $3.47 in environmental service values for every dollar invested. “This study demonstrates the importance of caring for and serving California’s land, so that it can serve our communities in return,” says California Rangeland Trust CEO Michael Delbar. “Conserving the state’s open spaces and rangelands isn’t just about ranching. It’s about investing in environmental services that will benefit Californians now and into the future.” According to the Department of Conservation, over 1.4 million acres of land in California have been converted from agricultural to other uses since 1984. 78 percent of that land has been lost to urban development. This study looked at 306,781 acres of rangeland conserved by the Rangeland Trust in order to better understand what would have been lost if these ranchlands had vanished. Researchers found that ranches conserved by the Rangeland Trust produce the following ecosystem service values every year: • $236 million in food production • $13.9 million in water for people, plants and wildlife • $250.6 million in biodiversity maintenance • $96.6 in habitat lifecycle production

42 California Cattleman September 2020

• $31.6 million in aesthetics and viewsheds • $28.5 million in recreation opportunities • $28.5 million in climate regulation “Our research found there is immense economic value in ecosystem services provided to society through rangeland conservation,” said Lynn Huntsinger, professor of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at UC Berkeley. “The study further underscores how protecting California’s working landscapes provides us with food, clean water, fire protection and many more vital benefits.” The Rangeland Trust has helped protect over 340,000 acres across the state. Transparent, informed research is at the heart of our mission at the Rangeland Trust. By communicating with our readers, ranchers and supporters the importance of ranching and rangeland, we aspire to change the way California values working landscapes. To learn more about these incredible findings and to download the report, please visit: https://rangelandtrust. org/ecosystem-service-study/.


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by International Brangus Breeders Association Executive Vice President Darrell Wilkes, Ph.D. The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) has been running an advertisement proclaiming that today’s Brangus are, “Not your granddad’s Brangus.” Most breeders can tell simply by looking that the cattle have changed quite significantly over the past couple decades. As Yogi Bear famously said, “You can see a lot just by observing.” Broadly speaking, Brangus breeders have moderated the frame, added base width, added body capacity, increased muscle expression, deepened the flank, tightened the sheath and, in general, made the cattle look more appealing to the majority of observers. While the visible changes are fairly obvious, there are some invisible changes that have occurred in the population that are very important. It is interesting to “look under the hide” at the changes in Brangus.

Today’s Brangus beef fits a white tablecloth menu

Today’s Brangus are high-grading cattle. This statement surprises some people, but it is true and there’s a reason for it. Brangus breeders utilize ultrasound to a high degree to estimate carcass traits on yearling bulls and heifers. This information feeds into IBBA’s cutting-edge genetic evaluation which computes the breed’s EPDs. What may surprise many is that the average value for percent intramuscular fat (IMF) now exceeds 4 percent. What does that mean? IMF is an indicator of marbling, which is the primary determinant of USDA quality grade (Select, Choice, Prime). Meat scientists report that 4 percent IMF generally places an animal in the Choice quality grade. This would be impressive if the animals being ultrasounded were steers and heifers on a high concentrate ration in a feedlot. But these are yearling bulls being fed a grow ration – and they have high levels of natural testosterone which works in favor of muscling and against deposition of IMF (marbling). The Brangus data also includes yearling heifers which are developed on grass or forage-based rations and they STILL have enough IMF to grade Choice. And they only have a quarter inch of backfat on average when they are ultrasounded. One has to speculate, what percent IMF would be present if these same cattle would have been on a high concentrate ration in a feedlot for 160 or more days and delivered to a packer with .50 to .60 inches of backfat? The number would easily rise to 5.5 to 6.5 percent IMF which places them in the middle of the Choice grade. It is no 44 California Cattleman September 2020

wonder then, that we see the data or hear of results of pens of Brangus steers or heifers grading more than 90 percent Choice, with 20 to 40 percent making Certified Angus Beef, and up to or exceeding 10 percent Prime. This is entirely consistent with the genetic trend in Brangus for marbling. It’s not a fluke. “I can remember back when a Brangus broke a 3 percent IMF scan, we were doing handstands! Today, Brangus are scanning IMF’s better than the top end Angus cattle. Better overall, in fact, because of the Brangus cattle’s high yields. For a balance of yield and quality grade, you just can’t beat a Brangus,” says ultrasound technician, Donnie Robertson. Your granddad’s Brangus did not marble like this – or very few of them did. The beef industry across the board has increased the percentage of cattle that grade Choice or higher. The average is now on top of 80 percent Choice, compared to 60 to 65 percent Choice less than a decade ago. Brangus breeders take pride in doing their part to improve the quality of U.S. beef. This is due to genetic change. Marbling is heritable. If one has access to state-of-the-art genetic evaluation (i.e. computation of EPDs), along with access to good genomic tests (DNA tests) which enhance EPD accuracy, and if breeders place emphasis on marbling in their selection, you can move the curve – which is exactly what Brangus seedstock breeders have done. The chart above compares the actual IMF averages with the EPDs for IMF over the past 19 years. Clearly, the actual IMF increase is steeper than the EPD line, but this is expected. EPDs tend to be conservative. Moreover, the EPD is only half of the actual genetic level of the animals because an EPD is an estimate of the effect that a random sample of 50 percent of an animal’s genes will have on his/her progeny. The key point is that Brangus breeders are moving the average higher and have been doing so for 20 years or longer. Very importantly, the average has reached the point where Brangus genetics are clearly making a positive contribution to the grading profile of the higher-quality beef industry of today.

How about muscling?

Granddad’s Brangus had a reputation for being a bit flat-muscled. Current data on Brangus make it clear that this is an outdated perception. Today’s Brangus cattle have muscling that places them above average in the U.S. cattle population. Ultrasound is used to estimate the size of the rib eye


Did granddad ever turn out a yearling Brangus bull?

muscle in live cattle. People wonder why so much stock is placed on the size of a single muscle. The reason is straightforward: The rib eye muscle, measured at the junction of the 12th and 13th ribs, is strongly correlated with the total muscle mass in an animal. Rather than getting hung up on the actual size of the rib eye, it is more informative to look at the rib eye size in comparison to the live weight of the animal. A good rule of thumb is that an animal should have 1.1 square inches of rib eye per 100-pound of live weight. This would be considered par for muscling when measured on animals near one-year of age. The animals within the current Brangus population which are ultrasounded for rib eye area, on average, boast 1.24 square inches of rib eye per 100-pound of live weight – which is nearly a 13 percent muscling “bonus” in Brangus compared to the industry rule of thumb. As Brangus breeders have dramatically improved carcass value, some might worry that the maternal goodness of Brangus females has been sacrificed. That’s a legitimate thing to worry about because it has been known to happen in several breeds of cattle. Either by good luck or good planning, the Brangus female has become even more maternally productive while the carcass traits have been improved.

Probably not. This is almost the same question as whether or not granddad bred heifers as yearlings. Sexual maturity is occurring earlier in Brangus females, and earlier in Brangus bulls also. Experienced Brangus breeders remember the days when a 30-cm scrotal size was a rare find. Today, it is common to measure yearling bulls in the mid-30s, and yearling bulls over 40-cm are not unusual. To be relevant in today’s ever-demanding marketplace for beef genetics, there is no place for one-dimensional cattle. The competition is simply too fierce. Breeds of cattle that will still be here 10 or 20 years from now must connect all the dots of maternal efficiency, growth efficiency, management convenience and end product quality. Brangus breeders are meeting the challenge. Your granddad might be surprised by modern Brangus cattle.

Did granddad breed his Brangus heifers as yearlings? Probably not. It was not uncommon at all, three decades ago, to hold Brangus heifers until they were 18 months of age before breeding them. It took granddad’s Brangus a bit longer to reach puberty. Those days are long gone. The vast majority of Brangus heifers in the IBBA database have their first calf at two-years of age. It is not at all unusual to see 10-month-old Brangus heifers cycling. Sexual maturity is occurring much earlier in Brangus these days. It is a result of hard-nosed breeders selecting for early puberty and culling heifers that don’t breed early.

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HARMFUL RAYS

Reminding ranchers how and why they should protect themselves by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen Known for their trademark jeans, long sleeved shirts and cowboy hats, it may come as a surprise to some that cattlemen and women are still some of the most at-risk individuals facing the real possibility of skin cancer. While it isn’t a first-in-line topic that many ranchers consider among their long list of worries, perhaps it should be something more of them are aware of. According to a 2019 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer each year in the United States. Agricultural and construction workers (ACWs) may be at increased risk for skin cancer because of high levels of ultraviolet radiation exposure from the sun. This is the first study that uses nationally representative data to assess sunprotection behaviors among ACWs. Most of the 2,298 agricultural and construction workers studied were male (by industry, 72.4 percent in agriculture and 89.3 percent in construction; by occupation, 66.1 percent in agriculture and 95.6 percent in construction) and non-Hispanic white. About one-third had at least one sunburn in the past year. The prevalence of sunscreen use and shade seeking was low and did not significantly differ among groups, ranging from 15.1 percent to 21.4 percent for sunscreen use and 24.5 percent to 29.1 percent for shade seeking. The prevalence of wearing protective clothing was significantly higher among agricultural workers than among construction workers by industry (70.9 percent versus 50.7 percent) and occupation (70.5 percent versus 53.0 percent). The aged-old term “farmer’s tan” may no longer be as appealing as it once was and ranchers, both male and female should refrain from shedding layers as the sun’s rays get hot during the day. It is important to keep from exposing any skin to the sun.

A WAKE UP CALL FOR US ALL There is a popular misnomer that the more pale your skin is, the more deadline the sun’s rays. But as one California family knows all too well, that is not always the case. On July 7, Tulare County friends and family said goodbye to a cowboy they all loved. David Caetano, just 36 years old, passed away on July 1 after a battle with melanoma. Family friend Sally Dudley Baker said what is 48 California Cattleman September 2020

speculated to have possibly started as a simple spot on his neck, ultimately took his life. “Being of Portuguese descent, David was stunning with dark skin, hair and eyes,” Baker said. “For those of us who work daily out in the sun, we need a reminder of the ravages of melanoma. If we can make people aware, maybe David didn’t die in vain.” Though David’s story is a sad one to tell, perhaps the harsh reality of his situation will inspire other cattlemen and women of all ages to take a proactive approach to their health. For David, the battle was a whirlwind. His initial symptoms in January 2020 led him to believe he may have strained his back. Despite several weeks of weight loss and at the encouragement from loved ones to see a doctor, David’s initial hospital visit – via ambulance – happened after he passed out at work in late February. From there he was transferred to UC San Francisco to have a stage IV tumor removed from his cerebellum. With follow up treatment, David’s friends and family were hopeful he would beat the deadly disease. But only six months from his initial symptoms, David succumbed to terminal melanoma. While many mistakingly consider melanoma to be a simple skin cancer that can just be burned or cut off of the surface of the skin, melanoma currently kills just over two people per hour in the United States. Some other interesting facts that may have spurred David’s decision to seek treatment or implement preventative measures are that: • 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer by age 70. • Half of all adults aged 18-29 report at least one sunburn in the past 12 months. Sustaining five or more sunburns in youth increases lifetime melanoma risk by 80 percent. • When detected early, melanoma has a 99 percent survival rate. • Men age 49 and under have a higher probability of developing melanoma than any other cancer. • From ages 15 to 39, men are 55 percent more likely to die of melanoma than women in the same age group. • Women age 49 and under are more likely to develop melanoma than any other cancer except breast and thyroid cancers. David’s girlfriend Samantha Hilvers said David’s situation is unique because unlike symptoms one might expect from skin cancer, David’s cancer used a sneak attack on his body. But stubborn, as many ranchers are, Hilvers said David persisted through the pain, thinking it was only a result of the physically demanding work he did routinely. Following his ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 50


