January 2021 California Cattleman

Page 1

January 2021

INTRODUCING

2021-2022

CCA PRESIDENT

TONY TOSO

January 2021 California Cattleman 1


Modoc Bull Sale

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January 2021 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION KEEPING OUR EYES FORWARD by CCA President Tony Toso

It seems like only 20 years ago we rang in 2020 and to this day, I have yet to find one person that was sad to see 2020 become history. As we are aware, change is inevitable and, in the case of 2020, more than welcome. I think I have to agree with my friend Stevie Ipsen that 2020 was a “dumpster fire,” and by my estimation, one of biblical proportions at that. With the dawning of 2021, change brings us new hope, a new day to rethink where we are at, and where we are headed in the age of coronavirus lockdowns and rolling blackouts. While we are all eager to welcome a new year, I want to step back briefly and offer some thanks. Thanks for the leadership we had these past two years under Mark Lacey, who persevered through one of the toughest periods most of us will see in our lifetimes. We owe him a debt of gratitude for keeping us on track and making plenty of lemonade on our behalf. Mark is a friend, a warrior, a student, a thinker and cares deeply about CCA and the ranching community. So, from all of us, thanks Mark! I am also thankful for the fellow officers who gave selflessly of their time to work on our behalf. Steve Arnold, John Hammon, Greg Kuck, Rob Von der leith, Jesse Larios and Trevor Freitas, thanks guys! I am thankful for a staff, who while are small in numbers, puts out a herculean effort and gives CCA maximum effort, day in, day out and in the face of any adversity. Thank you, Billy, Kirk, Lisa, Katie and Morgan. Well done as usual! So, let’s get back to the hope of a new day. As we turn our attention to 2021, until we, as officers and staff, are able to get back on the road to hear from you in person, we will continue to make getting information to you a top priority. The tried and true

mediums of our magazine, Hot Irons publication, CCA website and email blasts will continue to be produced to keep you in the loop. But we will also try to expand our outreach with the use of technology to disseminate information to you through more aggressive uses of social media, possibly something along the lines of YouTube videos and maybe a podcast. As always, we will be diligent in taking on the issues that matter to our members. We will be aggressive on fire and work hard toward meaningful change and regulatory reform that will not only be to the benefit of our members, but also to our communities. We will lead by example and do our best to show just how important the California cattle rancher is to helping mitigate wildfire risk. If not by grazing down fuel loads, we will work toward helping get prescribed fire on our private lands as well as advocating for its use on state and federal lands. We will also push hard to see more influence from grazing on state and federal lands as well. We will look at areas where we can help with improving the response to drought, keep our eye on the wolf/lion problems our members face and monitor any legislation that could impact you. We will also be proactive in being involved with the price discovery issue and do our best to put the California cattle producer in the best position to succeed. We have a bunch on our plate for 2021, and I am excited to work with staff and our officer team to tackle the challenges that lie ahead. Here’s to wishing you all a prosperous 2021!

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication #8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher.

4

Periodical postage paid at Jefferson, Mo. Publication # 8-3600 National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814 California Cattleman January 2021


ON THE COVER

JANUARY 2021 Volume 104, Issue 1

PERSPECTIVES

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

What does 2021 have in store?

4

BUNKHOUSE 6 Reflecting on where we've been

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 2020 virtual convention brings new policies PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

10

VET VIEWS

26

Carcass improvement for consumers A storied career in vet medicine

22

This month’s cover photo, taken by CCA Director of Communications Katie Roberti, features 2021-2022 CCA President Tony Toso at home on his family ranch in Mariposa County near Hornitos.

UPCOMING INDUSTRY EVENTS

CHIMES 34

JAN. 26-30

NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

52

FEB. 6

CALIFORNIA CATTLE COUNCIL

64

RANGELAND TRUST TALK

70

CCW president comes with deep cattle roots Is sustainability holding us back?

Helping producers hold strong after rough year Preserving open space within an urban place

SPECIAL FEATURES

Toso named CCA’s 50th president Culling: not always a dirty word 30 days in the shoes of a CCA president 80 years in Red Bluff 2020 scholarship winners Possible tax changes in Biden Administration Grazing to help landowners manage fire risk Distance learning in the agriculture classroom

READER SERVICES Buyer’s guide Ad Index

12 16 18 47 54 56 60 72

RED BULL BULL & GELDING SALE Red Bluff KLAMATH FALLS BULL SALE Klamath Falls, Ore.

To list your group’s events here, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or e-mail magazine@calcattlemen.org. Want help scheduling a virtual meeting? Contact CCA Office Administrator Morgan Lyman at morgan@calcattlemen.org

76 82

January 2021 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE STARTING ANEW

cca springboards into 2021 by CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin January is always a time of fresh starts and new beginnings. It is always a time of year that is filled with hope and optimism and one that I look forward to. Like so many of you, I had hoped that the COVID-19 pandemic would be left behind in 2020 and we would be moving into 2021 with the pandemic fully behind us. Despite the stubbornness of the pandemic, though, there is a lot to forward to over the next 12 months. At the top of the list for me will be the ability to travel around the state again to attend local cattlemen’s association meetings and connect with all our members. More than anything, the last ten months have reminded me that our members are the best part of our association. Despite us not be able to physically meet, we accomplished a lot together in 2020. Thanks to each of you and the tireless efforts of our leadership team, the CCA staff had the resources and direction to achieve many major successes over the past year. 2020 will always be the year that the Foothill Abortion Vaccine became commercially available. Jeff Stott, Ph.D., and Myra Blanchard’s determination and dedication over the last few decades has resulted in an effective vaccine that will help producers throughout the state and will add to the health of the state’s cattle herd and the economic prosperity of our ranchers. The 2020 legislative session turned out to be one of our most successful in decades. In large part the success is due to COVID-19 restrictions and the truncated legislative session but is also the result of the efforts of Kirk Wilbur and Jason Bryant with Bryant Government Affairs. Early in the pandemic response Kirk worked tirelessly to ensure that California ranchers were included in the economic relief packages being considered by Congress. Meanwhile, Jason was working to ensure that the few remaining bills that would have negatively impacted ranchers were defeated. The California Cattle Council has now been established for over a year and with a full year of collections they have the resources to execute their strong strategic plan. They have already made a huge difference in 2020 6 California Cattleman January 2021

by executing a public affairs campaign “Resilience 2020," that reassured consumers about the safety and availability of California beef during the pandemic. By highlighting the resilience of ranchers throughout the state they made a strong, lasting impression not only with consumers but with legislators. Our shared resilience will be the foundation of our state’s economic recovery and ranchers will be an active partner in our state’s long-term success. Proposition 15 would have been the largest tax increase in California history. But thanks to you and ranchers throughout the state, we were able to aggressively push against and defeat Prop 15. Without your support and engagement, the campaign to defeat Prop 15 would not have been possible. These are just a few of CCA’s successes throughout 2020. We have proven that our shared resilience is stronger than COVID-19 and that working together we can achieve big goals. This success will be the springboard for all our efforts in 2021. We have momentum to carry us through and achieve even bigger goals over the next 12 months. This year we will be laser-focused on achieving major reforms to address the megafires that consumed over 4 million acres of our state in 2020. I am optimistic that we will see increased funding, reduced regulation and increased protections for our state’s ranchers. I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be in the fight with each and everyone of you. I can’t wait to see all of you in 2021. In the meantime, if you need anything, please don’t hesitate to call me.


Performance Plus Bull Sale Elite Bull Sale • February 15, 2021 • Terrebonne, Or • 100 Fall Bulls • 50 Spring Bulls TEX Rita 5553

TEX Playbook 5437 TEX Playbook continues

TEX Rita 5553 (Freckles) is the daughter of Rita 1C43. She has been extremely successful in the Simmental breed producing several elite progeny. Purchased by Red River Farms.

to be one of the hottest bulls in the industry. As one of our leading herd sires, Playbook consistently produces elite progeny with high customer satisfaction. Playbook has a $M of 98 (Top 1%).

Rita 1c43 AN UNEQUALED OPPORTUNITY TO INTRODUCE FRESH GENETICS INTO YOUR HERD!

RRF Rita 215g RRF Rita 215G (3596354) is the highly successful simmental granddaughter of Rita 1C43, and was awarded Percentage Show Heifer of the Year for 2020. Bred by Red River Farms. Showed by Morgan Jackson. She excelled in the show ring and is backed with a phenomenal EPD profile.

Rita 1C43 of 9M26 Complete continues to be one of our most consistently successful donor cows. Her industry wide influence has produced elite progeny spanning multiple generations. With earnings of over $500,000, Rita’s distinctive qualities – most notably her udder quality – have set her apart in her success within both Angus and Simmental breeds. Her most well known progeny, TEX Playbook 5437 has gone on to produce exceptional females, AI and herd sires. Keeping in mind the undisputed successes of Rita 1C43, TCC is offering three (3) Hoover No Doubt x Rita 1C43 sons and total of six (6) progeny at the Performance Plus Sale in February 2021. Don’t miss out on this remarkable opportunity to add Rita 1C43’s unique genetics to your herd.

Hoover Know How TEX Rita 9057 Hoover Know How has proven to be an incredible addition to our herd sires. Know How has a $C of 298, a PAP score of 38, and offers big time stats for CW, MARB, and REA. Twenty sons sell in Performance Plus 2021.

Vintage BlackBird 7480 Vintage Blackbird 7480 is a paternal granddaughter to Rita 1C43. Bred by Vintage Angus Ranch and owned by Riverbend Ranch. She was a top seller in the 2018 Vintage Angus Ranch sale. Cattlemen across the country love TEX Playbook daughters.

TEX Rita 9057 is the daughter of Rita 1C43 x Hoover Know How and maternal sister to TEX Playbook 5437. She was Know How’s first heifer offered at public auction – sold in the 2020 Bases Loaded sale for $40,000 to Riverbend Ranch. Full brother sells in Performance Plus 2021.

T h e A TFamilye Tradition i x eForiOverr aTwenty FFiveaYearsm i ly Ou r fa mi ly

would love for you to join us on President’s Day,

February 15, 2021, for our annual Performance Plus Bull Sale. Please do not hesitate to reach out, and find us on Facebook and Instagram (@teixeiracattleco). We look forward to seeing you at the sale! Allan and Cee Teixeira Allan’s Cell: 805-310-3353

Tom Hill Tom’s Cell: 541-990-5479

John, Heather, Nathan, Joseph and Ben Teixeira John’s Cell: 805-448-3859

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CCA welcomes new officer team With a love of the land, cattle and their lifestyle, cattle producers are known for their undying devotion to their way of life. Since 1917, the California Cattlemen's Association has been led by cattle producers who are not only dedicated to their lifestyle but also to protecting it. For decades the leadership team at CCA has worked tirelessly to represent their fellow cattlemen and women. They travel up and down the state to gain perspective from local ranchers and from Sacramento to Washington, D.C., with CCA staff to lobby on behalf of the beef production community. With the arrival of a new calendar year, in long-standing tradition, CCA is also ringing in 2021 with a new leadership team. While most are not new faces to members of the association, almost all are new to their roles within the association. Moving up from serving as first vice president for the past two years, Tony Toso, Hornitos, was nominated by his peers and elected president of CCA by his fellow members at the 2020 CCA Convention, which was held virtually the first week in December 2020. You can read more about Toso and his cattle industry expertise in the feature article on page 12. Steve Arnold, a life-long and reputable rancher from Santa Margarita, moved up to first vice president from his two-year stint as second vice president. John Hammon of Exeter, will continue the second year of his two-year term as second vice president alongside newly-elected officers Trevor Freitas, Tipton, and Rick Roberti, Loyalton, who will each also serve two-year terms in their new capacity as Siskiyou County rancher Greg Kuck's second vice president term came to an end. Freitas, who has also served two years as the chairman of CCA's Feeder Council has been involved in CCA in various capacities for many years and looks forward to working with the state's producers for years to come. Roberti is a cow-calf producer from California's Sierra Valley where he raises commercial Angus cattle and hay. Beverly Bigger, a rancher from

Ventura, is beginning a six-year term as CCA's Treasurer. CCA's will be well-served by Bigger's wealth of experience in agriculture finance. Now a full-time rancher, Bigger retired in 2016 from Farm Credit West. Bigger fills the shoes of Rob von der Leith, Copperopolis, who began as CCA Treasurer in 2014. CCA thanks him for his service and dedication to the association. Leaving a tulmultuous 2020

in the rearview mirror, the CCA officer team is looking foward to 2021 and beyond with many goals in mind, all of which aim to better the cattle industry and help beef producers continue their lifestyles for generations to come. Should you wish to contact any of the leadership team or CCA staff to share your input on the direction of the beef industry or your association, your outreach is always welcomed.

2021 CCA OFFICERS

CCA PRESIDENT Tony Toso cottoncrk@aol.com (209) 988-4468

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Steve Arnold pozovalley@aol.com (805) 235-7840

SECOND VICE PRESIDENT Trevor Freitas trevor@mendescalfranch.com (559) 805-5431

SECOND VICE PRESIDENT John Hammon hamdawg66@gmail.com (559) 623-1538

SECOND VICE PRESIDENT Rick Roberti rickroberti@yahoo.com (530) 249-4988

8 California Cattleman January 2021

TREASURER Beverly Bigger brbigger@sbcglobal.net (805) 340-3755


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DUES DOLLARS AT WORK MEMBERSHIP ADOPTS NEW POLICY, SLATES NEW OFFICERS AT VIRTUAL CONVENTION With COVID-19 gathering restrictions precluding an in-person gathering of California’s cattlemen in Reno, Nev., this year, CCA held its 104th Annual Convention online via the Zoom platform on December 3 and 4. While the online setting necessitated some deviations from the usual format of CCA’s annual meeting, more than 150 member households took the time to participate in the convention, and the business of the association was well-executed. Among the most significant actions taken at annual convention was the installation of new officers. 2020 marked the end of Mark Lacey’s Lacey’s two-year term as CCA President, during which Lacey deftly steered CCA through multiple crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic and a historically catastrophic wildfire season. Lacey is succeeded by Mariposa County cattle rancher Anthony (Tony) Toso, Toso, who was promoted from CCA First Vice President and is well-suited to lead the Association over the next two years. After six years of service as CCA Treasurer, Rob von der Lieth also departs the CCA officer team, and is succeeded in that role by Ventura County rancher Beverly Bigger. Bigger. Siskiyou County rancher Greg Kuck also concluded his two-year term as a CCA Second Vice President. Both Kuck and Lacey expressed disappointment that the pandemic prevented them from traveling the state to meet with ranchers during what would normally be CCA’s fall and spring “tour meetings,” but expressed an interest in visiting CCA’s local affiliates once the pandemic is behind us. CCA thanks Lacey, Kuck and von der Lieth for their years of extraordinary service. The cattle industry leaders will get a proper “send-off ” at next year’s Convention, when California’s cattlemen can once again gather in person to celebrate their achievements. Steve Arnold of San Luis Obispo County now moves up as CCA First Vice President. Trevor Freitas, Freitas, who has served as Chair of CCA’s Feeder Council and Rick Roberti of Plumas-Sierra Cattlemen’s Association will serve as CCA Second Vice Presidents. John Hammon of Tulare County has one year remaining in his term as a CCA Second Vice President. Among Toso’s first acts as CCA President was appointing his replacement as chair of CCA’s Fire Subcommittee. Toso has appointed San Luis Obispo County rancher Anthony Stornetta, Stornetta, who brings to the Subcommittee his dual expertise as a rancher and as a Battalion Chief with the Santa Barbara County Fire Department. Stornetta has a wealth of experience in applying prescribed fire, background that will be invaluable to the association as CCA focuses throughout the 2021-22 legislative session on priorities like expanding prescribed burns and utilizing cattle grazing as a fine fuels treatment on state-owned lands. CCA members also tackled the policy of the Association in streamlined virtual policy committees 10 California Cattleman January 2021

and Friday’s virtual Board of Directors meeting. With a Foothill Abortion vaccine now commercially available through Hygieia Biological Laboratories—capping years of efforts by CCA, the Livestock Memorial Research Fund, and researchers at the University of California, Davis and University of Nevada, Reno—CCA’s Cattle Health & Well-Being Committee removed two policies from the book calling for the development and marketing of such a vaccine. Members also adopted a series of new policies and staff directives at this year’s annual convention. Below are the operative provisions of those new policies and directives (with “whereas” clauses omitted); you can view CCA’s full policy book at www.calcattlemen.org/cca-policy. AG & FOOD POLICY DROUGHT MONITOR COMMITTEE BE IT RESOLVED, that the California Cattlemen’s Association work with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association to establish a committee of range beef cattle producers to work with the Drought Monitor program to develop a system to refine their determinations. ALTERNATIVE PROTEIN PRODUCTS—Staff Directive BE IT DIRECTED, that the California Cattlemen’s Association work with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association to support federal legislation requiring that imitation beef products be labeled as “imitation” and ensure that the Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture have the authority to enforce such labeling provisions. PROPERTY RIGHTS & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOREST/RANGELAND FUELS REDUCTION BE IT RESOLVED, that the California Cattlemen’s Association work with appropriate state and federal agencies and organizations to promote the reduction of these fuels and subsequent use to generate electrical energy. LOCAL CONTACT LIST FOR CAL FIRE BE IT DIRECTED, that the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) work with local associations to develop a contact list of willing members that could provide information to fire officials on access, terrain, and general geography in their locale, and BE IT FURTHUR DIRECTED, that CCA update this list annually and provide it to CAL FIRE and USDA Farm Service Agency.


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Toso takes on the balance of serving as CCA's 50th President by CCA Communications Director Katie Roberti Just days after being installed as the 50th president of the California Cattlemen’s Association, Anthony (Tony) Toso said something that wouldn’t have made much sense before the infamous year of 2020. “I’ll be CCA’s first virtual president,” Toso joked. A statement that’s improbable as social gatherings are likely to resume within his term, but one that’s not far from unbelievable after a year in which not a single CCA-hosted event was able to take place in-person and CCA leadership was only able to attend a few local association meetings before the onset of the pandemic in the United States. In November 2018, when Toso became CCA’s first vice president, there was no way of knowing what he and immediate past president Mark Lacey would face over the next two years. It’s unlikely they predicted virtual meetings, facemasks, extremely volatile cattle markets, toilet paper shortages, plexiglass and the worst year of wildfires in California’s history would all be trending during the last year of their 2019-2020 terms—yet, they all were. The year 2020 brought its lists of challenges for farmers and ranchers, and with it came no shortage of work and challenging situations for Lacey’s term as president and Toso’s tenure as first vice president. “Having worked directly with Mark Lacey, I can tell you I personally am grateful for the efforts he put into his leadership term,” Toso said. “He was constantly reading up,

12 California Cattleman January 2021

investigating and thinking through policy issues, and not only did I enjoy working through some of those issues with him, but I was really inspired by his work ethic, thought process and commitment to do right by our membership. Those efforts I will use as motivation to push myself harder.” Fitting with 2020 being a year of twists and turns, the week Toso was installed as CCA president wasn’t a breeze of emotions either. In addition to being installed as president, Toso’s week consisted of honoring his father with a memorial service, giving permission for his youngest daughter to be married, shipping three loads of cattle, hosting a fall branding (where his daughter got engaged) and providing an update on the CCA Fire Subcommittee at the Association’s first-ever virtual convention, all amid a global pandemic. The week’s magnitude demonstrates that balance is an act Toso has practiced long before serving with CCA. Toso says this ability was instilled by his father, Gilbert Toso. Balance is something Toso has had to have from the start of his love for agriculture. Back in the hills of Mariposa County, behind the small, historic gold rush town of Hornitos and off a dirt road stretching for miles, Cotton Creek Ranch is located. Toso has been running cattle, raising a family and managing ranch life on this land for 30 years.


