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October 2019

In this fall issue... Wotus Dead in the water livestock man of the year NCBA GETS NEW CEO October 2019 California Cattleman 1


e e s o t e p o h e W there! you MAKE PLANS TO JOIN US AT THESE UPCOMING EVENTS!

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Est. 1974

Bull Sale

OCTOBER 19 • 1 P.M.•LAMBERT RANCH, OROVILLE Horned and Polled Hereford bulls bred, raised in the mountains and developed in the hot valley — ready to perform in any environment! OFFERING ALL-AROUND PERFORMANCE BULLS FROM TOP HERDSIRES AS WELL AS 16 BAR KD ANGUS BULLS & 25 FALL ANGUS REPLACEMENT HEIFERS

LAMBERT GUNSLINGER 37F CED

BW

2.4

2.5

CED

BW

WW

52

YW

82

MK

30

RE

.48

$CHB

102

6.2

$B

CED

10

.2

56

YW

91

$W

63

$G

48

126

Bar KD Ranch Kenny & Dianne Read Ranch: 541.546.2547 Cell: 541.480.9340 culver, OR

BW

2.0

WW

57

YW

87

MK

27

RE

.57

$CHB

103

KD REVELATION 1971

KD KAG 1896 WW

LAMBERT STEAKHOUSE 79F CED

www.barkdangusranch.com

6

BW

2.2

WW

75

YW

127

$W

66

$G

44

$B

139

The Lambert Family Steve Lambert (530) 624-5256 slambert@digitalpath.net

October 2019 California Cattleman LambertRanchHerefords.com

3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS

PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Tony Toso, Hornitos SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Steve Arnold, Santa Margarita Greg Kuck, Montague Cindy Tews, Fresno TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Justin Oldfield DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Brendlen DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Jenna Chandler DIRECTOR OF OUTREACH AND CREATIVE CONTENT Katie Roberti

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org

4 California

Issues Impacting All by CCA First Vice President Tony Toso

As a long time member of the California Cattlemen’s Association, I have based and valued my membership much on the belief that we are much stronger and more effective together than we can ever be as individuals, especially in the current political climate we face in California. During my time as a CCA officer, that belief has been proven true time after time for me as I realize just how many important issues impact all of us and our operations. In my travels there have been two primary issues that I have been discussing with our members while on the road. Both issues are a great reminder that we need a united front to help one another stay out in front of important concerns to cattle producers. Recently I have had the opportunity to listen in on some of the California Cattle Council’s public meetings as this group gets their start on implementing provisions and policies regarding who will run the organization on a day to day basis (executive director search is now underway), how the council will set up its bylaws, and most importantly how your $1 per head assessment will be best spent for California’s cattle producers. After listening in on several meetings, I continue to be impressed by the concern and attention cattle council members have displayed and the dedication they have shown to ensure the foundation they are going to build and policies they are considering are done thoughtfully and correctly and done in the best interests of all cattle producers in our state. As the search for the final members of the council continues, the public member and their alternate, are being sought, I am confident that the council will appoint a person of character and industry knowledge who will work with this group to get our message out to the public and share with our fellow Californians just what an important role cattle and California’s cattle producers play in our state. Another issue that you may have read about in last month’s magazine or heard about at a fall tour meeting near you is fire – a topic

that some of us are all too familiar with and that none of us are exempt from. Our CCA Fire Subcommittee is comprised of some very impressive fire professionals, academics and ranchers who have not only been involved in some of these fires, but have worked hard to influence policy makers and get information in place that can help us all in the event of a fire. So please join me in thanking a great group of people who have generously given of their time to serve on this subcommittee. That said, several CCA fire subcommittee members have been working on a Burn Boss Certification curriculum that would allow for private citizens (i.e. fellow ranchers) to be certified for burn bosses and help conduct prescribed fires. So a special thanks goes out to Anthony Stornetta, who is the San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s President and Battalion Chief with Santa Barbara County fire, and also to Lenya Quinn-Davidson and Jeff Stackhouse, with UC Cooperative Extension in Humboldt County, for the long hours they have put into this program on our behalf and I am excited for the promise it holds. Another member of the fire subcommittee who had great idea that I would like to see come full circle is Ventura and L.A. County’s Mike Williams who proposed the idea of CCA publishing a rancher’s handbook for wildfire preparedness that would include information about pre-fire, during a fire and post fire aftermath with pertinent information a rancher needs to be best prepared. While the details are many regarding both of these issues and others that are important to you, magazine space is limited and as the fall tours get into full swing I know myself or any of my fellow officers would welcome hearing and discussing your concerns at a tour meeting near you and I hope you will make plans to attend the upcoming CCA and CCW Convention the first week in December, after all the best way to fight literal and proverbial fires is together.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication # 8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher.

Periodical postage paid at Jefferson, Mo. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 2716100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Cattleman October 2019 California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


OCTOBER 2019 Volume 102, Issue 9

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN CCA working on issues hitting home for all

4

BUNKHOUSE End of legislative session

8

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 14 WOTUS sees final rejection COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR Fall beef promotions

24

HERD HEALTH CHECK Tips for successful weaning

30

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD U.S. protein in ASEAN

32

SPECIAL FEATURES

2019 CCA & CCW Convention details Talbot honored at Cow Palace Cattle Council's well-rounded representatives

READER SERVICES

Cattlemen’s Report Obituaries and New Arrivals Buyers’ Guide Advertisers Index

12 16 20

36 38 40 46

ON THE COVER As the seasons change and temperatures begin to dip, the scenery across the state will also begin to take on a new look as shown in this month's cover photo shot in Kern County. As CCA staff and officers are hitting the trail on CCA's Fall Tour, you are encouraged to attend an event in your area to learn abou the most important issues in the California cattle business and learn what CCA is doing for you!

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS OCT. 11

SONOMA-MARIN CATTLEMEN'S FALL MEETING Respini Ranch, Sebastopol

OCT. 17

CONTRA COSTA-ALAMENDA FALL DINNER MEETING Beeb's at Los Positas Golf Course, Livermore

OCT. 24

PLUMAS-SIERRA CATTLEME'S FALL DINNER MEETING Greenhorn Guest Ranch, Quincy

OCT. 25

LASSEN COUNTY CATTLEMEN'S DINNER MEETING Honey Lake Valley Grange Hall, Johnstonville

OCT. 26

LOS ANGELES COUNTY CATTLEMEN'S MEETING Peterson Ranch, Lake Hughes

OCT. 26 MODOC COUNTY CATTLEMEN'S FALL DINNER MEETING Brass Rail, Alturas OCT. 27

VENTURA COUNTY FALL DINNER MEETING Atmore Ranch, Ventura

NOV. 9 MERCED-MARIPOSA CATTLEMEN'S DINNER MEETING Merced Co. Fairgrounds, Merced DEC. 4-6

103RD CCA & CCW CONVENTION The Peppermill Resort, Reno, Nev.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication! October 2019 California Cattleman 5


Thomas angus Ranch

Bull Sale

October 17 • Noon • Baker City, Oregon Thomas Acclaim 8596 19413556

$Profit: $25,935 $Ranch: $32.64 Sire: Jindra Acclaim • Dam’s Sire: baldridge Xpand x743 CED +7; BW +1.5; WW +76; YW +150; Milk +40; MRB +.95; RE +.71 $M +57; $W +88; $F +137; $G +72; $B +209; $C +328

Thomas 100X 8543 19413493

$Profit: $22,691 $Ranch: $55.50 Sire: GAR 100X • Dam’s Sire: Plattemere Weigh Up K360 CED +14; BW -1.8; WW +62; YW +107; Milk +25; MRB +1.00; RE +.75 $M +73; $W +77; $F +89; $G +76; $B +165; $C +287

Thomas Discovery 8531 19413337

$Profit: $24,612 $Ranch: $45.71 Sire: VAR Discovery 2240 • Dam’s Sire: KCF Bennett Absolute CED +9; BW -1.0; WW +72; YW +134; Milk +33; MRB +1.22; RE +.46 $M +59; $W +89; $F +88; $G +82; $B +170; $C +279

6 California Cattleman October 2019

Thomas 100X 8608 19413507

$Profit: $23,700 $Ranch: $33.40 Sire: GAR 100X • Dam’s Sire: Plattemere Weigh Up K360 CED +14; BW -2.1; WW +57; YW +110; Milk +29; MRB +1.06; RE +.83 $M +67; $W +70; $F +84; $G +80; $B +13; $C +278

Thomas Enhance 9007 19462072

$Profit: $25,627 $Ranch: $61.34 Sire: SydGen Enhance • Dam’s Sire: A&B SpotLite 3065 CED +15; BW -.3; WW +68; YW +126; Milk +32; MRB +1.27; RE +.78 $M +67; $W +81; $F +105; $G +85; $B +190; $C +313

Thomas Command 9111 19462091

$Profit: $17,476 $Ranch: $44.10 Sire: Baldridge Command C036 • Dam’s Sire: Connealy Black Granite CED +10; BW +.4; WW +62; YW +116; Milk +33; MRB +.53; RE +.95 $M +60; $W +74; $F +120; $G +54; $B +175; $C +287


Thomas angus Ranch Female Sale November 21 • 11 a.m. • Baker City, Oregon Thomas Ester 4764 18040305

Sire: AAR Ten X 7008 SA • Dam’s Sire: SAV Net Worth 4200 CED +14; BW -1.1; WW +55; YW +96; Milk +20; MRB +.72; RE +.47 $M +55 ; $W +59 ; $F +83; $G +51; $B +133; $C +228 Due 2/2/2020 to Thomas Navigator 5771.

Thomas Swan 8129 19160347

Sire: EF Commando 1366 • Dam’s Sire: Sitz Upward 307R CED +2; BW +3.5; WW +66; YW +115; Milk +35; MRB +.98; RE +.54 $M +70 ; $W +71 ; $F +71; $G +67; $B +138; $C +249 Due 1/24/2020 to Thomas Absolution 6568.

Thomas Elsa 0502 16698162

Sire: Thomas Grade Up 6849 • Dam’s Sire: GAR US Premium Beef CED +5; BW +1.6; WW +46; YW +88; Milk +26; MRB +1.16; RE +.66 $M +31 ; $W +42 ; $F +93; $G +79; $B +172; $C +254 Sells open. Has a 8/19/19 bull calf at side by Thomas Big Data 7435.

Eisa 0502 is the dam of Thomas Xpansion 5810.

Thomas Blackbird 3746 17739357

Sire: EXAR Upshot 0562B • Dam’s Sire: SAV Net Worth 4200 CED +7; BW +1.0; WW +66; YW +110; Milk +21; MRB +.67; RE +.92 $M +59 ; $W +69 ; $F +88; $G +60; $B +148 Due 3/13/2020 to Basin Payweight 1682.