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 48 diagnosis, he couldn’t stand to see the herd gathered and not be on horseback with his friends and family working alongside them. “Back and rib pain, accompanied by decreased appetite were the only real warning signs we had before the tumor in his brain started to bleed which finally lead to him going into the hospital in the end of February,” Hilvers explains. “He worked every single day up until he got admitted and after surgery, and while receiving immunotherapy treatment he was still trying to help out around the ranches with running water and checking fencelines from the cab of his truck.” It comes as no surprise that the biggest struggle for David throughout his whole cancer journey was having to rely on other people for help. “He had such a huge and giving heart,” Hilvers says. “He worked hard and treated everyone with respect. He treated their livestock and land with pride, just like he treated his own. You would be hard pressed to find someone that knew him that had anything bad to say.” Hilvers said David had his own way of pushing everyone he met to be better, and it is her hope that by sharing his story that he can continue to push people to be better. “Take care of your body and listen to the warning signs it might be giving you. Don’t just push through and think ‘oh this is normal. I need to suck it up and deal with it.’ Be and do better than what you have done in the past. Treat everyone with respect. Take each challenge the day throws at you as they come. And don’t stress over every little thing, that was a big one he worked on teaching me the two years we were dating,” she said. David’s brother Brian echoed Hilvers’ words and added that sharing David’s story may help others avoid a similar fate. “Sharing David’s story is now up to us. That is what he would want. Helping others avoid the same tragedy is the least we can do to honor his memory,” said Brian Caetano. NOT JUST MELANOMA There are three primary types of skin cancer and each varies in seriousness. The most common type of skin cancer is basal cell carcinoma (BCC), with an estimated 2.8 million people diagnosed each year. About eight out of 10 skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas (also called basal cell cancers). These cancers start in the basal cell layer, which is the lower part of the epidermis. These cancers usually develop on sun-exposed areas, especially the face, head and neck. They tend to grow slowly. It’s very rare for a basal cell cancer to spread to other parts of the body. But if it’s left untreated, basal cell cancer can grow into nearby areas and invade the bone or other tissues beneath the skin. If not removed completely, basal cell carcinoma can come back (recur) in the same place on the skin. People who have had basal cell skin cancers are also more likely to get new ones in other places. BCCs often look like open sores, red patches, pink growths, shiny bumps or scars, and are usually caused by a combination of cumulative and intense, occasional sun exposure. About two out of 10 skin cancers are squamous cell carcinoma (also called squamous cell cancers). These cancers start in the flat cells in the upper (outer) part of the epidermis. These cancers commonly appear on sun-exposed areas 50 California Cattleman September 2020

of the body such as the face, ears, neck, lips and backs of the hands. They can also develop in scars or chronic skin sores elsewhere. They sometimes start in actinic keratoses (described below). Squamous cell cancers can usually be removed completely (or treated in other ways), although they are more likely than basal David Caetano works at a cattle branding in cell cancers to January 2020, prior to being diagnosed with grow into deeper stage IV melanoma. layers of skin and spread to other parts of the body. Sometimes this starts out as actinic keratoses, which is a scaly or crusty growth. Although the vast majority of actinic keratoses remain benign, some studies report that up to 10 percent may advance to squamous cell carcinoma,” according to the American Skin Cancer Foundation. SCC is the second most common type of skin cancer, and roughly 700,000 are diagnosed with it each year. It is estimated that 2 percent of patients with SCC die from the disease. Melanoma, as previously mentioned, is the most deadly type of skin cancer, and although it accounts for only 2 percent of cases, it has the highest death rate. DETECTION Detecting skin cancer early makes a huge difference in the ability to treat it. Ranchers should perform self-exams on a regular basis. Any bumps, moles or off-looking spots should be checked out by a doctor. Here are some conditions to look out for, especially if you have regular exposure to the sun. Actinic keratosis (AK), also known as solar keratosis, is a pre-cancerous skin condition caused by too much exposure to the sun. AKs are usually small (less than 1/4-inch across), rough or scaly spots that may be pink-red or flesh-colored. Usually they start on the face, ears, backs of the hands, and arms of middle-aged or older people with fair skin, although they can occur on other sun-exposed areas. People who have them usually develop more than one. These tend to grow slowly and usually do not cause any symptoms (although some might be itchy or sore). They sometimes go away on their own, but they may come back. A small percentage of AKs may turn into squamous cell skin cancers. Most AKs do not become cancer, but it can be hard sometimes to tell them apart from true skin cancers, so doctors often recommend treating them. If they are not treated, you and your doctor should check them regularly for changes that might be signs of skin cancer. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 52


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 50 “If you see something that looks like skin cancer, make an appointment to see a dermatologist. The earlier skin cancer is caught and treated, the more likely it can be cured,” according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Squamous cell carcinoma in situ, also called Bowen disease, is the earliest form of squamous cell skin cancer. “In situ” means that the cells of these cancers are still only in the epidermis (the upper layer of the skin) and have not invaded into deeper layers. Bowen disease appears as reddish patches. Compared with AKs, Bowen disease patches tend to be larger, redder, scalier and sometimes crusted. Like AK, Bowen disease usually doesn’t cause symptoms, although it might be itchy or sore. Like most other skin cancers (and AKs), these patches most often appear in sun-exposed areas. Bowen disease can also occur in the skin of the anal and genital areas (where it is known as erythroplasia of Queyrat or Bowenoid papulosis). This is often related to sexually transmitted infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), the viruses that can also cause genital warts. Bowen disease can sometimes progress to an invasive squamous cell skin cancer, so doctors usually recommend treating it. People who have these are also at higher risk for other skin cancers, so close follow-up with a doctor is important. Keratoacanthomas are dome-shaped tumors that are found on sun-exposed skin. They may start out growing quickly, but their growth usually slows down. Many keratoacanthomas shrink or even go away on their own over ime without any treatment. But some continue to grow, and a few may even spread to other parts of the body. They can be hard to tell apart from squamous cell skin cancer, and their growth is often hard to predict, so many skin cancer experts recommend treating them (typically with surgery). Preventcancer.org highlights the ABCDEs of melanoma to help people identify possible risks: •“A” stands for asymmetrical. Does the mole or spot have an irregular shape with two parts that look very different? •“B” stands for border. Is the border irregular or jagged? •“C” is for color. Is the color uneven? •“D” is for diameter. Is the mole or spot larger than the size of a pea? •“E” is for evolving. Has the mole or spot changed during the past few weeks or months? Talk to your doctor if you notice any of these changes in your skin or a new growth, a sore that doesn’t heal, a change in an old growth. PREVENTION Protection is the No. 1 key to preventing skin cancer, and there are several ways that cattlemen, women and anyone who spends significant time outdoors can protect themselves from the sun’s damaging rays. Protection from ultraviolet (UV) radiation is important all year round, not just during the summer or at the beach, like some may assume. UV rays from the sun can reach you on cloudy and hazy days, as well as bright and sunny days. UV rays also reflect off of surfaces like water, cement, sand and snow. While it may seem obvious to an average rancher it is good to remind that indoor tanning (using a tanning bed, booth or sunlamp to get tan) exposes users to UV radiation. The hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Daylight Saving Time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time) are the most hazardous 52 California Cattleman September 2020

for UV exposure outdoors in the continental United States. UV rays from sunlight are the greatest during the late spring and early summer in North America. CDC recommends easy options for protection from UV radiation: • Stay in the shade, especially during midday hours. While this may be impossible for those who make a living outdoors, proper precautions can still be taken. • Wear clothing that covers your arms and legs. • Ranchers are known for their attire, so it should go without saying but wear long sleeves if possible. Long sleeves will protecting your skin from the sun even after sunscreen wears off. Lightweight shirts can help ranchers stay cool as well. • Wear a hat with a wide brim to shade your face, head, ears and neck. Baseball caps are not sufficient, a cowboy hat is much more effective. A hat should protect the top of the head, the ears, much of the face and the neck, which are all areas that see the most sun. And keep in mind that straw cowboy hats with holes in the top can be deceiving and can lead to sunburn on the head, especially on ranchers who may no longer have a full head of hair. This is where sunscreen may still be important. • Wear sunglasses that wrap around and block both UVA and UVB rays. • Use sunscreen and lip balm with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher, and both UVA and UVB (broad spectrum) protection. • Examine your skin once a month. Tell your health care professional about any skin changes. The first line of defense is to make a habit of daily sunscreen use. Sunscreen is marked with SPF, which stands for sun protection factor. There are three classifications: high (30plus), moderate (12-29) and minimal (2-11). According to the American Melanoma Foundation, the SPF displayed on the sunscreen label ranges from 2 to as high as 50 and refers to the product’s ability to screen or block out the sun’s harmful rays. For example, if you use a sunscreen with an SPF 15, you can be in the sun 15 times longer than you can without sunscreen before burning. “Consumers need to be aware that SPF protection does not increase proportionally with an increased SPF number. While an SPF of 2 will absorb 50 percent of ultraviolet radiation, an SPF of 15 absorbs 93 percent and an SPF of 34 absorbs 97 percent,” the foundation explains. If working outside, ranchers should consider using a water-resistant or waterproof sunscreen. Water-resistant sunscreen should be reapplied every 40 minutes, and waterproof sunscreen every 80, according to the FDA. “Regular daily use of an SPF 15 or higher sunscreen reduces the risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma by 40 percent and the risk of developing melanoma by 50 percent,” according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. “People who use sunscreen daily show 24 percent less skin aging than those who do not use sunscreen daily.” As someone who makes a living off mother nature, staying indoors in the heat of the day is not always an option. But it is important to arm yourself with this vital information and take proactive steps to protecting yourself. While it’s true that there are individuals who are more prone to the sun’s damaging effects, it has been proven that no matter your age, gender, skin color or background, skin cancer can impact you. So for the sake of yourself and your loved ones, follow these guidelines and stay educated on this and other issues impacting your heath.


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September 2020 California Cattleman 53


ANAPLASMOSIS Staying ahead of a costly problem for California’s cattle producers

by Gaby Maier, DVM, PhD, DACVPM, Extension Veterinarian for Beef Cattle Herd Health & Production, UC Davis and Josh Davy, UC Livestock/Range Advisor, Tehama, Glenn and Colusa counties Anaplasma marginale is a blood parasite that targets red blood cells of ruminants including cattle. Anaplasmosis is the disease caused by the organism, estimated to cost the U.S. cattle industry several hundred million dollars annually, and one of the most important cattle diseases throughout the world. The name Anaplasma stems from the Greek words an (“without”) and plasma (“shape”) describing an organism that appears to have little substance to it. “Marginale” means – you guessed it – marginal, so we are talking about a small organism living “on the edge”, in this case on the outer edge of red blood cells. It falls in the order Rickettsiae, which belong to the bacteria, but similar to viruses it needs other cells to live and can’t survive outside an animal for long. Transmission between cattle occurs via several species of ticks. In California, Dermacentor aka the dog tick is most commonly responsible for transmission. Mechanical transmission of small amounts of blood through instruments such as taggers, hypodermic needles, tattooers or through blood-sucking insects like biting flies is also possible. Once infected, disease in cattle develops within 7 to 60 days depending on the infective dose. The body recognizes the intruder and destroys infected red blood cells. This process causes fever, anemia, lethargy, abortion and death in cattle. The disease can easily be confused with respiratory disease because cattle may have a fever and breathe harder. Since red blood cells get destroyed during the disease, there are fewer of them picking up oxygen in the lungs, which cattle try to compensate for by breathing faster. It is like going from sea level to a 10,000-foot mountain and realizing the air is pretty thin and getting out of breath easily. Some telltales that cattle have the disease include the color of mucous membranes, like the inside of the mouth, that may appear pale or yellow, incoordination, and/or a cow’s behavior. With insufficient oxygen supply to the body including the brain, changes in behavior occur. Often cattle are simply found dead and a necropsy by a veterinarian will lead to diagnosis. Affected cattle can become aggressive and may attack an approaching person so proceed with caution if you suspect anaplasmosis in a cow or bull. Stress, such as a gather, can exacerbate the disease causing death. If anaplasmosis is suspected as the culprit causing aggression, it may be better to leave animals where they are. 54 California Cattleman September 2020

Although not BQA approved, antibiotic treatment with a dart gun may be less stressful than a long walk to the corral or roping in this particular instance. Besides cattle, blacktail and mule deer, water buffalo, American bison and bighorn sheep can also become infected and act as reservoirs although disease is most severe in cattle. Cattle that survive the infection likely stay infected for life, i.e. they eventually replenish their red blood cells, but the organism survives at low levels in their body. The good news is that recovered cattle are usually protected from future anaplasmosis disease; the bad news is that survivors can become quite debilitated with loss of body condition, decreased fertility and their calves can have reduced weaning weights. Age at infection determines the severity of disease where young animals less than six months of age rarely are affected by the infection, while older cattle, especially those over two years of age are much more likely to become very sick and die. Sick cattle can be treated with antibiotics or blood transfusions and may survive. However, treatment works best in the early phases of the disease and the stress of restraint can kill the animal once the disease has progressed. Anaplasma marginale does not cause disease in people, but there are other Rickettsiae that infect humans through tick bites, e.g. Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Removing ticks as soon as possible helps prevent tickborne disease in people.

HOW CAN YOU PROTECT YOUR HERD FROM ANAPLASMOSIS?

The herd status determines how Anaplasma should be managed. Herds that do not come into contact with infected ticks, infected wildlife or infected cattle, for example in the Central Valley on permanent pasture, have little risk for disease. For such naïve herds, the biggest risks for an anaplasmosis outbreak are either movement to an endemic area or introduction of a carrier animal. If such a herd needs to be moved to an area that is suspected to harbor Anaplasma, vaccination of all adult cattle before movement is the best option. For incoming cattle to a naïve herd, a negative blood test should be a prerequisite for introduction. Introducing a positive animal to a negative herd could start the spread of disease and could result in multiple losses.