While Toso’s journey with Cotton Creek Ranch started in 1990, he can’t remember when he wasn’t interested in the lifestyle. “Ranching and the cattle business has just always been a part of me,” Toso said. His experience in the livestock world began at a young age. Raising bucket calves and 4-H projects as a kid led Toso to study agriculture in college and to continually expand his knowledge of the industry any way he could. While his parents were not involved in agriculture, his extended family was, and agriculture is part of his heritage. “Because my immediate family was not in ranching, I had to learn from anyone who would teach me,” Toso said. “I studied it in school. I was constantly in auction barns watching, learning, asking questions. When opportunities to work came up, like at the auction barn or on a dairy, I took them and I’d soak it all up.” After working to gain experience through milking and feeding at dairies, learning to be a ring man at an auction yard and even working for a vet without pay for a part of one summer, Toso graduated from California State University, Fresno, with a degree in animal science and agricultural business. “Seems like all I ever wanted to learn about was anything cattle related,” Toso said. “But the real start was when I graduated college and my first job was feeding cattle at Harris Feeding in 1986 with Steve Scribner as my first boss.” As Toso continued to build on his knowledge and experience of the cattle industry, he met his soon-to-be wife, Danette Wilkey, just a few years after graduating. The

couple was married in 1989 and wasted no time in starting their first purebred cattle herd. Not long after getting married and going in the beef business, Cotton Creek Ranch came into Toso’s path with a for sale sign on it. “At that time, I was just 26, and like many 26-year-olds, I was light on cash but could work,” Toso said. “My fatherin-law, Dick Wilkey, had seen the place for sale, and he was a few years from retiring and he had wanted to get a ranch like this for a long time. We were both really interested in being here, and so he and I made an agreement to work toward being 50/50 partners.” From there, “the rest was history,” Toso says. In 1990, he and his wife Danette, along with her parents, moved to Cotton Creek Ranch and began the partnership that continues to grow three decades later. “I’m not telling anyone who is in the cattle business anything new when I say that it’s not easy,” Toso said. “It seems like it is always a work in progress, and I’m sure others feel the same way.” As Toso and Wilkey continue to expand and work together, they have been intentional about their decisions and learning what works best for their cattle operation along the way. The introduction of various breeds of cattle in their herd is one example. From starting with a mix of purebred Brahman and commercial cows to introducing more Angus genetics to recognizing the value of SimAngus bulls in their herd, the two have continually evaluated what works best for the operation. “…as with any investment the cattle have to carry their own weight,” Toso said. “Feed, health program, genetics and more are considered and evaluated, and I also keep records on individual cows so we can have a better handle on culling and selection.” In addition to the cow-calf program, Toso has immersed himself in other sectors of the industry over the years. In conjunction with his friend Craig Uden, Toso feeds cattle each year in Nebraska at Darr Feedlot. This year, the ranch has also started up with stockers again. “Performance, gain, health and overall quality are evaluated on our stocker calves when we go back to restocking for the next year,” Toso said. “But we also look ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

Tony Toso and his ranch partner, as well as father-in-law Dick Wilkey, smile after a successful day at their fall 2020 branding. The pair have been partners of Cotton Creek Ranch together since 1990. January 2021 California Cattleman 13


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

California cattle industry now for over a century with a stellar track record of protecting ranchers and ranching interests, and being their advocate,” Toso said. “We have worked very hard in that role as an organization, and I want to build on that record of strength and leadership that has come before me.” Having led CCA’s Fire Subcommittee during his term as CCA first vice president, fire is one issue Toso has already worked on extensively through his leadership with CCA. After meeting regularly over the past two years, establishing the association’s fire priorities for the 20212022 legislative session ahead of its commencement is a vital result of the subcommittee’s work under Toso in union with CCA staff. “CCA [continues to] put maximum effort into wildfire and also will continue promoting grazing as a means to help in the mitigation of wildfire risk and in fire fuel load reductions,” Toso said. Toso is well-versed in fire policy and the wildfire issues impacting the state, not just through his time as chair of the subcommittee, but through a personal experience of having a wildfire come through Cotton Creek Ranch and reach within feet of his family’s home. From the Detwiler Fire in July 2017, Toso knows firsthand what it feels like to see the smoke grow from afar, move cattle to safety and watch the CAL FIRE crews arrive as flames make their way to the ranch. He also is well aware of the problems that arise for ranchers during wildfires, such as gaining access to roads that lead to livestock. Toso believes that had he not been home when the Detwiler Fire started, it’s unlikely he would have been able to gain access to his property. Anthony Stornetta, San Luis Obispo County rancher and battalion chief for the Santa Barbara County Fire Department will continue the work of the CCA Fire Subcommittee Chair through Toso’s presidency. As Stornetta leads the charge on fire, the subcommittee will

at value versus cost, and there is a difference. The leastcost path is not always the best, especially with genetics, so we look pretty hard at what we are getting for the dollars spent.” Toso says he believes the principles he and his fatherin-law have implemented in the business are vital to the ranch’s continued growth and sustainability. In addition to the strategic program, working as a team to run the ranch has been essential to its longevity as Toso also balances his time as a successful agricultural appraiser. In 2018, Toso was the recipient of the California Chapter of the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers’ prestigious Chapter Service Award. Last year, he was also honored with the California Chapter’s Ag Appraiser of the Year award for 2020. “Being my father-in-law and I are partnered on the ranch, and he is on the ranch every day, he keeps an eye on everything,” Toso said. “When there is more work, branding, shipping, preg checks, we team up and get it done.” In 2009, after years of experience appraising cattle, equipment and eventually real estate, obtaining a general certified appraisal license and earning his Accredited Rural Appraiser designation with the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers, Toso joined another partnership—Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc. Alongside his partners, Randy Edwards and Jeff Lien, Toso is currently chief financial officer for the company made up of agricultural appraisers and brokers. On top of balancing the ranch and a successful appraising career, Toso has made it a point to serve organizations across sectors of the industry from cattle ranching to appraising to all of agriculture through leadership with the California Farm Bureau Federation. It was about 20 years ago, when he got his start serving the cattle industry after he was recruited for the Merced-Mariposa Cattlemen’s Association’s board by Stanislaus County rancher David Medeiros. “I really liked the idea of giving back and working with fellow ranchers to protect the industry,” Toso said. “It’s important for the grassroots to play a role in their future and I saw this as an opportunity to help and be involved with something I really loved doing.” By dedicating his time to the local cattlemen’s association, Toso said he valued the feeling of helping people who shared a common love of the cattle business and recognized how important the leadership is to ranching families. Now serving as CCA President, Toso continues to take on this responsibility as he carries on the legacy of leading the Association, representing all of California’s cattle industry sectors. “CCA has been the workhorse for the Toso with his daughters Alyssa (Toso) Haines and Gianna Toso.

14 California Cattleman January 2021


“I really enjoy the people, the stories, the laughs and the salt of the earth character of people who carry on a tradition or way of life that transcends generations. But the thing that really hits home for me is the family part and seeing other families and their kids being a part of the ranching community.” —Tony Toso

keep striving for improvement on the access issues ranchers face amid fires on their property and grazing lands. The group is also continuing to work on various projects to ensure members have the needed resources to prepare for fire, handle a fire on their property and recover in post-fire situations. In addition to meeting with membership—even in virtual settings if needed—communicating with members and making educational resources available, not only on the subject of fire, is something Toso wants to expand during his presidency. “With the COVID situation, it has become very difficult to get out and interact with our membership, and I want to do our very best to bring our members the information they need to help them be successful,” Toso said. “We will not only use our current media outlets to inform members, but we will also now look at podcasts, social media work, YouTube videos, webinars and the like to get information out to our members regarding cattle industry issues.” While making progress on fire policy and keeping CCA members informed are two of Toso’s priorities for

the term, immediate past president Lacey recognizes other areas of strength the new president brings as well. “Tony is a grassroots producer who is passionate about livestock and beef production, and cares deeply about issues that impact cattle producers,” Lacey said. “As a bonus, Tony brings a wealth of experience from his land appraisal business, which will be an asset to CCA regarding the Governor’s “30 by '30” initiative, as well as potential land use issues related to Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) implementation.” While Toso’s genuine interest and knowledge of the business are critical, his dedication to leadership isn’t all for the love of cattle. “I really enjoy the people, the stories, the laughs and the salt of the earth character of people who carry on a tradition or way of life that transcends generations,” Toso said. “But the thing that really hits home for me is the family part and seeing other families and their kids being a part of the ranching community.” For Toso, the hard work, long days and time spent serving the ranching community is for his wife Danette, daughters Gianna and Alyssa, and the hardworking people in this industry who came before him. “We work very hard at the cattle we produce, but having my kids working alongside of my father-in-law and me is just the best,” Toso said. “To have that pride in your family and what you are producing to help feed people – it just doesn’t get any better than that.” It’s this positive mindset that Toso’s daughter, Alyssa (Toso) Haines knows will serve her dad well as he takes on the golden opportunity to lead as CCA president through 2022. “I think that as president of California Cattlemen’s, my dad will be an exceptional leader because of his passion for the cattle industry and his love for agriculture,” Haines said. “There is a lot to look forward to over nd we cannot wait the next two years, and to see what the future holds for him!”

January 2021 California Cattleman 15


TO KEEP OR TO CULL Changing the Perceived Negative of Culls into a Positive by Bruce Derksen for the California Cattleman Whether producers use a spring or fall calving system, culling of subpar females will always be required. Some experts claim 15 to 30 percent of most cow/ calf operator’s income is realized from the sale of these animals. With the size of these proceeds hanging in the balance, it’s crucial to manage for the highest possible financial rewards. Reasons for Culling Females are culled for a variety of reasons at any time of the year. They could include calendar extremes such as the loss of a calf during birthing to being pronounced ‘open’ by a veterinarian. For many decisions, pregnancy checking day is an excellent time to assess the entire herd and deliberate the fate of individuals. Steve Paisley, Director at the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension Center (SAREC) Research Station, at the University of Wyoming, encourages producers to complete these tests as early as possible, whether the cows are calving in spring or fall. “It’s a good tool to use every year because it provides more flexibility in markets. For fall calving between August and November, testing can be done in early spring, or by 45 days of breeding. That’s a nice marketing window.” Additional motivations to cull include but are not limited to, physical injuries or conformation issues, poor temperament or consistently inferior offspring. The positives achieved from the perceived negatives of culling include higher calf crop percentages in future years and lower health problems. No matter the rationale, when the decisions are made, other choices are waiting. Deciding What to Do with the Culls Just as there are numerous reasons to cull, several options of how to deal with them are available. The simplest is to immediately sell at the local auction 16 California Cattleman January 2021

barn. If direct from pasture, this marketing might be preferred as finishing condition is not yet applied and buyers have feedlots with demand. They could be left in the herd on a maintenance diet while waiting for a higher market price to materialize. “This is a good option especially for older cows,” said Paisley. “Even if we’re not adding much weight gain, hopefully it will take advantage of a little swing in the market price.” It’s especially practical in years when feed or crop residue is abundant. Other options include holding them over to be added to a successive calving season, either spring or fall. “Use caution with this strategy,” says Paisley. “Cows are open for a reason and we don’t want to invest a lot of money in one with other issues. But sometimes they’re open due more to management than genetic problems and if this is suspected with younger animals, moving them from fall calving to a spring calving program might be successful.” Another common strategy is to feed culls in a drylot situation on a high grain ration. CattleFax data suggests approximately 80 percent of the time there is value in such a system. Paisley says focused selection must be employed with this strategy. “Not every open cow is a candidate for term feeding. Again, they come open for a variety of reasons. Make sure to be selective and pick the healthier ones. We can add some quick gain to those animals and improve the meat quality pretty dramatically, and if there’s a way to direct market them to a packing facility, a lot of value can be gathered.” Factors Involved in Making the Choice Choosing an option is based on numerous factors. Cattle markets generally follow a relatively consistent cycle with high and low prices at specific times of year. Other aspects include facility and feed availability, labor


and staffing, interest costs, tax deferrals and calculations of weight increase in relation to carcass grade and yield improvement. “I think options should be examined on an individual basis since every operation has different feed or forage supplies to consider. It’s a balancing act, trying to match the nutrient needs with available resources.” For drylot programs, Paisley says it’s vital to market directly to a packing plant to capture value from additional investments in time, labor and feed. “Drylots work really well but a market must be established before buying into it or you’ll lose out.” When cows are finished and sold live, buyers lean toward the assumption of mature grading and pay accordingly. Culls entering a feeding system and transitioning from a forage-based to a concentrate-based finishing grain diet will need time for their rumen to adapt but can be worked up to an 80 percent grain diet quite easily. “They handle this well. Plus, they’re more efficient especially when thin. We can get some rapid weight gain on them.” Healthy, thin cows will eat from 2.5 to 4 percent of their body weight per day. In 8 to 10 weeks, this translates to gains from 175 to 220 pounds, using an efficiency of 7.5 to 10 pounds of dry matter required per pound of gain. Costs of gain are up to 30 percent higher than feedlot steers. “Data would suggest we don’t want to feed them longer than 80 or 90 days, so we maximize weight gain response. They will gain rapidly but aren’t going to convert well.” Consider Carcass Quality and Implant Use Paisley says when feeding for an 80-day period, carcass value is improved. Dressing percentage alone is increased 2 to 3 percent. Another key component is fat color. “We’re doing a couple of things, adding some fat cover, improving meat quality and color of the lean. We’re also changing the fat color from yellow, due to

the beta-carotene in the grass, to white, on a grain diet.” Most thought processes suggest it takes sixty to seventy days to change fat color. An extra consideration is the use of implants to improve average daily gain, final weights, hot carcass weight, ribeye area and yield grade. There should be some fat cover on these cattle from a harvest standpoint. “When they’re in a cooler, there must be fat color on the carcass, and it needs to be converted to white fat.” He suggests using a 90 or 100-day TBA combination implant to match up well to the animal and the timeline. “Cull cows can be implanted relatively aggressively and respond dramatically to a growth promoting implant. Muscle gain, improved cutability and increased efficiency are achieved.” Overall, the greatest return on investment comes from the improvement of carcass quality no matter the time of year. Young females have a higher potential with less danger of becoming overly fat, consequently they’re usually more profitable to feed than older cows. Price fluctuation and targeted markets will influence justifications and strategies. “Anything to improve the value of the animal is worth looking at,” Paisley said. “Drylot systems work well but markets need to be established before buying into them. The ability to direct market to a packer is critical or value will not be captured. But I think there is certainly merit in doing it. There’s always a premium for cattle with white fat.” The portion of the cow/calf operator’s annual income represented by culled females should not be overlooked. Feeding and marketing options must be considered. Each operation’s situation, calendar year and decision making are different. Factors such as types and ages of animals, what resources are available at what cost, and how they will be sold and harvested sway assessments. With thoughtful planning and management, this revenue can provide a sizeable profit.

January 2021 California Cattleman 17


A Month in the Life of a CCA President

By the time an officer of the California Cattlemen’s Association reaches the position of being elected president, they have often already spent four years on behalf of the association. While it should come as no surprise that CCA officers are cattlemen first and foremost, the amount of time officers spend away from their operations often takes people by surprise. Some people even assume officer roles are paid positions, which is not the case. Officers of CCA are volunteer leaders, nominated and elected by their peers to represent the association on issues impacting cattle producers in every area of an extremely diverse state, both in terms of the cattle industry as well as the population of the state. CCA staff asked Immediate Past CCA President Mark Lacey, of Independence, to recount his final 30 days as president of the association to illustrate for members just what the life of a CCA president might look like. While Lacey is regarded by many as being modest demeanor, he is also known for being very well-versed on the industry. While both are true, this month-long journal is evidence of why people respect his opinions and abilities. CCA is fortunate to always be in the hands of a capable leadership team, but it is important to remember that their first jobs are that of family-oriented, community-centered people with a stake in the success of the beef industry.

Well December was supposed to be my last article, but things are so uneventful that Katie, CCA’s Director of Communication and Stevie, managing editor of the California Cattleman needed some boring filler which happens to be my specialty, so once more into the breach. Katie asked me to provide a journal of my last 30 days as CCA President. This article will be extremely useful if you are having trouble sleeping it’s guaranteed to work better than ambien. While much of my time as CCA officer has been spent on the road, bouncing between industry events both in and out of state, the time of year typically dictates how and where CCA officers are needed. No two weeks are the same. The first day of the final month countdown is really about the daily routine and being on the ranch. I start every morning with feeding the saddle horses and weaned colts. After that, I start making the rounds checking stock water and gates. Because of the below average snowpack, we had to bring our bred heifers and bulls home several months early. Since much of our winter ground is leased from Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) who’s policy is to allow at least 75 percent public access, keeping gates closed is a daily task. This year, because of the pandemic and people being away from their usual routines, we had a huge increase in people using the LADWP land – so consequently, checking gates is a twice-a-day necessity. The rounds take about three hours every day. Sunday, November 1: 1: It happens to be the last day of halter breaking 13 weanling foals. Halter breaking involves a threeday program that I developed in 1994 with the help of my friend Sharon Blanks. That first year she and I had 10 babies all leading and tying by noon the first day. By the third day they had shots, wormer, feet trimmed, freeze brands and were loading in a two-horse trailer. This year went really well. Next, I prepared to start receiving cows from Bridgeport and Mammoth. The Tule elk tear up fences all summer so they need repairs, but it doesn’t make much sense to do repairs much before the cows come home because elk season lasts clear into November, so we make a mad dash doing repairs. During this week I missed checking gates one evening and 40 bred heifers got out and headed south. 18 California Cattleman January 2021

The next morning, I saddled up and rode up to the Manzanar crossing on the Owens River then headed south to Lone Pine. I finally caught up to them and brought them home. This takes up half my day making the 20-plus mile roundtrip of which I had to drive them every step of the way because they liked where they were. Sunday, November 8: 8: We gathered all the bulls in preparation for testing. Monday, November 9: 9: Tom Talbot, DVM, showed up at about 7 a.m. to start trich and semen testing 95 bulls. It was a little chilly and the vaccine wanted to freeze up in the tubing. We finished with bulls turned out and everything was put away by 3 p.m. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 20


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 Tuesday, November 10: 10: At 4:30 p.m. I had a Southern Inyo Healthcare District Board meeting, which happens every second Tuesday. At 7 p.m., I spoke at a young cattlemen’s group via a Zoom meeting. I really enjoyed talking with this group of sharp and ambitious young cattlemen. They had some great questions about job opportunities in the food animal sector and pertinent questions about current issues. Wednesday, November 11: 11: I had a CCA officer call. The discussion was mostly about finalizing how we are going to handle the convention since every attempt at an in-person meeting has been shut down. Thursday, November 12: 12: I attended a Zoom meeting with the Tahoe Cattlemen’s Association set up by Bonnie Anderson and Dan Macon. They did a really great job accomplishing their business even if they did have to do it by Zoom. Good discussion about current issues, and they named California Beef Council Director Bill Dale Cattleman of the Year. Friday, November 13: 13: We started gathering and sorting cows. Sunday, November 15: 15: At 6 a.m we started loading four trucks in Bridgeport. They make two rounds a day. I received them in Independence to get them turned out in the pastures they belong in. Just a few days in, Caltrans shut down the highway because of high winds, so no loads. The next day Caltrans shuts down because of a couple inches of snow. They never used to shut down as much as they have in the last five years. Saturday, November 21: 21: Carolyn, one of our employees, and I gathered the bred heifers off the river. The count is four short. We are still receiving cows, so the remnants will have to wait. Monday, November 23: 23: All the cows are out of Mammoth/ Bridgeport.

Monday, November 30: 30: We vaccinated and wormed all the broodmares and yearling fillies. Wednesday, December 2: 2: I did an up-and-back to Alturas to pick up some young dogs. This is when the context of six years as a CCA officer really hit me. When I started as a CCA second vice president, my young dogs were two and a half years old and my older dogs were seven. I had to bury both my older dogs this fall. The older male “Buster” was a great working dog, but also the family pet. He was the mascot of Molly and Katie’s soccer team. He had his own t-shirt and everything. That was a tough one. Turns out I’m more John Boehner than John Wayne. Thursday, December 3: 3: We conducted the first day of the first ever virtual CCA Convention. Kind of a dubious milestone. There was pretty decent participation even though we couldn’t schedule the second day of December 4 in the evening when more people were able to be at home in front of a computer. Friday, December 5: 5: I start going through the 28 different files that I sort CCA issues into, and start purging outdated information, and deciding what I need to save for Tony. Also, today the packet with funding proposals for the Rustici Rangeland research grants arrive. This year there are 10 proposals, so I have some reading to do. The whole last week I was constantly reflecting on the things the staff and officers were able to accomplish in 2020, and unfortunately all the things we weren’t. The thing that disappointed me the most was not having in-person contact with our members. Our new president, Tony Toso, Toso, and I discussed this several times. Looking forward to 2021, I hope that all the county associations will make every effort to get back in the saddle and schedule in-person meetings, if possible. If we are still locked down, I encourage you to make use of the Zoom technology so at least your officers and board members can share information and ideas with staff and officers. I hope everyone enjoyed the holiday season with family and friends. Good luck in 2021.