Selling 350 Spring Calving Cows • 100 Fall Calving Pairs 100 2019 Spring-born Heifers

Sale Managed by:

&

517.546.6374 www.cotton-associates.com

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Clint Brightwell, Customer Relations Manager: (417) 359-6893 Cole Owens, Marketing Specialist & Cooperative Manager: (918) 418-7349 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

October 2019 California Cattleman 7


BUNKHOUSE EVENTFUL ENDING A Recap of Legislative Session by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield The end of the 2019 legislative session in Sacramento was not without a rollercoaster of events on September 13. Nearly every major issue facing the legislature was deliberated the last week, pushing the Friday at midnight deadline to Saturday morning at 3 a.m. Looking back on what was the first year of a two-year legislative session that comprised a new legislature and a new Administration, we overall had a positive year. This year did not end without hiccups, as almost any legislative year inevitably does in Sacramento. That said, there is good reason to remain positive and to be proud of the victories that CCA achieved for livestock producers across the state. Earlier in the year, CCA, working with our partners at Western United Dairies, was instrumental in neutering a bill that sought to interject the California Air Resources Board in the state’s school lunch program to subsidize the offering of plant based meal and beverage options. Significant amendments were made to the bill in the Assembly Education Committee that removed the guts of the bill that intended to market a voluntary program to students as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions based on their meal choices. The bill was ultimately held in the Senate Appropriations Committee and is dead for the year. For the second time in the last three years, CCA was instrumental in helping to defeat a measure that would ask voters to reinstate a California-only estate tax. SB 378 (Weiner) was introduced in March and proposed a new tax that would capture estates that fell within the federal exemption. Specifically, the bill would subject estates valued between $3.5 million and the current federal exemption of $11.4 million to a 40 percent tax on the gross value of the estate paid to the state Treasury to fill California Social Inheritance Accounts to"build assets among people that have historically lacked them.” Although the bill would have still required voter approval to overturn a previous referendum passed in 1982 banning a state-only death tax, the legislation as written remained a serious threat to ranching families. The last week of the legislative session also saw the passage of AB 5 (Gonzalez) that seeks to codify a California Supreme Court decision affecting the relationship between employers and those classified as independent contractors. In Dynamex v. Superior Court, the California Supreme Court ushered in a new formula to determine if a worker should be classified as an employee or an independent contractor known as the “ABC Test”. In many cases, current employer/employee relationships did not meet the existing “Borello Test.” The Supreme Court ruled that under the “ABC Test,” a worker can be classified as an independent contractor if they: 1) are free from control of the hiring entity in connection 8 California Cattleman October 2019

with the performance of their work; 2) they perform work outside the usual course of the hiring entity's business; and 3) the contractor is engaged in an independently-established trade of the same nature as the work performed. Lawsuits have been filed in federal court seeking to overturn the California Supreme Court’s JUSTIN OLDFIELD decision and this issue has been put forward to Congress to secure a federal preemption. The last week did end with a bang for ranchers with Governor Newsom’s announcement that he will veto SB 1 (Atkins). SB 1 proposes to lock in pre-Trump Era regulations and the science behind them for the implementation of the federal Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act. Additional amendments were made to the bill on September 6, that sought to define “Waters of the State” to be consistent with the 2015 regulation promulgated by the Obama era U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corp of Engineers. The 2015 regulations were officially rescinded by the Trump Administration September 12 and are scheduled to be replaced with a new proposed rule at the end of this year. Although these amendments were stripped from the bill prior to a final vote, due to considerable push back by stakeholders and legislators, the bill still retained harmful provisions that threaten ongoing negotiations between the Newsome Administration and water districts to finalize Voluntary Settlement Agreements for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Watersheds in lieu of heavy-handed regulations passed down by the State Water Resources Control Board. CCA worked with a coalition of other agricultural and business organizations to oppose SB 1 and engaged the governor and his senior staff early on to ensure the Administration was prepared to act should the bill reach his desk. The governor’s actions are to be applauded and uphold his commitment to supporting collaborative solutions to addressing the state’s environmental and natural resource challenges. Without a doubt, many of these issues are set to return next year when the legislature reconvenes in January. However, we live to fight another year and ranchers should continue to remain positive knowing you have a dedicated staff in Sacramento working to represent you on a daily basis.


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USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for California Farmers Hurt by Disasters

California farmers and ranchers affected by wildfires in 2018 and 2019 can apply through the Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program Plus (WHIP+). Sign-up for this U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) program began September 11. “There is no doubt that extreme weather has greatly impacted California’s agricultural producers over the last several years, and 2019 is no exception,” said Connie Conway, State Executive director for Farm Service Agency (FSA) in California. “With record amounts of crops prevented from planting nationwide and other devastation, more than $3 billion is available through this disaster relief package passed by Congress and signed by President Trump in early June." WHIP+ will be available for eligible producers who have suffered eligible losses of certain crops, trees, bushes or vines in counties with a Presidential Emergency Disaster Declaration or a Secretarial Disaster Designation (primary counties only). Disaster losses must have been a result of hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, typhoons, volcanic activity, snowstorms or wildfires that occurred in 2018 or 2019. Also, producers in counties that did not receive a disaster declaration or designation may still apply for WHIP+ but must provide supporting documentation to establish that the crops were directly affected by a qualifying disaster loss. A list of counties that received qualifying disaster declarations and designations is available at farmers.gov/ recover/whip-plus. Because grazing and livestock losses, other than milk losses, are covered by other disaster recovery programs offered through FSA, those losses are not eligible for WHIP+. Eligible crops include those for which federal crop insurance or Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) coverage is available, excluding crops intended for grazing. A list of crops covered by crop insurance is available through USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) Actuarial Information Browser at webapp.rma.usda.gov/apps/ actuarialinformationbrowser. The WHIP+ payment factor ranges from 75 percent to 95 percent, depending on the level of crop insurance coverage or NAP coverage that a producer obtained for the crop. Producers who did not insure their crops in 2018 or 2019 will receive 70 percent of the expected value of the crop. Insured crops (either crop insurance or NAP coverage) will receive between 75 percent and 95 percent of expected value; those who purchased the highest levels of coverage will receive 95-percent of the expected value. At the time of sign-up, producers will be asked to provide verifiable and reliable production records. If a producer is unable to provide production records, WHIP+ payments will be determined based on the lower of either the actual 10 California Cattleman October 2019

loss certified by the producer and determined acceptable by FSA or the county expected yield and county disaster yield. The county disaster yield is the production that a producer would have been expected to make based on the eligible disaster conditions in the county. WHIP+ payments for 2018 disasters will be eligible for 100 percent of their calculated value. WHIP+ payments for 2019 disasters will be limited to an initial 50 percent of their calculated value, with an opportunity to receive up to the remaining 50 percent after January 1, 2020, if sufficient funding remains. Both insured and uninsured producers are eligible to apply for WHIP+. But all producers receiving WHIP+ payments will be required to purchase crop insurance or NAP, at the 60 percent coverage level or higher, for the next two available, consecutive crop years after the crop year for which WHIP+ payments were paid. Producers who fail to purchase crop insurance for the next two applicable, consecutive years will be required to pay back the WHIP+.

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DEWORM WITH CONFIDENCE IVOMEC IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: Do not treat cattle within 48 days of slaughter. Do not use in female dairy cattle of breeding age or in veal calves. Do not use in other animal species not on the label, as severe adverse reactions, including fatalities in dogs, may result. IVOMEC and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks of Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health USA Inc. ©2019 Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health USA Inc., Duluth, GA. All Rights Reserved. JOB-US-BOV-0566 ®

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LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD

Cottonwood, California

SPECIALS! CATTLEMEN’S SPECIAL PETERS RANCH DISPERSAL 150 YOUNG EARLY SPRING CALVING COWS 200 WEANED CALVES

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For Information, Please Call Shasta Livestock (530) 347-3793 find us and watch online at ShastaLivestock.com!

October 2019 California Cattleman 11


103RD ANNUAL CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S & CATTLEWOMEN, INC.

Convention

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN AT CALCAT TLEMEN.ORG! Opening General Session

FRANK MITLOEHNER, PH.D UC DAVIS DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE PROFESSOR AND AIR QUALITY EXTENSION SPECIALIST

Cattlemen’s College Sessions

ALISON VAN EENENNAAM, PH.D

UC DAVIS EXTENSION SPECIALIST: ANIMAL BIOTECHNOLOGY AND GENOMICS, DEPT. OF ANIMAL SCIENCE

ERIN BORROR U.S. MEAT EXPORT FEDERATION ECONOMIST

TINA SAITONE, PH.D

UC DAVIS COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SPECIALIST

CattleFax Breakfast and more!

DUANE LENZ CHRIS CARR LEN NIELSON CATTLE FAX MANAGER OF OPERATIONS AND ANALYST SERVICES

BAKER BOTTS LLP, PARTNER OF SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE

CAL FIRE S. REGION, UNIT FORESTER FOR MADERA, MERCED & MARIPOSA

BOOK YOUR ROOM AT THE PEPPERMILL RESORT HOTEL

Please call (866) 821-9996 and mention ACCA19 for the discounted group rate, or visit www.calcattlemen.org/convention2019 today for more information about reservations at the Peppermill Resort Hotel. Reservations must be made by NOVEMBER 3, 2019 to receive the discounted group room rate. 12 California Cattleman October 2019


DON’T MISS OUT ON ALL THAT IS HAPPENING DECEMBER 4-6TH, 2019 AT ANNUAL CONVENTION IN RENO! WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALE

Before the convention begins, make plans to drop by the Western Video Market Sale on Wednesday from 8 am-Noon at the Peppermill Resort Hotel.

TRADESHOW WELCOME PARTY

Enjoy the opening of the California Cattle Industry Tradeshow hosted by the California Cattlemen’s Association and Western United Dairies. Spend the evening chatting with your fellow cattle producers and dancing the night away with live music!

SPEAKERS & INDUSTRY EXPERTS

From Dr. Frank Mitloehner the greenhouse gas guru, to Duane Lenz the expert on updating producers on market trends and forecasts, you’ll hear from the best on all the hot topics in the beef business.

COMMITTEE, POLICY & BOARD MEETINGS Come Thursday to participate in the policy-making process—one of the best ways to get involved and make your voice and vote count. Then, stay Friday for the CCA Board and Membership meeting to get further involved with CCA.

RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS

Attend the Cattlemen’s Poster Session hosted by the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association on Thursday to learn about the latest beef cattle and natural resource research being conducted by researchers throughout the state.

CCA/CCW RECEPTION & ANNUAL AWARDS BANQUET

Spend the last evening of the 2019 convention celebrating those honored in the California beef cattle community for the year!

r e t s i g e R To day!