On the other hand, if the herd is in a known endemic area, cattle at the highest risk of disease are unexposed additions to the herd, for example a breeding bull that comes from an Anaplasma-free herd. These animals have a high chance of becoming sick from anaplasmosis when they join the herd. The best ways to prevent this from happening is to purchase bulls that test positive or that have been vaccinated. In endemic areas, deliberate exposure of young animals to pastures that are thought to harbor ticks that transmit Anaplasma is a common way to address the disease. A study from 2013 that followed a commercial beef herd in California from March through September showed that the percent of infected replacement heifers rose from 19 to 69 percent and from 41 to 92 percent in two groups of heifers during the study period. In mature cows, 90 percent tested positive initially and 95 percent at the end of the study showing that it is possible to manage Anaplasmosis through deliberate exposure in this herd, but other situations may be different. If the proportion of infected drops below 50 percent, the danger of outbreaks seems to increase. Exposure of animals to the pathogen at the right time including the presence or absence of infected ticks or the use of needles or other instruments during processing will influence how well the herd becomes exposed. This method entails some unknowns and is therefore not without risk of failure if conditions in the environment change. There is concern that treatment with oxytetracycline for any reason can render an already exposed animal back to a vulnerable state because the drug is effective against Anaplasma. However, if used at the labelled drug dose, multiple rounds are required to achieve killing of all organisms and is very unlikely to occur if only one or two doses are given. Use of CTCs (chlortetracycline) medicated feed products fed free choice are only approved for control of active infection of anaplasmosis and require a Veterinary

Feed Directive (VFD).

WHAT ABOUT VACCINATION?

The only vaccine available at present is an experimental killed vaccine that can be purchased through the California Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association. Unfortunately, the efficacy of the vaccine has never been tested in California, which means we do not actually know how well it is able to protect from disease. Given the cost of the vaccine, blanket vaccination of all animals in the herd can be expensive and it is unknown how well cattle are protected. As a killed vaccine, it requires a booster shot four weeks after the initial dose and yearly revaccination. Vaccinated animals will test positive on an antibody ELISA test, i.e. the test cannot distinguish between vaccinated and infected cattle. The Anaplasma polymerase chain reaction test, which tests for the presence of the pathogenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DNA, will be negative in an animal that was vaccinated but never infected. Anaplasmosis vaccines are difficult to make because of the biology of the organism and its immune evasion mechanisms and because of strain variability. In the Midwest, many different strains have been found within the same herd. One explanation for the abundance of strains in that region is the commingling of cattle from different parts of the country in feedlots of the Great Plains. We do not know what the predominant strains of Anaplasma in California are or whether we have a similar patchwork of strains than the midwestern states. Gaining this knowledge will be important in making sure future vaccines will be effective in California herds.

CURRENT RESEARCH

The Beef Cattle Herd Health and Production team at UC Davis has launched a survey that will be sent out to a sample of ranchers across the state to gather more ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 56

September 2020 California Cattleman 55


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 55

A word from former CCA President Tom Talbot, DVM: “To my fellow beef cattle producers and beef cattle veterinarians: Could you please take the time to complete the questionnaire you recently received regarding anaplasmosis. Information received from this survey will help us to direct research and acquire funding to hopefully better manage this costly and rapidly expanding disease.”

information on the current state of this important cattle disease in California. The researchers are trying to learn how familiar ranchers are with the disease, how widespread it appears to be, whether the area where it can be found is expanding, how it is managed and what the risk factors are for having cases of the disease in cattle. A companion survey of beef cattle veterinarians is being conducted as well to complement the rancher survey. The results may help provide guidance into how to reduce the risk of disease in areas where Anaplasma is endemic or where the disease is newly emerging. It may alert ranchers that have been Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. The unaware of the disease to become killed anaplasmosis vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age more vigilant and look out for cases. from infection and requires a booster given 4 to 6 weeks after the In order to be able to assess what the initial vaccination. Find out below if you should order the vaccine! differences are between locations with and without the disease, both positive Do you NO YES own cattle? and negative herds are needed and are equally important. Based on the results of the survey, blood samples from targeted herds will be collected to survey what strain Do they types are circulating in California and You don’t need it, graze in also to study factors such as what but should still areas where YES percentage of the herd needs to be Anaplasmosis support the is a positive in order to achieve herd California problem? Cattlemen’s immunity and if there is correlation to (Consult your local Association the strain type. The results may also be veterinarian to find out) important to assess how good future vaccine candidates will be at providing Do you want to prevent protection for California herds. the effects of the disease There is interest in development including severe anemia, of a new vaccine for anaplasmosis and weakness, fever lack of Kansas State is at the forefront of that appetite, depression, YES type of research. One group at Kansas constipation, decreased State has evaluated the feasibility of milk production, ear implants for delivery of vaccine jaundice, abortion and for anaplasmosis and have tested possibly death? the use of combination adjuvants versus a single adjuvant in a challenge ORDER TODAY BY CALLING (916) 444-0845! experiment where the combination Available in 10 or 50 dose bottles 10-40 doses: $8.50 per dose resulted in diminished clinical signs in 50+ doses: $7.50 per dose infected Holstein steers. It is important *10 dose minimum and $10 flat rate shipping to understand, however, that these are SOLD ONLY TO CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION MEMBERS early stages of vaccine development and a commercial product is still far in the future. 56 California Cattleman September 2020

SHOULD YOU ORDER THE ANAPLASMOSIS VACCINE?

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RANGELAND RESEARCH University of California specialists show passion for grazing by Lizzeth Mendoza, beef sustainability Intern, University of California Cooperative Extension ©m.squaredphotography

H

aving access to the latest research can be a challenge but more so overwhelming. You search Google phrasing your questions one way but the answers you are looking for do not appear. You rephrase it another way and nothing. You turn to another search engine to look specifically for peer reviewed research but none of it makes sense or better yet, you are clueless on which article to select to find answers. What if I told you that there is an information hub filled with researchers and educators that provide a variety of research in rangeland onto one site? Very organized, friendly and accessible, UC Rangelands has created an information hub to help producers, students, regulators and agriculturists learn more about sustainable livestock grazing management practices. University of California (UC) specialists across multiple campuses and local UC Cooperative Extension livestock and natural resources advisors are researchers and educators who are passionate about grazing management and are committed to researching agriculture and environmental sustainability. UC Rangelands is the collection of decades of research conducted on working rangelands in California by UC all located in one place. “UC Rangelands is a network of researchers and educators across the University of California and Cooperative Extension focused on the economic, ecological and adaptive livestock grazing enterprises from cattle to sheep and goats, ” states Director Leslie Roche, Ph.D., a UC specialist in rangelands management. “There has been tremendous research conducted through the UC system for decades at the local level and on UC campuses. The website brings together these resources to make them accessible for those with an interest in working rangelands.” The UC Rangelands website was originally launched in 2015. Each year the site gets over 30,000 visitors. The work of UC Rangelands on topics from water quality to invasive species is of interest to land managements, ranchers and agencies who visit the site from across the globe. 58 California Cattleman September 2020

“We know that the site is highly valued by local, state and federal government agencies as a scientifically credible and solution driven collection of research on rangelands in California,” states Roche. “Co-Director Ken Tate has more than 25 years of water quality research that is shared on the site along with features of our more recent work on predators, mountain meadows and adaptive grazing strategies.” Ranching and livestock grazing is complex, the benefits of having more than 40 researchers and educators come together with diverse backgrounds and expertise is the ability to answer the multi-disciplinary questions posed by ranchers in the field or agency staff. “California ranchers have collaborated with UC to conduct practical, field based research on private working ranches and grazed public lands,” states Tracy Schohr, UC Cooperative Extension Livestock and Natural Resources Advisors in Plumas, Sierra and Butte counties. “UC Rangelands hubs currently showcase research projects on irrigated pasture to drought, and public lands grazing with fact sheets, policy briefs and peer reviewed research publications. While the publications section covers a broader scope of published research on working rangelands - over 700 total.”

Drought Research

During the 2012-2015 drought UC Rangelands originally developed a “Drought Hub” to provide tools for livestock producers and land managers. This past year, as limited rainfall hit the state and several headlines regarding the new California drought were printed, the team continued to add new resources to the site. This section includes fact sheets and research papers on management and production, feeds and nutrition and economics. The site also includes a section of resources for government programs. This is an easy place to find current rainfall ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 60


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 58 reports, snow survey information and drought monitor updates.

Irrigated Pasture Research

California is well known for its diverse Mediterranean climate bringing an abundance of agriculture products and it’s grassy lands for livestock. With over 500,000 acres of valley, foothill and mountain meadow pastures in the state, irrigated pastures are a critical resource for livestock producers. The Irrigated Pastureland Enhancement Program was created to address drought frequency, severity and extent - as well as growing water demands. The project has a participatory research approach that ensures relevance and credibility of the project, while integrating technical, experimental and social learning pathways. There are currently 35 on-ranch demonstration sites with 23 producers operating on over 4,000 acres across Northern California. Monitoring of the demonstration sites consists of: forage productivity and utilization, forage composition and quality, soil fertility and soil moisture conditions. There is also a management aspect to the project consisting of tracking livestock numbers, irrigation and fertilization. “In Modoc County there are five sites at three different locations: Likely, Davis Creek, New Pine Creek that are part of the UC Rangelands Irrigated Pasture Research Project,” states Laura Snell, UC Cooperative Extension Livestock and Natural Resources Advisor in Modoc County. At these specific sites we simulated grazing or haying by clipping at various heights and tracking pasture productivity. There are also other variables collected

including long-term weather, soil sampling, stubble height measurements, noxious weeds presence, species richness and forage nutrient analysis.” Through this project we are identifying management practices that support livestock productivity, water quality, plant diversity, drought resiliency and water efficiency.

Water Quality

Water in relation to livestock grazing, has been under public watch for decades. The team at UC Rangelands investigates water quality in rangeland streams that are essential for drinking water and irrigation. There is estimated to be over 40 million acres of rangeland watershed that supply surface drinking water, irrigation, habitat, production, grazing and more. UC Rangelands investigates water quality to determine impacts of best management practices, source verification, riparian health and more that support sustainable livestock grazing on California’s vast landscapes. In one specific project highlighted in UC Rangelands, 19 streams were analyzed during 2000 and 2001 from October to September. The watershed sizes ranged from 1,000 to 143,000 acres with a dominant land use for range livestock production including grazing, corrals and irrigated pasture. Concentrations were found to be low when comparing to state and federal water quality standards. Although this data relates to phosphate and ammonium levels the data did show that fecal coliform and E. coli indicator bacteria exceeded the recommended levels during rainfall runoff seasons. This is just one of the many studies that looks at grazing in relation to water quality across the state.

Public Lands Research

Grazing strategies are analyzed in the UC Rangelands public land meadows and riparian areas in six National Forests with a total of 74 sites. These leases on national forest grazing lands supply forage for over 70,000 head of cattle annually. The Public Lands Research Project was created to assess the effectiveness of grazing strategies used on public lands and riparian areas. These monitoring programs are meant for managers who are wanting to adapt grazing management to site specific conditions while maintaining successful environmental outcomes that concern the public. The preliminary results show longterm meadow health trends are compatible with grazing management.

Rustici Endowment

©m.squaredphotography

UCCE researchers spend time on a UC Rangelands project. 60 California Cattleman September 2020

UC Rangeland also showcases the research and extension efforts of UC funded by the “Rustici Endowment.” The Endowment was a generous gift to the UC from the late Russell L. Rustici, a Lake County cattle rancher who was dedicated to preserving rangeland ecosystems. Through his generosity and gifts, faculty positions, research and outreach are supported and a scholarship program administered through the California Farm Bureau Federation is available for undergraduates with an interest in rangeland science and management. “The vision and leadership of Mr. Rustici to create a ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 62


26TH Annual Sale by the sea 58 Bulls • October 9, 2020 • 4:00PM • Pismo Beach, CA Due to COVID19, 2020 has been very different, and we want to accommodate your needs prior to sale day! Please contact us to preview the bulls or with any questions. See our website for the sale book.

TEX Confidence Plus 9052

TEX Confidence plus 9063 Reg No.: 19394168 • Date of Birth: 01/08/19

BW EPD 1.4 YW EPD 135 HP EPD 10.8 CW EPD 64

MARB EPD 0.95 RE EPD 0.84 $M 70 $B 180 $C 303 - Brother, TEX Confidence Plus 9052, sold at Performance Plus for $60,000 to Riverbend Ranch - Paternal sister TEX Toni 9101 sold at Bases Loaded for $60,000 to Rooney Angus Ranches - TEX Confidence Plus 9131, full brother to TEX Toni 9101, sells at Sale By The Sea

TEX Toni 9101

Hoover Know How R67

TEX Playbook 9322 Reg No.: 19467863 • Date of Birth: 03/14/19

BW EPD 1.9 YW EPD 134 HP EPD 14.8 CW EPD 63 MARB EPD 0.61 RE EPD 0.8 $M 90 $B 155 $C 291 - 4 brothers being sold

TEX Playbook 5437 TEX Rita 905 7

TEX know how 9161 Reg No.: 19467887 • Date of Birth: 02/10/19

BW EPD 1.4 YW EPD 126 HP EPD 9.3 CW EPD 54 MARB EPD 1.19 RE EPD 0.57 $M 41 $B 182 $C 277 - Brother TEX Know How 9094 ($C 286) sells at Sale by the Sea - Paternal sister TEX Rita 9057 sold at Bases Loaded for $40,000 to Riverbend Ranch

Offering Progeny from Elite Sires:

PLayBook • Confidence Plus • Know How • Protocol • Power Surge • Calvary • Regulator • Phenom 50% LOW BW EPD + HIGH $C BULLS

56 PUREBRED ANGUS | 2 SIMANGUS

SALE STREAMED ON CCI.LIVE

T H E T E I X E I R A F A M I LY John, Heather, Nathan, Joseph & Ben Teixeira John’s Cell: 805-448-3859 • Heather’s Cell: 805-448-3869

Allan & Cee Teixeira Allan’s Cell: 805-310-3353

Tom Hill Tom’s Cell: 541-990-5479

w w w. t e i x e i r a c a t t l e c o . c o m | 8 5 5 T h o u s a n d H i l l s R d . P i s m o B e a c h , C A 9 3 4 4 9 | c a t t l e @ t h o u s a n d h i l l s r a n c h . c o m


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 60 program to support research and the next generation of ranchers is unparalleled,” said Ken Tate, Ph.D., Rustici Endowed Chair in Rangeland and Water Quality at the University of California, Davis. “Through his generous donation UC is able to conduct a myriad of research projects of critical importance in the state on animal health, livestock genetics and natural resource topics. Also, it has funded various extension activities including multiple tours on public lands grazing and water quality stewardship on irrigated pasture for regulators to see firsthand the sustainable grazing management practices undertaken by California ranchers.”