Mark Lacey shared some final comments as officers and staff closed out the final day of the virtual convention in early December 2020. 20 California Cattleman January 2021


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January 2021 California Cattleman 21


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER MAKING THE GRADE by Patrick Doyle, Ph.D., College of Agriculture, California State University, Chico Back in 1995, Dr. Bryan Melton proposed that reproduction is 3.24 times more valuable than end product traits for cow-calf producers selling calves at weaning. Each cow must produce enough calves in their lifetime to pay for herself and females that fall out of the herd early. Reproduction is the foundation, but it does not minimize the importance of understanding the growth and carcass potential of your cow herd and calves. Cow-calf producers feed the feedlot and meat packing sectors with high quality calves whose genetics provide the framework to build muscle and end product characteristics such as marbling. Today’s calves must have the growth potential for the feedlot and desirable carcass characteristics to perform on the rail. Let’s take a look at current carcass production and national trends in carcass weights, Yield Grade (YG) and Quality Grade (QG). Carcass weights are on the rise and have been for decades. Steer carcasses have increased nearly 4 pounds per year since 1960 (USDA-Economic Research Service). In the last decade alone, there’s been a 7 percent increase in carcass weight. The 2020 numbers to date suggest the trend continues (CattleFax.com). Desirable individual carcass characteristics such as carcass weight, ribeye area and/or back fat are often identified in today’s USDA certified beef programs. For programs with hot carcass weight requirements, the maximum weight is most often 1050 pounds with very few programs having 1100 pounds and 1150 pounds maximum carcass weights (USDA – Agricultural Marketing Service). These upper limits are reflective of today’s increasing weight trend. Additionally, significant discounts for heavy carcass weight do not occur until carcasses weigh more than 1,000 pounds (USDA

Livestock, Poultry and Grain Market News – National Weekly Direct Slaughter Cattle, Oct 5, 2020). Market signals support an acceptable carcass weight range from 600 to 1,000 pounds, and in some markets, 1,050 pounds. Carcass weight is one component of yield grade along with ribeye area, back fat and kidney-pelvic-heart fat. Yield Grade predicts cutability or the yield of boneless, closely trimmed retail cuts from the chuck, rib, loin and round. Yield grades are reported on a scale from 1 to 5; a Yield Grade 1 carcass is leaner, having higher cutability versus a 5, which is fatter and lower cutability. Since 2014, the number of carcasses grading YG 1 and YG 2 has decreased 2 percent each while the number of YG 3 carcasses has increased by 2.4 percent. Reviewing the National Weekly Direct Slaughter Cattle – Premiums and Discounts Report, YG 1 and 2 received market premiums while YG 4 and 5 were discounted (USDA Livestock, Poultry, and Grain Market News, Oct 5, 2020). The current market favors carcasses grading YG 1, 2 and 3. In the June 2020 California Cattleman, Cattleman, the new California Beef Cattle Improvement Association’s Carcass of Merit criteria were shared. Changes from previous years’ criteria included increasing the carcass weight range (600 to 1000 lbs) and YG (Below 4.0) for Carcass of Merit (COM) and YG (Below 3.0) for Gold Seal designation. The current trends in carcass and yield grade support these changes and better align fair carcass contests with meat industry trends. Far more carcasses are presented for quality grading than yield grading (Speer in BEEF, 4/2019). Quality Grade is a value driver in today's certified beef programs. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

TRENDS IN YIELD GRADE (%)

Source: USDA-Agricultural Marketing Service 22 California Cattleman January 2021


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22

Quality Grade (QG) predicts the eating satisfaction of the product, including tenderness, juiciness and flavor. Marbling and maturity are used to determine QG. Marbling is associated with improved tenderness, juiciness and flavor. Improved QG is associated with increased palatability. From a retail perspective, the most common QG from the most marbling and favored eating characteristics to the least include Prime, Choice and Select. Premiums favor USDA

Source: USDA-Agricultural Marketing Service

Prime. USDA certified beef programs have varied QG requirements, including USDA Select and higher depending on consumer market. Since 2014, the number of carcasses grading Prime and Choice each increased 4.5 percent or more while the number of Select carcasses decreased 9 percent. The 2020 numbers suggest these trends will continue (CattleFax.com). There are many factors behind the trends in YG and QG, including larger carcasses, longer days on feed and improved marbling to name a few. In addition to management practices, genetic improvement in carcass traits is apparent by the many EPD trends found on breed association websites. Genetic trends in marbling have increased over time since the introduction of Marbling EPDs. Similar trends exist for carcass weight and ribeye area. Carcass traits are highly heritable. Simply put, selection for improved carcass characteristics is quite effective through the selection of sires with the desired characteristics. The continued improvement of carcass yield and quality can be made using today’s genetic selection tools such as EPDs, genomics, and selection indices. Matching sire genetics that complement the cow herd will produce a calf that will perform in the feedlot and grade on the rail. Consumers are choosing beef. Let’s keep trending.

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January 2021 California Cattleman 25


VET VIEWS THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED by Kent Fowler, DVM, California Department of Food and Agriculture Veterinary medicine is an exciting and rewarding career to protect the health and well-being of animals, and yet opportunities abound for pathways that diverge from only practicing small or large animal medicine. The divergent pathways are especially inviting to many millennials and Generation Z recent veterinarian graduates who have a different, and perhaps healthier, vision of work-life balance. A more structured work environment with defined days off, time to raise a family and family together-time can be benefits of alternative careers in veterinary medicine. Employment opportunities for veterinarians include regulatory service, military service, teaching and research, public health, aquatic animal medicine, animal welfare, wildlife medicine, private or corporate clinical practice and many others. This vast array of employment pathways also provides managerial and leadership opportunities as well as showcasing communication skills. After graduating from veterinary school, I was fortunate to be hired into a large animal practice on the Central Coast of California—the same practice I had worked various jobs in since a sophomore in high school. My dream came true—a great veterinarian who was my boss and the best clients in the world. I experienced it all—5 percent small ruminants, 10 percent dairy, 30 percent beef cattle and 55 percent equine. After eight years, I became a partner in the practice, and it evolved into more and more equine work. After 27 years in this practice, which was then 10 percent equine, I sold the practice and took one of the divergent pathways into regulatory medicine with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA). Leaving private practice and hundreds of wonderful clients in 2004 was extremely difficult, but I was ready for the challenges presented by the CDFA Animal Health Branch (AHB). My initial position within AHB was in Emergency Programs, and I was tasked with preparedness and response plans for foreign animal diseases (FADs - i.e., foot and mouth disease, anthrax, exotic Newcastle disease, piroplasmosis) and other regulatory diseases (i.e., tuberculosis, brucellosis, West Nile virus, pseudorabies, scrapie). After a year with AHB, I was promoted to AHB Chief and all the administrative

26 California Cattleman January 2021

and leadership challenges associated with that position. I have had the pleasure of serving as AHB Chief for the past 16 years and have officially retired as of the end of 2020. I have been afforded the pleasure of working under the California State Veterinarians, Rich Breitmeyer and then, following his retirement, Annette Jones. Both brought professionalism and dedication to veterinary regulatory medicine, both were great mentors to me, and both are highly respected by other state veterinarians. I have also been blessed with a great staff of veterinarians and other AHB professionals. My “second” career as a regulatory veterinarian has really allowed my 44-year veterinary career to come full circle. Regulatory veterinary medicine has provided challenges in preventing FADs from entering the U.S. and California, success in eradicating FADs as a team, pride in writing laws and regulations to protect the livestock industry and surpassing bureaucratic hurdles to improve livestock traceability. This career path has also provided more family time and pursuit of recreational activities, comprehensive health, dental and vision insurance, excellent retirement and a great team of colleagues to work alongside. Regulatory veterinary medicine may not be for all veterinarians but as the poet Robert Frost wrote in The Road Not Taken, Taken, “I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.”


ANGUS

RANCH

Oregon Division ANGUS BULL SALE & FIELD DAY

K Bar Ranch, 3845 Roberts Mtn. Rd., Myrtle Creek, OR TH

SAT., FEBRUARY 13

EZAR MONUMENTAL 9482

Sire: EXAR Monumental 6056B • Dam’s Sire: Basin Yuma 4286 CED BW WW YW MILK MA RE $M $B $C +11 -1.3 +71 +132 +18 +1.05 +0.73 +46 +169 +265

Featuring 30 Fall-Born, Zoetis HD50K-Tested, Long-Yearling Bulls

9 A.M. – BULLS AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING 12 NOON – COMPLIMENTARY LUNCH SERVED 1 P.M. – COWBOY AUCTION

These bulls pictured at right sell! To preview the entire offering, visit www.EZAngusRanch.com.

EZAR POWER PLAY 9464

Sire: V A R Power Play 7018 • Dam’s Sire: V A R Discovery 2240 CED BW WW YW MILK MA RE $M $B $C +10 -0.1 +65 +122 +30 +0.87 +0.51 +71 +168 +289

BULLS SELL SIRED BY

EXAR Monumental 6056B Basin Payweight Plus 6048 V A R Power Play 7018 SydGen Enhance Basin Empire 7167 EZAR Exceed 7458 Vermilion Spur E143

EZAR BLACK MAGIC 9489

Sire: Byergo Black Magic 3348 • Dams Sire: Basin Payweight 006S CED BW WW YW MILK MA RE $M $B $C +11 +0.3 +66 +120 +27 +0.81 +0.67 +76 +160 +284

FOR A SALE CATALOG, CALL OR TEXT: 916 806-1919 THD ©

ALSO PLAN TO JOIN US AT OUR CALIFORNIA FALL BULL SALE: SAT., SEPT. 4 • FARMINGTON, CA

ANGUS

RANCH

3845 Roberts Mtn. Rd.

Myrtle Creek, OR 97457

Tim & Marilyn Callison .....................Owners Chad Davis ........................... 559 333-0362 Travis Coy ............................ 559 392-8772 Justin Schmidt ..................... 209 585-6533 John Dickinson, Marketing ....916 806-1919 Website .................. www.ezangusranch.com

January 2021 California Cattleman 27


Charolais

“Just Quality”

Bull Sale

February 16 • 1 p.m. • Nyssa, OR 110 total Charolais Bulls including 40 Red-Factor bulls

Watch for pictures of this year’s stout set of bulls coming soon on our facebook page!

64 years of beef industry excellence

28 California Cattleman January 2021


AS YOU CAN SEE, V-A-L BULLS WILL PUT MEAT ON YOUR CALVES AND MORE MONEY IN YOUR POCKET.

We largely attribute the exceptional qualities of our bulls to to the V-A-L functional females that wean off heavy, high-growth calves.

The Grand Ghampion steer from the 2019 Malheur County Fair, sired by V-A-L bulls and raised by Mike Robertson, a 30-year V-A-L customer.

BRINGING YOU QUALITY REGISTERED CHAROLAIS BULLS SINCE 1967.

Sale offering also includes Top Quality Angus and Brangus bulls from Romans Angus & Brangus!

THE GARNER FAMILY

ROMANS ANGUS & BRANGUS (541) 473-3822• (541) 212-1790

VALCHAROLAIS@HOTMAIL.COM (541) 372-5025 • (208) 573-4133 Kendalee: (541) 212-8798 January 2021 California Cattleman 29 True (541) 212-8802


CCA Wishes CDFA Chief Well in Retirement After 15 years of serving as Chief of the California the Animal Health Branch of the California Department Department of Food and Agriculture’s (CDFA) Animal of Food and Agriculture has always been marked by Health Branch, Kent Fowler, DVM closed out the year strong support for our industry and our organization,” 2020 by retiring. Talbot said. “Kent’s knowledge of the industry and Fowler has a long history of contributing to common-sense approach to problems has made him a improving animal health; he received his Doctorate in true asset for all of us.” Veterinary Medicine in 1977 from the University of In addition to a busy work schedule, Fowler has California, Davis. At UC Davis, he was president of the a long history of leadership and dedication to public Rodeo Club and Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity. service. He and his wife, Cindy, have been married 40 After graduation, he practiced large animal years; they have a son and daughter. He also enjoys veterinary medicine, specializing in equines, in Monterey, working on his golf game. San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura counties With Fowler’s departure, Brad Peek, Peek, Co-Owner from 1977 until January 2004 when he sold his practice and general manager of Shasta Livestock Auction, also to explore new career challenges. recognizes the big shoes left to fill at CDFA. In February 2004, Fowler started working with the “I want you to know how much you will be missed,” CDFA/Animal Health Branch Emergency Programs and Peek said on behalf of Shasta Livestock’s staff. “Your up until he retired, had been the Animal Health Branch availability and genuine concern for all segments of this Chief since August 2005. He was a steady leader through great livestock industry will be difficult to replace. Thank numerous disease outbreaks and other challenges. He you for your hard work and friendship through the held leadership roles on national and international animal years.” health committees, organizations and boards and could Talbot echoed Peek’s comments that Fowler will be be counted on to pick up the phone and talk through greatly missed in his longtime role at CDFA as he focuses regulatory and trade issues with a level head and practical on the well-deserved next chapter in life. approach. “It is my pleasure to wish him a long and happy Tom Talbot, DVM, and a past CCA President from retirement with as much time being spent on the golf Bishop holds a strong appreciation for Fowler’s work, course as possible,” Talbot said. as he has been able to be part of his veterinary journey Brief written with significant contributions from CDFA. from chapter one. “Kent and I were roommates in veterinary school and in the many years since that time, we have remained close friends and veterinary colleagues,” Talbot said. “From the time Kent became employed by CDFA many years ago and up until as recently as a few weeks ago, we have worked together on numerous issues that have had significant impacts on the California beef industry and the members of the California Cattlemen’s Association.” Having a long history of working with Fowler, Talbot knows firsthand the experience and value he brought to CDFA and California’s cattle industry During his 16 years as chief of the CDFA’s Animal Health Branch, Kent Fowler, DVM, has been through his years of service. on the forefront of protecting California ranchers and keeping them abreast of issues with the potential to impacting them. “His leadership as Chief of 30 California Cattleman January 2021


January 2021 California Cattleman 31


Big Wins

2020 PROVES SUCCESSFUL AMID UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES

The ongoing support of California’s ranching community is key to CCA’s success. Together we are making a difference. With your help, we secured major victories in 2020, including: Successfully opposed Proposition 15, the largest tax increase in California history. If passed, Proposition 15 would have eliminated critical Proposition 13 protections that help keep our property taxes in check. Secured the commercial production and release of a Foothill Abortion vaccine, a critical achievement for the cattle industry with decades of research, hard work and the investment of millions of dollars. Obtained COVID-19 relief funding to ease the impact of the virus on our businesses. Defeated legislation that would have limited the availability of food byproducts for use in animal feed, killed a proposal to require a consumption-based greenhouse gas inventory only for animal food products with the express goal of "Reducing animal food intake," and defeated legislation that sought to increase regulatory burdens under the California Environmental Quality Act. Worked alongside the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association to ensure that federally, ranchers saw significant reforms in the Endangered Species Act, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and advancements in trade policy like the ratification of the United StatesMexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA). Defeated legislation that attempted to replace beef in school lunches with vegan options Our work is far from complete, and we remain committed to advocating for ranching in Sacramento and Washington, D.C. CCA has already been working tirelessly to lay the groundwork with the Legislature and Administration to ensure that wildfire resilience is top-of-mind as we roll into the 2021-22 Legislative Session. With your help and resilience, we will be laser-focused on achieving major fireforms along with other victories this upcoming year. 32 California Cattleman January 2021


SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, INC. EARLY 2021 EVENT LINEUP... JANUARY 8

SISKIYOU COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S SPECIAL I

JANUARY 15

SISKIYOU COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S SPECIAL II

JANUARY 22 REGULAR SALE

JANUARY 29

BULL SALE WEEK BREEDING STOCK SPECIAL AND REGULAR SALE

THE LOCAL CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATIONS.

For Information, contact Shasta Livestock (530) 347-3793 Visit our website www.shastalivestock.com or follow us on Facebook and Instagram for updates.

3917 Main Street Cottonwood, CA 96022 Ellington Peek, Owner, (530) 347-3793 Brad Peek, General Manager, (916) 802-7335 Davin Lower, Sale Barn Manager, (530) 864-0673 January 2021 California Cattleman 33


CHIMES GETTING TO KNOW THE NEW CALIFORNIA CATTLEWOMEN PRESIDENT by California CattleWomen, Inc., President Julie Barnett Sometimes, you have to wonder about the turns in life that land you where you are at a certain point in time. I grew up in and around King City. Being surrounded by farming and ranching throughout my life led to pursuing my education at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, to study Ag Business Management. It was here that I realized I had more than a passing passion for the livestock industry. Do What You Love My first position after college was in the Central Valley working the agriculture segment in a large loan business lending office focused on dairy and cattle operation loans. While working in this capacity I met my husband, Bill Barnett,, who was beginning his career as a large herd Barnett dairy manager. As my professional friends teased me about him, that he liked cows like I did, I declared that I had made a decision in college after making friends in the dairy industry that I would never marry a dairyman. They work 24-7, 365 days a year. I also learned to never say never. God laughed at my foolishness. Bill Barnett and I have been married for 33 years. We have a daughter, Shannon, who works in marketing in the bovine health industry for Parnell. I am currently employed as Northern California Sales Manager for Virtus Nutrition, LLC, makers of by-pass fatty acid supplements for beef and dairy cattle. I get to work with cattle and cattle producers every day. There is never a bad day at work when you get to walk some cows. Becoming a Cattlewoman Kern County CattleWomen is my original “home� unit, where I joined CattleWomen over 25 years ago. Though I have moved from the area I am forever grateful for the women of that unit that saw something in me that I had yet to see in myself. It shows the power of how a group of women that strive to include friends of the industry can have a big impact on a life and path of another. While in Kern County CattleWomen, I had the honor of serving as scholarship chairman, to learn about fund raising from some 34 California Cattleman January 2021

of the best, serving as vice president and was blessed by being selected as Cattlewoman of the Year in 2015. Since we moved north to Chowchilla, I attend meetings with the Madera County CattleWomen and Fresno-Kings CattleWomen. While serving in CCW state positions I have worked as website chairman (six years) and as second vice president of the association. Goals as CCW President As the incoming president of CCW, I am deeply grateful to the heritage laid down by the founders and past leadership of this organization. There is a strength and tenacity to forge ahead that allowed us to continue to move forward, even as a 100 percent volunteer organization, during this pandemic season. As I write this, we are in the second stay-in-place order here in California, yet we have forged new ground for us and conducted our second online meeting this past December. The gift to the CCW during this season was the time to step back and re-evaluate how we accomplish what we do and to look for ways to improve. We have been expanding our communication tools, getting more resources into the hands of membership and ways to streamline workflows. It has also allowed for us to look at ways to better support those who tirelessly work on behalf of the California ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 36


January 2021 California Cattleman 35


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 34

2021 CCW LEADERSHIP TEAM

CattleWomen as state leaders, unit leaders and chairmen. We have been evaluating how to better transitions between leadership teams and improve the ownership of organizational data by the CCW. Hours of evaluation, learning phone calls and conversations have happened during this time, all focused on bringing long term value to our membership. We would not be able to do any of this without continuing to build on the heritage we have been given. The ability to widen the road for people with varied skills and ways of doing things requires a strong foundation. The strongest value we have as CattleWomen is that we know every member of every age and generation is key to the success of our mission – telling the great news about beef. It Takes a Great Team CCW is blessed to have some incredibly talented and passionate women working for them this coming year. Serving on the executive committee in 2021 are listed to the right. Beef – it is what’s for dinner Throughout the years, my depth of passion for the beef industry and importance has continued to grow. As the world searches for nutritious and sustainable protein for a growing population, sharing the good news about beef has become more important to me than ever. I truly believe that beef is what’s for dinner. I just hope you will serve a great cheese appetizer first, because after all, I am married to a dairyman.