Register at calcattlemen.org/convention2019 or download a registration form and mail it to the CCA office at: 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814. Questions about convention? Call (916) 444-0845. October 2019 California Cattleman 13


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

DEAD IN THE WATER EPA AND CORPS REPEAL OBAMA-ERA WOTUS RULE by CCA Director of Government Affairs Kirk Wilbur On September 12, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) finalized a regulation repealing the 2015 Waters of the United States (or “WOTUS”) Rule. The move brings an end to the 2015 regulation that was widely opposed by ranchers (including CCA), farmers and other private property rights advocates because of its unprecedented expansion of EPA and Corps authority. With repeal of the 2015 WOTUS Rule, the EPA and Corps will temporarily revert to implementing the pre-2015 definition of “Waters of the United States.” By the end of the year, the agencies intend to issue a final rule re-defining “Waters of the United States” in accordance with President Trump’s Executive Order 13778, which directed that the agencies should strive to ensure that “the Nation’s navigable waters are kept free from pollution, while at the same time promoting economic growth, minimizing regulatory uncertainty, and showing due regard for the roles of Congress and the States under the Constitution.” Industry groups like the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) have worked closely with the Administration to ensure that the new WOTUS Rule will be workable for ranchers. NCBA President Jennifer Houston hailed the repeal of the 2015 Rule. “Cattle producers are the nation’s original environmental stewards—we work hard to ensure that our natural resources remain pristine and to implement conservation practices to protect our water resources,” Houston said. “The 2015 WOTUS Rule was an illegal effort by the federal government to assert control over both land and water, significantly impacting our ability to implement vital conservation practices. After years spent fighting the 2015 WOTUS Rule in the halls of Congress, in the Courts, and at the EPA, cattle producers will sleep a little easier tonight knowing that the nightmare is over.” Ranchers, farmers and other private property rights advocates strenuously opposed the 2015 WOTUS Rule, noting that the rule vastly expanded the regulatory jurisdiction of the EPA and Corps and increased the permitting burdens upon landowners. The 2015 WOTUS Rule expanded the agencies’ jurisdictions to some waterbodies which had no connection to traditional navigable waters, extending the agencies reach beyond their Constitutional authority. The 2015 Rule also gave the agencies significant regulatory jurisdiction over land features which only ‘flowed’ following significant rain events, such as ephemeral streams and lands within the 100year floodplain of a jurisdictional water body, meaning that in practice the “water rule” gave the agencies permitting authority over significant dry-land features. Upon finalizing the 2015 WOTUS Rule, the EPA and 14 California Cattleman October 2019

Corps were inundated with lawsuits. Thirty-one states filed suit against the agencies, along with dozens of trade associations and private landowners. CCA, represented by Pacific Legal Foundation, filed suit against the agencies in the U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota. The EPA and Corps, seeking to minimize their defensive efforts and limit the judicial record in the lower courts, argued that the numerous lawsuits could not be brought in the district courts (of which there are 94, with at least one district court in each state and territory). Rather, the agencies argued that the challenges could only be brought in one of the thirteen courts of appeal, which would have had the effect of limiting the record developed against the agencies and would also have significantly reduced the timeframe in which landowners could challenge the regulation. The jurisdictional question ultimately made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which in January of 2018 unanimously sided with CCA and other challengers of the WOTUS Rule, finding that the EPA and Corps had to defend the Rule in district courts throughout the country. In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision, numerous litigants re-filed their challenges to the 2015 WOTUS Rule. As a result of those lawsuits, courts prohibited the EPA and Corps from enforcing the 2015 WOTUS Rule in 28 states (prior to the repeal of the 2015 WOTUS Rule, California was among the 22 states in which the Obama-era rule remained in force). CCA and NCBA chose not to re-file our challenges to the 2015 Rule, trusting that the Trump Administration would make good on its commitment to repeal the Obama Administration’s rule and draft a replacement that promotes economic growth and minimizes regulatory uncertainty. With September’s repeal of the 2015 Rule, the Trump Administration has made good on the first half of that commitment. Repeal of the 2015 WOTUS Rule will take effect 60 days after formal publication of the regulation in the Federal Register (as of press time, the repeal had not yet been published in the Federal Register). Of course, it is likely that the Trump Administration will find itself inundated with suits over the repeal of the 2015 WOTUS Rule—the Colorado Attorney General, for instance, is already considering a challenge to the rollback. CCA welcomes the rollback of the 2015 Rule, and in April submitted detailed comments along with NCBA generally in favor of the Administration’s proposed redefinition of “Waters of the United States.” CCA will continue to keep you apprised of any developments on this important regulatory issue, including finalization of the Administration’s proposed revision expected later this year.


October 2019 California Cattleman 15


MAN OF THE HOUR TALBOT TO BE HONORED AT COW PALACE by CCA Director of Communications Jenna Chandler The great grandfather of Tom Talbot, DVM, homesteaded in the Owens Valley in the 1860s, probably never guessing that his great grandson would someday be bestowed with the highest honor a cattle rancher in the Golden State can win, Livestock Man of the Year. But through his years in the cattle business, as a veterinarian and tireless advocate for agriculture, 2019 couldn’t have seen a more qualified winner. Born and raised in Bishop, in the Eastern Sierras, Tom Talbot, developed a love for animals and the beautiful country they lived on. Encouraged by his father, Talbot says he always knew we wanted to be a veterinarian and rancher. After high school he went on to attend the University of California, Davis for both his undergraduate work and for veterinary school. Shortly after graduating vet school in 1975, Talbot married his wife Laura. He practiced for a short time in Fallon, Nev., and then in Visalia before ultimately returning to Bishop, where they were both from, to raise their own family. The Talbots have four children, Tim, Kelly, Kayla and Ashley, and eight grandchildren. Today, Tom and his brother Bill run Talbot Land and Livestock, consisting of about 600 commercial cows run on 4,000 acres in the Owens Valley, leased from the City of Los Angeles. He works as a veterinarian at the same mixed, small and large animal practice that he has been at for over 41 years. And it’s that unique perspective, as both a cattle producer and as a veterinarian, that he says has made him so well-poised to advocate for such a diverse industry. Talbot says that it was watching his dad struggle with the ups and downs of the beef cattle industry that inspired his interest in advocacy growing up. “I was lucky enough to be born into the industry,” he said. “My dad was in the industry my whole life and I watched the struggles he had while we were trying to move forward. While he was an advocate, he was never very active. At a certain point I think you realize if you don’t participate, it may not be there tomorrow. I want to make sure this ranch and this industry and this lifestyle is here for my kids and my grandkids.” And advocate actively he has. When asked what the prestigious award means to him, Talbot says that it is an honor to be recognized for the efforts he has put in to try to improve the climate of the industry for his kids and grandkids. It also acknowledges, he says, the need to continue to do so. Over the years, Tom has served as a board member for the Partnership for Quality Program at Harris Ranch Beef Company, a member of the Bishop Union Elementary School District Board, member of the board of directors for the California Animal Health and Food Safety Lab System in Davis, as chair of the CCA cattle health committee, a past president of the Inyo-Mono-Alpine Cattlemen’s Association and also served as the 2009-2010 California Cattlemen’s Association President. Throughout his tenure, Talbot has worked on a number of important issues for CCA and NCBA. “One of the biggest, when I took over as president 16 California Cattleman October 2019

[of CCA], was that we had a chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee and almost all of the people up there with him were anti-ag. We realized that we had a legislature that didn’t realize how important agriculture was to California, no matter what commodity. We worked hard on animal welfare. Water quality issues were just starting to creep in. The other thing that happened was that the tuberculosis issue in the dairies came into play and we had a hard time getting cattle out of California because of the restrictions. I was lucky with my background as a veterinarian working with other states and CDFA, making sure [producers] could get cattle out of the state.” But don’t think that once the award ceremony is over that Talbot will be caught sitting on his laurels. There’s lots still left to do he says. And he wants to be one of the ones on the front lines to do it. “I think the biggest issue right now in the industry is the climate change issue and the misinformation put out there by others in an attempt to eliminate animal ag,” Talbot says. “The task that we have is to get people to understand the benefits of beef cattle production, to know what the real truth is about greenhouse gas production. So many activists are citing old research that has been disproven and disavowed by even the author of the research himself. We have got to convince people of the true facts and the contribution we make, the benefits of grazing for the environment, wildlife, reduction of wildfires. The biggest challenge is getting the true facts out to the public because the anti-meat people sure are getting theirs out there.” Tom is to be recognized as Livestock Man of the Year at the Cow Palace on October 12 at the 73rd Grand National Livestock Expo, Horse Show and Rodeo, surrounded by friends and family. “When I was young the Cow Palace was such a big deal,” he said. “To be able to take my family to receive this recognition there is so exciting.” But while he is sincerely humbled to receive the 2019 award, it’s being included in the company of the famed past winners that leaves Talbot truly in awe. “I never would have imagined. To think about such an honor, primarily because of the individuals prior to me, just knowing the names of the people before. It means a lot. To be in the company of the John Laceys and the Dave Woods of the industry.” And while he is certainly correct about the caliber of company he is now in as the 2019 Livestock Man of the Year winner, there’s also no doubt that he himself, fits it awfully well! Congratulations Tom!


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October 2019 California Cattleman 17


NCBA Names new CEO and WAshington Government Affairs VP The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) announced significant leadership changes on September 18. The NCBA Executive Committee of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association confirmed Colin Woodall to serve as the association’s new Chief Executive Officer. Woodall, who was named this morning after an exhaustive national search, managed NCBA’s efforts in Washington, D.C., for more than a decade. Since joining NCBA in 2004, Woodall has been instrumental in ensuring the interests of NCBA members and the beef community, are well represented in the nation’s capital. “Colin has served NCBA members for 15 years, and in that time, he has done a great deal for beef producers everywhere. Much of his work and many of the victories registered by NCBA in Washington, D.C., is the result of his ability to build coalitions and bring people together across political divides,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston. Houston expressed confidence that the same talents that made Woodall a success in the nation’s capital will translate to Woodall’s responsibility to lead NCBA’s work as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program. “In his new role as NCBA CEO, there is no doubt that Colin will be an outstanding advocate for the Beef Checkoff and the essential work being done to build consumer demand,” said Houston. “Colin’s passion for the beef community has made him one of the most effective advocates in American agriculture and I’m excited that he will now be applying that same passion to the work NCBA is conducting on behalf of the Beef Checkoff.” Originally from Big Spring, Texas, Woodall graduated from Texas A&M University. Following graduation, he worked

both as a grain elevator manager and sales manager for Cargill at several locations in western Kansas and the Oklahoma panhandle before moving to Washington, D.C., to work on Capitol Hill. “I am very thankful for the opportunity to lead NCBA and to serve the beef community as the next CEO of the association. American beef producers are the best people I know and although our industry faces many challenges, I am confident we can overcome them,” said Woodall. Ethan Lane was also named today to serve in the role of Vice President of Government Affairs. In his new role, Lane will guide NCBA’s policy efforts in Washington, D.C., where he has extensive experience advocating on behalf of cattle producers. Lane has been serving as Executive Director of the Public Lands Council and NCBA Federal Lands. In that role, Lane has been a driving force in many of NCBA’s most important policy wins. His leadership skills and extensive political experience make him an effective choice to lead NCBA’s Washington, D.C., office and the association’s ongoing policy efforts. “I am looking forward to the opportunity to lead NCBA’s office in Washington, D.C., and I’m fully committed to representing the policy priorities of NCBA members across the nation,” said Lane. “By standing together, cattle producers have shown they can push back the burdensome impacts of government over-regulation and protect the interests of NCBA members for future generations.” Lane, is a fifth-generation Arizonan, with 18 years of experience in natural resource and land use issues. Prior to his tenure with PLC and NCBA, he owned and operated a consulting firm specializing in natural resource issues.

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Q&

with the

A

PROCESSOR AND DAIRY PRODUCER BOARD MEMBERS Last issue we introduced the range cattle producers and cattle feeder members serving on the board. Now meet the dairy producers and processors. Dairy Producer Member

CODY NICHOLSON -STRATTON

HUMBOLDT COUNTY

Term ends 2022

Cody Nicholson-Stratton is a seventh-generation dairyman. He graduated from Oregon State University with a degree in Rangeland Ecology in 2010 and came back to the family farm about five years ago. Today he co-owns the business with his dad and the family milks 100 to 130 registered organic Jersey cows, depending on seasonality and pricing. The farm is certified organic and certified humane through the American Humane Association. The farm has also done the GMO-free verification and is also environmentally certified through the California Dairy Quality Assurance Program. Nicholson-Stratton’s cows are on pasture a full 365 days a year, which is unique to Humboldt County, as the climate lends itself to that. Additionally, NicholsonStratton has a small herd of grass -fed Angus and Hereford cattle, and raises fine-wool sheep, rabbits and pasture poultry.