MONDANI LIVESTOCK

Visit UC Rangelands

Having access to UC Rangelands and its workshops producers, regulators and others can adopt new and upcoming sustainable management strategies to efficiently manage pastureland that is critical to ranching and provides many ecosystem benefits. Ultimately the UC Rangelands hub is here for YOU. Through rangeland research and education UC Rangelands strives to provide you with fast and accessible resources to not only be more efficient and sustainable but also make better environmental decisions for our future. Recently, the team at UC Rangelands launched a free webinar series “Working Rangelands Wednesday” that showcases research, ranchers and land managers talking about grazing management in California. You can also follow the work of UC Rangelands on Twitter @UCRangelands and on Facebook. For more information, visit rangelands.ucdavis.edu.

Teresa Mondani of Mondani Livestock of Ione, is seen checking out the old Doc Scheiber Grazing Allotment in mid-July near Pearl Lake in the El Dorado National Forest. She’s getting spoiled on one of Doug Veerkamp’s best mules.

For more information on Mondani Livestock, e-mail: teresamondani@gmail.com

CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

SQUEEZE CHUTES HEAD GATES CATTLE WORKING SYSTEMS

Since 1938, Powder River has provided the highest quality and most durable products available for the livestock industry. Conlin Supply Co. carries the full line of Powder River’s squeeze chutes, working systems, classic gates and panels which are unsurpassed in quality, functionality and reliability, making them an overall great investment. Stop by either of our locations to see the full line of products... 576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • 62 California Cattleman September 2020


S U N D A Y, O

M P 0 0 C T O B E R 4 T H AT 1 :

64 Years of Performance-Tested Yearling Bulls Sale will be held at the Cal Poly Oppenheimer Family Equine Center via in-person video and online auction. Bull preview will be held sale weekend at the Cal Poly escuela Ranch and Bull Test Facility.

DIRECT INQUIRIES AND SALE BOOK REQUESTS TO: AARON LAZANOFF BEEF OPERATIONS MANAGER (805) 801-7058 ALAZANOF@CALPOLY.EDU

ZACH MCFARLANE, PH.D. BEEF CATTLE SPECIALIST (805) 756-2685 ZMCFARLA@CALPOLY.EDU September 2020 California Cattleman 63


64 Years of Cal Poly Tradition CONTINUING IN PERSEVERANCE AMID UNFORSEEN CHANGE from Cal Poly Bull Test Advisor Zach McFarlane What an unbelievable year to date. The impact of COVID-19 has been felt by all and certainly has had an impact on Cal Poly. In my third year as the Cal Poly Bull Test advisor, I never thought I would have to manage the program during a pandemic. I felt like I had finally started to have a firm grasp on managing students and the program. However, we have had to completely reevaluate how we could accomplish the daunting task of managing around 100 bulls with a skeleton crew of beef employees that remained within the county. The Cal Poly Beef unit students have certainly stepped up to the task. Our student managers, Jenna Fields and Jeremy Schwartz, have done an outstanding job managing over 100 bulls that were delivered to Cal Poly in mid-July. In addition, our student secretaries, Grace Guthrie and Maureen LaGrande, have exceeded expectations with their focus and determination to provide updates to consignors. The following students should also be recognized for their efforts to help feed bulls and deliver a successful sale in October: Rachel Day, Robee Knoch, Payton Thomas, Colton Naylor, Clarissa Ballo, Janae Lewis, Stella Boller and Jason Dubowsky. Without the help of these students who have remained on campus, the Bull Test would not even be

2020 Bull Test

possible. This year, the focus of the test has been genetic potential (i.e. EPDs) as opposed to growth performance. This decision was made as a result of the shortened length of the test in response to COVID-19. The sale will look quite different this year, but we are excited to invite buyers to campus on Oct. 4 at 1 p.m. The sale will be held in-person and on-campus at the Oppenheimer Family Equine Center. Like many sales during this pandemic, the bulls will be sold via video auction. However, buyers will be able to view bulls during the week prior and on sale weekend. The sale will also be available online for buyers that may be unable to attend. Visitors are asked to follow all COVID-19 safety protocols upon arrival to campus. Please reach out via e-mail at bulltest@calpoly.edu or by phone at (805-756-2685) with any questions, to request sale catalogs and/or to schedule a bull viewing appointment. Fortunately, we have a group of amazing consignors that never fail to support this program. The following list of consignors have provided a spectacular set of bulls available for purchase at the 64th Annual Cal Poly Bull Test on Sunday, October 4. I hope we will see you there!

Consignors

Alina Amaral, Amaral Cattle Company, Angus Joe and Patricia Borges, Borges Angus Ranch, Angus Jim Brown, Rollingwood Ranch, Angus/Polled Hereford CK Angus, Angus Jim and Dustin Brown, B Bar Six, Polled Hereford Bob Coker, Genoa Livestock, Hereford Loretta Cooksey, C2-IT Cattle Co., Angus Jackie Davis, Davis Cattle Service, Polled Hereford Greg Furtado, Furtado Angus, Angus Paul Gianandrea, Gianandrea Angus Cattle Co., Angus Tom and Stacy Hardesty, Diamond S Angus, Angus Nicole Hartzell, N Style Cattle Company, Angus Sharon Hertlein, Hertlein Cattle Co., Angus David Holden, Westwind Angus Ranch, Angus Cal Poly Foundation, Angus Dennis Lopez, Diablo Valley Angus, Angus Mickelson Family, Sonoma Mountain Herefords, Horned and Polled Herefords Lee Nobmann & Morgon Patrick, Dixie Valley Angus, Angus Ryan Person, Person and Son Cattle, SimAngus & Angus Roger Sosa, Eagle Grip Cattle Co., Angus Jerry Spencer, Spencer Cattle Company, Angus Brandon Theising & Dwight Joos, P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co., Hereford 64 California Cattleman September 2020


breeding curve-bending cattle that perform! selling Top Hereford bulls at Cal Poly, Visalia and Private Treaty off the ranch!

home of the 2019 cal poly Champion & High Preforming Hereford Bulls

GCC HOME RUN 18043 ET

5T TESTED TARGET 18042

He sells via private treaty off the ranch!

He sells via private treaty off the ranch!

GCC KNIGHT GILLIBRAND 18017

GCC KNIGHT GILLIBRAND 18029 He sells at Visalia Sept. 27

He sells at Visalia Sept. 27

join us Oct. 4 in San Luis Obispo & Visalia Sept. 27 Name 5T TESTED TARGET 18042 GCC HOME RUN 18043 ET 5T TESTED ROUGH RIDER 18039 ET GCC GENETIC DESIGN 18055 ET 5T PROSPECTOR 18057 ET GCC KNIGHT GILLIBRAND 18017 GCC KNIGHT GILLIBRAND 18029

REG NO. 43996500 43997899 43997926 43997932 43997934 44158636 44158638

CED +9.8 +8.2 +4.0 +6.6 +5.5 +13.2 +10.5

BW +1.1 +1.2 +1.1 +0.2 +0.6 -0.7 -0.1

WW +54 +69 +62 +64 +69 +63 +59

YW +86 +113 +99 +113 +113 +107 +99

SC +1.1 +1.6 +.9 +1.6 +1.5 +1.6 +1.6

MILK +22 +17 +22 +27 +22 +33 +31

M&G +49 +51 +53 +59 +57 +64 +60

We stand behind our bulls 100% Horned and Polled Genetics Extensive use of ET and AI technology Top cow families represented Great dispositions Cattle available year round by private treaty

CEM +4.6 +6.9 +2.0 +6.8 +6.2 +6.8 +5.5

CW +60 +69 +78 +77 +76 +79 +72

FAT +.023 +.053 +.043 -.007 +.013 +.033 +.003

REA +.32 +.38 +.66 +.67 +.56 +.48 +.50

MARB +.49 +.67 +.53 +.22 +.33 +.62 +.34

BMI +469 +391 +432 +347 +346 +410 +408

$CHB +94 +87 +113 +108 +101 +127 +121

Give us a call today! Brandon Theising (809) 358-2115 Dwight Joos, manager (805) 428-9781

www.pwgcattle.com September 2020 California Cattleman 65


7 WESTWIND WINNERS AT CAL POLY! FEATURING SONS OF BASIN PAYWEIGHT PLUS 6048 ALSO SELLING SONS OF JINDRA ACCLAIM, BALDRIDGE COLONEL AND DIABLO DELUXE Watch for these early standouts... Diablo Deluxe 1104 • MGS: K C F Bennett TheRock A473 LOT 1 Sire: CED BW WW YW MARB RE $W $B $C 13

1.5

77

139

1.19

0.73

77

198

313

Basin Payweight Plus 6048 • MGS: V A R Discovery 2240 LOT 4 Sire: CED BW WW YW NARB RE $W $B $C 7

LOT 7

BASIN PAYWEIGHT PLUS 6048

-TWO OUTSTANDING SONS ON TEST-

1.7

80

157

1.10 0.45

83

174

274

Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: Plattemere Weigh Up CED 9

BW 2.6

WW 88

YW MARB RE 162 0.69 0.60

$W 84

$B 187

$C 321

Typical fo the kind you expect from a program that has produced multiple Cal Poly Champions and High-Sellers!

RANCH ANGUS

David J. Holden • (530) 736-0727

38 Montana Ave, Oroville, 95966 wstwind@hotmail.com Where Cowmen Buy Bulls www.westwindangus.com Also watch for Westwind Angus bulls selling in the Butte Bull Sale at Lambert Ranch on October 17 in Oroville!

MANY 1/2 BROTHERS SELL...

loaded with calving ease, performance and carcass quality! V A R FOREMAN 3339 • 7 SONS ON TEST!

A A R Ten X 7008 S A X Connealy Onward CED 11

BW 0.9

WW 73

YW 133

Milk 19

Marb 1.22

$B 166

$C 264

V A R LEGEND 5019 • 3 SONS ON TEST!

V A R Discovery 2240 X SydGen C C & 7 CED 6

BW 1.7

WW 68

YW 133

Milk 19

Marb 0.91

$B 179

$C 290

ALSO SELLING ONE SON OF V A R COMPLETE 1209 Aaron Lazanoff Beef Operations Manager (805) 801-7058 alazanof@calpoly.edu

contact us about any of the 2020 cal poly foundation bull offering!

66 California Cattleman September 2020

Zach McFarlane, Ph.D. Beef Cattle Specialist (805) 756-2685 zmcfarla@calpoly.edu


GENOA LIVESTOCK WE DO NOT DO AVERAGE!

Take a look how our two powerful prospects compare across the board. Genetic excellence doesn’t just happen, we strive to create it every day!

GENOA 17013 YORK 19238

Sire: GENOA YORK Y02 17013 • MGS: R VISIONARY 4200 CED BW WW YW DMI

SC MILK CW

Fat REA Marb BMI

BII $CHB

-0.2

1.4

.053

414

3.8

70

113

0.6

25

81

.47

.15

326

115

GENOA 33Z VICTOR 19251

Sire: JDH VICTOR 719T 33Z ET • MGS: NJW 73S W18 HOMETOWN 10Y ET A powerful son of this breed leader sells!

CED BW WW YW DMI

SC MILK CW

7.8

1.9

2

62

114

0.4

38

Fat REA Marb BMI

82 0.023 0.31 0.20 430

BII $CHB 518

130

Compare Genoa bulls to the Hereford breed averages! CED BW WW YW DMI

SC MILK CW

2.2

0.9

3

51

82

0.1

24

Fat REA Marb BMI

64 0.009 0.35 0.08 332

BII $CHB 398

100

JDH VICTOR 719T 33Z ET

GL

GENOA LIVESTOCK

Also join us Sept. 8, in Minden, Nevada for our annual production sale! Or join us online...

www.genoalivestock .com

SPENCER CATTLE COMPANY HAS THE SPURS YOU NEED! 8 POWERFUL BULLS SELL INCLUDING 3 SONS OF CONNEALY SPUR! CONNEALY SPUR

DIAMOND S ANGUS BRINGS TOP PERFORMERS TO THE TEST Selling 4 Angus Bulls that cover the gamet from calving ease to carcass Watch for these standouts by Jindra Acclaim and Connealy Legendary! Hardesty Acclaim 9032 Hardesty Legendary 9038 Reg No 19691217 DOB: 09/18/2019 JIndra Acclaim X EXAR Significant 1769B CED BW WW YW MK CW RE $M $C 9 0.3 69 134 29 65 0.73 165 276

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

FAT

+5

+3.6

+70

+121

+29

+.83

+.46

+.036

$B

$C

+148 +281

He is a powerhouse sire with loads of muscle and has been siring the top selling sire groups at the past few Vermilion’s production sales. These sons are the big volume type cattle that excel in production, carcass and $values and daughters in production are really productive.