PRESIDENT

Julie Barnett – ccwpresident@cattlewomen.org first vice president

Jeri Roen - ccw1stvice@cattlewomen.org second vice president - promotion

Tara Porterfield – ccwpromo@cattlewomen.org second vice president – media

Tischa Coffman – ccwmedia@cattlewomen.org SECOND VICE PRESIDENT - UNIT INFORMATION

Barbara O’Connell - ccwunitinfo@cattlewomen.org

NORTHERN DIRECTOR

CENTRAL DIRECTOR

SOUTHERN DIRECTOR

Sharon Erickson Doni Rosasco

Christine Snyder TREASURER

Heidy Carver – ccwtreasurer@cattlewomen.org SECRETARY

Paula Francis – ccwsecretary@cattlewomen.org PARLIMENTARIAN

Callie Borror Martinez

CCW, cbc recognize 2020 walt rodman award winners Despite losing the usual fanfare of an in-person convention in 2020, California CattleWomen, Inc., and California Beef Council are still proud of all the beef promotion work that has been done by units over the past year and want to recognize the annual Walt Rodman Award recipients. The Walt Rodman Award is given to units who demonstrate exemptional projects for beef promotion in their local communities. For the 2020 Walt Rodman competition, there were three winners based on unit membership, three runners-up and five honorable mentions. The California Beef Council sponsors the annual competition as a way to honor and highlight the excellent beef promotion work done by California CattleWomen units on a local level throughout the year. Now in its 38th year, the contest is named after one of the CBC’s first Executive Directors and is designed to reward the efforts of CattleWomen to share the beef community’s story in creative and unique ways. First place winners receive $400 from the CBC, runners-up receive $200 and honorable mentions receive $50. Congratulations to this year’s winners!

36 California Cattleman January 2021

WINNERS San Joaquin-Stanislaus CattleWomen (1-49 members) “Beef and Wine Pairing Event” Plumas-Sierra CattleWomen (50-69 members) “Pizza Lunch for Firefighters” Alameda County CattleWomen (70 or more members) “Creative Beef Promotion and Education During a Pandemic” RUNNERS UP Napa-Solano CattleWomen (1-49 members) “Ag Day in the Classroom” Mid-Valley Cowbelles (50-69 members) “Beef For Schools” Tehama County CattleWomen (70 or more members) members) “Western Art Show” HONORABLE MENTION Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento CattleWomen “Super Steer Award” Calaveras-Tuolumne CattleWomen “A Fresh Start With Beef ” Modoc County CattleWomen “Highway 299 Road Sign” San Luis Obispo Cattlewomen “Culinary Arts Program Partnership” Santa Barbara County CattleWomen “Ask the Cow Gal”


WHat is the Baker Angus Advantage?

• Our age-advantaged bulls are available in volume! These bulls out of top sires, listed below, can increase consistency and marketability in your calf crops. • As the second-largest registered Angus cowherd in Oregon calving out 600-plus females a year, you get the Advantage of only the cream-of-the-crop! The top 50% of our bulls have extremely large contemporary groups to increase predictability consistency and quality for our customers from a cowherd that has been around for nearly 40 years.

1275 BENCH ROAD • VALE, OREGON LUNCH 11:30 A.M. • SALE 1 P.M.

Selling 150 bulls

• Ruthless culling for feet and legs, plus structure gives you the Advantage when it comes to bull selection. Our bulls are extremely athletic. They run in big pastures over the summer after weaning. They are developed in extremely large lots that require them to travel up and down hills over rocky, hard ground every day between a high-roughage feed source and water to ensure soundness and longevity.

High-Quality, Uniform, Older, Age-Advantaged Bulls in Volume

• Our intense A.I. program utilizes the most current and sought-after genetics in the Angus breed, with herdsires infused and utilized that rival the most popular

many bulls qualify for the cab targeting the brand program

®

A.I. sires in the breed for genetic value and potency. • Volume and repeat buyer discounts are available; delivery is free.

BID LIVE

• Bulls are backed by a Zoetis HD50K DNA evaluation, complete performance and fertility evaluation, plus an industry best guarantee.

Sons sell

angus sireS G A R Ashland • S S Niagara Z29 • Musgrave 316 Stunner • SydGen Enhance • Werner Flat Top 4136 • G A R Inertia Byergo Boomer 6351 • Ellingson Homegrown 6035 • Basin Bonus 4345 • D R Niagara E437 • Rathbun Double Vision B629 Thomas Game On 21366 • Thomas Prophet 5348 • Kesslers Black Granite 7624 simangus sire J Bar J Nightride 225Z

BY these sires

G A R ASHLAND

MK MA RE 21 1.22 .99

AMERICAN ANGUS PERCENTILE RANKINGS

3

30

3

4

75

3

4

MUSGRAVE 316 STUNNER

SYDGEN ENHANCE

Sire: G A R Early Bird Dam’s Sire: B/R Ambush 28

CED BW WW YW 15 .4 79 137

AUCTIONEER Rick Machado, 805.501.3210

Sire: LD Capitalist 316 Dam’s Sire: MCATL Pure Product 903-55

Sire: SydGen Exceed 3223 Dam’s Sire: SydGen Liberty GA 8627

$W 77

$F $B $C 85 171 280

10

45

5

10

CED 10

BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $F $B $C .2 66 135 27 1.12 .75 68 124 200 335

AMERICAN ANGUS PERCENTILE RANKINGS

25

30

20

5

35

4

20 25

1

1

1

CED BW 7 .2

WW YW 69 120

MK MA RE $W 22 .71 .41 68

$F $B $C 109 157 259

AMERICAN ANGUS PERCENTILE RANKINGS

45 30

Jerry & Judy Baker: 208.739.3449 jbaker@bakerandmurakami.com Samuel Mahler: 208.739.0475 January 2021

15

20

70

25

65 25

10 15

15

SALE MANAGER Matt Macfarlane 916.803.3113

m3cattlemarketing.com

THD

m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com California Cattleman 37©


california Cattlewomen release Ranch-Raised Kids book Seth Joel and Charlie Holland began their discovery of the ranching community in Arizona, and being of urban upbringing they were surprised to find that ranching was still alive and well today. It’s easy for an urban person to think that ranching along with real cowboys somehow only existed in the movies. To Joel and Holland's surprise they discovered there is a rich heritage of ranching and family still thriving in the open lands of the west. They set out to begin learning about this community and way of life they somehow thought only existed in the movies. Thus began the fine art photographic journey into the beauty and story of the ranch raised kids. When they approached the California CattleWomen in 2018 looking for a partner to work with them to tell the California Ranch Raised Kids story, they found a willing partner that saw their vision for telling the story of California ranches and the modern children being raised today learning to care for and preserve the open spaces that make California so productive and beautiful. The partnership into the second of the ranch raised kids series began. California CattleWomen only had a few requests as this journey began – to showcase our wide diversity of the environments in the State of California, and share the things we care about – family, the land and the cattle under our care. The result has exceeded expectations. Through the 100 pages of the California Ranch Raised Kids book, you can see the vast climates, landscapes and iconic images that make California special. From the Sequoias to the Pacific, from the wildness of the north country to the near deserts of the south, California's widely differing terrain and climates make a dramatic backdrop to the faces and stories of the children that call a ranch home. Joel’s stunning photographic attention to detail makes this book a feast for the eyes, and Holland’s ability to pull together the words of the kids are the complete reading and visual package.

HOW THE KIDS SEE THEMSELVES The real stars of the book, are the articulate and thoughtful children that are learning the skills and catching the knowledge of the cattlemen and women around them. They share the good and the not so good realities of ranch life from their young, though wise, perspective. Joel and Holland were able to catch the ranch kids just being who they are through their deep curiosity about people and their story. When you meet them, you have no doubt that they care, with a desire to share the truth accurately and fairly. The ranch kids responded to their desire to learn about their world. The book is full of direct quotes stated by the kids themselves. Not just anyone can get a stoic, serious young cowboy or cowgirl to open up, but by caring about what the kids care about even the toughest will soften and share their thoughts, hopes and dreams.

IT TOOK A LOT OF PEOPLE TO BRING CALIFORNIA RANCH RAISED KIDS TO LIFE As California CattleWomen, Joel and Holland began promoting the book, so many stepped up to support the project to bring the fine art photography and story of a ranch kid to life on the pages. There are not adequate words to thank the generous supporters for this project. First, we would like to thank California Beef Council was instrumental in supporting the vision, and being a key contributor to this project. Their unwavering support of the importance of ranching in the beef story is greatly appreciated. A huge thank you to The California Rangeland Trust, who’s mission is to help ranching operations preserve the ranches and the natural resources on them for future generations. Thank you to California Cattlemen’s Association, for unwavering support of California CattleWomen and our efforts to tell the story of ranching and ranching families, including your support of the California Ranch Raised Kids project. And to the many family ranches, and families who have benefited from ranching, that made contributions to help bring this book to life,your financial support and words of encouragement were invaluable. What you will hold in your hands when you order your copy of California Ranch Raised Kids would not have happened without the expertise of Arizona Litho for their superior printing skills. The big thank you belongs, however, to the kids that shared their story and smiled for the camera. This book is about you, and the hopeful future of ranching, and you told your story extremely well. “We understand how life works. We know how hard it is to create life, and You can order your copy of California Ranch how hard it is to see it go.” Raised Kids at www.cattlewomen.org.

38 California Cattleman January 2021


2020 year-end CCW wrap-up and awards The year of 2020 was definitely challenging, and CCW members are truly grateful for at least getting to meet in March 2020 for their beef promotion meeting. These challenging times for our organization have also been of a great learning time for our members. The times of 2020 has really given the executive officer team a time to look at our traditions, meeting formats and evaluate them. The online platform is here to stay, and when we are able to meet again in person it will be streamed side-by-side the meeting. The annual Powder River Raffle was a great success for the counties and the California CattleWomen. The winner of the Powder River Raffle was Erica Ahmann Smithies of Napa-Solano. The CattleWomen did a great job selling 854 books of tickets for a grand total of $17,660. The ticket sales continue to increase as the fundraiser grows each year. A big thank you goes to Cody Hayes, Matt Johnson and the Powder River team. An extended thank you goes to the following dealers: JSC; Evan’s Feed & Livestock Inc.,: Higby’s Country Feed; Hawes Ranch & Farm Supply, Inc., – Red Bluff; and Conlin Supply. The CCW Board of Directors met via our GoogleMeet platform on Dec. 3. We had approximately 60 members

2020 Ag In The Classroom Contests All Star Reader 2020 1rd place tie - Diane Egan & Jan Luis 2nd place - Edith Solari 1st place - Molly Watkins Special Star Reader Award / The Things We Do Award Jeri Roen Ag In The Classroom-Ag Star 2020 3rd place - Tehama County Cattlewomen 2nd place - San Joaquin/Stanislaus CattleWomen 1st place - Mid Valley CowBelles

Beef Promotion Awards

on the call. All in all the meeting ran fairly smoothly. We also had the honor of having our American National CattleWomen President Evelyn Greene join. She gave a beautiful update on where ANCW is and the direction they are headed. Evelyn also did the officer installation team. We are looking forward to 2021 and the opportunities which it will bring. The state membership contest awards were sponsored by John and Dee Lacey of Lacey Livestock. The contest is based on those membership collected during the fiscal year November 1-October 31. In 2020, we had 30 units in California. However, out of those 30 units, only 23 submitted their membership rosters by the deadline of November 15, making the eligible for the membership contest. The Winners were as follows: 1-50 members – San Diego; percentage of new members 18.7 percent; 51-100 members – Amador/El Dorado/ Sacramento; percentage of new members 22.5 percent; 101-150 members – Kern; percentage of new members 10.79 percent; and 151 members and up San Luis Obispo; percentage of new members 6.07 percent. Other awards given in 2020 are listed on this page.

California Ranch raised kids get your copy

Today!

1st place: Tehama County CattleWomen 2nd place: Mid Valley CowBelles 3rd place: Siskiyou County CattleWomen

2020 Scrapbook Awards Unit Overall Elanco Beef Promotion & ED. Book (under 50 members)

San Joaquin-Stanislaus CattleWomen Unit Overall Elanco Beef Promotion & ED. Book ( 51 to 100 members)

San Diego County CowBelles Unit Overall Elanco Beef Promotion & ED. Book (over 101 members)

1st place - Siskiyou County Cattlewomen 2nd place - San Benito County Cattlewomen 3rd place - San Luis Obispo County Cattlewomen Unit Publicity Tools - Newsletter 1st place - Siskiyou County Cattlewomen

www.cattlewomen.org January 2021 California Cattleman 39


SQUEEZE CHUTES HEAD GATES CATTLE WORKING SYSTEMS CALF EQUIPMENT GATES AND PANELS CATTLE GUARDS & MORE!

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576 Warnerville Rd., Oakdale, CA •(209) 847-8977 • M-F: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sun: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 717 E. Childs Ave. • Merced, CA • (209) 725-1100 • M-F: 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat: 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM •

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40 California Cattleman January 2021

CED

BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

RE

FAT

+1

+4.1

+69

+132

+17

-0.08

+1.09

+0.001

SPENCER CATTLE CO Jerry & Anne Spencer 7879 Van Vleck Rd Rancho Murieta, CA 95683 (916) 275-5422

$B

$C

+112 +196

Contact us about everything from calving ease to carcass bulls


12:30 P.M. MST ~ AT THE RANCH, BRUNEAU, IDAHO

AHA 44122963

C CJC 4264 LAD 0137 ET

CED BW WW YW MM REA MARB CHB

5.8 3.9 69 110 31 0.42 0.51 167

Awesome look and pedigree in this prospect. Dark red color with big red eyes. He is a maternal brother to Belle Heir and with chart topping IMF and CHB values. Genomics say he should be an easier calving sire while still staying in the top 2% of the breed for growth at both weight periods.

AHA 44122903

C 2052 LONG RANGE 0074 ET

C 1311 MR CANADA 9324 ET

7.2 2.4 61 90 38 0.79 -0.01 104

Mr. Canada son out of a full sister to Miles McKee. Maternal brother to Double Your Miles, Special Edition and numerous donors like 6018. Lots of calving ease with as much pigment and maternal excellence as you can build in one.

C BELLE HEIR 0065

CED BW WW YW MM REA MARB CHB

This young sire could prove to be very useful when breeding replacement females this spring. He is out of a first calf heifer that made it straight to the donor pen. Use this one for udder quality and calving ease but also his carcass values and look makes him a big time prospect.

AHA 44122964

C 1311 LONG RANGE 0138 ET

CED BW WW YW MM REA MARB CHB

1.7 2.6 57 95 31 0.65 0.06 118

Here is a polled Long Range son out of Miles McKee’s full sister 1311. If you are looking for an all around sire with tremendous phenotype and look this is a great place to land. His mother is one of the best donors we have produced and her presence in pedigrees is a must. She is close of having one million dollars of progeny sales with numerous daughters being flushed.

AHA 44122948

AHA 44077469

C 1311 4013 INNISFAIL 0121 ET

CED BW WW YW MM REA MARB CHB

-0.6 4.0 68 105 30 0.54 0.42 160

C BAR1 BAILEE VALOR 9354

CED BW WW YW MM REA MARB CHB

-0.6 3.4 66 109 22 0.77 0.14 154

This young herd sire will be found by many top cattlemen this spring. He is a full brother to the lot 11 female from the fall sale that so many were trying to own. Performance and weight with a 160 CHB in the top 1% of the breed but still has the maternal strength.

Exciting young sire with as much look and quality as you can find. He is bred for standout phenotype but has a great EPD profile to go along with it. Huge growth numbers with excellent carcass traits place him in the top 2% for CHB.

AAA 19778381

AAA 19778409

AHA 44122894

9.5 0.3 60 88 36 0.53 0.35 145

4.4 2.6 59 98 32 0.39 0.25 123

This Long Range son blends together everything cattlemen are searching for into one complete package. He comes from one of our most popular donors 2052 and has so many of her qualities that made her a standout. Huge bodied with tons of shape and doability. He truly bridges the gap between good cattle that have calving ease, performance, maternal traits and carcass.

AHA 44077440

CED BW WW YW MM REA MARB CHB

CED BW WW YW MM REA MARB CHB

CCC BANKROLL 0007

BW WW YW SC CEM MILK $W $F $G $B $C

0.2 70 123 .83 12 35 87 94 57 151 277

Big time herd sire prospect that is out of a first calf heifer. He has been a standout in the group because of his extra muscle and rib shape. Balanced EPD profile with enhanced REA and $W values. He has the phenotype of a western ranchers kind with a set of numbers that are hard to find a hole in.

CCC CASINO BOMBER 0043

BW WW YW SC CEM MILK $W $F $G $B $C

1.1 91 145 0.59 8 13 81 92 52 144 249

This Bomber son has a great look with an explosive growth curve that places him among the breeds elite. He is in the top 1% WW and top 2% for YW. His mother has been a top producer posting WWR of 103 and YWR of 106. ~ OFFERING 250 BULLS & 45 FEMALES ~ Horned Hereford | Polled Hereford | Angus

www.hereford.com

Guy, Sherry and Katie Colyer, 208.845.2313 Two-Year-Olds, Senior Yearlings and Yearlings Kyle, 208.250.3924 • GUY cell: 208.599.0340 Sale broadcast email: guy@hereford.com • FAX: 208.845.2314 live on ... January 2021 California Cattleman 41


January 26-30, 2021

Tehama District Fairgrounds • Red Bluff, California Tuesday, January 26 9 a.m.

Sifting & Grading of all Range Ready Calving-Ease and Range Ready Bulls, Don Smith Pavilion

Wednesday, January 27 9 a.m. 12 p.m. 1 p.m.

Sifting & Grading of all Halter Calving-Ease and Halter Bulls, Don Smith Pavilion Trade Showopens - closes at 7 p.m. Working Stock Dogs - All dogs work outside

7:30 a.m. 9 a.m. 11 a.m. 3 p.m. 5:45-7 p.m. 7 p.m.

Geldings shown at halter, in age order, youngest to oldest. Pauline Davis Pavilion Trade Show opens - closes at 7 p.m. Western Video Market Internet Feeder/Female Sale, presented by Boehringer Ingelheim, Don Smith Pavilion Geldings - Calf Branding, presented by Skinner Livestock Transportation, Pauline Davis Pavilion Clinic/Deomonstration, presented by Cinch Jeans, Pauline Davis Pavilion Geldings - Conformation Horse Selected, presented by Triple Ciown Animal Nutrition, Followed by working cows dogs, presented by Merck, Pauline Davis Pavilion

8 a.m.

Geldings - Cutting, Snaffle Bit/Hackamore, Stock Horse and Team Roping contests followed by selection of the Craig Owens Ideal Ranch Horse, Pauline Davis Pavilion Trade Show opens. Closes at 9 p.m. Final working of stock dogs, presented by Loyall - work outside Sale of stock dogs, presented by Loyall, Don Smith Pavilion Doors open for Gelding Sale, Pauline Davis Pavilion Vic Woolery’s Famous Tri-Tip BBQ before & during the gelding sale. $10/person. Pauline Davis Pavilion Youth Activities Fund Raffle, Pauline Davis Pavilion Sale of Quarter Horses and Paint Geldings, presented by Rolling Hills Casino. Pauline Davis Pavilion. Admission is $15/person. Tickets available at door, or call office

Thursday, January 28

Friday, January 29 9 a.m. 1 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 4 p.m. 4 p.m. 5 p.m. 6 p.m.

Saturday, January 30 9 a.m. 9:30 a.m.