What interested you in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council? My interest was I kind of kept track of it as it developed and I was given the opportunity to testify on it when it was at both the Assembly and the Senate. My hope was that by being on the board I’d have the opportunity to represent the northern California dairy style. My hope was that we would have a wide diversity. What makes California agriculture so great and makes California cattle so interesting is that it’s such a diverse spectrum, so I was really interested in being there to represent the niche that we fall into, as well as other niches that are there.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? My ultimate hope for the Council is that we are able to keep California cattle sustainable, especially as our political, social and regulatory climate changes; that we are able to maintain the sustainability of California cattle. Not just the catch-phrase sustainability

20 California Cattleman October 2019

spectrum where we often talk about sustainability relating to the environment and our environmental practices as farmers, but also the economic aspects. If our farms aren’t financially stable, we are not sustainable. We can’t invest in green technology. We can’t continue to maintain working landscapes. My hope for the Council is that through various educational and research opportunities that it will fund, that it’s able to maintain that sustainability so that future generations will be able to raise cattle. I’d love to see our land move on to the eighth-generation and that working landscapes are maintained. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? The issue I really hope we as a Council are able to tackle and address is animal health and welfare. We often see the negative side of that portrayed, especially through social media. I hope that’s a story the Council is able to endorse and show the positive side of animal welfare and health in cattle operations. There is a lot that goes on to ensure that our animals are healthy and that the systems that are in place, are in place for a reason. That reason is the well-being of cattle. Dairy Producer Member

JENNIFER BERETTA

SONOMA COUNTY

Term ends 2021

Jennifer Beretta is a fourth-generation dairywoman. Beretta works as the herd manager at Beretta Dairy in Santa Rosa, California. The dairy is made up of 300 milk cows. In addition to managing the dairy, Beretta also raises approximately 10 head of beef cows. About 12 years ago, the Beretta Dairy went organic to keep the dairy in operation on the North Coast. However, today the operation sells their dairy cows in both conventional markets and organic markets.

What interested you in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council? My interest in serving on the board was to make sure dairy, as well as the organic sector, is represented. I also wanted to make sure there was representation for the younger generation. I am only 32-years-old, but have been involved in agriculture and cattle since I could push the tractor pedal so I could help my dad feed.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? A goal I have for the Council is to make sure we show unity. We are fortunate that multiple sectors of California’s cattle industry are represented. I hope that this diversity on the board helps motivate the people paying into the Council to keep their dollar going to the Council. I also hope we get some great organizations to ask for grant funding. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? Sustainability is one industry issue I hope the Council will be able to positively impact. I also hope it can have a positive impact on the unity between different sectors within the industry (i.e., organic, conventional, grass-fed, etc.).


Dairy Producer Member

TYLER RIBEIRO Term ends 2020

TULARE COUNTY

As a fourth-generation dairy farmer, Ribeiro grew-up working with his father and grandfather on their family farm in Tulare. After graduating college, Ribeiro started working full-time on the farm and started a family of his own. Over the last few years Ribeiro’s had many leadership opportunities, such as to create an ag education event referred to as “Ag Career Exploration,” write articles for Hoard’s Dairyman, sit as a mentor for the Holstein Association’s Young Dairy Leadership program, work as an influencer for the California Milk Advisory Board and sit as a board member for Western United Dairymen.

What interested you in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council? My interest in serving on the board was peaked when I heard that the group involved in starting the California Cattle Council was not interested in taking the same path as other checkoffs or trade organizations. When the opportunity arose to be a part of creating a new organization with a new method of operation I knew I wanted to be a part of it.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? My goals for the Council are simple. I want the Council to benefit the cattle industry, as well as the consumer. The Council should be able to not only help change the false stereotypes of raising cattle, but also help people choose healthy foods based on science and truths, not false facts and myths. I would love to see this Council take “big swings” at some of the cattle industry’s biggest struggles in ways that California has not seen before. One industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? My hope is that the Council will be able to take a strong position on the benefits of the cattle industry in California, including the economical and environmental beneficial impacts the cattle industry has for the state. Processor Member

SARAH MORA

HUMBOLDT COUNTY

Term ends 2022 Sarah Mora is the fourthgeneration of the Mora family involved in the beef industry. She was raised working at Humboldt Auction Yard, which her grandfather and father ran for 50 years. She attended college at Chico State and worked for California Farm Bureau during the late 90s early 2000s. Mora returned to Humboldt about 10 years ago and began taking over management and ownership of Humboldt Grassfed Beef— marketed to retail stores and restaurants throughout Northern California. She is a member of both California Cattlemen and CattleWomen, and is currently serving as chairperson for The Buckeye, a local agriculture group dedicated to educating the public about the importance of working ranch and timberlands.

What interested you in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council? I was intrigued with the idea of being on the ground floor of building a Council that would have a positive impact on our industry. What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? I feel that the more ways we have to tell the story of production agriculture the better. As we move forward, I would like to see the Council work towards providing consumers with a positive image of today’s cattle

ranchers and the role they play in managing our open spaces and maintaining a healthy environment, while also explaining the vital role production agriculture has on the overall economic well-being of California. What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? The general lack of knowledge and understanding consumers have about what goes into producing food and fiber is one industry issue I hope the Council will be able to positively impact. The further removed a person is from where their food comes from, the easier it is for misconceptions and misinformation to gain a foothold. I hope that the Cattle Council can have a positive impact on the perceptions consumers have about the beef industry. Processor Alternate

What interested you in serving on the board?

Term ends 2022 FRESNO COUNTY Brian Coelho is the President/CEO for Central Valley Meat Co. (CVM). He has grown up in the beef livestock and slaughter industry where he began learning the skills of the industry at a young age. He received a Bachelor Degree in Business and Economics from St. Mary’s College of California. In 1996, he returned to the family business where he has held several roles throughout the company. In addition to CVM, Coelho is the president of affiliated companies that include Harris Ranch Beef Company, Harris Feeding Company, Coelho Meat Company, Triple C Trucking, and CLW Foods. CVM and its affiliates collectively form an integrated beef company that includes cattle feeding, slaughter, processing, ground beef production and transportation. Coelho is a past president for the North American Meat Association and past chairman for the North American Meat Institute. He currently serves on boards for North American Meat Institute, TERRA, and California Beef Council.

I was interested in serving on the board for the California Cattle Council to be able to work with production partners throughout the California cattle/beef production system to initiate a Council that can achieve the goals that will help move our industry forward. This is an opportunity to establish a program that if managed correctly can have a significant, positive impact to California’s cattle/beef industry.

BRIAN COELHO

What are a few of the goals you have?

One goal is to develop better tools and methods to tell our story to our consumers. People want to learn and understand how their food is grown/ produced and we in the beef industry have a great story to tell. Another goal is to address the concerns over greenhouse gas contribution from the cattle industry and educate consumers on the truth. Finally, to have a Council that makes positive decisions for the entire California cattle and beef industry, a Council that is openminded to the real challenges that we face and is willing to identify solutions. One industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? Better promotion of beef products through further education of our consumers and industry partners is one industry issue I hope the Council will be able to positively impact. Interviews continued... October 2019 California Cattleman 21


Interviews continued... Dairy Producer Alternate

XAVIER AVILA Term ends 2022

TULARE Xavier Avila was COUNTY born into a dairy family—parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, all dairymen. While Avila did not inherit his dairy operation, he went off and started his own in 1992 with a partnership. Avila has been involved with many groups, including the California Dairy Campaign, Western United Dairymen and Dairy Cares, and serves as a current board member on the Land O’Lakes Cooperative.

He also owns a small, partnership dairy in Layton, California as well as a small herd of beef cattle that are separate from the dairy. In addition, Avila is the territory sales representative for CalfTel for California and part of Nevada. Avila is also active politically in agriculture and has lobbied in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. over various agricultural issues.

What interested you in serving on the board? When you see all the different challenges that are coming at agriculture, in particular animal agriculture and beef and dairy, there seems to be an attack, and I disagree with the demonizing of raising cattle. I think the industry needs to respond to that and help educate consumers and tell them the truth. My interest is preserving our way of life and educating the consumers that beef is good for you, dairy products are good for you. The activist’s goal is to make people feel bad about consuming animal products and I think we should make people feel good about consuming animal products.

What are a few of the goals you have for the Council? One goal would be using social media and other means that are easy to get to a mass amount of consumers in this state. Obviously we have a limited budget so we have to work within our means, but we need an effective way to reach the most people and give them science-based information so they can have something to weigh against the animal activist’s information. For example, right now there are a lot of people that think they can eat their way out of climate change. Science shows that cattle are hardly anything as far as emitting greenhouse gases, but that’s not what you hear within a lot of circles. My goal would be “here’s the science, take a look at it,” and to make sure people don’t feel guilty.

themselves. When a producer talks to a consumer there seems to be a lot of credibility there. Another issue is that there is a lot of grass and land that gets burned up every year and I think we need to talk more about how cattle can help prevent fires. Dairy Producer Alternate

LAUREN REIDACEVEDO Term ends 2021

FRESNO COUNTY

Lauren Reid-Acevedo grew up in the dairy cattle industry, and returned to her family’s dairy in 2011. Since 1942, her family’s dairy has been operating in California and in 2014, the family began breeding Angus cattle to diversify their business, which has grown into a 200 head cow-calf operation. As part of the operation, Reid-Acevedo is involved in day-to-day decision making on both the dairy and farm. She also assists with environmental and safety compliance for the operation and manages human resources and the accounting related to each entity. The dairy is a producer-member of the California Milk Advisory Board, as well as Western United Dairymen and California Dairies, Inc.

What interested you in serving on the board for the Council? The Council provides a unique opportunity to serve both the dairy cattle and beef cattle industry simultaneously. Each of these industries has direct impacts on one another and face similar challenges. The opportunity to work directly with women and men in the various aspects of cattle production within California will create a united approach to the challenges we face and also increased opportunities for cattle and dairy producers and processors alike.

What are a few of the goals you have for the California Cattle Council? I hope that an outcome of this California Cattle Council is to create a streamlined approach to consumer and legislative education and outreach of our industries. I would like the see this accomplished through the incorporation of technologies, operating systems and applications that are used widely amongst not only current consumers and legislators, but also those who will one day fill these roles.

What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? I would say one issue is educating beef and dairy producers on the truth about all the hot-button issues that are being challenged because people will tell you the best advocates are the producers

What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? One industry issue I hope to positively impact is state and local legislator education and on-farm experiences related to the various facets of California cattle production and processing.

FULL CALIFORNIA CATTLE COUNCIL BOARD

Note: Public member and alternate will be selected by the board.