SPENCER CATTLE CO. Jerry & Anne Spencer 7879 Van Vleck Rd Rancho Murieta, CA 95683 (916) 275-5422

Reg No.19691222 DOB: 09/21/2019 Connealy Legendary 644L X S A V Ten Speed CED BW WW YW MK CW RE $M $C 16 -2.1 68 117 21 44 0.98 161 292

Contact us about everything from calving ease to carcass bulls

ALSO SELLING TWO SONS OF ANGUS BREED LEADER

TEX PLAYBOOK 5437 Tom & STacy Hardesty (916) 869-9294

Also watch for our bulls selling at California Breeders Bull Sale in Turlock and the World of Bulls Sale in Galt! September 2020 California Cattleman 67


COMMERCIAL REPLACEMENT HEIFER SELECTION by Alison Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., University of California, Davis, and Darrh Bullock, Ph.D., University of Kentucky

T

raits that are of the most economic value to self-replacing herds are reproductive traits including age at first calving, reproductive success and reproductive longevity or stayability. These maternal traits are sex-limited, lowly heritable, and some are expressed quite late in life. This has precluded direct selection on these traits when selecting commercial replacement heifers, and impeded genetic progress. In fact, the antagonism between carcass traits and some maternal and calving traits may have led to negative progress (e.g. carcass weight is positively correlated with mature weight), as positive selection on the terminal traits can result in negative selection on the maternal traits. Improvements in reproductive performance can be up to four-fold more important in terms of the bottom line than improvements in end-product traits in a conventional cow-calf operation selling market calves at weaning. Given the economic importance of reproduction, commercial cow-calf producers raising their own replacement heifers should focus some of their selection emphasis on maternal traits. However, most commercial producers have no expected progeny differences (EPDs) information upon which to base their replacement heifer selection decisions. Selection is frequently driven by size, as an indicator of age; smaller heifers are often the ones that are born late(r) in the calving season and are too immature to be cycling in time for the first potential breeding season. Commercial producers typically select on at least a visual estimate of a heifer’s yearling weight, in addition to a visual evaluation of structural soundness. If increased size is due to age then this will put indirect selection on fertility traits of the dam (e.g. early calving), however if increased size is due to genetics for growth then it can lead to inadvertent selection for increased mature weight. Ideally animals born in the first 21 days of the breeding system would be selected, however commercial producers often do not record birth dates and so have to 68 California Cattleman September 2020

estimate the likely birthdate based on the size of the calf. DNA testing offers an appealing approach to provide previously-absent selection criteria. Theoretically, DNA tests are ideally suited for traits where there is no other tool available for selection. Ironically, research shows that DNA tests for lowly heritable traits will be the most difficult to develop. That is because a very large amount of data (e.g., a large number of performance records) will be required to develop accurate DNA tests for lowly heritable traits. Additionally, such tests will also be the most difficult to evaluate as there is a shortage of cattle populations with sufficient phenotypic data to estimate the accuracy of new genomic tests for those traits. It was shown early on that 50,000 SNP (50K) DNA tests developed using information from one breed have low predictive ability in other breeds. This is thought to be due to the fact that much of the accuracy of genomic breeding values results from the effect of large chromosome segments that segregate within closely related animals in one breed, but not across breeds. Practically this means that each breed needs to develop their own database of phenotyped and genotyped animals. There are a number of breeds (Angus, Brangus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Limousin, Red Angus, Simmental and Santa Gertrudis) that have done this by genotyping at least one thousand, and in some cases tens of thousands, of animals with EPDs and phenotypic records to develop DNA tests that are accurate for genomic prediction within those breeds. This genomic information is starting to be incorporated into National Cattle Evaluations and the resulting “genomic-enhanced EPD” have increased accuracies, especially on young animals. For more information see: “How DNA Testing Will Affect the Accuracy of EPD Information” factsheet at eBEEF.org. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 70


Est. 1974

Bull Sale

OCTOBER 17 • 1 P.M. • LAMBERT RANCH, OROVILLE Horned and Polled Hereford bulls bred, raised in the mountains and developed in the hot valley — ready to perform in any environment! OFFERING SONS OF THESE ALL-AROUND PERFORMANCE HERDSIRES...

NJW 73S 3304 GUNSLINGER 86D ET

XAMR RIBSTONE DOMINO 613

SIRE: UPS UNDISPUTED ET • MGS: PW VICTOR BOOMER P606

SIRE: UPS DOMINO 1544 • MGS: UPS RIBSTONE 9713

CED -2.0

BW 3.2

WW 60

YW 102

M&G 66

MB .18

RE .75

$CHB 123

CED +4.6

BW 2.9

WW 51

YW 87

M&G 54

MB .16

RE .44

$CHB 101

COME BY THE RANCH TO CHECK OUT MORE OF THIS YEAR’S OFFERING! ALSO VISIT US ONLINE AT LAMBERTRANCHHEREFORDS.COM TO VIEW BULLS! REG # 44043215

REG # 44043216

HORNED • LONG-MADE • FREE-MOVING POLLED • PIGMENTED • DARK RED

The Lambert Family Steve Lambert (530) 624-5256 slambert@digitalpath.net

REG # 44043219

HORNED • SQUARE • EASY-DOING

REG # 44043225

POLLED • DEEP • ATHLETIC

ALSO WELCOMING A GREAT SET OF ANGUS BULLS FROM THESE REPUTABLE BREEDERS: Gary Ford, Sunbright Angus: (530) 526-6128 Joel Popkin, Tara Farms: (530) 865-3600 Dave Holden, West Wind Angus: (530) 553-3090

September 2020 California Cattleman 69 LambertRanchHerefords.com


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 68 Sire Selection Drives Genetic Gain When making selection decisions to improve fertility it is important to remember that genetic gain in herds is predominately driven by sire selection. Although it may seem intuitive to focus on female selection to drive fertility, bulls are where selection focus should lie. That is because sires have a larger number of offspring per year (approximately 25-35) than females who typically have a single calf per year. Figure 1 shows that 87.5 percent of genetic composition of the calf crop is determined by the sires used over the last three generations. There are some EPDs directly related to fertility including heifer pregnancy and stayability.

FIGURE 1. Genetic composition of the herd: 87.5% of genetic composition of calf crop is determined by the sires used over the last three generations.

Use of Genomic Information The value of using DNA information in making replacement heifer selection decisions will depend upon the information available at the time of selection (e.g. phenotypic measurements, parentage data, EPDs), the accuracy of the test with regard to the selection objective and the replacement rate. Typically only a subset of heifers are replacement candidates due to size, other selection criteria (e.g. feet and legs, disposition) and replacement rate (i.e. what proportion of replacement heifers are selected to return to the herd each year). If EPDs are known on the sires of your replacement females then you have an estimate of half of their genetics. Therefore, parentage testing for sires can be a very useful genomics tool to assist in heifer selection and is much less expensive than genomically testing all of the heifers. To illustrate the interplay between accuracy, heritability and phenotype, consider a test that explains a quarter of the genetic variation (meaning the test has a correlation (r) of 0.5 with the true breeding value) in a lowly heritable trait like heifer pregnancy rate (h2 = 0.1). Although this test would be considered quite predictive for a lowly heritable trait, it would be expected to explain only 2.5 percent of the phenotypic variation in that trait. While it is important to select sires according to their genetic potential, in the case of commercial replacement heifers their readiness and ability to conceive in the proposed breeding season is important, and this includes both their genetic potential and also the environmental factors to which they have been exposed. Independent estimates of the accuracy of genetic tests are not available for all breeds and tests on the market. To date, data suggest that tests trained and developed for use in one breed are unlikely to work well in a different breed, or in a commercial crossbred population. Many papers have documented it is very difficult to develop genetic tests that have a correlation (r) of greater than approximately 0.2 for commercial crossbred populations. Unfortunately there are not yet any independent, peer-reviewed papers in the scientific literature documenting the field performance of genomic tests for commercial heifer selection. To estimate the value of genomic testing for replacement heifers, Van Eenennaam modeled the breakeven cost of testing all 45 potential replacement heifers born per 100 cows (weaning rate = 90 percent; 70 California Cattleman September 2020

50 percent female) per year in a commercial herd with a replacement rate of 20 percent (i.e. 20 replacement heifers were selected each year). For this estimate it was assumed that the commercial producer was not basing heifer replacement decisions on performance records. To select replacement heifers a multiple-trait maternal selection index was developed that included maternal, pre-weaning performance, post-weaning performance and carcass traits. For economic weightings it was assumed that the producer was retaining ownership through feeding and marketing the cattle on a value based grid. The maternal trait with the highest relative economic value in that index was weaning rate (i.e. number of calves weaned per cow exposed). A hypothetical DNA test with an intermediate accuracy (0.3) with regard to the selection objective was then modeled. The breakeven cost of testing replacement heifers was approximately $24 per test. In other words, to test all of your potential replacement heifers the cost of the test would need to be under $24 for it to provide a positive return on investment assuming the accuracy of the test is 0.3. As the accuracy of the test increases, the breakeven cost will decrease. Of this value, less than $10 was associated with traits of economic value to the cow-calf sector (i.e. cow-calf producer that does not retain ownership), with the majority of the value being realized by post-weaning genetic improvement (i.e. feedlot/ carcass traits). If we consider that producers are likely to have at least a visual estimate of weight, and possibly some information on the age of the heifer, utilizing this information would further decrease the breakeven value of the information provided by genomics testing. The value of obtaining a commercial replacement heifer genetic evaluation is significantly less than that for bulls because bulls produce more descendants from which to derive returns for accelerated genetic improvement. The breakeven estimate of $24 per test does not take into consideration the possibility of reallocating those funds for improved bull selection. For the herd with 45 replacement heifers the potential investment would be $1,080. The question ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 72


Thomas Angus Ranch

Oregon Bull & Female Sale Thursday, October 15, 2020 Noon at Baker City, Oregon

Thomas Big Data 7435

19008202

Sons of these ell! leading sires s Thomas Xpansion 5810

SydGen Enhance

18170041

18368349

CED +13; BW +.2; WW +60; YW +110; Milk +28; MRB +.72; RE +.68 $M +46; $W +67; $F +91; $G +58; $B +149; $C +239

CED +11; BW +.1; WW +64; YW +131; Milk +28; MRB +1.20; RE +.70 $M +72; $W +68; $F +128; $G +79; $B +207; $C +340

CED +7; BW +1.4; WW +61; YW +121; Milk +35; MRB +.69; RE +1.51 $M +58; $W +70; $F +126; $G +70; $B +196; $C +312

Selling

150 Bulls and 100 Females Females sell immediately following the bulls

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Cole Owens, Marketing Specialist & Cooperative Manager: (918) 418-7349 www.thomasangusranch.com info@thomasangusranch.com Keep informed of updates and information by following our social media profiles: Thomas Angus Ranch ThomasAngusRanch

@thomasangusranch

flyingt_angus

thomas-angus-ranch

View the sale bull videos at www.thomasangusranch.com

&

517.546.6374 www.cotton-associates.com

September 2020 California Cattleman 71


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 70

Shorthorn breeds showed the lifetime production of weight of calves weaned was increased by about 36 percent due to the effects of heterosis. This was broken down into direct effects on crossbred calf survival (+4.9 percent) and growth (+3.8 percent), and maternal effects on weaning rate (+6.2 percent), increased weaning weight of progeny due to the crossbred dam (+5.8 percent) and longevity (+16.2 percent) of crossbred cows. Choosing the right management tools to make genetic improvement in the beef herd is critical to economic viability. Taking advantage of heterosis, along with good sire selection decisions are proven means of positioning the herd for profitability. It is important in genetic management, as in all other management practices, to weigh the cost/gain balance of available tools. For every dollar invested you should expect at least an additional dollar in return. To determine what that value is in regard to commercial heifer selection using genomics is complicated and involves many factors. Under current market conditions and technologies and in the absence of any other information the value seems to be approximately $24 in retained ownership with replacement heifer operations, but closer to $10 in a market at weaning, retained heifer operation.