Trade Show opens - Closes at 7 p.m. Sale of all bulls, presented by Zoetis, Don Smith Pavilion

for more information, visit www.redbluffbullsale.com

"Where the best in the west meet to compete!" 42 California Cattleman January 2021


2021 Gelding & Stock Dog Consignors Geldings CONSIGNOR(S)........................................... CITY, STATE

PERR BELMONT............................................ WATSONVILLE, CA TOM &CARMEN BUCKINGHAM............................ BRUNEAU, ID BOONE & LORI CARTER......................................... PINGREE, ID PEGGY DAVIS............................................KLAMATH FALLS, OR PEGGY DAVIS............................................KLAMATH FALLS, OR SHARON EDSALL......................................................... AVON, MT RYAN & SAMANTHA GALLAGHER..................... BONANZA, OR CHELSEA HALE................................................WATERFORD, CA MISSY HAMMACK.............................................. CHILOQUIN, OR SHANE HARLEY................................................... BONANZA, OR HAWK RANCH........................................................ CHARLO, MT WES HOULSEY.......................................................... WELCH, OK SEAN HOWARD.................................................... BONANZA, OR BRIAN JACOBS.................................................. HOLLISTER, CA TRAVIS JOHNSON.................................................OAKDALE, CA RICK & JULIE JONES.........................................STEVINSON, CA RANDY LEIGHTON.............................................STEVINSON, CA JD MACHADO.......................................................... GERBER, CA JR MARSHALL....................................................... ATWATER, CA JARROD & KRISTEN MCCLENAHAN...........................GALT, CA NIKKI MILLIN.......................................................... GERLACH, NV RICHARD MONTARBO................................PAYNES CREEK, CA RUBEN MORENO................................................. RIVERSIDE, CA MIKE & PAM RALPH......................................GRANTS PASS, OR KATHY & DINAH SARMAN....................................STANDISH, CA DIANE SCHALBERG.................................................. BISHOP, CA JAIME SILVA........................................................... ATWATER, CA BRYCE SVEDIN..................................................BAKER CITY, OR HENRY & GEORGIA VAN ORNUM................GRANTS PASS, OR

LARRY WOIDA............................................... ROGUE RIVER, OR TIM & ROXANNE WOODS............................ COTTONWOOD, CA JUSTIN WRIGHT....................................................... ORCUTT, CA CRAIG WRIGHT....................................................... ORLAND, CA

Stock Dogs CONSIGNOR(S)........................................................Lot #

DAVID BLEDSOE, CHALLIS, ID.................................................18 BILL BOYD, CHILOQUIN, OR.......................................................3 ROBIN BROWN, INDIAN VALLEY, ID..........................................8 ROCKY BROWN, INDIAN VALLEY, ID.........................................7 JEFF CLAUSEN, MELBA, ID .......................................................9 ALLEN HELMUTH, POWELL BUTTE, OR...................................6 LOREN HOLMES, RED BLUFF, CA.............................................2 BARBARA JACOBS, GALT, CA.................................................16 BRIAN JACOBS, HOLLISTER, CA.............................................15 CLINT JOHNSON, BAKER CITY, OR.........................................17 BRYAN NEUBERT, ALTURAS, CA.............................................12 MANDI POST, WALLOWA, OR...................................................19 SHERI JO PROSE, WILLIAMS, OR............................................ 11 MIKE & PAM RALPH, GRANTS PASS, OR..................................5 TROY SPOON, VALLEY SPRINGS, CA.......................................7 BRYCE SVEDIN, BAKER CITY, OR............................................10 ERIC WANMAN, BUHL, ID..........................................................20 MASON WINEBARGER, PRINEVILLE, OR................................14 DUSTIN & SHANNON WOOD, TEMPLETON, CA........................9 TIM WOODS, COTTONWOOD, CA.............................................13

Celebrating 80 years in 2021! January 2021 California Cattleman 43


2021 Bull Consignors Angus

Charolais

Bar KD Ranch.............................. Culver, OR Bar-N-Bar.......................................Burney, CA Barry Ranch.................................Madras, OR Bianchi Ranches.............................Gilroy, CA Caliber Cattle Co.........................Tulelake, CA Cardey Ranches.......................... Turlock, CA Charron Ranch........................... Paicines, CA Check X Livestock..............Powell Butte, OR Chico State Beef Unit.....................Chico, CA Cooper Cattle..............................Oakdale, CA Diamond S Angus..........................Herald, CA Dixie Valley Ranch...................Montague, CA England Ranch...................Powell Butte, OR Feather River College...................Quincy, CA Flint Hill Corp. ...................Copperopolis, CA HAVE Angus...................................Wilton, CA Hogan Ranch................................ Gerber, CA Little Shasta Ranch.................Montague, CA Madsen Herefords & Angus.. Livermore, CA Morgan Cattle & Hay............... Prineville, OR Oak Ridge Angus......................Calistoga, CA Owings Cattle......................Powell Butte, OR R. Angus Cattle............................Yakima, WA Rafter E Angus, LLC..................... Ronan, MT Rockin RL.................................... Esparto, CA Sammis Ranch............................... Dorris, CA Simmie Ranch....................... Santa Rosa, CA Spencer Cattle Co........ Rancho Murrieta, CA SV Livestock...........................Baker City, OR The Bull Mart.................................. Burns, CA The England Ranch............Powell Butte, OR TJ Stroing Cattle.......................Red Bluff, CA Twin Pine Angus...............................Adin, CA Westwind Ranch Angus............. Oroville, CA Wulff Brothers Livestock........... Cheney, WA Zanolini Cattle Co................. Healdsburg, CA

Reis Livestock.............................. Gridley, CA Cardey Cattle................................Turlock, CA Rafter DN............................. Powell Butte, OR

Hill Ranch............................ Galt, CA CONSIGNOR..................... CITY, STATE Rocking Romans Ranches Charolais.........Harper, OR

Balancer

Louie’s Cattle Service....................Burns, OR

Hereford

Barry Ranch.................................Madras, OR Chandler Hereford’s, Inc........Baker City, OR Dewar Farms......................... Bakersfield, CA Genoa Livestock.......................... Minden, NV High Desert Cattle Co..........Canyon City, OR Hufford’s Herefords.................Fort Rock, OR Kudlac Herefords................ Grants Pass, OR Kudlac Herefords.......................Prineville, Or Lambert Ranch........................... Oroville, CA Macfarlane Livestock..........Cottonwood, CA Madsen Herefords & Angus.. Livermore, CA Morgan Cattle & Hay............... Prineville, OR Morrell Ranches.......................... Willows, CA Rocking K Herefords.....................Salem, OR Sonoma Mtn. Herefords....... Santa Rosa, CA STAM Farming & Consulting..... Oroville, CA The England Ranch............Powell Butte, OR

Maine Anjou

Brocco Show Cattle.................... Sonoma, CA

Polled Hereford

Colbie Delong............................. Corning, CA England Ranch................... Powell Butte, OR Kool Breeze Red Angus................... Adin, CA Owings Cattle...................... Powell Butte, OR

Shorthorn

Cardey Cattle ................................Turlock, CA

SimAngus

Bar-N-Bar Angus............................... Burney, CA Check X Livestock.................. Powell Butte, OR Eberhardt Livestock....................Wheatland CA EV Show Cattle....................................Wilton, CA Hinton Ranch Simmentals.......... Montague, CA Little Shasta Ranch...................... Montague, CA Newton’s Angus........................... Montague, CA Sidbar Cattle.......................................Hardin, MT T&S Livestock.....................................Gerber, CA

Simmental

Hesters Livestock......................................Aurora, OR Hinton Ranch..............................Klamath Falls, OR

Join us Jan. 30!

Barry Ranch.................................Madras, OR Dewar Farms..........................Bakersfield, CA Genoa Livestock...........................Minden, NV Lambert Ranch............................Oroville, CA Macfarlane Livestock.......... Cottonwood, CA Morrell Ranches...........................Willows, CA Rocking K Herefords..................... Salem, OR Sonoma Mtn. Herefords........Santa Rosa, CA Weimer Cattle Co.................... Susanville, CA

Red Angus

Bianchi Ranches.............................Gilroy, CA Chico State Beef Unit.....................Chico, CA

Offering more greats like these past champions!

44 California Cattleman January 2021


s r e h t o r b h s u fl f 2 sets o f f u l B d e R n i l sel

Last year we had the top-selling and second top-selling bulls with flush brothers. We are bringing the same power and kind!

FULL SIBLING ANGUS SONS OF S&R ROUNDTABLE OUT OF THE PAST $12,500 FEATURE & HIGH-SELLER AT ANGUS DAYS!

–EV CATTLE BRINGS 2 FULL BROTHERS – STOUT 3/4 SIMANGUS BANKROLL SONS OUT OF AN ATTRACTIVE, STOUT, GREAT UDDERED DAUGHTER OF PAYS TO BELIEVE!

S&R ROUNDTABLE J328 BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

FAT

REA

$B

$C

4.7

62

104

19

.52

.67

.020

154

238

W/C BANKROLL 811D BW

WW

YW

MK

MB

1.3

78

109

32

.04

FAT

REA

-.113 1.07

Be Part of a Winning team that brings Red Bluff’s best year after year! Jim, Karen & Elizabeth Vietheer: (916) 687-7620 (916) 834-2669 jimvietheer@frontiernet.net

Darrell, Reba & Mac Hansen: (707) 328-9349 darrellhansen1@hotmail.com Mel Hansen: (707) 478-2662

HAVE Angus

www.haveangus.com

Dominant SimAngus | Angus Bulls BROOKS PAY WEIGHT E361

NS

Sold as Lot 1 - the Gold Bullion Production Sale

Stan Sears

5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA. 96064 530-842-3850

3 Sons of WS Top Heavy 1 Son of Broken Bow 6 Sons of Brooks Pay Weight ASA REG # 3290993

SELLING 6 SONS!

CE BW WW +11.8

-0.1

+77.7

YW

Milk

Marb

RE

Fat

+130.0

+18.5

+0.77

+0.54 +0.46

9 SimAngus Bulls & 1 Angus Bull !

ding

Inclu

2 Halter Bulls | 8 Range Bulls

Catalog Ad.indd 1

January 2021 California Cattleman 45PM 12/16/20 4:41


9 OF OUR BEST INCLUDING SONS OF UPS SENSATION 2296 ET WE HAVE CONSISTENLY BROUGHT OUR BEST FOR YEARS AND THIS YEAR IS NO EXCEPTION!

REGISTEREDhorned HORNED HEREFORDS registered herefords REGISTEREDhorned HORNED HEREFORDS registered herefords

Breeding in Breeding with with the the Commercial Commercial Cattleman Cattleman in Mind Mind Breeding with the Commercial Cattlema

Breeding with the Commercial Cattlema

QUALITY, POWER AND PERFORMANCE IN VOLUME! UPS SENSATION 2296 ET

REGISTERED HORNED HEREFORDS REGISTERED HORNED HEREFORDS

Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind

with the Commercial C 4 big stout range bulls going to Red Bluff Bull Breeding Sale 2021 with theHUFFORD CommercialFAC 4 big stout range bulls going to Red Bluff Bull Breeding Sale 2021 FA also selling Private Treaty bulls at the ranch 79337 HUFFORD SOTO LN. • FOR also selling Private Treaty bulls at the ranch 541-576-2431 79337 SOTO •LN. • FOR ijhuffor

3L 3L

3 well-rounded, maternal sons sell!

Barry, Carrie & Bailey Morrell

Barry: (530) 682-5808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 morrellranches@yahoo.com • 5640 County Road 65 • Willows, CA

BIANCHI RANCH BULLS:

7 b RED BLUFF a 4 b KLAMATH FALLS

Top Red Angus a Angus Bulls Backed by Proven Genetics Sell!

Selling Private Treaty Selling Private Treaty HUFFORD FAMILY

HUFFORD 799337 Soto Ln. •FAMILY Fort Rock, Or 799337 Soto Ln. • Fort Rock, Or 541-576-2431 541-576-2431 Ken: 541-403-1044 Jesse: 541-810-2460 HUFFORDKen: FAMILY 541-403-1044 Jesse: 541-810-2460 www.huff ordsherefords.com HUFFORD FAMILY 79337 SOTO LN. www.huff ordsherefords.com ijhuff ord@yahoo.com 79337 SOTO LN. FORT ROCK, OR ijhufford@yahoo.com FORT ROCK, OR 541-576-2431 541-576-2431 KEN 541-403-1044 KEN JESSE541-403-1044 541-810-2460 HUFFORD FAMILY JESSE 541-810-2460 HUFFORD FAMILY 79337 SOTO LN. www.huffordsherefords.com 79337 SOTO LN. www.huffordsherefords.com FORT ROCK, OR ijhufford@yahoo.com FORT ROCK, OR 541-576-2431 ijhufford@yahoo.com

541-576-2431 • ijhuffor

3L 3L

YOUR CONSISTENT RED BLUFF SOURCE 541-576-2431 FOR QUALITY CALVING EASE BULLS! KEN 541-403-1044 KEN 541-403-1044 JESSE 541-810-2460 Featuring sets of brothers to add JESSE 3 541-810-2460 www.huffordsherefords.com www.huffordsherefords.com ijhufford@yahoo.com consistency to your program! ijhufford@yahoo.com

...INCLUDING SONS OF ONE OF THE MOST USED AND PROVEN BULLS IN THE ANGUS BREED, CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE.

RED ANGUS SIRES WCR Power Eye 5041C Silveira’s Red Ruby 9621

ANGUS SIRES

Styles Cash R400 S & R Roundtable J328

CONNEALY BLACK GRANITE

Robert Bianchi 408-804408-804-3133 3133 Chris Bianchi 408-804-3134 Erica Bianchi 408-804-3153 6810 CANADA RD. GILROY, CA 95020 THD ©

BULL NAME

CED

BW

WW

YW

MB

RE

$B

WULFFS BLACK GRANITE 9207 WULFFS BLACK GRANITE 9212 WULFFS ALTITUDE 9214 WULFFS ALTITUDE 9215 WULFFS HERO 9201 WULFFS HERO 9224

9 17 7 9 15 14

1.0 -.5 1.0 .6 -2.4 -3.3

65 59 64 50 38 41

103 100 106 91 77 70

.13 .31 .33 -.19 .32 .52

.30 .47 .50 .71 -.21 .12

89 94 100 89 69 85

Videos of sale bulls will be available at wulffbrotherslivestock.com.

CARL WULFF & FAMILY • CHENEY, WA

Sale Bull Details: www.BianchiRanches.com 46 California Cattleman January 2021

Carl: (509) 559-2216 • carlwulff57@gmail.com Charlie: (509) 995-7555 • Chester: (530) 665-3777

HUFF

79337 HUFF SOTO 541-576-2431 79337 SOTO 541-576-2431


red bluff: the show can go on, albeit different from normal In its 80th year, the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale seems to be starting more like it did in 1941 than anyone may have predicted just one year ago. Known for a plethora of dinners, cocktail parties and gatherings in recent years, this year's event, while still one of the best western traditions around, will come with a little less fanfare in 2021, probably like the first Red Bluff bull sale did all those years ago. Following a whirlwind year of event cancellations, business shutdowns and more, the board of directors of the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale have put in a great deal of effort to ensure the mainstay western event continues. While the event will see some distinct changes at the 80th anniversary event, the board of directors is proud to be hosting the event at a time when many similar events have been disrupted, postponed or cancelled entirely. As a consignment event where cattlemen and women and horse enthusiasts go to sell seedstock and replenish their breeding stock for their ranching operations, Red Bluff is an essential sale event crucial to agriculture in California and beyond. From the week-long event's namesake pastime – the bull sale – to the replacement female sale and one of the best cowdog trial and sale and ranch horse show and sale, the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale is a one-stop shop for any western enthusiast and this year – though different – still hosts the most time-honored parts of the Tehama County tradition. As usual, the event will kick off on a Tuesday with the sifting and grading of consigned range bulls raised by consignors up and down the west coast. Bull sifting of halter bulls will take place on Wednesday as in year's past with stock dogs competing Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and geldings taking the stage all day Thursday and Friday. While the competition and sale events will continue as usual, hosted buyer, consignor and sponsor dinners will not be held as usual due to this year's pandemic restrictions. While the tradeshow will still take place, the art show will not be held in 2021. Similarly, the Saturday night bull riding event will not be held this year as the state does not view spectator events

as "essential" while the livetock sale aspects of the weeklong event are viewed as "essential." BUYER PASS In order to comply with Covid-19 restrictions and regulations, any person 18 years and older that would like to attend any portion of the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale will need to purchase a Buyer Pass. This Buyer Pass must be retained on your person for the duration of the sale week at all times. Buyer Pass will be valid for entrance to our event and all sales for the dates of January 26-30. Children 17 years of age and under do not need to obtain a Buyer Pass. If you have any further questions please feel free to call the Bull Sale Office at (530) 527-2045.

January 2021 California Cattleman 47


Velez Retires from CDFA With 34 Years of Service After working for the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) Animal Health and Food Safety Services Division since 1986, Victor Velez is on to the next adventure in life after retiring from the Department at the end of December. Possessing a master’s in agriculture from California Polytechnic State University, Pomona, strong communication skills in Spanish and English and consistently sound judgment, Velez has been critical to emergency disease eradication, animal identification and traceability, animal movement permitting, data management and Division-wide process improvement. Former California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) President and current California Cattle Council Chairman Dave Daley knows firsthand what Velez has provided to the industry through his years of service. “Victor Velez has been a selfless, dedicated representative for CDFA for many, many years,” Daley said. “I have had the opportunity to work with him on many issues that have impacted the livestock community in California. Most importantly, we worked closely on the changing world of traceability and animal identification. The challenge was to develop a practical program that worked for ranchers while helping protect the health of our cattle from foreign animal diseases.” Velez’s time on his family cattle ranch in Colombia has translated to true belief in California farmers and ranchers and a “service” attitude. He builds collaboration through patience and inclusiveness. Most recently, he served as the Animal Health and Food Safety Information and Technology Manager, leading development of numerous technology projects. Velez has also held national leadership with the National Institute for Animal Agriculture and the U.S. Animal Health Association. Additionally, he served as an assistant for both CDFA Secretaries Lyon and Kamawura, dealing with Mexican and Canadian affairs. “Victor was innovative, sincere and cared deeply to do the ‘right thing’ for livestock producers,” Daley said. “His service to the cattle community will be missed.” While Velez has had an accomplished career, he is most proud of his wife Jeannette, their children and the family’s continuing community contributions. CCA staff and leadership extend their gratitude to Velez for his years of dedication to serving California agriculture. 48 California Cattleman January 2021

Simmentals

SIM GENETICS DESIGNED FOR PROFIT

9 BULLS CONSIGNED TO RED BLUFF SIMANGUS & PUREBRED BULLS

FULL BROTHER SELLS IN RED BLUFF JAN. 30!

ALSO JOIN US

FEB. 20, 2021 .

FOR OUR SPRING PRODUCTION SALE! online from the convenience of your home

WWW.HINTONRANCH.COM | (541) 892-4264

MACFARLANE LIVESTOCK Selling 5 Rugged individuals by UPS Sensation 2296 ET — LOADED WITH POWER, MUSCLE AND LOOK — From the same program that brought you the 2020 Champion Polled Hereford!

5 Sons Sell!

UPS SENSATION 2296 ET

2020 CHAMPION POLLED HEREFORD B.J. & Melissa Macfarlane, 530-518-1024 | Bob Macfarlane, 530-355-8340 19760 Amen Lane Cottonwood, CA 96022


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January 2021 California Cattleman 49


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Wildland fire damage? Scales NW is proud to serve: California Idaho Montana Nevada Oregon Utah Washington

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50 California Cattleman January 2021

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FreitasRangelandImprovements.com 1/11/2018 1:35:26 PM

(925) 580-6415


T he

Cowman’s Kind

Bul l Sale

Bar 6 Charolais

FEBRUARY 26

2021 1:00 PM

Green Spot Arena Madras Oregon

Lunch at 12 pm

Video catalog and Online bidding available at:

Bull Preview at 8am Jim Anspach 541-325-3251

Actual Bar Six Carcass Data Purebred Heifers Harvested At AB Foods 25 harvested on August 3, 2018

Visit our Facebook

“Cowman’s Kind Bull Sale” for Sale updates

Days on Finish Ration 127

Choice Plus & Prime 100%

Average Live Weight 1266 lbs.

Average Hot Carcass 801 lbs.

Average Hot Yield 63.3%

Outs none

Days on Finish Ration 140

Choice Plus & Prime 100%

Average Live Weight 1499 lbs.

Average Hot Carcass 949 lbs.

Average Hot Yield 63.3%

Outs none

Days on Finish Ration 145

Choice Plus & Prime 96%

Average Live Weight 1356 lbs.

Average Hot Carcass 881 lbs.

Average Hot Yield 65.02%

Outs none

7 harvested on August 10, 2020

25 harvested on October 23, 2020

January 2021 California Cattleman 51


NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE

METHANE: A BLACK EYE FOR THE CATTLE INDUSTRY? OR NOT ? by Ashley Lyon McDonald, NCBA Senior Director of Sustainability Methane is often cited for why beef is a major contributor to global warming. However, a new (and more accurate) assessment of the effect of methane shows that when the short atmospheric life of methane is accounted for, the U.S. cattle industry may NOT be contributing much at all to global warming. Why is that important? If you read the anti-beef reports related to climate change, the argument against beef is focused on the high amount of methane produced by cattle through the ruminant digestive process. Methane is viewed as a powerful greenhouse gas that has 25 to 35 times the warming impact of CO2, but when that impact naturally goes away because methane is broken down in the atmosphere the picture of beef ’s impact on global warming is significantly changed. Armed with this new methodology, the U.S. cattle industry may be able to show it makes minimal contributions to global warming, and in the future, may even suggest cattle production is helping to “cool” the effects of other industries, such as transportation and electricity generation. A recent report written by Jason Sawyer, Ph.D., at King Ranch® Institute for Ranch Management and commissioned by NCBA to apply the new calculation (called Global Warming Potential Star, or GWP*) to the U.S. cattle herd shows promising evidence that our industry’s improvements over the last few decades has us hovering around zero warming equivalents from methane contributions. GWP* accounts for methane’s meager 10 to 12 year lifespan in the atmosphere, instead of accounting for methane emissions accumulating indefinitely over time. CO2 emitted by burning fossil fuels can take 1,000 years to break down in the atmosphere. This discrepancy is finally being addressed through GWP*. In fact, using the new calculation, U.S. cattle move from contributing 2 percent of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions to being responsible for only 0.4 percent. GWP* was first reported by the Climate Dynamics research team at the University of Oxford in 2018 and has been gaining acceptance in the scientific community as a more accurate accounting for methane’s effects on warming. In its previous reports, the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) acknowledged the shortcomings of current methods of reporting methane impacts, and may recommend a change to GWP* in their next report, which sets the standard for global emissions reporting.