MEMBERS

ALTERNATES

CATTLE FEEDERS

Jesse Larios, 2022 Mike Smith, 2021 William Brandenburg, 2020

PROCESSOR

Sarah Mora, 2022

RANGE CATTLE PRODUCERS Dave Daley, 2022 Jake Parnell, 2021 Julie Morris, 2020

DAIRY PRODUCERS

Cody Nicholson-Stratton, 2022 Jennifer Beretta, 2021 Tyler Ribeiro, 2020

22 California Cattleman October 2019

CATTLE FEEDERS

Roger Guess, 2022 Brad Peek, 2021 Julie Belezzuoli-Hathaway, 2020

PROCESSOR

Brian Coelho, 2022

RANGE CATTLE PRODUCERS Shelia Bowen, 2022 Beverly Bigger, 2021 Sam Avila, 2020

DAIRY PRODUCERS

Xavier Avila, 2022 Lauren Reid-Acevedo, 2021 Brad Scott, 2020


Dairy Producer Alternate

BRAD SCOTT Term ends 2020

RIVERSIDE Brad Scott is a COUNTY fourth-generation dairy farmer in the town of San Jacinto, California, located about an hour and 45 minutes east of Los Angeles. In addition to having a dairy, Scott also farms.

Scott has been a member on the California Beef Council for 18 years. Additionally, he serves on the Federations of State Beef Councils for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

What interested you in serving on the board? Having experience serving on the Beef Council Board, I was asked to serve on behalf of the dairy sector. Hopefully being there at the beginning, I can help make sure the intent is followed as far as getting additional revenues to continue some programs or start new programs that are needed based on what comes out of the Council as far as dealing with the cattle issues in California.

Name a few goals you have for the Council. I know many are questioning having an additional checkoff program, but I’m pretty impressed with the board of directors so far and some of the leadership on the executive committee as far as making sure that the intent of this additional checkoff is carried out, not only as far as efficiencies and making the best use of dollars to benefit cattle producers of California, but then also there’s the complexity of the voluntary refund. I want to make sure [the refund process] is something that for those who do want this option, is a very simple, understandable process and not something that’s a problem for producers to deal with.

What is one industry issue you hope the Council will be able to positively impact? As environmental issues come up we need to be able to identify what we are doing and the fact that we are good stewards. We need to have a voice on behalf of the industry that can show the true science and benefits of having a cattle industry in California; that it’s beneficial and not detrimental to the state.

All appointees were selected from nominations made by the cattle industry over a six-week nomination period and represent the diversity of cattle producers around the state, as required by the California Cattle Council Law. Visit www.cdfa.ca.gov/mkt/mkt/cattle.html. to learn more.

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• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • October 2019 California Cattleman 23


COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR CHECKING IN ON YOUR BEEF CHECKOFF

Fall Promotion Ties Beef, Wine and Tailgating by California Beef Council director of Producer Communications Jill Scofield With fall in the air, tailgating is in full swing for many Californians who are ardent football (and other sport) aficionados. And when it comes to tailgating food, beef is definitely a fan favorite. That’s the inspiration behind the California Beef Council’s latest integrated marketing campaign, which combines the experience of tailgating with the deliciousness of beef on the grill. Our current “Elevate Your Tailgate” campaign (which runs through October 15) features a variety of elements designed to encourage consumers to purchase beef, including a $4 rebate on Tri Tip steaks or roasts, 12 ounces or larger, through the mobile retail app Ibotta. To unlock this enticing offer, shoppers view a 15 second video featuring our food influencer partner Parker Wallace, of the popular blog ParkersPlate.com. Like other integrated marketing campaigns the CBC has conducted in recent years, Elevate Your Tailgate incorporates a number of other elements to reach consumers both on their path-to-purchase and in the retail stores. A comprehensive radio and digital advertising campaign targeting California consumers is underway,

featuring a text-to-win contest element that offers the chance to win a grill kit, complete with a Traeger grill. And early results have been promising – even just a week into this campaign, consumer engagement in the contest element was the highest we’ve seen. At the retail level, the CBC has worked with its large chain retail partners to provide promotional assets, helping further extend the campaign messaging in-store, online and through social channels. Our brand partners at E&J Gallo have also created co-branded point-of-sale signage, and distributed to retailers throughout the state – all of which helps extend the reach of the campaign without additional investment from the CBC. What’s more, Gallo is offering and funding a separate $2 rebate for its Dark Horse branded wine on Ibotta, with an additional co-branded $1 bonus rebate if both Tri Tip and Dark Horse are purchased together. These kinds of partnerships have allowed the CBC to incorporate complementary brands into its campaigns, helping maximize and extend the spending power of checkoff dollars. The California-specific promotion also ties in well with national checkoff efforts to promote beef as a tailgating fan favorite, with an entire tailgating recipe collection available through Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. Beef Advocates Unite In August, the CBC partnered with National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, to bring together top California beef advocates for two days of training and development. The goal was to help further hone the skills of those who are passionate about sharing the beef community’s story with broad audiences. The workshop included spokesperson and media interview training, social media training, information about beef ’s nutritional profile, how to handle tough conversations and more. To qualify to apply for the training, attendees had to be graduates of the Masters of Beef Advocacy (MBA) program, and demonstrate why they wanted to expand on their knowledge of sharing their message through a variety of ways. The attendees included several ranchers and beef producers, some of whom already ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

24 California Cattleman October 2019


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24

completed, advocates use their boosted knowledge and communication tools to conduct their own outreach. Graduates are also invited to join the Masters of Beef Advocacy Alumni Facebook group, a virtual community for MBA graduates where they gain access to continuing education and the latest advocacy resources. If you’re interested in further enhancing your advocacy skills, be sure to visit BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com and search “MBA.” In addition to the training itself, there is an MBA classroom kit, ideal for ag teachers interested in incorporating more beef industry information into their curriculum.

have strong social media influence. One of the participants, Kiah Twisselman, hails from a multi-generational ranching family and spent a few years working for the Kentucky Beef Council before returning to California earlier this year. With a lot of experience under her belt in the world of social media, brand development and marketing and communications, she feels the work of sharing the industry’s story is an important role for producers. “People want to feel confident in the products they are consuming and they want to know where their food comes from, but more importantly, they want to know the people behind it,” says Twisselman. “Science might give us Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread some of the answers when it comes primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. The to consumer concerns, but at the killed anaplasmosis vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age end of the day people connect with from infection and requires a booster given 4 to 6 weeks after the initial vaccination. Find out below if you should order the vaccine! people. As a cattle rancher, I think it is so important that we as producers share our own stories and use our Do you NO YES voices to create real, authentic own cattle? connections with consumers.” The checkoff-funded MBA program recently celebrated its 10th anniversary and has over 15,000 Do they graduates. It was created to equip You don’t need it, graze in and engage beef industry advocates but should still areas where around the country, helping them YES Anaplasmosis support the communicate about beef and raising is a California cattle. It is hailed as one of the problem? Cattlemen’s industry’s strongest advocacy efforts. (Consult your local Association MBA is a self-directed online veterinarian to find out) training program which requires students to complete five free online Do you want to prevent lessons. Once the lessons have been

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CattLeMen’s FaLL speCiaL FeedeR saLes wednesdays at 12 p.M. October 2 • October 23 November 6 • November 20 December 4 • December 18

No Sales the Week of Thanksgiving and Christmas

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Featuring Females from Reputable California Ranches, followed by the CLM Annual Social

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Vintage Angus Initiates Scholarship Fund in Honor of Longtime customer time. But my dad’s main business is as a farmer so he was After her peaceful passing following a courageous battle always busy. My mom did all of the bull buying and all of with cancer in July, the presence of friendly face but serious buyer and cattlewoman, Terry Bengard, was sorely missed at the research. My dad was so busy with all of the farming the Vintage Angus Ranch (VAR) annual bull sale last month. that she pretty much ran the cowherd, health, nutrition, breeding, etc.” But while she wasn’t there in person, she certainly was in When asked about their goals for the scholarship, the spirit as stories about her life were shared and proceeds family turns to Terry Bengard’s love of helping those in from the sale of a bull were generously donated to fund a agriculture whether it be through 4-H, FFA or similar scholarship in her name. organizations and their desire to continue so in her name. “VAR does some kind of philanthropy every year “[She] was the most humble person I’ve ever known. and this year, they really wanted to honor mom,” Terry’s Never would she have ever thought she was that smart or daughter Tracy Pezzini, Salinas, said. anything, just a regular person. But clearly, all of the people “My family had already talked about possibly setting up who knew her thought she was pretty special.” a scholarship in her name and this gave us the opportunity "Terry only selected bulls that would add value to her to do so for someone with a future in the cattle industry. program. The proof in her bull selection ability is plain to My son is a freshman at the UC Davis School of Veterinary see in what her cattle brought at auction. Always at the top Medicine…and it just made her so happy when he would of the market, the best. That's the kind of bull buyer she talk with grandma about cattle diseases, genetics and was, only the best," Worthington said. breeding. She would be so surprised and honored to hear The Terry Bengard Memorial Scholarship will join the about this in her name,” Pezzini said. other scholarships given each year to deserving students Vintage Angus Ranch Manager Doug Worthington through CCA’s scholarship program. Over $30,000 is said Vintage Angus Ranch owner "Jim Coleman wanted awarded through the program annually. to donate as Terry wished, instead of flowers. He didn't know which charity to donate to, so we decided a bull would be donated and the family could choose the best avenue for those funds," Worthington explained. "Mr. Coleman admired Terry and Tom for always wanting to do better even when everyone else thinks you are at the top," Worthington said. "They were longtime customers of VAR. Terry loved coming to the bull sale and loved selecting genetics that would move her program forward to new heights. We felt that Terry ran her herd like Vintage, always looking for the best." SWEETLIX® Delivers. The donated bull, VAR Colonel SWEETLIX® EnProAl® supplements offer protein and essential 8106, was hotly bid over and sold for nutrients around the clock. When matched to your forage conditions, this self-fed system results in consistent delivery. a total of $11,000, kicking off a solid start to the scholarship fund in the • High magnesium content is an aide in the prevention of grass tetany • Convenient, palatable source of protein, energy and minerals inspirational Bengard’s name. • Predictable consumption rate “My father [Tom Bengard] was always my mom’s partner, but she www.sweetlix.com 1-87-SWEETLIX was the cow boss,” Pezzini said. “Not really typical for women to do at that 28 California Cattleman October 2019

When Pastures Give Out


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Sunday, October 13, 2019 33rd Annual “Genetic Gold” Production Sale

Vintage Rita 8115 • Reg No: 19037145 BW

2.5

WW

60

YW

116

$W

53

$F

114

$B

191

$C

306

Sire: Baldridge Colonel C251 • MGS: SJH Complete of 6108 1564

Vintage First Lady 7414 • Reg No: 18916445 BW

2.0

WW

80

YW

143

$W

90

$F

136

$B

194

$C

311

Sire: TEX Playbook 5437 • MGS: Vintage First Lady 4389

Vintage Blackcap 8583 • Reg No: 19309257 Vintage Isabel 9356 • Reg No: 19403655 BW

2.2

WW

84

YW

151

$W

89

$F

143

$B

202

Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: VAR Blackcap 9319

$C

324

Vintage Blackbird 8476 • Reg No: 19192722 BW

1.6

WW

71

YW

134

$W

80

$F

120

$B

187

Sire: SydGen Enhance • Sandpoint Blackbird 8809

$C

322

BW

2.3

WW

99

YW

173

$W

99

$F

148

$B

221

$C

338

Sire: VAR Power Play 7018 • MGS: Baldridge Isabel C221

Vintage Henrietta Pride 9387 • Reg No: 19408670 BW

2.4

WW

86

YW

$W

155 105

$F

153

$B

215

$C

357

Sire: VAR Power Play 7018 • MGS: Vintage Henrietta Pride 6189

THE VINTAGE OFFERING 138 females as compared to the breed: $Combined...........sale average Top 3% $Beef...................sale average Top 3% $Wean.................sale average Top 3% $Feed.................sale average Top 3% WW EPD..............sale average Top 3% YW EPD...............sale average Top 2% Vintage Rita 5045 • Reg No: 18066057 BW