becomes, which is better, investing more in the sires that will produce the future replacement heifers or spending the money on a tool to improve the selection of the current crop of replacement heifers? It should be noted these calculations are based on the value of genomic information to make heifer replacement decisions in a commercial beef herd. The dairy industry is successfully using genomic testing on commercial replacement females. However, there are some important differences between the dairy and beef industry that make genomic testing of commercial replacement heifers a more cost-effective proposition in the dairy industry. The first is that most dairy cattle are straightbred and highly related to mainstream purebred genetics, and there are high accuracy genetic tests available for all traits in the selection index ($NetMerit). Culling rates on modern, well-managed dairy operations tend to be low, and widespread use of sexed semen has generated an excess of replacement heifers. Dairy producers are using genomic information to make decisions such as keeping versus culling heifers, flushing exceptional heifers, breeding certain high-value heifers with sexed versus conventional semen and breeding with dairy versus beef semen. There may be some opportunity to use genomic testing of beef heifers in analogous ways, although the value proposition will need to be considered for each operation. It is important to remember the value of crossbreeding for fitness and survival traits such as longevity, lifetime production and reproduction rate. Improvements in cow-calf production due to heterosis result from both the improved maternal performance of the crossbred cow (conception rate, percent born alive, percent weaned, age of puberty, milk production and increased longevity) • 20 MILES SOUTH OF TULSA and individual performance of the • Excellent Surface Water Resources crossbred calf (percent born alive, • Numerous Pastures & Hay Meadows Offered in 21 Individual Tracts percent weaned, weaning growth). from 7± Acres to 1,608± Acres • Primarily Open Native Grasslands Research from the US Meat Animal • Abundant Wildlife Online INSPECTIONS: 9/29, 8am-Noon • Bidding Research Center (USMARC) reported • Frontage on Highway 16 Oct 17, 8am-Noon • 10/26, 4-8pm • Available Oct 27, 8am-Noon • Meet on Tract 3 • Future Development Potential that the lifetime production of Auction Mgr: BRENT WELLINGS • 405.332.5505 reciprocal-cross and straightbred 800.451.2709 • SchraderAuction.com cows of the Hereford, Angus and

Dillingham Ranch - An Oklahoma Icon

OKLAHOMA LAND AUCTION

5contiguous ,778 acres

± Tuesday, October 27 at 6pm

72 California Cattleman September 2020


join us for a sale event you won’t want to miss! 14 TH ANNUAL

9 PEAKS RANCH BULL SALE OCTOBER 13, 2020 • 1 P.M. • FORT ROCK, OR SELLING 120 SPRING AND FALL YEARLING ANGUS BULLS

DOB: 8/11/19 • BW: 82 Weaning Ratio: 123

DOB: 8/21/19 Weaning Ratio: 102

9 Peaks Tahoe G806 CED 7

BW -0.4

WW 76

YW 124

MILK 28

AAA # 19776640 MARB 0.91

REA 0.17

$M 93

$B 136

9 Peaks Tahoe G954 AAA#19776669 CED 4

BW 1.8

WW 75

YW 127

MILK 32

MARB 0.71

REA 0.61

$M 79

$B 138

Standouts like these Tahoe sons, sons of KM Broken Bow and SAV Resource and other breed leaders sell October 13, 2020 at the ranch in Fort Rock, OR! OR!

See a complete listing of our range ready sale bulls at www.9peaksranch.com

Aaron Cell: (541) 633-3284 Rebecca Cell (541) 771-4151 P.O. Box 38, Fort Rock, OR 97735

Sale, video and bidding also streamed live! AARON AND REBECCA BORROR

www.9peaksranch.com

September 2020 California Cattleman 73


RESULTS ARE IN

CALIFORNIA RANCHER’S SELECTION AND MANAGEMENT OF HERD BULLS SURVEY UPDATE by Zach McFarlane, Ph.D., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo; Tracy Schohr, M.S., University of California Cooperative Extension; and Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D., California State University, Chico Raising cattle in California comes with a multitude of challenges when considering the environment alone. Producers need cattle that can adapt to the state’s diverse regional climates, topography and rangeland conditions. Specifically, bulls need to be able to successfully breed cows and remain sound in extensive rangeland conditions. Few research studies have investigated factors related to the selection, purchase, management and longevity of bulls on California’s rangelands. Therefore, the objectives of this research study with Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, California State University, Chico and University of California Cooperative Extension were to assess the factors related to bull purchasing decisions, management and culling decisions of California beef producers. A total of 1,410 surveys were mailed to the California Cattlemen’s Association membership. Approximately 220 individuals have mailed in their responses or completed the online version, resulting in a 16 percent response rate to date. Surveys are still being collected and we encourage the membership to respond in the online version (ucanr.edu/bullsurvey) or complete the mailed catalog. Preliminary results of this study are discussed below, with a select highlight of the 35 total questions from the survey. Keep in mind that the results may change as more data are collected from producers. Please check your mail for a postcard that provides a QR code and the link for the online version of the survey. Demographic Findings The average California beef producer is approximately 61 years old with 27 years of experience. Respondents manage cattle on more than 1.7 million acres of owned, privateleased and public leased rangelands in California and surrounding states. Most respondents were cow-calf producers that managed a herd size of 378 head on average; however, herd sizes were highly variable across the state. California producers had a bull battery that averaged 18 head of bulls with an average longevity of five years. The survey results showed 60 percent of respondents purchase a 74 California Cattleman September 2020

bull every year. The preferred purchase method was at a bull sale (44 percent), by private-treaty (26 percent) or a combination of sales and private treaty purchases (25 percent). Producers attended an average of two sales per year, while 80 percent of survey respondents do not attend any online sales during the year. Respondents preferred to purchase long-yearlings (56 percent of respondents; bulls aged about 18 months). The predominate breed of bull purchased was Angus (66 percent). Bull buyers paid an average price of just over $5,000 in the last two years, while the average highest price reported by producers to have paid in the last five years was just below $7,000. In all, 71 percent of survey respondents indicated that limited bull guarantees were important for their bull purchasing decision. Selection Criteria Expected progeny differences (EPDs) have been used as selection criteria in order to promote genotypic selection in the most utilized breeds of beef cattle. Breed associations and research scientists are constantly working on increasing the accuracy of these genetic prediction tools for producers. In this study, we wanted to ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 76


FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT ONE OF OUR TEAM MEMBERS:

Doug Slattery 979.451.2003

Tracy Woods

405.880.3866

Jarrod Payne

308.870.6348

TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK, PLEASE CALL 254.697.4401 OR VISIT 44FARMS.COM

September 2020 California Cattleman 75


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 74

operation is continuously improving our genetics and we have expanded our reach with a sale in both Butte and Modoc County. This research project provides a baseline for our industry that is continuously evolving, and this information gives guidance for future research.” Researchers recognize bull producers consider EPDs, along with a cross section of other factors when selecting a bull. We asked producers a series of questions about elements that play a role in their purchasing decision. The following options were provided: strongly agree, agree, undecided, disagree and strongly disagree. The data has been summarized for respondents that agreed and strongly agreed in Figure 1, while the response categories were summarized into Agree, Undecided, or Disagree in Figure 2.

understand the EPDs that California producers utilize for bull selection. The following EPDs were listed as priorities for bull selection and respondents were asked to rank from the highest to lowest priority: birth weight, calving ease direct, weaning weight, yearling weight, scrotal circumference and milk. Producers indicated calving ease (73 percent birth weight and calving ease direct combined) and weaning weight (21 percent) EPD as their highest priority when selecting bulls. The American Angus Association has developed a wide-array of dollar-value indices that are linked to economically-relevant traits. Index values combine multiple data sources into one EPD value to allow for ease of selection in order to facilitate substantial directional changes in production efficiency. We again asked producers FIGURE 1. Survey responses to selection factors related to bull to rank the highest priority for price phenotype and genotype that are important for bull selection. indices with the following EPDs: Beef Value ($B), Maternal Weaned Calf Value ($M), Weaned Calf Value ($W), Cow Energy Value ($EN), Quality Grade ($QG), Yield Grade ($YG) and Grid Value ($G). Respondents recognized Beef Value (38 percent), Weaned Calf Value (27 percent), Maternal Weaned Calf Value (17 percent) and Cow Energy Value (10 percent) as their highest priorities. These results align with the EPD results and demonstrate the focus of California producers on calving ease and weaned calf performance for their bull selection criteria. FIGURE 2. Survey responses to questions related to marketing attributes that are considered relevant and important for bull selection. Producers were asked to rank criteria that were considered the most important for their bull purchasing decision. The primary criteria that producers considered for bull selection was structural soundness and confirmation (59 percent) and expected progeny differences (23 percent). “As a seedstock producer, I am interested to learn from the study of cattlemen on what is important to them. EPDs are essential, but we know there is a cross section of other factors cattlemen consider when selecting a bull,” said Steve Lambert, Lambert Hereford Ranch, Oroville. “Our family 76 California Cattleman September 2020


Bull Management We asked California cattlemen a series of five questions to define current bull management practices post-purchase and for the following breeding seasons until a bull is culled. After bull purchase, 46 percent of producers turned bulls out directly with females, while 49 percent held bulls until the following breeding season. Most producers (75 percent of respondents) do not manage bulls to reduce condition after purchase. Researchers also asked producers how bulls were typically managed on their operations; 47 percent of respondents use a bull pasture to manage bulls in the off-season, while 23 percent of respondents used a combination of a bull pasture and supplemental forages in a pen (e.g. hay). When asked about annual veterinary care, semen quality was evaluated annually by 45 percent of producers, while 20 percent of producers reported they never evaluated semen quality. The most common factors associated with culling bulls were bull age (35 percent) and structural soundness (29 percent). Bull longevity was moderately correlated with the average purchase price a producer paid in the last two years. Conclusion Bulls represent the primary source of new genetics in the herd. The initial results presented in this study are

a first glance at this complex and critical component of cow-calf operations. Researchers look forward to getting back more surveys from California ranchers throughout the fall and linking the findings to provide better continuing education to producers and feedback to seedstock producers. Additionally, this research indicates the need for additional research focused on bull selection and management to maximize producer investment in genetics and reproduction. We will continue to collect and analyze data from survey respondents, and we plan to provide the final update at the California Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association annual convention during the Rustici/ California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA) Poster Session and the CBCIA meeting.

This research project was made possible by funding and support from the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association, California Cattlemenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and Poor Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Press. We would like to acknowledge the efforts of Cal Poly students Katie Peterson, Claire Stevenson, and Jack Cameron for their help with data collection and analysis.

September 2020 California Cattleman 77


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

18

M i d Va l l e y

Thanks to all our buyers at the annual BCC Bull Sale! We hope to see you again September 4

Join us Sept 17 in Denair for our 29th annual bull sale! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

Thank you to our 2020 Red Bluff and Modoc Sale Bull Buyers!

KENNY & DIANNE READ

CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340 E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdangusranch.com

Join us at the Heritage Bull Sale in Wilton Sept. 6!

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! VISIT US AT WWW.DONATIRANCH.COM!

916.712.3696 • 916.803.2685 jj@barrangus.com

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

78 California Cattleman September 2020


Angus

RAnch

Join us for our annual production sales Annual Bull Sale: Sat., September 1, 2018 in fall 2020: Inaugural Female Sale: Mon., October 15, 2018 Bull Sale • Sept 5 Female Sale • Oct 12

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

18

M i d Va l l e y

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2020.

O’NEAL RANCH Gerber, CA

— Since 1878—

Join us Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020

for the Performance Plus Angus Bull Sale

O’NEAL RANCH BULLS OFFER THE COMPLETE PACKAGE

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H R

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

(530) 200-1467

• (530) 227-8882

GROWTH • PERFORMANCE ADAPTABILITY • CARCASS

Thank you to all of our 2019 bull and female buyers!

Join us for our 2020 “PARTNERS FOR PERFORMANCE” PRODUCTION SALES BULL SALE • SEPTEMBER 2 FEMALE SALE • OCTOBER 10 Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Gary & Betsy Cardoza

PO Box 40 • O’Neals, CA 93645 (559) 999-9510

Celebrating Angus Tradition Ssince 1974

September 2020 California Cattleman 79


CHENEY, WA • (916) 417-4199 Contact Clinton Brightwell for assistance marketing or buying your Hereford Cattle! (417) 359-6893 THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2020

CARLWULFF57@GMAIL.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

Thank you for attending the annual TAR bull sale! Join us again in 2020!

(530) 385-1570

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

11500 N Ambassador Drive, Suite 410 | Kansas City, MO 64153 | (816) 842-3757 | aha@hereford.org

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

A FAMILY TRADITION

Thank you to our spring cattle buyers!

Angus and SimAngus Cattle John Teixeira: (805) 448-3859 Allan Teixeira: (805) 310-3353 Tom Hill: (541) 990-5479 www.teixeiracattleco.com | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com

JOIN US SEPT. 3 IN LA GRANGE FOR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

CHAROLAIS Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

80 California Cattleman September 2020

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com


JOIN US IN OROVILLE FOR OUR BUTTE BULL SALE OCTOBER 17! CONTACT US FOR CATTLE AVAILABLE PRIVATE TREATY OFF THE RANCH

Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

Building Extremely High Quality Beef Since 1978

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Bulls and females available private treaty!

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL

La Grange, CA • Greeley Hill, CA Stephen Dunckel • (209) 878-3167 www.tubleweedranch.net twd@tumbleweedranch.net

Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

THE DOIRON FAMILY (707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results!