52 California Cattleman January 2021

Many reports have relied on the old calculation, resulting in some organizations publishing articles advocating for plant-based diets. These results may change, however, when GWP* is adopted more broadly. By identifying better science, NCBA is better positioned to push back on organizations who are not accurately portraying the U.S. cattle industry. It also allows us to build the case that the cattle industry may actually be off-setting the warming effect of other industries. With these insights, cattle producers may be able to find ways to lead in reducing the atmospheric burden of CO2, and be a part of the solution by helping reduce the intensity of climate change. Instead of vilifying the industry, those truly interested in comprehensive and sensible approaches to mitigation should become the cattle industry’s strongest supporters. Is the U.S. cattle industry climate neutral, or even climate positive? When you look at the soil and grasslands maintained by the cattle industry, it is certainly a strong possibility. If the industry continues its tradition of reducing emissions per unit of beef delivered to consumers (through nutrition, technologies, and genetics) while also continuing to be stewards of the land by continuously improving grazing lands to stimulate plant and root growth (pulling down more CO2 from the atmosphere), then climate positive beef is very possible. It’s time the industry stops ducking the issue of greenhouse gas emissions and takes the bull by the horns. If the world wants to address global warming (along with many other related issues like catastrophic wildfires), cattle are not only a part of the equation, but are the best solution.


TUESDAY,

FEB. 9, 2021 12:00 NOON AT THE RANCH 27262 424th Avenue Emery, South Dakota

W/C Bankroll 811D

QUALITY

Selling 65 Direct Progeny of this Dominant Sire!

IN VOLUME LIKE NEVER BEFORE!

SELLING 360 HEAD! SIMMENTAL, SIMANGUSâ„¢ & ANGUS

200 PERFORMANCE BULLS 150 YEARLING BULLS 50 STRONG AGED BULLS 160 REGISTERED BRED HEIFERS SEMEN & EMBRYOS

W/C Doctors Orders 665F

Selling 10 Sons and 30 Bred Heifers carrying his service!

W/C Fort Knox 609F

Selling 10 Sons and 5 Full Brothers to this past high seller!

OFFICE 605-825-4024 DALE 605-661-3625 SCOTT 605-682-9610 JARED 605-933-1661 27262 424th Avenue, Emery, SD www.werningcattle.com Eberspacher Enterprises Inc.

Mr. SR Right Now

Selling 15 Sons and 30 Bred Heifers Carrying His Service!

Remington Lock N Load Selling 30 Direct Progeny of this Popular and Proven Sire

Val & Lori Eberspacher 507-532-6694 Val Eberspacher Cell 612-805-7405 Email: sales@ebersale.com Like us on Facebook for all sale updates! 2904 County Road 6, Marshall, MN 56258

www.ebersale.com

January 2021 California Cattleman 53


Deserving Scholars Rewarded This year's CCA scholarship finalists, came from a large pool of impressive applicants from California with unique beef industry interests and experience. In total, nearly $50,000 was contributed, making it the biggest scholarship year yet for CCA’s affiliate groups. The groups represented on the scholarship panel include: Allflex, USA; the Ken Carr Memorial Scholarship (CCA Allied Industry Council); the CCA Feeder Council; the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA), representing the Hank Stone Memorial Scholarship; the Livestock Memorial Research Fund (LMRF); and a representative for the Tom Grimmius Memorial Scholarship, in memory of legendary cattle feeder Tom Grimmius..

Maggie Creamer

University of California, Davis Doctorate Student in Animal Behavior $5,000 Livestock Memorial Research Fund

Orlando Ochoa

Michigan State University Veterinary Student $5,000 Livestock Memorial Research Fund

Emily Violini

Washington State University Veterinary Student $5,000 Livestock Memorial Research Fund

Megan Banworth

Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Master's in Agriculture $2,500 Hank Stone Memorial/CBCIA

Macy Perry

Samantha Werth

Jessie Smith

Elizabeth Ross

University of California, Davis University of Oklahoma Animal Biology Graduate Student Law Student $5,000 $5,000 Livestock Memorial Research Fund Livestock Memorial Research Fund

University of California, Davis Animal Biology Graduate Student $5,000 Livestock Memorial Research Fund

Oklahoma State University Food Science $1,500 Tom Grimmius Memorial

54 California Cattleman January 2021

To qualify for a scholarship, students must be members of CCA’s Young Cattlemen’s Committee and have either graduated from a California high school or be currently attending a California college or university, majoring in a beef industry-related field. This year, not only were the candidate’s applications impressive, but the group also represented both in-state and out-of-state students ranging from the community college level to veterinary and graduate school students. Recipients of the 2020-21 CCA scholarships are pictured here. To learn more about how to apply for a CCA scholarship, call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

Allie Carmickle

University of California, Davis Animal Biology Graduate Student $2,500 Hank Stone Memorial /CBCIA

Grace Guthrie

Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Agribusiness $1,500 Tom Grimmius Memorial

Serena Schontanus Kansas State University Animal Science $1,500 Tom Grimmius Memorial


2020-2021 SCHOLARSHIPS PRESENTED BY...

the family of the late tom grimmius

Feeder Council

Kyle Prock

Claire Stevenson

California State University, Fresno Animal Science $1,000 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Microbiology $1,000 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Gloria Becerra-Cortes

Ashley Porter

University of California, Davis Animal Biology $1,000 Ken Carr Memorial/Allied Industry

Meredith Harrison

University of California, Davis Beef Cattle Systems $1,000 Ken Carr Memorial/Allied Industry

Purdue University Agricultural Economics $1,000 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Bailey Morrell

Colorado State University Ag Education & Political Science $1,000 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

LMRF Shayna Allison

Kansas State University Masters in Agribusiness/Animal Health $1,000 Ken Carr Memorial/Allied Industry

Selby Boerman

University of Nebraska, Lincoln Animal Science & Extension Education $1,000 Allied Industry Council

Madison Kindberg

University of California, Davis Animal Science $750 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Colby Perry

Oklahoma State University Animal Science $1,000 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Sarah Klopatek

University of California, Davis Doctorate in Beef Systems $1,000 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

Rachael Koon

University of California, Davis Doctorate in Animal Biology $750 Allflex, USA/Feeder Council

January 2021 California Cattleman 55


NOW WHAT?

A look at potential tax law changes after election by Michael J. McCormack, estate & business succession planning specialist, Lincoln Agribusiness Services

Many clients have asked me “Now What”? The 2020 election is finally over. It is time to consider potential key tax law changes that may affect you in 2021 and beyond. Given the election results, many tax and fiscal issues remain uncertain. No doubt, the ultimate make-up of the tax laws will depend on the direction taken by our nation’s leadership (including President-Elect Biden and Congress), either by their ability or inability to agree on tax and fiscal legislation. POST-ELECTION UNCERTAINTY REMAINS

in 2021. Ultimately, if the Senate remains in Republican control, most of the existing tax laws may remain in effect at least until the 2022 elections. If the Senate comes under Democratic control in 2021, one should expect income and estate tax law changes to be enacted Assuming there will be tax law changes, will they be “permanent”? The democratic process in the U.S. is ever changing. Given this dynamic, even if income tax rates increase and the estate tax reverts to a lower exemption amount (as called for by President-Elect Biden), the democratic process may cause a return of higher (or lower) income tax rates and estate tax exemptions at just about any time in the future. One only needs to recall 2010, when the estate tax was repealed for one year, as evidence of tax law “permanency.”

With a new President and Congress coming in 2021, there are many variables and hurdles to overcome regarding any legislation (including tax legislation). As it stands currently, nothing has changed regarding income, estate, gift, generation-skipping transfer, payroll, etc., taxes. CONSIDERATIONS GIVEN THE POST-ELECTION When debating budgetary issues, Congress must address UNCERTAINTY projected deficits, anticipated increases in infrastructure The chart below includes various tax proposals as set spending, projected increases in defense spending, forth in President-Elect Biden’s campaign. proposed tax increases, funding Social Security and social If you believe President-Elect Biden’s income and/or security and disability insurance, funding Medicare, etc. estate tax campaign proposals will become law in 2021, With respect to income and estate tax changes, there you might consider the following actions. are several obstacles to overcome. While there may be a focus on potentially raising income and estate taxes, 1. Accelerate income recognition to taxable year 2020, there is not currently a clear path to higher federal taxes. where income tax rates may be lower if income tax For example, it remains unclear whether there will be a legislation increase income tax rates. Republican or Democratic Senate majority in 2021, given a. Consider year-end bonuses. a couple expected election runoffs in early January 2021. Thus, if the Senate control is not decided until after 2020, ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 58 year-end tax planning will be difficult because of the uncertainty of the Senate majority POTENTIAL TAX CHANGES

56 California Cattleman January 2021

Income tax rates

Generally higher for income in excess of $400.000

Payroll taxes

FICA tax imposed for earned and self-employment income in excess of $400,000

Capital gains and qualified dividend income

Apply ordinary income tax rates for income above $1 million

Qualified Business Income deduction

Repeal

C corporation income taxes

Increase tax rate from 21% to 28%, and provide a “minimum” tax on book profits above $100 million

Overhaul tax deductions for qualified plans

Provide a flat credit, instead of a deduction, for each dollar saved

Itemized deductions

Caps benefit for such deductions at 28%

Estate taxes

Revert to lower exemptions under previous law that existed prior to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, and possibly an increased tax rate


Kessler Angus 2020 Bull Sale Tuesday, February 16, 2021 At the ranch in Umapine, Oregon

130 Bulls Sell!

KESSLERS 38 SPECIAL H199

FALL & SPRING YEARLINGS

Reg #: 19719022 Sire: Baldridge 38 Special • Dam: Kesslers Rainbow 0595 BW WW YW CW MB RE $W $M -0.3 79 135 53 0.70 0.67 88 59

KESSLERS TAHOE H047

Reg #: 19845315 Sire: Tehama Tahoe • MGS: Black Granite BW WW YW CW MB RE $W $M 2.4 77 127 46 0.46 0.53 90 79

Lot 1

KESSLERS RAINBOW 0595

Reg #: 1672263 8 • Dam of ABS sire Kesslers Commodore 6516 CED BW WW YW 12 -0.2 57 108

CW MB RE 52 0.52 0.52

$B 141

$C 235

ALSO OFFERING THE FIRST EVER PICK OF OUR REPLACEMENT HEIFER CALVES!

There has never been an opportunity to pick out of the top end of our females. ET daughters of 0595 by Baldridge 38 Special, are included in the pick.

KESSLERS COMMODORE H083

Reg #: 19845308 Sire: Kesslers Commodore • Dam: S Whitlock BW WW YW CW MB RE $W $M 0.5 90 165 80 0.29 0.78 91 76

RANDY KESSLER (509) 520-3281 REK52@LIVE.COM

Request catalogs & more information at KESSLERANGUS.COM TIERRA KESSLER (509) 876-0884 TIERRA@KESSLERANGUS.COM

49838 FRUITVALE ROAD | MILTON-FREEWATER, OR 97862 | KESSLERANGUS.COM January 2021 California Cattleman 57


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 56

GIVEN THE ABOVE POST-ELECTION UNCERTAINTY, FLEXIBILITY IN PLANNING IS CRITICAL

b. For cash basis professionals, send year-end payment of expenses on or before December 31. c. For those contemplating a Roth conversion, 2020 rates could be lower. d. Maximize retirement contributions (e.g., 401(k) and deductible IRAs). 2. Assuming itemized deductions are otherwise allowable, accelerate income tax deductions to 2020, because income tax deductions may be limited under new legislation. Some items to consider include: a. Itemized deductions (e.g., mortgage interest, state income and property taxes, charitable contributions, etc.). b. Maximize (where appropriate) the use of expensing depreciable property under IRC section 179 (for acquisition of depreciable property in excess of the IRC section 179 deduction). 3. Utilizing tax loss harvesting in 2020 as you would in other taxable years. 4. With respect to estate planning in 2020, utilize gifts of the current $11.58 million (per person) exemption, valuation discounts, non-reciprocal spousal lifetime access trusts and other estate and gift tax reducing strategies.

2021 BULL SALE February 19

since 1984

“The best Value Angus, Balancer and SimAngus Genetics for Western Cowherds” Multiple generations of proven bulls and current sires including:

ANGUS

Tehama Tahoe • Werner Flat Top KM Broken Bow • Baldridge Bronc

BALANCER

Optimizer 148A24

Taken together, the issues raised earlier generally point to at least one absolute. That is, financial, business and estate planning will require constant monitoring and updating. You should always plan for contingencies with respect to tax planning. There may be (1) higher or lower federal income taxes, (2) modification or elimination of the Affordable Care Act Net Investment Income taxes, (3) modification of transfer taxes (e.g., estate, gift and generation-skipping taxes) and/or (4) unanticipated changes, etc. While tax rates are likely to change, income and/or deductions may be limited or excluded under new legislation. Given the potential changes over the short- and long-terms, traditional financial, estate and tax planning may become a year-round endeavor focusing on flexibility and multiple year planning. It is tempting to defer financial, estate and tax planning while waiting for President-Elect Biden and Congress to act; such a strategy is not recommended. Rather, you should continue your financial, estate and tax planning. A major focus of such planning, however, should be on the flexibility of the plan given the potential tax legislation. Finally, you and your advisors should consider all facts and circumstances regarding any course of action. In other words, relying solely on a projected tax outcome does not generally result in the optimal financial outcome.

SIMMENTAL

CCR Boulder 1339A

58 California Cattleman January 2021

Buttercreek Ranch Headquarters Lunch at 11:00 am Sale begins 1:00 pm

Best Value

BULLS

pricecattlecompany.com in the West Tom Price 541.969.8970 John Kerns 541.519.0422 Jason Larsen 435.616.1562 70066 Butter Creek Rd. • Echo, OR


January 2021 California Cattleman 59


MATCH MAKING Ranchers and landowners work together to reduce fire threat under new extension program by Stephanie Larson, Ph.D., UC Cooperative Extension Livestock & Range Management Advisor, Sonoma and Marin Counties

According to Marshall Turbeville, CAL FIRE Battalion Chief, “Areas that have been grazed, have reduced the spread of dangerous and costly fires. I’ve noticed on several fires, including extreme fires, the fire stopped in areas that were grazed. The one consistent variable, the one difference, was grazing.” University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE) Sonoma recently launched “Match.Graze,” https://matchgraze.com/, an online database that connects landowners who don’t have grazing animals to livestock owners with animals that can provide vegetation management services. With Match.Graze, UCCE aims to support the expanded use of grazing in California to achieve collective fuels reduction goals by providing a service that connects land owners with no grazing animals with ranchers that have grazing animals.

fire fuel loads, improving soil health, reducing weeds and/or enhancing desired species. For example, well managed grazing has the potential to be an ecologically and economically sustainable management tool for reduction of fire fuels. Existing data indicate there are two ways by which grazing impacts the fuel load: removal of vegetation and hoof incorporation of fine fuels (Nader, et. al., 2007). Fuel management studies have shown that spread rate and flame length decrease as dry grass fuel loads decrease (Scott and Burgan 2005). Grazing can also be more costly than alternative methods; however, depending on the site characteristics and landowner goals, it is often a good choice.

WHAT IS MATCH.GRAZE? From small semi-rural communities to large open spaces, grazing can provide an affordable solution to the inevitable accumulation of fire fuels. Grazing can be more cost effective for reducing fuels on landscapes that are too steep, rocky or remote for mowing or chemical treatment, or in the wildlandurban interface where burning is not an option. Every property is different and requires thoughtful consideration of how it should best be grazed. Cattle, sheep, goats and other grazing animals all have different roles to play in grazing for fire fuel reduction.

WHICH IS THE RIGHT GRAZING ANIMAL? Different species of grazing animals have different forage preferences. Cattle mainly prefer grass but do consume some forbs and browse (woody species, such as brush). Goats prefer woody species and grass but will also select forbs. Sheep generally consume mostly grass and forbs and express a lower preference for woody plants. These are general statements and just because a particular grazing animal prefers and consumes a particular plant at one site, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it will react in a similar way when grazing in another plant community. Still, generalities can provide a starting point for developing a prescription for grazing. Deciding on the appropriate species requires consideration of the type of terrain and vegetation you want to manage – this is something UCCE can help you figure out!

WHY GRAZING? Grazing is an ecologically sound and effective way to reduce fine fire fuels, and in some situations, can be more cost-effective than alternative methods. Grazing is a tool that uses domesticated animals to manage vegetation for a desired result. Other vegetation management tools include prescribed fire, mowing or herbicide treatments. In order to determine the appropriate tool for a specific parcel, one must consider a variety of factors, including: terrain, vegetation type, infrastructure, treatment area size and cost. If a landowner decides that his/her property is suitable for grazing, that landowner then needs to establish vegetation management goals. Well defined goals are important to ensuring successful grazing management is applied. Goals can include reducing

WHO IS THE APPROPRIATE GRAZER FOR YOUR PROPERTY? There’s no one grazing strategy; every property is different and requires thoughtful consideration of how it should best be grazed. Site characteristics and landowner goals should form the basis for determining the optimal grazing system. In order to clarify the variable styles and scales of different grazing management systems, I developed a theoretical framework for thinking about grazing in terms of three tiers. Smaller property owners, in a similar geographic area or neighborhood, can work together as a community, grazing animals from property to property. These are referred to as “Tier 1 grazers." Larger parcels, not necessarily connected, both privately and publicly owned, can

60 California Cattleman January 2021


be grazed by contract grazers, referred to as “Tier 2 grazers.” Finally, properties owners that want to receive money for animals grazing their land, can lease out their property to grazers referred to as “Tier 3 grazers.” California cattlemen can fit into all three tiers, increasing opportunities for beef producers to graze more lands to reduce fire fuels while providing more forage for their cattle. TIER 1: COMMUNITY / NEIGHBORHOOD GRAZING Community grazing involves small-scale livestock grazers using their animals to graze a community of smallscale property owners. These property owners range from a quarter of an acre to several acres; animals graze one parcel then are moved to a neighboring parcel. Having a grazing operation in the community increases community safety by grazing to reduce fire fuels on multiple properties. Community grazing: • Provides internships to young, local people interested in contract grazing or meat/wool business; and • Lowers carbon footprints by way of eliminating the need to transport animal’s long distances via truck and trailer, and reducing the use of petrochemicals and synthetic herbicides. TIER 2: CONTRACT / TARGETED GRAZING Contract or targeted grazing is the application of a specific kind of livestock at a determined season, duration and intensity to accomplish defined vegetation or landscape goals. The major difference between targeted grazing and

traditional grazing management is that targeted grazing refocuses outputs of grazing from livestock production to vegetation and landscape enhancement. In the case of contract/targeted grazing, the landowner must have a clear vision of their desired goals regarding plant community and landscape, and the livestock grazer must have the skill to graze the livestock in a way that accomplishes those goals. Contract/target grazing contractors often provide all necessary infrastructure (fencing, livestock water, predator protection, etc.); however, there are a variety of factors that impact the cost of a particular targeted grazing project. These include: • Relative ease (or difficulty) of setting up infrastructure, including loading and unloading facilities; • Projects in steep or difficult-to-access terrain require more labor and are therefore typically costlier; • Access to livestock water; livestock grazers may need to haul water to the livestock; • Risks, like vandalism, toxic plants, or proximity to highvalue landscaping may increase the cost; and • Headache factors – like free-roaming pet dogs or neighbors who object to livestock or livestock guardian dogs – can increase the cost of a project. TIER 3: TRADITIONAL GRAZING: LAND LEASED ON AN ANNUAL OR LONG-TERM BASIS Traditional grazers are livestock producers that own cattle, sheep and/or goats that are managed year round on owned and/or rented properties – these grazers are interested in fulfilling their production goals. If they do not own grazing land, these livestock producers need to rent land for their animals to graze on. If a property is suitable for seasonal or continuous grazing, but the landowner lacks knowledge or desire to manage a grazing operation, leasing the land to a traditional grazer can be a good option. Rental fees are usually based on an animal or acre basis. Traditional grazers have the ability to haul their animals in and out of the leased property. If a property lacks infrastructure, a property owner and grazer can work together to install the necessary infrastructure to allow for grazing. These types of arrangements are best achieved by establishing a long-term lease and/or agreement – ensuring that both party’s needs and expectations are defined. Leasing lands for grazing can result in: • A more cost-effective alternative for reducing fine and ladder fuels over large and rugged landscapes that may be inaccessible for equipment or hand crews; and • Income received from the grazing lease. CONNECT WITH YOUR MATCH If you want to list your property for grazing or be a grazer, go to https://matchgraze.com/ and start matching. This project was funded by CAL FIRE and Rebuild Northbay Foundation. For more information on Match.Graze, call the UCCE office at 707-565-2621.