5.0

WW

60

YW

108

$W

55

$F

105

$B

188

$C

292

Sire: VAR Generation 2100 • MGS: SJH Complete of 6108 1564

Vintage First Lady 8470 • Reg No: 19192698 BW

1.7

WW

73

YW

145

$W

53

$F

114

$B

191

$C

306

Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: Vintage First Lady 4389

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HERD HEALTH CHECK TRANSITION STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL WEANING by Kevin Hill, DVM, Merck Animal Health In addition to optimizing feedlot health and performance, the bestprepared calves will result in the biggest return to the ranch. Because calf buyers want the healthiest calves, providing them with a certified history of health management procedures, especially one verified by your veterinarian, can result in a $15 to $35 per head premium paid by buyers. Here are four tried-and-true weaning-related strategies to help make the shift to the feedlot as seamless as possible.

everyone can hold calves for 45 days after weaning, but nearly everyone can utilize some aspects of preconditioning.

product selection. Many researchers over the past 10 years have documented the avermectin class of anthelmintics as often not 2) Examine your vaccination strategy effective at reducing worm burdens. Vaccination programs should include Because most commonly used core protection against Infectious dewormers are in this class, switching to Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR), Bovine a dewormer with the active ingredient Viral Diarrhea (BVD), Respiratory fenbendazole, such as Safe-Guard or Syncytial Virus (BRSV), as well as Panacur, significantly improves the protection against the major bacterial efficacy of eliminating parasites. causes of pneumonia. Combining two products from Timing also is important. Instead differing classes at once, such as of waiting to vaccinate calves after they fenbendazole and an ivermectin, 1) Spread out the stressors arrive at the feedyard, where they may typically achieves reduction of parasite encounter disease before the vaccine Weaning day is often the most egg counts by 99 percent, and is the best stressful day in a calf ’s life. The roundup, has a chance to take effect, it’s ideal strategy for slowing the development of to vaccinate two to three weeks prior vaccinations, separation from mother, resistance. to weaning. This allows time for the a long truck ride and then landing in a Consult your veterinarian for strange pen with lots of new neighbors best protection against respiratory and assistance in the diagnosis, treatment clostridial diseases. Booster doses can is more than any calf should be asked and control of parasitism. This should be given 2 to 3 weeks later, when calves include a plan for collecting fecal to endure. The key to managing these stressors is to plan ahead and spread out have adjusted and are eating well after samples and performing a Fecal Egg weaning at home or in a backgrounding Count Reduction Test (FECRT) to the procedures over several weeks. yard, or after arrival if going directly to Preweaning should be thoughtfully determine if the current deworming the feedlot. planned to begin two to three weeks program is effective. before weaning and culminate 45 to 3) Implement concurrent parasite 4) Evaluate economic impact of 60 days after weaning day. This is control implants important in order to minimize stress on a calf ’s immune system and give Parasitic infections depress immunity No other investment in the cattle them the best chance to respond fully to and feed intake, which are extremely industry is as consistent and predictable immunizations. detrimental to calf health. Therefore, as the use of growth implants. Because Calves also need time to adjust incorporating deworming into a the investment is relatively small, a to separation from the cow and new preconditioning plan is essential. Again, positive return is realized within a few nutrition before adding in other stressors preweaning timing is important (two weeks after implantation. If you plan like shipping and commingling. Not to three weeks prior to weaning), as is to retain ownership for three weeks or more after weaning, consider the value of using implants. The return can be as much as $30 to $40 per head in added value. Implanting can be conveniently added to the preconditioning program either prior to or after weaning. Data from thousands of calf sales prove that preconditioned calves command a significant premium. But to do so, effective communication of health programs to potential buyers that documents the health products and practices used on your operation – including dates of vaccinations, parasite control and other treatments – is an absolute requirement to get that premium. 30 California Cattleman October 2019


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BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD GLOBAL REPRESENTATION USMEF HELPING MOVE BEEF IN ASIA AND EUROPE from the U.S. Meat Export Federation Updating importers and distributors in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region on red meat trends and providing a platform for U.S. exporters to make new business contacts, USMEF hosted its inaugural ASEAN U.S. Meat Showcase and Conference in Singapore. The showcase was followed by an additional “Meet the Buyers” session in Indonesia. These events, which included product displays and a cutting demonstration, as well as discussions on topics ranging from trade with China to global demand trends to preventing the spread of African Swine Fever (ASF), were funded by the USDA Market Access Program (MAP), the National Pork Board and the Beef Checkoff Program. “The showcase was designed to facilitate ASEAN buyers who have been wanting to meet with U.S. exporters to explore opportunities to import U.S. red meat,” said Sabrina Yin, USMEF director in the region. “Beginning in Singapore and then moving to Indonesia, this gathering became even more important in the wake of ASF outbreaks in some ASEAN countries, such as Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar (ASF was also later confirmed in the Philippines). Some trade and buying missions from the region had been put on hold in recent months because of these outbreaks, so bringing importers and exporters together in two different locations was designed to continue the momentum U.S. red meat has established in the region and develop new growth opportunities.” Yin said ASEAN importers were invited to the showcase based on their buying capacity and potential for growth. Along with product displays featuring U.S. pork and beef and face-to-face meetings between traders, USMEF staff made presentations designed to help importers and exporters plan business strategies in the ASEAN region. Importers and exporters attended a U.S. wine and food promotion and tasting reception in Jakarta that featured U.S. beef and U.S. pork along with U.S. products. Bill Verzani, regional agricultural attaché of the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) office in Singapore, opened the showcase with Joel Haggard, USMEF senior vice president for the Asia Pacific. Haggard followed by leading a discussion on U.S.-China trade and the impact it could have on the meat business throughout Asia. He also updated participants on the effect of ASF on China’s meat supplies. An outlook for U.S. red meat supply and demand, as well as information on trends and pricing, was given by USMEF trade analyst Jessica Spreitzer. 32 California Cattleman October 2019

To wrap up the first day of the showcase, a trade reception featured roasted U.S. beef ribeye and U.S. pork baby back ribs, sausages and meatballs. Sun conducted a cutting demonstration and offered information on the most popular U.S. cuts in his market The second day in Singapore opened with a product showcase and more face-to-face meetings. Alex Sun, USMEF marketing manager in Taiwan, presented on U.S. red meat applications for the retail and foodservice sectors. Sun conducted a cutting demonstration using U.S. beef and pork. USMEF then moved the showcase to Jakarta, Indonesia, where importers and exporters were briefed by Chris Rittgers, agricultural counselor, and Garret MacDonald, agricultural attaché, for FAS. As was the case in Singapore, the purpose of the Jakarta gathering was to update importers, distributors, processors and retailers on the international meat market situation and the U.S. red meat outlook. “In Jakarta, we invited members of the Indonesia ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

Alex Sun, USMEF marketing manager in Taiwan, conducted a cutting demonstration and offered information on the most popular U.S. cuts in his market.


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 32 Meat Processors Association and trade contacts who did not have the chance to attend the Singapore showcase,” said Yin. “Bringing importers and exporters together in Jakarta had special significance because the event coincided with additional U.S. plants preparing to apply for approval to export to Indonesia in the near future.” A U.S. food and wine reception drew national television news coverage in Indonesia, which can be viewed online. USMEF also led a retail tour to explore how red meat is displayed and merchandised in the area. The second day in Jakarta was anchored by Spreitzer’s presentation, which included a detailed global red meat outlook and supply update to help attendees understand current and near-term market scenarios. Importers and exporters were then free to meet, exchange information and explore potential business deals. Feedback from participants at both locations was extremely positive. “Many commented that the showcase was very useful because the buyers were vetted and serious about doing business,” said Spreitzer. “In Indonesia, there was a lot of optimism on growth in demand for U.S. beef as incomes continue to rise. Opportunities for pork were also mentioned – especially regarding the growth in Chinese restaurants and for the tourism sector in Bali. The limited number of approved plants remains the biggest constraint in that country, according to the importers. But these are examples of the helpful discussion and information sharing that took place in both Singapore and Jakarta.”

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October 2019 California Cattleman 35


2019 FALL BULL SALE RESULTS & AVERAGES

O’NEAL RANCH “PERFORMANCE PLUS” BULL SALE

SEPT. 3, MADERA, CA Col. John Rodgers

78 ANGUS BULLS

O'Neal Ranch's Betsy Cardoza and Harry Pike of Booth Ranch, Orange Cove at the O'Neal Ranch Bull Sale Sept. 3.

Justin Rhoades and Jason Judge at Silveira Bros. Bull Sale in Firebaugh on Sept. 4.

$4,531

SILVEIRA BROS. “PARTNERS FOR PERFORMANCE” BULL SALE

with Tri T Farms SEPT. 4, FIREBAUGH, CA Col. John Rodgers and Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing

112 ANGUS & RED ANGUS BULLS

$5,471

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH “CARCASS MAKER” BULL SALE

SEPT. 5, LA GRANGE, CA Col. John Rodgers and Col. Rick Machado

214 ANGUS BULLS

$ 7,135

BYRD CATTLE CO. “IT’S ALL ABOUT THE GENETICS” BULL SALE

SEPT. 6, LOS MOLINOS, CA Col. Rick Machado

Matt Beechinor and Amador Zabalbeascoa at the Silveira Bros. Bull Sale.

Vintage Angus Ranch customers Todd Radelfinger, Lillie and Matt McKinney at the VAR event in LaGrange.

117 ANGUS BULLS

$6,268

EZ ANGUS RANCH BULL SALE

SEPT. 7, ESCALON, CA Col. Rick Machado Managed by Parnell Dickinson, Inc.

156 ANGUS BULLS

$5,460

HERITAGE BULL SALE

Five Star Land and Livestock, Bar R Angus and J/V Angus SEPT. 8, WILTON, CA Col. Jake Parnell Managed by Parnell Dickinson, Inc

76 ANGUS BULLS

Cattlemen Jake Cromley and Seth Scribner at the Vintage Angus Ranch Bull Sale on Sept. 5.

Matt Myers and Travis Coy looking at EZ Angus Ranch bulls in Farmington on Sept. 7.

$5,428

GENOA LIVESTOCK BULL SALE

SEPT. 10, GENOA, NV Col. Rick Machado

61 HEREFORD BULLS

$5,389

BLACK GOLD BULL SALE

Donati Ranches, O’Connell Ranches, Wulff Brothers Livestock SEPT. 13, COLUSA, CA Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing

125 ANGUS BULLS

$4,524

TEHAMA ANGUS RANCH “GENERATIONS OF PERFORMANCE” BULL SALE

EZ Angus Ranch owners Tim and Marilyn Callison at their annual bull sale.

ORIgen's Angela Vesco and Top Dollar Angus' Jared Wareham at the Byrd Cattle Company Bull Sale.