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

offering sons of this standout herdsire

POTTERS DISCOVERY C209

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

h

September 2020 California Cattleman 81


Full Service JMM GENETICS A.I. Technician

Premium Livestock Feeds “PERFORMANCE THROUGH WWW.BARALEINC.COM ADVANCED (888) 258-3333NUTRITION” • Williams, CA Matt Zappetini 526-0106 • Mineral Mixes with(530) Ranch Delivery • mzappetini@baraleinc.com • Hi Mag - Fly Control - Rumensin - Custom Mixes • Performance Through • Complete Feeds and Finish Mixes • Advanced Nutrition

SALE MANAGEMENT www.baraleinc.com • (888) 258-3333

• A.I, CIDR & heat synchronization •Proudly Extensive experience Featuring Conventional • Willing to Travel Non-GMO Certified Organic • Well-versed in dairy & beef pedigrees 

Sales Representatives:

JORGE MENDOZA • (530) 519-2678 jmmawss@gmail.com 15880 Sexton Road, Escalon, CA Matt Zappetini (530) 526-0106

Williams, CA Matt Zappetini (530) 526-0106 mzappetini@baraleinc.com

Tracy Lewis (530) 304-7246

Ranch Deliveries Available with our Truck and Forklift! We

& Semen Distributor

1011 Fifth Street Williams, CA. 95987 888-473-3333 info@baraleinc.com WWW.BARALEINC.COM

also offer custom formulations to meet your specific nutritional needs!

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We offer blends that contain: Molasses - Zinpro® Performance Minerals - Availa® 4 - Added Selenium Yeast - Rumensin® Available

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M3CATTLEMARKETING@GMAIL.COM (916) 803-3113

KNIPE LAND COMPANY

Idaho - Weiser River Ranch

2,103± acre cattle/hunting ranch has 587± irrigated, 3+ miles of river frontage, plus Cove Creek frontage, hunting lodge, 3 homes, hay storage & working corrals. Numerous upgrades to the property. Ranch can support 1,500± Animal Units per grazing season, and has 2 gravel sources for added income. Excellent hunting for waterfowl, game birds, elk and deer. $7,700,000

(208) 345-3163 knipeland.com

PRIVATE TREATY

Offering two quality, young Angus bulls for sale private treaty TWO-YEAR-OLD ANGUS BULL

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REG NO: 19576142

FOX ANGUS VENTURE

KAY FIELDING • (707) 688-0852

YOUR BUSINESS AD COULD BE LISTED HERE FOR AS LITTLE AS $400 PER YEAR! FOR DETAILS, CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE AT (916) 803-3113 OR

M3CATTLEMARKETING@GMAIL.COM

82 California Cattleman September 2020


MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA 95814 916-444-0845 (Office) · 916-444-2194 (Fax) www.calcattlemen.org

NAME(S):

RANCH/BUSINESS NAME:

ADDRESS: CITY:

STATE:

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

PRIMARY PHONE:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE OUR WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE E-MAIL BULLETIN?

Yes

ZIP:

No

Recruited By_________________________

Step 1: CCA Membership Producer Membership

For cattle owners and those seeking a voting membership level

Cattle Numbers 2500 & Over 1600-2499 1000-1599 800-999 500-799 300-499 100-299 0-99 

Dues $1,765 $1,275 $970 $725 $615 $460 $325 $240

Calves under 6 months of age are not counted. Stockers pay at ½ the total number of stockers owned each year or minimum dues, whichever is greater.

Associate Membership

For those who support California cattle production but do not own cattle Non-Voting Membership level

Statewide Allied/Feeder Associate $220

REGULAR MEMBERSHIP

Cattle Numbers

Dues

2001 + 1751-2000 1501-1750 1251-1500 1001-1250 750-1000 501-750 251-500 101-250 0-100

$1,900 + .38/per head $1,900 $1,650 $1,400 $1,150 $900 $650 $450 $300 $150

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: $100 (ASSOCIATES CANNOT OWN CATTLE)

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $20.00 $25.00

Humboldt-Del Norte Inyo-Mono-Alpine Kern County Lassen County Madera County Mendocino County Merced-Mariposa Modoc County

Young Cattlemen’s Committee

$ 25

Statewide Stewards of the Land

$150

Applicant’s Birth Date:_______________

CCA Supporting Member

$100

if over 25 years of age Applicant’s expected date of Graduation:

(Available to non-producers that own land on which cattle could or are run.) (Available to non-producers who support the industry.)

California Beef Cattle Improvement Association

MEMBERSHIP

CBCIA is an affiliate of CCA and is a producer driven organization that fosters beef cattle improvement and economical production based on information and education.

Regular Members:

$35

Associate Members: $35 Young Cattlemen: $ 5

$15.00 $25.00 NA $20.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00

Must own fewer than 100 head of cattle. Must be 25 years of age or younger or a full-time student

- OR -

Step 3: Total Payment

LOCAL ASSOCIATON MEMBERSHIP: (Circle up to four below) Amador-El Dorado-Sac Butte Calaveras Contra Costa -Alameda Fall River-Big Valley Fresno-Kings Glenn-Colusa High Desert

Non-Voting Membership

(includes Feeder Council Associate, Allied Industry membership and second membership. Second membership does not include Allied Industry voting rights.)

Step 2: Other Optional Dues National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

Young Cattlemen Membership

Monterey County $10.00 Napa-Solano $5.00 Plumas-Sierra $10.00 San Benito $20.00 San Diego-Imperial $10.00 San Joaquin-Stanislaus $5.00 San Luis Obispo $20.00 Santa Barbara $25.00

CCA

$

NCBA

$

CBCIA

$

Payment Options:

□ Check payable to CCA

Local (All) $ TOTAL

$

Card #___________________________________ Exp______/________ Name on Card ____________________________ Signature ________________________________ Santa Clara Shasta County Siskiyou County Sonoma-Marin Tahoe Tehama County Tulare County Tuolumne County

$25.00 $20.00 $10.00 $10.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $10.00

Ventura County Yolo County Yuba –Sutter

$35.00 $25.00 $25.00

September 2020 California Cattleman 83


IN MEMORY KENNY BUSCHER Kenneth (Kenny) Meinard Buscher, 81, passed away peacefully on July 29, 2020, surrounded by his loving wife and daughters. He was born on March 2, 1939 to Henry and Agnes Buscher as the first of three children. Kenny was raised in the town of Franklin on the family’s cattle ranch until he and his wife moved to Bonanza, Ore., in May 1999, where they purchased their own cattle ranch. Poor health required them to sell their ranch and return to California in December. Kenny was preceded in death by his parents, and is survived by his wife Dianne; daughters Cindy (Jack) Martin and Annette (Tony) Merola; grandchildren Jack (Lisa) Martin, Alec Martin, Stacey (Jason) Hogge and Brandon (Kristie) Merola; sister Yvonne (Richard) Bonacci and brother Dennis Busche; plus four awesome great grandchildren. While in high school, he was active in FFA and won numerous awards with his Ayrshire cattle. He enjoyed working with his daughters while they were in both 4-H and FFA showing their herd of Shorthorn cattle. During his senior year in high school, he met the love of his life, Dianne. They were married on Sept. 24, 1961 and enjoyed over 58 years together. Graveside services were held at the Franklin Cemetery on Aug. 6. Contributions in Kenny’s name may be made to the Wayne Heintz Memorial Scholarship, Elk Grove Regional Scholarship Foundation (P.O. Box 2021, Elk Grove, CA 95759). DAVID CAETANO

PRESTON KAISER Longtime Livermore resident Preston Kaiser passed away after a courageous battle with cancer at 77 years old. Preston was born in Santa Barbara, then moved to Livermore with his family. He attended Inman and Green school with his two brothers, G.C. and Eugene. He left Livermore High School at age 16 to work for Sunset Homes as a laborer. He learned to be a carpenter and pour concrete, and he worked for Robles Concrete for many years, finishing and setting forms. Preston was also a bartender at the Livermore bars whenever he was tending the bar, they were always full. He had many of friends and was always fun to be around. He worked as a cowboy for several ranches, working cattle and fixing fences. He was a horse shoer and would ride the young colts for N-3 Cattle Co. He loved that cowboy life - no electricity or running water was just how he liked it. He always had dogs, and he had the same horse for more than 30 years (named) old Wall Street. That horse was the first thing he would ask about every morning. Preston liked shooting guns and throwing knives. He made a lot of his knives and could throw them pretty good. He loved to draw, mostly faces. Any flat surface would have a face drawn on it - doors, tables or windows. He carved many figures out of wood stumps and scraps of lumber and decorated his yard with them. He was his own man and a one-of-a-kind friend. Everybody that knew Preston admired his personality. His daughter, Isa (Tom) Haase and two grandchildren survive him. His many friends and their children made his family larger than anything, Uncle Preston. He will never be forgotten and there will always be a story about Preston.

David Michael Caetano, Gavin, Talia and Jaxon; girlfriend Samantha Hilvers; 36, of Visalia passed away grandparents Joe and Mary Caetano and grandmother Alice July 1 after a valiant battle with Cardoza; as well as a large network of melanoma. David was born friends and family too numerous to Nov. 1, 1983 to Joey and Alice mention. Caetano, then of Hanford. He David was preceded in death by attended Waukena Elementary grandfather Frank Cardoza. School in Tulare and graduated Services for David were held July from Tulare Western High 7 and July 8 in Tulare with a private School in 2001 and went on to burial at the North Tulare Public study at College of the Sequoias. Cemetery. Throughout David’s youth he could usually be found riding dirt bikes and motocross racing but after high school he hung up his helmet and found a TO SHARE YOUR FAMILY NEWS: passion and love for ranching and horses. From crops to obituaries, birth and wedding cattle, there wasn’t much about agriculture he hadn’t been announcements, contact involved in. He worked on the family dairy for many years but for that last six years he also worked as a farm manager the CAlifornia Cattlemen’s overseeing walnuts for Souza Ranches. Association at (916) 444-0845 or David is survived by his parents, Joey and Alice e-mail magazine@calcattlemen.org Caetano; 14-year-old daughter Haeliegh; brother Richard and his wife Cecile, and their children Evan, Avery and Clara; brother Brian, his wife Nicole and their children 84 California Cattleman September 2020


BILL TULLOCH

William “Bill” Thomas Hildrup Tulloch passed away peacefully at home in Witch Creek on July 22, 2020 at the age of 94. Bill was born on October 6, 1925 in San Diego to Thomas Hildrup Tulloch and Eleanor Pratt Tulloch. He is preceded in death by siblings, Thomas, Scott, Page, Katherine and Julia. Bill grew up in the San Diego neighborhoods of Mission Hills and Point Loma. He shared stories of the days he spent riding his bike all over Mission Hills and riding horses with his sister from Point Loma to Mission Valley. He graduated from Point Loma High School in 1944. After high school, he served in the second Marine Division during WWII and was honorably discharged with the rank of corporal. After the war, Bill earned a two -year degree in Animal Husbandry from the University of California, Davis. In the fall of 1949, he was hired to work on a cattle ranch owned by George Sawday. During this time, Bill met his wife Betty Anne Cumming. They were married on June 22, 1952 and that was the beginning of a wonderful loving life together. They raised their children; Ben, Janet, Margaret and Lucy on the family cattle ranch near Pine Valley instilling in them a strong sense of family and a love of the land. The ranch has been passed down through many generations known as the Sawday Ranch which became Tulloch Family Partners in 1993. Bill was dedicated to preserving the ranch to pass on to his children and actively involved in the operations of the business until two years ago. His grandchildren have many fond memories of being on the ranch with their grandpa. Bill worked long hours but was also a great family man who found time to enjoy family activities such as camping trips to Lake Powell, river rafting on the Colorado River, off-road races in Borrego and being present for every 4-H

Field Day and County Fair when his kids were participating. Bill loved the outdoors and found true happiness being in nature. He loved to fish and enjoyed a bi-annual fishing trip to Baja with his brother-in-law which included off-road adventures in their Jeeps. After their children were grown, Bill and Betty Anne enjoyed traveling, Western Livestock Journal Ranch Tours in the U.S. and Canada and train trips through the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Throughout his life Bill devoted time and energy to promoting the cattle industry and agriculture. He was a lifetime member of the California Cattlemen’s Association and served on the California Beef Council from 1964 – 1985 (chairman in 1981). He served on the board of the San Diego County-Imperial Cattlemen’s Association (president for three terms). Bill was appointed to the board of the 22nd District Agricultural Association by Gov. Ronald Reagan and served for seven years (one term as president). He was a past president of the San Diego County Farm Bureau and awarded Farmer of the Year in 1967. As president of the Mountain Empire Unified School District Board for 14 years he had the privilege of presenting all four of his children their high school diplomas. He is survived by his loving wife Betty Anne, son Ben (Kelly), daughters Janet, Margaret (Glenn Drown) and Lucy (Phil Bryson); Grandchildren Alyson (Brian Connolly), Lindsey (Col. Bennet Mebane), Cameron, Sarah, Lyle and Acacia; and great granddaughter Charlotte. Bill always had a smile on his face and will be remembered for his amazing sense of humor and ability to tell a great story. Bill’s life was well lived and touched others in wonderful ways. The family would like to thank Sustainer Home Care of Ramona and The Elizabeth Hospice of Escondido for the compassion and care they gave Bill. At Bill’s request, a private family service was held. Donations can be made to the Don Diego Scholarship Foundation, 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd. Del Mar, CA, 92014. In the memo line write “Tulloch Endowed Scholarship.”

new arrivals MAELYN NEVIN

Creighton and Gabriella Nevin, Medford., Ore., alongwith big brother Hayes welcomed Maelyn Alleva Nevin on Aug. 7. Maelyn weighed in at 6 pounds, 1 ounce and was 19 inches long. Grandparents are Mike and Dawne’ DeSimone and paternal grandparents are Jim & René Nevin.