January 2021 California Cattleman 61


SECRETARY PERDUE APPLAUDS USDA’S 2020 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Prior to Christmas 2020, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue applauded the accomplishments made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) over the past year. “While this was a tough year with the coronavirus, historic wildfires, and weather damage, USDA met these challenges with a multitude of programs and services to support Americans and keep our agricultural sector running and responsive to the country’s needs,” said Secretary Perdue. “We salute our mission areas and agencies for keeping our customers front and center, serving the American people, farmers, ranchers, foresters and producers.” Farmers to Families Food Box Program USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) purchased $8.6 billion in food for delivery to food banks, churches, schools, community organizations, tribal organizations, and international food aid organizations through various programs during Fiscal Year 2020. Using Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) funding, USDA announced the Farmers to Families Food Box Program on April 17, 2020. Through this program, USDA has been partnering with national, regional and local distributors, whose workforces have been significantly impacted by the closure of restaurants, hotels and other food service businesses, to purchase up to $4.5 billion in fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy products and meat products from American producers of all sizes. Distributors then package these products into family-sized boxes and transport them to food banks, community and faith-based organizations, and other nonprofits serving Americans in need. The Food Box Program has provided more than 125 million food boxes to Americans in need and will purchase nearly $4.5 billion worth of food by the end of the year. Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) Funding Working with the Office of the Chief Economist (OCE), the Office of the General Counsel (OGC), and the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS); FSA and the Farm Production and Conservation Business Center quickly built and delivered two rounds of the CFAP, which provides financial assistance to help producers absorb some of the revenue losses and increased marketing costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. So far, CFAP 1 and CFAP 2 made available $30 billion in relief. Additionally, USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) worked together to adopt new processes for electronic signatures to ensure producer and field staff could use electronic tools safely and securely. Ensuring Access to Food USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) took unprecedented steps to ensure that children and low-income individuals had access to nutritious food in response to the pandemic as well. FNS issued more than 4,000 program flexibilities to adjust to local needs and maximize access for all eligible families across each of USDA’s 15 nutrition assistance programs. In October, USDA announced it would allow free meals to continue to be available to all children throughout the entire 2020-2021 school year. This unprecedented move is part of USDA’s unwavering commitment to ensuring all children across America have access to nutritious food as the nation recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. 62 California Cattleman January 2021

Trade In January, the United States and China reached a historic agreement on a Phase One trade deal that set forth structural and technical reforms to China’s trade practices in the areas of intellectual property, technology transfer, agriculture, financial services, and currency and foreign exchange. The Phase One agreement addressed many non-tariff barriers to U.S. agriculture; it also included a commitment by China to make substantial purchases of U.S. goods and services. This agreement led to a record pace of Chinese purchases in many sectors, boosting agricultural commodity prices. In July, The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) entered into force, replacing the decades-old NAFTA, expanding market access for U.S. farmers to sell their products to our closest neighbors. In ongoing engagements with the European Union, and as the U.S. pursues a post-Brexit free trade agreement with the United Kingdom, Secretary Perdue and USDA called for transparent, science-based trade policies that foster innovation and ensure that agriculture remains economically, environmentally and socially sustainable. Customer Service USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) stood up a call center to help producers with questions and assistance with program applications for CFAP and Seafood Trade Relief Program. The call center has received over 25,000 calls, including over 800 in Spanish, since its inception in May. In just two weeks, the Farm Production and Conservation Business Center developed and deployed a new tool that walks producers through eligible commodities for CFAP and outlines their next steps. Another new decision tool, the Conservation Concerns Tool, gives landowners conservation solutions to fit their business needs. In addition to searching for information on farmers.gov, producers can also log into farmers.gov to manage their conservation business online. Rural Broadband USDA invested $1.3 billion to support rural broadband expansion through the ReConnect Pilot Program. Included in this total is $85 million provided through the CARES Act. In total, these investments are connecting approximately 280,000 households, 19,978 farms and 10,053 businesses to high-speed internet. Innovation and Sustainability Agenda Through the Agriculture Innovation Agenda, USDA committed to stimulate innovation so that American agriculture can achieve the goal of increasing U.S. agricultural production by 40 percent while cutting the environmental footprint of U.S. agriculture in half by 2050. The initiative is comprised of four main components; developing a research strategy; aligning the work of our customer-facing agencies and integrating innovative technologies and practices into USDA programs; setting benchmarks to track progress toward meeting future food, fiber, fuel, feed and climate demands. As one example of Agriculture Innovation Agenda efforts, USDA, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are working together to deliver on the U.S. national goal of reducing food loss and waste by 50 percent by 2030 through consumer education, food date labeling, measurement, and collaboration with private industry.


THE PROGRAM WITH A PURPOSE CONTINUES....

50 Anniversary Sale th

F R I D AY M A R C H 1 2 T H , 2 0 2 1 | P I L O T R O C K , O R E G O N

P lus

SELLING 125 YEARLING ANGUS BULLS & 30 FALL ANGUS BULLS 25 SELECT HEREFORD YEARLING & 2 YEAR-OLD BULLS FROM HIGH DESERT CAT TLE COMPANY

RYAN & AMY RAYMOND BILL & JENNIFER DAVIS P. 541.457.2366 P. 406.388.8136 C. 541.969.9409 C. 406. 489. 2311 RAYMONDANDSONRANCH@GMAIL.COM ROLNROKDAVIS@GMAIL.COM ON FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM @ROLLINROCKANGUS // R O L L I N R O C K A N G U S . C O M //

January 2021 California Cattleman 63


CALIFORNIA CATTLE COUNCIL

CHALLENGE MEETS OPPORTUNITY

CATTLE COUNCIL FINDS WAYS TO HELP PRODUCERS PROSPER IN THE FUTURE by California Cattle Council Executive Director Justin Oldfield I think we can all be thankful that 2020 has finally come to a close. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, volatile cattle and commodity markets and a lack of rainfall at the beginning of this winter season has tested us all. But what a year for the California Cattle Council’s (Council) first full 360 days in operation. Although the Council has certainly experienced its share of challenges in 2020, we also recognized the need to rise above these trials and put your investment to work in an effective and judicious manner. Our mission and our need to respond to issues that face ranchers, dairy producers and cattle feeders across the state was not diminished even in the midst of a global pandemic. I’m proud of the work we were able to accomplish on your behalf in 2020. The Council has entered 2021 with a healthy balance sheet that will enable us to continue to educate and advocate on your behalf with those that need to hear our message the most – policymakers and consumers that know little about what you do and the economic, environmental and societal value you contribute to California on a daily basis. In collaboration with CCA and Western United Dairies, the Council launched the Resilience Campaign in early 2020 to remind consumers and more importantly policymakers that California’s cattle industry was rising to meet the needs of our neighbors and fellow Californians

64 California Cattleman January 2021

to provide food during a time of anxiety and panic. The campaign was delivered digitally to targeted audiences in Sacramento’s Capitol region and other urban centers across the state. Phase one of the Resilience Campaign was not just to promote a “feel good” message but served a greater strategic purpose. It was a clear reminder to policymakers that cattle producers and the values they provide during a pandemic should not be overlooked in the future. In other words, our issues, opinions and solutions to future challenges should be taken seriously because 2020 was a year that underscored the societal benefits provided by you and this industry on a daily basis. In October the resilience campaign shifted to a statewide public affairs effort to educate Californians and policy makers on the negative consequences altering state tax provisions and protections would have on cattle producers, and more importantly, all those that live and work here. The Council invested significant resources on this effort at a time when residents needed to hear it the most. The Council also spent 2020 working on wildfire. First, the Council financially supported research conducted by Univeristy of California (UC) Cooperative Extension ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 66


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CENTURY

January 2021 California Cattleman 65


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 64 to calculate the amount of forage, or fuel, removed from California’s rangelands on an annual basis. Although we already recognize grazing is an important tool to reduce the spread of catastrophic fire, this is the first project that has numerically quantified the benefit ranchers provide through grazing. This type of research is important to bolster the industry’s narrative and advocacy efforts. The Council is now implementing phase two of the study which will take the data from phase one and quantify the air quality and greenhouse gas benefits associated with grazing. In other words, what would the impact be if this forage burned and was not consumed by livestock. The initial study received significant press and public attention when it was released and the Council will continue to amplify the work being done in this area in the future. In fact, a Council-backed public affairs effort is already underway targeting policymakers as Sacramento returns to business at the beginning of this year and will debate the need for action and investment to increase land management tools across the state including prescribed fire and grazing.

66 California Cattleman January 2021

These are just two examples of worked performed by the Council in 2020 and doesn’t highlight the many other efforts undertaken on your behalf. I would like to remind all producers that if you don’t see our work in action, don’t believe the Council is not working for you every day. Our resources and efforts are not spent targeting and educating producers but policymakers, consumers and residents that do not have an understanding or appreciate California’s cattle industry. As I look back on the challenges of 2020, I eagerly look to the opportunities that will be presented for the Council in 2021. Our commitment to operate lean with minimal overhead continues and we will look to put the full force of the Council to work in 2021. Also, please do not forget you have producer representatives that oversee the use of Council funds and your investment. Never hesitate to contact any of our board members or myself with questions or comments. This is your dollar and we take our commitment to spend it responsibly and judiciously very seriously. On behalf of the Council board and myself, we look forward to continuing to serve you this year and long into the future.


GENETIC EDGE BULL SALE Saturday, March 13, 2021 • 11 a.m. Idaho Falls, Idaho

www.riverbendranch.us

The Riverbend Ranch Advantage BACKED BY THE BEST GUARANTEE IN THE BUSINESS!

Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed! If you’re not happy with your bull purchase at anytime for any reason, we’ll give you full credit.

WE INVEST IN OUR CUSTOMERS!

Put our customer investment program to work for you. Over the last 10 years Riverbend has been putting millions back in your pockets.

REPEAT CUSTOMER DISCOUNT!

Customers who purchased Riverbend Bulls in the 2020 Sale will receive 5% off of their bull purchase in this sale. In addition all customers can also qualify for the volume discount.

Whatever your needs we have you covered! Growth Bulls, Maternal Bulls, Carcass Merit Bulls, Calving-Ease Bulls or Multi-trait Bulls. 18-Month-Old Bulls are ready for heavy service in the big country. All Semen tested and ready for turn out. 2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot | Owners Rhett Jacobs | General Manager | 208-681-9841 Dale Meek | Purebred Operations Manager | 208-681-9840 Chris Howell | Director of Customer Service | 208-681-9821

CALL 208-528-6635 OR E-MAIL BULLS@RIVERBENDRANCH.US TO BE PLACED ON OUR MAILING LIST

c

Sale Managed by:

OTTON & associates

January 2021 California Cattleman 67


RANGELAND TRUST TALK

STRIKING A BALANCE: PRESERVE IS COMMON GROUND BETWEEN HOMES AND HABITAT by Alyssa Rolen for the California Rangeland Trust Imagine a project that would perfectly balance meeting the infrastructure demands of a growing community while protecting a valuable working landscape in the process. A new community in West Roseville, a suburb located 25 miles east of Sacramento, is seeking to accomplish just that by serving as a model for thoughtful development, innovative land management and responsible stewardship. The 500-acre Winding Creek Community— currently being constructed by the land development and homebuilding company, Anthem United— will provide residents with access to new homes and amenities that make way for comfort, fun and outdoor adventure. Simultaneously, this project will also conserve an area of pristine rangeland adjacent to the development site. The masterplan for the Winding Creek Community will Located adjacent to the Winding Creek development area, the create 2,000 residential units, including 1,400 single-family preserve will offer residents an opportunity to experience the beauty homes and 600 multiple-family units, some of which will and environmental benefits of working lands just by taking a few be affordable housing. The plan also includes 16 acres of steps outside their front doors. neighborhood parks, a seven-acre school site and 20 acres of commercial development. Well-managed grazing offers a symbiotic relationship between agriculture and environmental stewardship. For this reason, developers often need to offset the habitat their project will impact by permanently conserving a similar working landscape nearby. For this development project, 87 acres of rangeland adjacent to the Winding Creek Community will be forever protected as the “Creekview Northern Preserve” to comply with mitigation requirements set forth by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the City of Roseville. “We’re thrilled about this preserve,” explains Brendan Leonard, Project Manager for Anthem United. “Something like this next to a residential area of this size doesn’t really exist in West Roseville; there’s nothing quite like this.” and biking trails will surround the property and provide When it came time for Leonard and the team at Anthem Walking abundant opportunities for community members to get outside, Untied to determine which third-party entity would hold the breathe in the fresh air and view the cattle and wildlife up-close mitigation easement on the Creekview Northern Preserve, without disturbing the land’s natural habitat. they reached out to multiple accredited land trusts before ultimately landing on the California Rangeland Trust. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 70

68 California Cattleman January 2021

The mitigation project on the Creekview Northern Preserve in West Roseville will conserve 87 acres of rangeland for grazing animals and wildlife to offset the environmental impacts from nearby development.


The same Angus cowherd, raised on the same ranch by the same family for 102 yrs.

Bull & Female Sale: March 8, 2021 160 Bulls & 50 Females Sons and daughters of these proven sires sell.

Spring Cove Reno 4021

Spring Cove Compound 12E

Mogck Entice

Reg 17926446 CED+7 BW+.9 WW+82 YW+136 SC+1.17 Milk+38 PAP+1.70 CW+52 Marb+.98 Rib+.69 $M+81 $G+72 $B+151 $C+277

Reg 18875915 CED+18 BW-3.2 WW+60 YW+113 SC+.51 Milk+28 PAP+1.67 CW+51 Marb+.78 Rib+.54 $M+67 $G+55 $B+149 $C+265

Reg 18952921 CED+3 BW+2.3 WW+74 YW+135 SC+2.60 Milk+27 PAP+1.50 CW+68 Marb+.82 Rib+.80 $M+55 $G+65 $B+180 $C+288

BUBS Southern Charm AA31

Spring Cove Crossbow

Sydgen Enhance

Reg 17853196 CED+4 BW+3.2 WW+68 YW+114 SC+1.99 Milk+26 PAP+2.85 CW+38 Marb+.84 Rib+.81 $M+70 $G+65 $B+140 $C+252

Reg 17924903 CED+17 BW-1.2 WW+56 YW+104 SC+.38 Milk+23 PAP+.69 CW+45 Marb+.94 Rib+.59 $M+50 $G+66 $B+162 $C+260

Reg 18170041 CED+10 BW+.2 WW+66 YW+135 SC+1.57 Milk+27 PAP+4.42 CW+63 Marb+1.12 Rib+.75 $M+76 $G+76 $B+200 $C+335

For sale catalogs call : 208-352-4332 www.springcoveranch.com Find us on Facebook The Pioneer Herd of the West

Spring Cove Ranch Angus since 1919 269 Spring Cove Rd Bliss, Idaho 83314

For more information call:

Art Butler: 208-280-1026 Stacy Butler: 208-320-8803 Josh Mavencamp: 208-358-0057 Sarah Helmick: 208-490-0741 Randy Lancaster, Triple L: 208-731-1947

January 2021 California Cattleman 69


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 68 Leonard admitted, “When it came time to find a steward, I wanted to put this in the hands of people who are passionate about the work and committed to doing it well. The Rangeland Trust is proving to be that champion, both as responsible stewards for the natural resources and as the handler of the administrative responsibilities that come with the project.” To protect the area’s natural resources, the land will be grazed by cattle as part of the preserve’s management plan. Well-managed grazing helps to maintain the health of the ecosystem. It also improves the resiliency of the landscape to protect against wildfires. Without grazing, grasses grow tall and dry out earlier, soil health deteriorates with fewer nutrients returned, native plants are choked out by invasive grasses, bared soil becomes susceptible to erosion, and all of this results in greater fire hazards on the land and to the nearby community. Anthem United will be responsible for managing the preserve until the development project is complete. After that, the preserve will be transferred to the City of Roseville who will take over the management responsibilities. “California Rangeland Trust is proud to play a role in this venture which seeks to strike a balance to provide homes and habitat for people, wildlife and livestock,” said Rangeland Trust CEO Michael Delbar. Delbar. “We all need places to live and society needs infrastructure to survive. The key is finding responsible ways to do that. We feel this project with Anthem United and the City of Roseville accomplishes that goal.” Teaming with oak trees, an intermittent stream, seasonal

70 California Cattleman January 2021

wetlands and scattered vernal pools, the Creekview Northern Preserve functions as a valuable working landscape that provides potential habitat for the federally listed branchiopod species. Adding further benefit to the area’s wildlife and migratory bird populations is the 1,500-acre Al Johnson Wildlife Preserve, located immediately to the west of the project. “We are very excited about being able to sort of add to that,” said Leonard. “It is biologically connected to the north and to the west of the project where it won’t ever change.” While cattle and wildlife will certainly benefit from the preservation of the landscape’s natural resources, there will also be unique opportunities for the public to experience the intrinsic beauty of nature. Walking and biking trails will surround the property and provide abundant opportunities for community members to get outside, breathe in the fresh air and view the cattle and wildlife up-close without disturbing the land’s natural habitat. “We are really happy about that and we think it’s a tremendous amenity for people to enjoy,” expressed Leonard. “When it’s preserved like this forever it makes us feel good about people’s ability to interact with nature and be close to it, while still being in a suburban area and not having completely blitzed over all the natural resources that are surrounding the neighborhood.” “For the residents of this community to be able to connect with the land and agriculture just by taking a few steps right outside their front doors is an incredibly unique opportunity,” said Delbar. “This partnership offers a win-win solution for the land, people and wildlife, and that is exactly what the Rangeland Trust is all about.”