36 California Cattleman October 2019

SEPT. 14, GERBER, CA Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers

87 FALL YEARLING ANGUS 37 SPRING YEARLINGS 29 COMMERCIAL OPEN HEIFERS

$5,972 $5,007 $1,200


David Parks and Bob Coker at Coker's Genoa Livestock Hereford Bull Sale in Minden, Nev.

Joe Jones, Col. John Rodgers and Bruin Ranch's Joe Fischer caught up at Tehama Angus Ranch's Bull sale in Gerber on Sept 14.

Mike Massey and Pat Kirby at the Thomas Angus Ranch Sale in Galt.

CCA First Vice President Tony Toso (right) and Dick Wilkey receive a bit from Joey Gonsalves at the Bullseye Breeders Bull Sale for buying the high-selling bull.

Tehama Angus Ranch Bull Sale Crew with Bill Borror on sale day.

THOMAS ANGUS RANCH CALIFORNIABULL SALE

SEPT. 17, GALT, CA Col. Rick Machado

95 ANGUS BULLS

$4,390

BULLSEYE BREEDERS BULL SALE

Gonsalves Ranch, Diamond Oak Cattle Co., Flood Bros. Cattle, and Double M Ranch SEPT. 18, MODESTO, CA Col. Rick Machado

45 ANGUS BULLS 16 SIMANGUS BULLS

$4,024 $3,826

RANCHO CASINO & DAL PORTO LIVESTOCK BULL SALE with Hoffman Herefords SEPT. 19, DENAIR, CA

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. Jake Pickering, Regional Manager Arizona California Nevada Utah P.O. Box 348 Shandon, CA 93461 530.415.5484 jpickering@angus.org

Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers

133 ANGUS BULLS 23 HEREFORD BULLS

A reliable business partner is difficult to come by. Contact Jake Pickering to locate Angus genetics, select marketing options tailored to your needs, and to access Association programs and services. Put the business breed to work for you. To subscribe to the Angus Journal, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report on RFD-TV Monday mornings at 7:30 CST.

$6,859 $4,226

WATCH FOR MORE SEPTEMBER SALE AVERAGES IN THE NOVEMBER ISSUE OF THIS PUBLICATION.

3201 Frederick Ave. • St. Joseph, MO 64506 816.383.5100 • www.ANGUS.org

© 2017-2018 American Angus Association

October 2019 California Cattleman 37


In Memory

Fred director and president of his local association, as well as serving on Hayes was several standing committees. He born July 7, 1944, in Santa served as state director, the state nominating committee and vice Barbara, chairman of the membership California. committee. He served on the His parents were Fred T. Sheriff's Rural Crime Committee as Vice Chairman and an alternate to and Mary C. the California Beef Council Board. Hayes. Fred lost his battle He was a director for the Coalition of Labor, Agriculture and Business with cancer (COLAB), a member of the on Aug. 3, 2019, with his family Santa Barbara County Range by his side. He was raised on the Improvement Association and family ranch on Sweeney Road in Lompoc High School Agriculture Lompoc. After his father passed Advisory Committee. He served in 1963, at the young age of 18, as chairman of the Sheriff Rural he took over the responsibility of Crime and the State Public Lands running the family business. He Committee. He spent many continued expanding his farming years as a Board of Director on and ranching business that lasted the Santa Barbara County Farm for over 58 years. Fred married Susan Anderson Bureau, and he served on the in 1967. They were happily married USDA Farm Service Agency Board for many years for 52 years. Together they raised Some of his most honored three children: Fred T. Hayes (Jill), Julie Folgate (Chris) and Lana Riley awards include being voted Young Farmer of the Year in 1969, (David). Fred's greatest joy in life Livestock Producer of the Year in was his family. He cherished his nine amazing grandkids who loved 1995, and Santa Barbara County Cattleman of the Year in 2001. him dearly. He was loved by his His desire for young people family and all those who called him to participate and succeed in family. ag-related activities such as 4-H Fred was not only a Dad and Papa to his kids and grandkids, he and FFA has been a big part of his personal and business life. was Papa Fred to many. He made He served on the Lompoc High sure everyone he met was treated School Agriculture Advisory and with the respect they deserve. He was awarded the Honorary Chapter was a man of dignity and made Farmer of Lompoc FFA. Fred a point to put everyone before was passionate about the He was a himself. He was a very influential founding cattleman member of the man in the Lompoc Valley. Replacement Heifer Program at the To this day Fred operated Santa Barbara County Fair and the roughly 100 head of commercial current local bred chairman. and purebred Angus cattle, along Fred leaves behind a legacy of with farming around 200 acres of hard work and kindness. “A man lima beans and hay. One of his greatest passions was raising cattle who led such a simple life could and sharing his knowledge with the leave behind so much. There's a little bit of you in everything we younger generations. Along with see.” He walked a life of profound farming, he helped start what is now one of the most sought after faith and led all of us by example. He will be missed in all his earthly Pinot Noir wine regions in North endeavors, but his family knows America. he is now with Jesus. Fred stayed very involved A Celebration of Life was held in the Farming and Ranching on Aug. 8. A scholarship fund has community by serving on many been established in his name for a boards throughout the state. He student of agriculture. Please call was a member of the California Bank of the Sierra, Lompoc, (805) Cattlemen's Association for 737-4064 for details. nearly 50 years. He had served as 38 California Cattleman October 2019

FRED HAYES

PATSY LUND March 2, 1934 – July 6, 2019 When the definition of Cattlewomen is looked up, you see “the equivalent to cattlemen.” The definition of cattlemen is one who tends or raises cattle but there is definietly there is more to it. Aside from raising two sons, Patsy Lund was president of California Cattlewomen, Inc., she won many awards for her accomplishments with Mary Kay, worked for the City of Pleasanton in finances, volunteered for Valley Care hospital, and was an active member with her church. All on top of being a business woman, she also helped run our family cattle operation with her husband Victor Lund. Patsy was never afraid to get hands dirty but was also a very classy woman. Patsy served as the president of the CCW in 1991-1992. During her term of office, California hosted the National Beef Cookoff. As Jean Barton, a long time California State officer said, “Patsy was a fierce advocate for the California Beef Industry at this time making sure that California needs were met.” Jean stated that Patsy was a “gorgeous lady.” Patsy believed that it was important for the beef industry that as many women as possible should be knowledgeable not only on the local level, but also on the state and national levels as well. Patsy and Vic were a wonderful couple working hard to better the California beef industry. They also never hesitated to dust off their dancing shoes! Patsy is and forever will be a role model for Cattlewomen across the Nation. On top of raising cattle, Cattlewomen raise families, have jobs, and many other responsibilities. My grandmother is someone I inspire to be like everyday and will be missed by so many. Please help us celebrate her beautiful life by attending a Celebration Of Life being held at the Inderbitzen Ranch on Oct. 19, 2019 at 11 a.m. 6030 Dagnino Road in Livermore.

NEW ARRIVAL INDY NELSON

Indy Shea Nelson was eagerly welcomed on August 26 by three big brothers, Jhett, Cort and Nash and parents Ryan and Hailey Nelson, Clements. She weighed 7 pounds 11 ounces and was 20 and one-half

inches long. Grandparents are Mark and Abbie Nelson, Wilton and Kelly and Diane Upton, Gridley.


invites you to a free workshop on

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Accessing the availability of current and future export markets for United States beef Explaining the economic value of export markets to the United States cattle industry in general and for individual producers Participating in value added third-party traceability, as well as age and source verification Understanding traceability requirements for specific export markets (European Union, China, etc.,) Analyzing market conditions to determine when best to invest in voluntary traceability programs to increase the value of livestock LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT AND THE SCHEDULE OF SPEAKERS AT WWW.CALCATTLEMEN.ORG.

This material is based upon work supported by USDA/NIFA under Award Number 2018-70027-28587. October 2019 California Cattleman 39


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

SEPTEMBER 20

M i d Va l l e y

9th Annual

Thanks to all our buyers at the annual BCC Bull Sale!

THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

Look for our “ Distinctly Different” Angus Bulls & Replacement Heifers at the 2019, BUTTE SALE ~ October 19 ~ Oroville, CA.

KENNY & DIANNE READ

“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340

BULLS, FEMALES, EMBRYOS AND SEMEN FOR SALE AT THE RANCH IN LOS MOLINOS

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner (530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com

E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdangusranch.com

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! VISIT US AT WWW.DONATIRANCH.COM!

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

40 California Cattleman October 2019

September 12, 2019


SEPTEMBER 20

Angus

RAnch

M i d Va l l e y

Annual Sale: September 1, 2018 Join usBull Oct. 14Sat., for our elite annual Inaugural Female Sale: Mon., October bull and female sales! 15, 2018

9th Annual

Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

We hope to see you in Firebaugh Oct. 12 for our annual female sale! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2019.

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus

Gerber, CA

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES!

Thank you for attending the annual TAR bull sale! Join us again in 2020!

O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

(530) 385-1570

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

October 2019 California Cattleman 41


Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

A FAMILY TRADITION

Join us in October for our fall production sale!

Angus and SimAngus Cattle John Teixeira: (805) 448-3859 Allan Teixeira: (805) 310-3353 Tom Hill: (541) 990-5479

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

www.teixeiracattleco.com | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com

CHAROLAIS THANK YOU TO ALL OUR 2019 BUYERS!

Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199 Jared Patterson Western Region Field Manager (208) 312-2386 THURSDAY, SEPT. 12, 2019

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

Call AHA today for assistance or information on buying or marketing of Hereford cattle! 11500 N Ambassador Drive, Suite 410 | Kansas City, MO 64153 | (816) 842-3757 | aha@hereford.org

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS

42 California Cattleman October 2019

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

THANK YOU TO OUR BUTTE AND MODOC BULL SALE BUYERS! Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

3L

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988


Pitchfork Cattle Co.

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

JoinususOct for15, our2018 annual production sale iu Modesto! Join for our annual production sale!

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

h

Building Extremely High Quality Beef Since 1978

Bulls and females available private treaty!

La Grange, CA • Greeley Hill, CA Stephen Dunckel • (209) 878-3167 www.tubleweedranch.net twd@tumbleweedranch.net

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

THE DOIRON FAMILY (707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

October 2019 California Cattleman 43


SALE MANAGMENT

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Ranch Fencing Materials and Accessories & Ranch Supplies

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• A.I, CIDR & heat synchronization • Extensive experience • Willing to Travel • Well-versed in dairy & beef pedigrees

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FARM EQUIPMENT

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BALE WAGONS

New Holland self propelled and pull-type models/parts/tires

sell/buy/deliver/can finance

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REAL ESTATE

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1,103 acres, with 900± irrigated. Ranch, farm, develop, or use for tax credits via conservation easements. $15,000,000 Lostine, Oregon - Price Reduced 9,810 acres east of Enterprise. Timber/grazing/recreation land. Was $9,810,000. Now $9,319,000 New Meadows, Idaho Ranch 420± acre ranch with timber. Minutes to McCall, Idaho. $3,131,000

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EVENT MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITY

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The Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale is seeking General Manager to direct and manage all aspects of the annual event including, but not limited to; operational, administrative, financial, marketing and sales. For more information and application contact Tehama Job Training Center at 530-529-7000 or visit www.jobtrainingcenter.org/

44 California Cattleman October 2019

YOUR BUSINESS AD COULD BE LISTED HERE!

FOR AS LITTLE AS $400 PER YEAR!