JUNIPER DALEY

Juniper Elaine Daley was eagerly welcomed by parents Kyle and Jordan Daley, Oroville, on July 21. “June” weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and was 20 inches long. She is the first grandchild of Dave Daley, and Cyndi Daley, and seventh for Brad and Lisa Bidlack, all of Oroville.

LANE ARRECHE

Lane Pierre Arreche was welcomed to the world on July 24, at 2:43 a.m. to Jon and Kelsey Arreche of Cedarville. Lane weighed 7 pounds, 1 ounce and measured 20 inches long.

September 2020 California Cattleman 85


Advertisers Index 44 Farms............................................................75 9 Peaks Ranch...................................................73 Amador Angus...........................................43, 78 American Ag Credit...........................................9 American Hereford Association.....................80 Anima Health Internationsl............................82 Arellano Bravo..................................................15 Bar Ale...............................................................82 Bar KD Ranch...................................................78 Bar R Angus......................................................78 Beef Solutions Bull Sale...................................49 Black Gold Bull Sale.........................................22 Bovine Elite, llc.................................................82 Broken Box Ranch............................................80 Bruin Ranch......................................................49 Buchanan Angus...............................................78 Bullseye Breeders Bull Sale..............................27 Byrd Cattle Co...................................................78 Cal Poly Bull Test Sale......................................63 Cal Poly Foundation........................................66 California Cattle Council................................21 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market.........................11 Charron Ranch.................................................78 Chico State College of Ag................................82 Circle Ranch......................................................49 CoBank................................................................9 Conlin Supply Co., Inc.....................................62 Dal Porto Livestock....................................33, 78 Diablo Valley Angus.........................................15 Diamond Oak Cattle........................................27 Diamond S Angus............................................67 Dixie Valley Angus.............................. 15, 78, 87 Dixie Valley Angus...........................................87 Donati Ranch....................................................23

Double M Ranch..............................................27 Eagle Pass Ranch..............................................41 EZ Angus Ranch.......................................6, 7, 79 Farm Credit West...............................................9 Flood Bros. Cattle.............................................27 Fox Angus Venture...........................................82 Freitas Rangelend Management.....................24 Fresno State Ag Foundation............................82 Furtado Angus..................................................79 Furtado Livestock Enterprises........................82 GenePLus...........................................................46 Genoa Livestock.........................................80, 67 Gonsalves Ranch..............................................27 Harrell Hereford Ranch...................................80 HAVE Angus.....................................................79 Hinton Ranch Simmentals..............................53 Hogan Ranch....................................................79 Hone Ranch.......................................................81 Hufford’s Herefords..........................................80 International Brangus Breeders......................47 JMM Genetics...................................................82 Kessler Angus....................................................79 Knipe Land Company......................................82 Lambert Ranch...........................................69, 81 Little Shasta Ranch...........................................81 M3 Marketing...................................................82 McPhee Red Angus....................................80, 39 Mid Valley Bull Sale.........................................43 Mondani Ranches.............................................62 Morrell Ranches................................................81 Multimin ...........................................................25 New Generation Supplements........................26 Noahs Angus Ranch.........................................79 O’Connell Ranche.......................................23, 79

86 California Cattleman September 2020

O’Neal Ranch....................................................79 Pedretti Ranches.................................................2 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle Co..........................65, 81 Pacific Trace Minerals......................................82 Pitchfork Cattle Co...........................................81 Rancho Casino..................................................33 Red River Farms...............................................79 Sammis Ranch..................................................79 Scales Northwest...............................................24 Schafer Ranch.............................................43, 79 Schohr Herefords..............................................81 Shasta Livestock Auction.................................17 Sierra Ranches...................................... 36, 37, 81 Silveira Bros.................................................57, 79 Sonoma Mountain Herefords...................51, 81 Spanish Ranch...................................................81 Spencer Cattle Co.............................................67 Stepaside Farms................................................80 Stokrose Angus.................................................24 Tehama Angus Ranch................................80, 13 Teixeira Cattle Co.......................................80, 61 Thomas Angus Ranch......................................71 Traynham Ranches...........................................59 Tumbleweed Ranch..........................................81 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard...............18, 19 VF Red Angus ..................................................80 Vintage Angus Ranch................................80, 88 Visalia Livestock Market.................................10 Western Stockman’s Market............................25 Western Video Market.......................................3 Westwind Ranch Angus..................................66 Wulff Brothers Livestock...........................80, 23


“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS”

25 FALL & SPRING YEARLINGS SELL IN CALIFORNIA THIS FALL!

Bulls Selling September 12...

STERLING ROCK 953

STERLING STONEWALL 933

2020 Cal Poly Bull Test Sale

Bravo/Diablo Valley Sale 9/12 Arellano CATTLEMEN’S LIVESTOCK MARKET, GALT

10/4 OPPENHEIMEREQUINEFACLITY,SANLUISOBISPO

Sterling Stonewall 933 AAA 19441664 DOB 3/5\/19 DNA Angus GS Sire: Jindra Stonewall MGS: A A R Ten X 7008 S A

CED +3

BW +3.8

WW +78

YW +150

MILK +23

CW +76

MARB +0.45

RE +0.66

$B +180

$C $270

Sterling Rock 953 AAA 19444015 DOB 3/29/19 DNA Angus GS CED +16

Sire: K C F Bennett TheRock A473 MGS: Baldridge Xpand x743 BW -3.2

WW +67

YW +122

MILK +26

CW +45

MARB +1.22

RE +0.68

$B +162

$C $274

Sterling No Doubt 956 AAA 19444026 DOB 4/3/19 DNA Angus GS CED +5

Sire: Hoover No Doubt MGS: G A R Prophet

BW +2.7

WW +87

YW +148

MILK +25

CW +54

MARB +0.66

RE +0.57

$B +145

$C $256

Sterling Payweight 9102 AAA 19726478 DOB 8/22/19 DNA HD50K CED +12

Sire: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: G A R Prophet

BW -1.4

WW +84

YW +132

MILK +30

CW +60

MARB +0.83

RE +0.42

$B +135

STERLING NO DOUBT 956

$C $260

Sterling Enhance 975 AAA 19724953 DOB 8/4/19 DNA HD50K Sire: SydGen Enhance MGS: V A R Discovery 2240

CED +9

BW +0.3

WW +73

YW +143

MILK +30

CW +66

MARB +1.18

RE +0.97

$B +202

$C $325

Sterling No Doubt 996 AAA 19728065 DOB 8/20/19 DNA HD50K CED +1

Sire: Hoover No Doubt MGS: G A R Prophet

BW +4.4

WW +89

YW +152

MILK +22

CW +65

MARB +0.89

RE +0.46

$B +162

$C $267

Sterling Plus 9101 AAA 19726966 DOB 8/21/19 DNA HD50K Sire: Connealy Confidence Plus MGS: G A R Prophet

CED +9

BW +3.8

WW +91

YW +158

MILK +26

CW +78

MARB +1.12

RE +0.97

$B +193

$C $324

Sterling Payweight 9103 AAA 19724809 DOB 8/23/19 DNA HD50K CED +9

BW +0.7

Sire: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: G A R Prophet WW +94

YW +161

MILK +26

CW +70

MARB +0.87

RE +0.38

$B +153

$C $265

Sterling Enhance 9110 AAA 19724930 DOB 8/25/19 DNA HD50K

Sterling No Doubt 9108 AAA 19728079 DOB 8/24/19 DNA HD50K

CED +9

CED +5

Sire: SydGen Enhance MGS: Mill Bar Hickok 7242

BW +1.7

WW +82

YW +150

MILK +24

CW +69

MARB +0.81

RE +0.76

$B +176

$C $315

Sire: Hoover No Doubt MGS: G A R Prophet

BW +2.7

WW +82

YW +146

MILK +24

CW +64

MARB +1.20

RE +0.76

$B +174

$C $295

Sterling Enhance 9125 AAA 19724938 DOB 9/9/19 DNA HD50K

Sterling Enhance 9118 AAA 19724908 DOB 9/3/19 DNA HD50K

CED +11

CED +5

Sire: SydGen Enhance MGS: Mill Bar Hickok 7242

BW -0.3

WW +73

YW +133

MILK +31

CW +62

MARB +0.82

RE +0.75

$B +170

$C $272

Sterling No Doubt 9128 AAA 19728083 DOB 9/12/19 DNA HD50K CED +7

BW +1.0

Sire: Hoover No Doubt MGS: G A R Prophet WW +79

YW +139

MILK +20

CW +54

MARB +0.99

RE +0.90

$B +156

$C $266

Sire: Sydgen Enhance MGS: Baldridge Colonel C251

BW +2.0

WW +75

YW +142

MILK +28

CW I+60

MARB I+1.03

RE I+0.83

$B +186

$C $321

Sterling Acclaim AAA 19731195 DOB 9/22/19 DNA HD50K CED +8

BW -0.1

Sire: Jindra Acclaim MGS: A A R Ten X 7008 SA WW +81

YW +154

MILK +40

CW +77

MARB +0.95

RE +0.62

$B +201

$C $315

Lee Nobmann, owner • Morgon Patrick, managing partner

(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com www.dixievalleyangus.com • follow us on facebook!

PRIVATE TREATY BULLS ALWAYS AVAILABLE ON THE RANCH

September 2020 Montague, CACalifornia Cattleman 87


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Sunday, October 11, 2020

34th Annual “Genetic Gold” Production Sale 1 p.m. • Ranch Headquarters Modesto, CA

Selling: Donors • Spring & Fall Pairs • Bred Heifers • Fall Yearlings • Spring Heifers

Vintage Rita 5008 • Reg No. 18066030 Sire: VAR Discovery 2240 Join Vintage in sharing the future

production of one of our most proven young donor cows. Her two featured daughters have sold for an average value of over $250,000. If you want a proven donor out of a proven family, and a great individual, then join us Oct. 11th. BW WW YW MARB $W $B $C 1.5 84 149 0.95 80 185 294

Vintage Rita 0399 • Reg No. 19722414

Vintage Rita 0020 • Reg No. 19668451

Vintage Rita 9405 • Reg No. 19493798

Sire: Baldridge Alternative E125 The future donor prospect

Sire: VAR Power Play 7018 If you are looking to add one of the best

BW 1.1

BW 2.0

sired by Alternative is from one of the most proven cow families in the breed. Her granddam is the dam of EXAR Stud and multiple EX sires. Check out the marbling to go along with the $Beef and $Combined. WW 73

YW 135

MARB 1.53

$W 62

$B 203

$C 317

Vintage Blackbird 0339 • Reg No. 19697601

Power Play daughters on the planet to your operation, then look no further. Her full brothers will be the lead-off bulls in our 2020 bull sale. This ranch and visitor’s favorite has all the data and type to be a breed leader. WW 85

YW 147

MARB 1.23

$W 95

$B 189

$C 316

Vintage Ruby 0035 • Reg No. 19668465

Sire: GB Fireball 672 Looking for something out of a new sire?

Sire: KCF Bennett Summation From the dominate cow family at

Sire: VAR Power Play 7018 Outstanding VAR Power Play daughter.

BW 0.1

BW 2.6

BW 0.4

If so check out this daughter of Fireball from a proven cow family that excels at Marbling, $Beef and $Combined. Genetics that can change the future here. WW 68

YW 126

MARB 1.62

$W 81

$B 202

$C 332

Vintage Barbara 0217 • Reg No. 19698588

Sire: GB Fireball 672 If you like your females cool looking with big

Vintage that produced VAR Power Play, VAR Generation and many more comes this fantastic Summation daughter that puts it all together great phenotype and big-time data. Her dam has a valuation of $400,000. WW 98

YW 179

MARB 0.90

$W 92

$B 207

$C 309

Vintage Blackcap 0176 • Reg No. 19668602

Sire: Hoover No Doubt Sired by the popular growth sire No Doubt and

time marbling, growth and combined value, then be sure to study picture and data here. Also selling a maternal sister by Alternative with the same look and data.

blended with one of the best maternal families at Vintage, the Blackcap 9319. Has produced awesome results, 0176 has form, function, and carcass value bred in. Raise your next generation with a powerful new donor.

BW 3.4

BW 3.0

WW 85

YW 153

MARB 1.40

$W 84

$B 206

$C 329

WW 79

YW 142

MARB 1.23

$W 66

$B 194

$C 302

The bull that set the record in 2018 when he sold half interest for $730,000 in our bull sale. If you are looking for a complete type and big data for a future donor 0035 will fill that bill. WW 77

YW 137

MARB 1.25

$W 90

$B 200

$C 320

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

CALL, E-MAIL OR VISIT US ONLINE TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK! SALE WILL ALSO BE BROADCAST ON

Profile for California Cattleman

September 2020 California Cattleman  

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