January 2021 California Cattleman 71


CLASS IS IN SESSION Remote learning in the agriculture classroom

by Lizzeth Mendoza, beef sustainability intern, University of California Cooperative Extension

California has rung the bell for a new year. 2020 was filled with new challenges in the agriculture community and some challenges just could not be beat. This school year has challenged high school and college agriculture teachers in California to shift their educational curriculum and start teaching through distance learning. The difficulties of distance learning range from educators trying to meet state, county and district regulations while continuing to battle out the never-ending problem of improving student engagement while utilizing limited resources. Due to this novel pandemic, students are missing out on once in a lifetime opportunities and the challenges don’t seem to be ending soon. Maigen Matteucci, Surprise Valley High School Agriculture and FFA Teacher in Northeastern California, is not only concerned for the students but also for her fellow teachers. She mentioned how being an agricultural teacher is already difficult as it is. Now with the ongoing pandemic she has overheard other teachers question themselves for the first time, “Why are we teachers? This is not what I signed up for.’’ The motivation to keep up with regulations is starting to fall heavy on educator’s shoulders, making it difficult for ag teachers like Matteucci to focus on their students’ education. She hopes to alleviate what is becoming a chronic problem by providing alternative distance learning activities. For example, a gardening kit that would include the necessary tools to plant a vegetable. By sending these types of kits home, students can make up for the hands-on learning that they signed up for without having to be in the classroom. Some courses have been more difficult to teach than others due to the lack of available resources such as access to a laboratory or shop, insufficient supplies or plain lack of participation and motivation from the students. High school educators are not the only ones being challenged with the pandemic. Nicole Morris, Modesto 72 California Cattleman January 2021

Junior College Animal Science Professor, mentions how colleges and universities have also been forced to cancel FFA speaking events and contests. These contests consist of judging livestock, dairy foods, crops, agriculture mechanics in addition to other areas of ag interest. Morris states that these event cancellations have made it difficult for students trying to fulfill their agriculture education degree. According to Morris, taking the responsibility and hosting these events is a requirement to become an agricultural teacher at most schools. Currently there is no way to know the long-term effects and impact the pandemic will have on agricultural education and the FFA community. What we do know is that students have been swiped of a vital opportunity to grow. FFA has had a tremendous impact on past graduating classes by providing them with the knowledge and resources needed to secure a job or study a career after high school. Students in FFA, in addition to their core courses, can learn and expand their skills in woodworking, welding, mechanics, floral design and communications by enrolling in hands-on labs that other classes do not offer. Although most students and ag teachers are doing their best with distance learning throughout the state, there are few rural school districts who began the school year in-person and continue to do so. However, the restrictions set by the Center of Disease Control and Prevention were high; making it just as burdensome for both students and teachers to receive and provide a quality educational experience. Matteucci at Surprise Valley High School and Anna Canon at Orland High School, state that most students are attending school in-person but were also given the option to participate in distance learning. Students, whether in-person or not, have the same expectations from their teachers. Distance learning has created the challenge ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 74


Annual Bull Sale

1 pm • February

25, 2021

At our NEW Trout Creek Sale Facility • Enterprise, OR Selling 90 Bulls • 10 Registered Heifers

Featuring these sires

Sitz Demand 730D

HA Cowboy Kind 8157

More sires: HA Prime Cut 4493 • U-2 Coalition 206C Oxbow Ozzie 3233 • S Powerpoint WS 5503 83552 Eggleson Lane Enterprise, OR 97828 Home • 541-426-4849 Beau Cell • 541-263-0988 beaubotts1@gmail.com bottsangusranch.com • Family Owned & Family Raised! January 2021 California Cattleman 73


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 72

Dominique Demoss, Modoc High School Ag Teacher. As meetings and activities move online, the personal connection between students and teachers is lost. Most FFA meetings are now done virtually. With all FFA activities moving to a virtual setting, each school’s social media platform has been used as the main source of communication for such events. Many schools throughout the state have continued to have SAE project animals while very few schools decided it was best to opt out. This closure was due to the parents and guardians of students losing jobs and not being able to monetarily afford the proper care for livestock animals. Many who completed their projects in 2020 turned to virtual sales in order to auction them off. In this new year, many California agriculture programs are optimistic that things will be different this time around. The challenges are there but ag teachers are adapting and continue to see the FFA members serve their community through their motto of “Doing to Learn and Living to Serve.”

of having online only students logging on to their virtual classroom but not participating. In many instances, walking away from the computer while logged on has become the norm. Canon also mentioned that one of her classes had turned into a gardening unit since the pandemic started. In this class students could garden at home in the spring and summer for credit. Now that some students have returned for in-person classes she faces the challenge of creating equity learning for her inperson and distance learning students. Students at school have access to the school farm but students at home do not. According to the California educational code, education has to be equitable to all students and that is a problem for many ag teachers. On the other hand, ag teachers are known for their creativity and engagement with students. Having a virtual classroom has had its limitations but has also allowed students to think outside the box. Stacey Dutra, Yuba City High School Ag Welding and Fabrication Instructor, says, “Many of our students are from non-farm communities and need the farm laboratory to raise livestock projects. This has limited the opportunity and number of FFA or Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects, internships and work experience activities.” These limitations have not stopped her from creating engaging activities for her students to say the least. When asked if she has implemented a unique or engaging activity for her students she mentioned ‘the wood box activity,’ a woodworking kit that includes all the tools needed to complete a building project. This activity allows students to be engaged in a more challenging environment while also providing basic tool use and a higher-level thought process. This activity also created a fun atmosphere by having students challenge each other to make a more creative product with objects found at home. Aside from Dutra providing the wood box activity, Meaghan Alvarez at Lindhurst High School teaches floral design and says, “I am lucky to be able to send students home with materials to complete floral arrangements at home with me in class after they pick up the supplies.” The creativity hasn’t stopped here. Several kits for the students are being sent home that encourage woodworking, electrical and plumbing skill acquisition. The pandemic has given ag teachers setbacks, but it has not limited their creativity. What is most disheartening to hear from the ag teachers is how they are noticing students losing Sebastopol FFA Advisor and high school agriculture teacher Heidi interest in FFA because the activities and events that Mickelson says remote learning will continue through at least this school year. Her classroom, shown here, is on Zoom through the motivated students are no longer available, mentions

spring where she teaches 150 agriculture students across five classes.

74 California Cattleman January 2021


MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA 95814 916-444-0845 (Office) · 916-444-2194 (Fax) www.calcattlemen.org

NAME(S):

RANCH/BUSINESS NAME:

ADDRESS: CITY:

STATE:

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

PRIMARY PHONE:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE OUR WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE E-MAIL BULLETIN?

Yes

ZIP:

No

Recruited By_________________________

Step 1: CCA Membership Producer Membership

For cattle owners and those seeking a voting membership level

Cattle Numbers 2500 & Over 1600-2499 1000-1599 800-999 500-799 300-499 100-299 0-99 

Dues $1,765 $1,275 $970 $725 $615 $460 $325 $240

Calves under 6 months of age are not counted. Stockers pay at ½ the total number of stockers owned each year or minimum dues, whichever is greater.

Associate Membership

For those who support California cattle production but do not own cattle Non-Voting Membership level

Statewide Allied/Feeder Associate $220

REGULAR MEMBERSHIP

Cattle Numbers

Dues

2001 + 1751-2000 1501-1750 1251-1500 1001-1250 750-1000 501-750 251-500 101-250 0-100

$1,900 + .38/per head $1,900 $1,650 $1,400 $1,150 $900 $650 $450 $300 $150

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: $100 (ASSOCIATES CANNOT OWN CATTLE)

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $20.00 $25.00

Humboldt-Del Norte Inyo-Mono-Alpine Kern County Lassen County Madera County Mendocino County Merced-Mariposa Modoc County

$ 25

Statewide Stewards of the Land

$150

Applicant’s Birth Date:_______________

$100

if over 25 years of age Applicant’s expected date of Graduation:

(Available to non-producers that own land on which cattle could or are run.)

CCA Supporting Member

(Available to non-producers who support the industry.)

California Beef Cattle Improvement Association

MEMBERSHIP

CBCIA is an affiliate of CCA and is a producer driven organization that fosters beef cattle improvement and economical production based on information and education.

Regular Members:

$35

Associate Members: $35 Young Cattlemen: $ 5

$15.00 $25.00 NA $20.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00

Must own fewer than 100 head of cattle. Must be 25 years of age or younger or a full-time student

- OR -

Step 3: Total Payment

LOCAL ASSOCIATON MEMBERSHIP: (Circle up to four below) Amador-El Dorado-Sac Butte Calaveras Contra Costa -Alameda Fall River-Big Valley Fresno-Kings Glenn-Colusa High Desert

Non-Voting Membership

Young Cattlemen’s Committee

(includes Feeder Council Associate, Allied Industry membership and second membership. Second membership does not include Allied Industry voting rights.)

Step 2: Other Optional Dues National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

Young Cattlemen Membership

Monterey County $10.00 Napa-Solano $5.00 Plumas-Sierra $10.00 San Benito $20.00 San Diego-Imperial $10.00 San Joaquin-Stanislaus $5.00 San Luis Obispo $20.00 Santa Barbara $25.00

CCA

$

NCBA

$

CBCIA

$

Payment Options:

□ Check payable to CCA

Local (All) $ TOTAL

$

Card #___________________________________ Exp______/________ Name on Card ____________________________ Signature ________________________________ Santa Clara Shasta County Siskiyou County Sonoma-Marin Tahoe Tehama County Tulare County Tuolumne County

$25.00 $20.00 $10.00 $10.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $10.00

Ventura County Yolo County Yuba –Sutter

$35.00 $25.00 $25.00


California Cattlemen’s Association

18

M i d Va l l e y

Thanks to all our buyers at the annual BCC Bull Sale! We hope to see you again in 2021!

Thank you to our 2020 bull buyers! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

Look for our “Distinctly Different” Angus bulls annually at Red Bluff and Modoc Bull Sales!

KENNY & DIANNE READ

CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340 E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdangusranch.com

Thank you to our 2020 Bull Buyers!

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! VISIT US AT WWW.DONATIRANCH.COM!

916.712.3696 • 916.803.2685 jj@barrangus.com

76 California Cattleman January 2021

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809


Angus

RAnch

Annual you Bull Sale: September 2018 Thank to allSat., of our buyers1,for an Inauguraloutstanding Female Sale: Mon., October 15, 2018 sale season! Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

18

M i d Va l l e y

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2021.

O’NEAL RANCH Gerber, CA

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

— Since 1878—

“Thank you!” to our 2020 bull buyers! O’NEAL RANCH BULLS OFFER THE COMPLETE PACKAGE GROWTH • PERFORMANCE ADAPTABILITY • CARCASS

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882

Thank you to all of our 2020 bull buyers and female sale customers. We hope to see you again next fall! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Gary & Betsy Cardoza

PO Box 40 • O’Neals, CA 93645 (559) 999-9510

Celebrating Angus Tradition Ssince 1974

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Call today about private treaty offerings!

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus January 2021 California Cattleman 77


Thank you for attending the annual TAR bull sale! Join us again in 2021!

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

Join us March 6 for our annual Cattlemen's Classic Production Sale

(530) 385-1570

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

CHAROLAIS Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

A FAMILY TRADITION Angus and SimAngus Cattle John Teixeira: (805) 448-3859 Allan Teixeira: (805) 310-3353 Tom Hill: (541) 990-5479 www.teixeiracattleco.com | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

THANK YOU TO OUR 2020 BUYERS!

Contact Clinton Brightwell for assistance marketing or buying your Hereford Cattle! (417) 359-6893

OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

11500 N Ambassador Drive, Suite 410 | Kansas City, MO 64153 | (816) 842-3757 | aha@hereford.org

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS

78 California Cattleman January 2021

CONTACT US FOR CATTLE AVAILABLE PRIVATE TREATY OFF THE RANCH

Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com

REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

THANK YOU TO OUR BUTTE BULL SALE CUSTOMERS. JOIN US IN ALTURAS IN FEBRUARY FOR OUR MODOC BULL SALE!

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988


P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! offering sons of this standout herdsire

POTTERS DISCOVERY C209

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

Reliable products you are looking for with the dependable service you need. Vaccines Mineral Medicines Supplements ...and more!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

h

Antonia Old • (209) 769-7663

antonia.old@animalhealthinternational.com

(775) 691-1838

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

THE DOIRON FAMILY Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

January 2021 California Cattleman 79


Watkins Fence Company

Premium Livestock Feeds “PERFORMANCE THROUGH WWW.BARALEINC.COM ADVANCED (888) 258-3333NUTRITION” • Williams, CA MattMixes Zappetini 526-0106 • Mineral with(530) Ranch Delivery • mzappetini@baraleinc.com • Hi Mag - Fly Control - Rumensin - Custom Mixes • Performance Through • Complete Feeds and Finish Mixes • Advanced Nutrition

ALE MANAGEMENT www.baraleinc.com • (888) 258-3333

specializing in oil pipe • chain link • barb wire

Proudly Featuring Conventional

  

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Sales Representatives: Matt Zappetini (530) 526-0106

Williams, CA Matt Zappetini (530) 526-0106 mzappetini@baraleinc.com

Tracy Lewis (530) 304-7246

Ranch Deliveries Available with our Truck and Forklift! We

Over 25 years serving California, Utah and Southern Idaho

1011 Fifth Street Williams, CA. 95987 888-473-3333 info@baraleinc.com WWW.BARALEINC.COM

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also offer custom formulations to meet your specific nutritional needs!

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KNIPE LAND COMPANY

Payette River Ranch - ID 1,103± acres with 900± irrigated. Ranch, farm, develop or use for tax credits via a conservation easement. $13,500,000

Winchester Ranch - ID 600± acres with 8 bedroom log home, log shop, cabin & 2 big barns. Pasture, farm land and timber with excellent big game hunting. $2,999,000

(208) 345-3163 knipeland.com

GENETICS

3300 Longmire Drive• College Station, TX 77845 (800) 768-4066 • (979) 693-0388 fax: (979) 693-7994 e-mail: info@bovine-elite.com

Full Service JMM GENETICS A.I. Technician & Semen Distributor

• A.I, CIDR & heat synchronization • Extensive experience • Willing to Travel • Well-versed in dairy & beef pedigrees

JORGE MENDOZA • (530) 519-2678 jmmawss@gmail.com 15880 Sexton Road, Escalon, CA

80 California Cattleman January 2021

Your business could be listed here! Contact Matt Macfarlane for more information: (916) 803-3113


PeEks Celebrate Platinum anniversary Betty and Ellington Peek celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 26, 2020. She was from San Andreas and he was from Murphys. They met at a dance in Mokelume Hill in 1950 and were married the same year. They first moved to Oakdale where Ellington worked at the Oakdale and Stockton Yards as a ring man. The Korean War started and Ellington was drafted. After serving in Korea for six months and Japan for six months, he came home. Ellington and Betty’s first son, Andy, was born while Ellington was overseas. When Ellington came home, he worked at various auction yards and for a meat company as a buyer. After a short time in Susanville running an auction yard, he moved to Anderson and rented the old Shasta Auction Yard for three years. Betty took the deposit for the first sale to the bank in Angels Camp where they had a loan. The Shasta Yard was doing well but when a new auction yard was being opened north of Red Bluff and he was offered the general manager’s job, he took it. He was 28 years old. He went from there to Elk Grove to manage the Maita Bros Feedlot. He also started back at the old Shasta Auction Yard in Anderson, buying it this time instead of renting. After being home with their children, Betty started a western store at the yard. It was only open on sale day but it was a hit. In 1966, with the help of John Trisdale, they built the Shasta Livestock Auction Yard in Cottonwood. Betty opened the Shasta Western Shop full time and even kept expanding it

over the years. Even though she closed it in 2008 and retired at age 80, the store is still talked about. Ellington has not retired and still goes to work most days at Shasta Livestock and Western Video Market. He is 92 and Betty just turned 91. They raised four children, Andy, Brad,, Callie and Laurie. They Brad also have five grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren.

January 2021 California Cattleman 81


Advertisers’ Index Amador Angus ......................................................... 76

Hoffman Ranch......................................................... 25

Schafer Ranch............................................................ 77

American Angus Association.................................. 21

Hogan Ranch............................................................. 77

Schohr Herefords....................................................... 79

American Hereford Association.............................. 78

Hone Ranch................................................................ 79

Animal Health International................................... 79

Hufford's Herefords............................................. 46, 78

Shasta Farm & Equipment....................................... 24

Baker Angus Ranch................................................... 37

JMM Genetics............................................................ 80

Bar 6 Charolais........................................................... 51

Kessler Angus....................................................... 57, 77

Bar Ale... ..................................................................... 80

Klamath Bull Sale........................................................ 9

Bar KD Ranch..................................................2, 47, 76

Knipe Land Company............................................... 80

Bar R Angus............................................................... 76

La Tierra Home & Ranch......................................... 70

Bianchi Ranches........................................................ 46

Lambert Ranch...................................................... 2, 78

Botts Angus Ranch.................................................... 73

Little Shasta Ranch.............................................. 45, 79

Bovine Elite LLC........................................................ 80

M3 Marketing............................................................ 80

Broken Box Ranch..................................................... 78

Macfarlane Livestock................................................ 48

Buchanan Cattle Company................................ 19, 76

McPhee Red Angus................................................... 78

Spring Cove Ranch.................................................... 69

Byrd Cattle Company............................................... 76

Morrell Ranches................................................... 46, 78

Stepaside Farms......................................................... 77

Charron Ranch.......................................................... 76

Noahs Angus Ranch.................................................. 77

Tehama Angus Ranch............................................... 78

Chico State College of Ag......................................... 79

O'Connell Ranch....................................................... 77

Colyer Hereford & Angus........................................ 41

O'Neal Ranch............................................................. 77

Teixeira Cattle Co.................................................. 7, 78

Conlin Supply Co., Inc.............................................. 40

P.W. Gillibrand........................................................... 79

Dal Porto Livestock............................................. 23, 76

Pacific Trace Minerals............................................... 79

Dixie Valley Angus.............................................. 76, 83

Pinenut Livestock Supply......................................... 81

Donati Ranch............................................................. 76

Price Cattle Co........................................................... 58

EZ Angus Ranch.................................................. 27, 77

Rancho Casino Angus.............................................. 23

Freitas Rangeland Improvements............................ 50

Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale......................42, 43, 44

Fresno State Ag Foundation..................................... 79

Red River Farms........................................................ 77

Genoa Livestock........................................................ 78

Riverbend Ranch....................................................... 67

Harrell Hereford Ranch...................................... 31, 78

Rollin Rock Genetic Partners.................................. 63

HAVE Angus........................................................ 45, 77

Romans Ranches Charolais...................................... 71

Western Poly Pipe...................................................... 40

Heron Fencing........................................................... 50

Sammis Ranch........................................................... 77

Wraith, Scarlette & Randolph ................................. 49

Hinton Ranch Simmentals....................................... 48

Scales Northwest........................................................ 50

Wulff Brothers Livestock.......................................... 46

82 California Cattleman January 2021

Shasta Livestock Auction Yard................................. 33 Shaw Cattle Company............................................... 11 Sierra Ranches............................................................ 79 Silveira Bros................................................................ 77 Snyder Livestock Company, Inc.............................. 65 Sonoma Mountain Herefords.................................. 79 Southwest Fence and Supply.................................... 35 Spanish Ranch............................................................ 79 Spencer Cattle Co...................................................... 40

The Cowman's Kind.................................................. 51 V-A-L Charolais................................................... 28, 29 VF Red Angus...................................................... 59, 78 Vintage Angus Ranch......................................... 84, 78 Vitaferm ..................................................................... 66 Ward Ranches............................................................ 23 Watkins Fence............................................................ 80 Werning Cattle Company......................................... 53 Western Video Market................................................ 3


“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS”

Selling January 30 in Red Bluff

STERLING 38 SPECIAL 979 Sire: Baldridge 38 Special • MGS: G A R Sunrise Reg. No. 19728136 • DOB: 8/5/19

STERLING NO DOUBT 9119 Sire: Hoover No Doubt • MGS: G A R Prophet Reg. No: 19728091 • DOB: 9/5/19

STERLING NO DOUBT 9128 Sire: Hoover No Doubt • MGS: G A R Prophet Reg. No: 19728083 • DOB: 9/12/19

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

4

1.8

80

136

22

1.54

0.45

9

1.9

77

134

24

0.54

0.79

4

1.3

78

136

19

0.97

0.90

$M

#W

$F

$G

$B

$C

$M

#W

$F

$G

$B

$C

$M

#W

$F

$G

$B

$C

69

80

93

91

174

295

77

75

93

49

142

261

65

71

89

69

158

270

ALSO CHECK OUT OUR IMPRESSIVE OFFERING AT THIS YEAR’S

MIDL AND BULL TEST SALE! STERLING NO DOUBT 9124

STERLING STONEWALL 9117

Sire: Hoover No Doubt • MGS: Styles Upgrade J59 Reg. No: 19822289 • DOB: 9/9/19

Sire: Jindra Stonewall • MGS: Barstow Cash Reg. No:1972380 3 • DOB: 8/29/19 CED 5

BW 1.6

WW

YW

66

MILK

132

29

MARB 0.86

RE 0.70

APRIL 2, 2021

CED

BW

WW

YW

MILK

MARB

RE

7

-0.1

60

116

17

0.56

0.79

$M

#W

$F

$G

$B

$C

$M

#W

$F

$G

$B

$C

30

62

122

63

184

269

71

53

105

47

152

268

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner 8520 5th Ave E., Montague CA 96064

(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com

California Cattleman 83 watch for us at top consignment sales or contact us anyJanuary time2021 about bulls private treaty


A special “Thank You” from

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH to our committed and dedicated buyer

GRIGORY RANCH

A family owned and operated commercial cow/calf ranch in San Ardo, CA “Grigory Ranch made a strategic decision to steadily improve our herd with a heavy emphasis on Vintage genetics. Vintage has a first-class operation and our program has been the beneficiary of their dedication and commitment to raising the best cattle in the industry. We see a distinct increase in the marketability of our calves through the VAR bull high-growth performance genetics. Our mother cows and replacement heifers are improving every year in both phenotype and calving ease. For us, we see investing in Vintage Genetics as a total value proposition – great genetics paired with great customer service.”

— Grigory Ranch

Annette & Jan Martinus, Yvette Stevenson and Odette Grigory Pura

JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES • (805)748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355

(209) 521-0537

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTCattleman AGEANGUSRANJanuary CH.COM2021 84 California

28 th Annual

“Carcass Maker” Bull Sale Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021 LaGrange , CA


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