AHA Engages in research to IDENTIFy GENETIC MARKERS in EYE PIGMENT On Sept. 12, the American Hereford Association (AHA), based in Kansas City, Mo., announced that it is collaborating with David Riley, Ph.D., Texas A&M, College Station, Texas and Dorian Garrick, Ph.D., Massey University, New Zealand, to identify genetic markers to predict eye pigment and its potential relationship to eye disorders. Previous research suggests markers may exist that could assist in predicting an animal’s eye pigment. The first step to identifying these genetic markers is to collect data. Utilizing genotyped cows from the Olsen Ranch herd in Harrisburg, Neb., Riley and AHA staff members Shane Bedwell, chief operating officer and director of breed improvement, and Stacy Sanders, director of records, collected pictures and scored eye pigment levels on approximately 900 cows. “I want to ultimately be able to predict with high probability from a DNA sample that a given animal will produce progeny with eye pigmentation…” Riley says. “I am really happy to again be working with Dr. Dorian Garrick on a research project with tremendous potential for impact. There are multiple investigations that could branch off of our main effort here and I plan on pursuing all of them. The Olsen’s are great and I really appreciated spending a couple of days with them.” The researchers are now working to quantify the phenotypic data (eye pigment) collected with the pictures and, using the genotypes already on file, will be able to look for correlations in genetic markers and eye pigment. The goal is to identify markers with a high correlation to pigment. “Research projects like this are valuable for gaining better understanding of Hereford genetics,” Bedwell says. “With the importance of pigmentation to the breed, this is an important topic to research.”

2019 Categories include:

California Landscapes People Rural Life Animals Plus a special category for cell phone photos!

$500 GRAND PRIZE plus cash prizes for all categories

Plus have the chance to see your photo on the cover of this magazine!

DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 1, 2019

all entries must be submitted by email

Give it your best shot. . COMPLETE RULES AND ENTRY DETAILS AT WWW.CALCATTLEMEN.ORG E-MAIL MAGAZINE@CALCATTLEMEN.ORG FOR QUESTIONS AND PHOTO ENTRY October 2019 California Cattleman 45


Advertisers’ Index Amador Angus Ranch........................................40 American AgCredit.............................................31 American Angus Association..................... 19, 37 American Hereford Association........................42 Animal Health International..............................44 Bar KD Angus Ranch..................................... 3, 40 Bar R Angus.........................................................40 Bentz Cattle..........................................................34 Boehringer Ingelheim.........................................10 Bovine Elite LLC..................................................44 Broken Box Ranch...............................................42 Buchanan Angus Ranch.....................................40 Byrd Cattle Co......................................................40 Cattlemen's Livestock Market............................27 Charron Ranch....................................................40 Chico State College of Ag...................................43 CoBank.................................................................31 Conlin Supply Company, Inc. ...........................23 Dal Porto Livestock.............................................40 Dixie Valley Angus....................................... 40, 47 Dontati Ranch......................................................40 EZ Angus Ranch..................................................41 Farm Credit West................................................31 Freitas Range Management................................34 Fresno State Ag Foundation...............................43 Furtado Angus.....................................................41

Furtado Livestock Enterprises...........................44 Genetrust..............................................................35 Genoa Livestock..................................................42 Harrell Hereford Ranch......................................42 HAVE Angus........................................................41 Hogan Ranch........................................................41 Hone Ranch..........................................................43 Hufford's Herefords.............................................42 Ivomec...................................................................10 J-H Feed Co..........................................................44 Jim Wilhite Bale Wagons....................................44 JMM Genetics......................................................44 Knipe Land Co.....................................................44 Lambert Ranch............................................... 3, 42 Leachman Topline Cattle Company.................25 Little Shasta Ranch..............................................43 M3 Marketing......................................................44 Maple Leaf Seed Company.................................34 McPhee Red Angus.............................................42 Morrell Ranches...................................................42 Multimin USA.....................................................15 Noahs Angus Ranch............................................41 O'Connell Ranch.................................................41 P.W. Gillibrand.....................................................43 Pacific Trace Minerals.........................................44 Pitchfork Cattle Co..............................................43

46 California Cattleman October 2019

Ranchers Heifer Sale...........................................34 Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale.........................44 Red River Farms..................................................41 Sammis Ranch.....................................................41 Schafer Ranch......................................................41 Schohr Herefords.................................................43 Shasta Farm & Equipment.................................18 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard...........................11 Sierra Ranches......................................................43 Silveira Bros..........................................................41 Sonoma Mountain Herefords............................43 Southwest Fence and Supply Inc.......................44 Spanish Ranch......................................................43 Step Aside Farms.................................................41 Sweetlix.................................................................28 Tehama Angus Ranch.........................................41 Teixeira Cattle Co................................................42 Thomas Angus Ranch.......................................6, 7 Tumbleweed Ranch.............................................43 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard..........................9 VF Red Angus......................................................42 Vintage Angus Ranch........................... 29, 42, 48 Western Stockman's Market...............................33 Western Video Market..........................................2 Wraith Scarlett Randoph Insurance..................17 Wulff Brothers Livestock....................................42


“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS”

$40/unit

$30/unit

JINDRA STONEWALL Owned with Nick Jindra

Sire: Jindra Acclaim • MGS: Jindra Double Vision

DIABLO DELUXE 110

Owned with Spruce Mountain Ranch & Judson & Denise Baldridge

Sire: V A R Discovery 2240 • MGS: GAR Prophet

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

+9

+.5

+75

+143

+32

+.86

+.58

211

+6

+1.2

+88

+160

+26

+1.06

-.006

195

$30/unit

$35/unit

STERLING ADVANTAGE 809

BALDRIDGE COLONEL C251

Sire: Connealy Confidence Plus • MGS:Connealy Consensus

Sire: Baldridge Xpand X743 • MGS: Styles Upgrade J59

Semen on this outstanding bull, born Jan. 2018 is now available! CED +11

BW -.3

WW +74

YW +139

MILK +30

MARB +.78

RE +.91

Owned with Spruce Mountain Ranch & Mangell Inc

$B

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

$B

183

+2

+1.7

+65

+121

+17

+.69

+1.02

160

CONTACT US TODAY ABOUT PURCHASING SEMEN ON ANY OF THESE OUTSTANDING ANGUS A.I. SIRES!

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner

(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com October 2019 California Cattleman 47


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Sunday, October 13, 2019 33rd Annual “Genetic Gold” Production Sale 1 p.m. • ranch headquarters • Modesto, CA

SELLING: DONORS • SPRING & FALL PAIRS • BRED HEIFERS • FALL YEARLINGS • SPRING HEIFERS

Vintage Rita 5045 • Reg No: 18066057

Sire: V A R Generation 2100 • MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55

Young, powerful top 1% $Combined donor, sired by V A R Generation 2100, out of 1564 - a $3 million producing donor. If you like long-spined females with bone and power, then 5045 is your kind of cow. Add on the multi-trait excellence data package she provides, and you have a can’t-miss donor.

Vintage First Lady 8470 • Reg No: 19192698 Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: V A R Discovery 2240

If you are looking to add a different but proven cow family to your herd, then this donor prospect, sired by SydGen Enhance, should be on your short list. Her dam is the $320,000-valued Lot 1 female from the 2018 sale at Vintage. The dam of 8470 has had five daughters sell at Vintage for an average price of $66,000 each. This heifer is as deep and stout as her data.

Vintage Isabel 9356 • Reg No: 19408655

Sire: V A R Power Play 7018 • MGS: Baldridge Xpand x743

Outstanding VAR Power Play 7018 daughter. The young sire that set a breed record when he sold for $730, 000 in the 2018 VAR Bull Sale. Out of a full sister to Baldridge Colonel, the bull that set the record at the Baldridge bull sale when he brought $580,000. These VAR Power Play daughters possess great type with outstanding data in multi-trait excellence. Future herd buildilgn donor here.

BW

BW

5.1

2

2.7

WW

WW

WW

60

80

60

YW

YW

YW

108

143

116

$W

$W

$W

54

90

52

$F

$F

$F

Vintage First Lady 7414 • Reg No: 18916445

107

Sire: TEX Playbook 5437 • MGS: Deer Valley Rita 0308

$B

This young donor prospect will calve before the sale to Ashland and be ready to start her flushing career. Sired by Playbook, Vintage First Lady is the No. 1 $Beef female by Playbook in the Angus breed. If you love the type of Playbook, but require a big-time data package to go with it, the 7414 is your next donor.

190

$C 288

BW

Vintage Rita 8115 • Reg No: 19037145

136

Sire: Baldridge Colonel C251 • MGS: Summitcrest Complete 1P55

$B

This bred heifer donor prospect is from one of the most proven cow families on the planet. Sired by Colonel, Rita 8115 is out of the $3 million producer 1564, who in-turn is out of the famed 8108 with progeny having dominated carcass genetics for years. A flush sister sold for $110,000 for one-half interest in our 2018 VAR sale. She sells due to calve to Enhance due March 2020.

193

$C 310

113

$B 190

$C 302

BW

BW

BW

1.6

1.6

2.2

WW

WW

WW

73

71

84

YW

YW

YW

146

135

152

$W

$W

$W

49

78

87

$F

$F

$F

142

$B 224

$C 360

Vintage Blackbird 8476 • Reg No: 19192722 Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: Connealy Onward

This female could be the most balanced package we have ever offered out of the dam of herdsires, the $7 million producer Blackbird 8809. Sired by Sydgen Enhance, she displays that she is one of the most powerful daughters ever born by Enhance. Rock solid, proven donor potential in this young female. Maternal brothers include VAR Power Play 7018, VAR Generation 2100, VAR Index 3282, VAR Foreman 3339, VAR Commander 4152, VAR Ranger 3008, VAR Rubicon 5414, VAR Reserve 1111, VAR Powerline 7238 and VAR Foundation 7210.

121

$B 188

$C 323

BW

BW

2.3

2.4

WW

WW

99

84

YW

YW

173

155

$W

$W

99

104

$F 146

$B 218

$C 328

Vintage Henrietta Pride 9387 • Reg No: 19408670 Sire: V A R Power Play 7018 • MGS: V A R Empire 3037

If you’re looking to add one of the best VAR Power Play daughters from his first calf crop to our program, then study your lesson here. Cool-made, top-of-the-breed data and look at all the great female in her pedigree: 1044, 643T 4212, 8809 and 558H just to name a few. If you are trying to plan for your future, you may want to consider what has worked for generations as your best plan forward.

$F 155

$B 216

$C

Vintage Blackcap 8583 • Reg No: 19309257 Sire: SydGen Enhance • MGS: Connealy All Around

This future donor is the flush sister to the lead-off bull in the 2019 VAR Bull Sale, VAR Best Buy 8577. the dam of these outstanding flushmates is VAR Blackcap 9319, sird by Conneally All Around. 9319 has become one of the most proven producers at Vintage with 25 daughters selling for an average price of $55,650 each. If you want breed-leading type, breed-leading data and a maternal side that has breed-leading donor cows five generations deep - the Blackcap 8583 is a can’t-miss opportunity.

144

$B 202

$C 326

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

358

CALL, E-MAIL OR VISIT US ONLINE TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK! WATCH AND BID LIVE ON LIVEAUCTIONS.TV!

Profile for California Cattleman

October 2019 California Cattleman magazine  

October 2019 California Cattleman magazine