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December 2019

the end of 2019 American Angus Convention Staff roles at CCA NCBA introduces the Real Meat Act December 2019 California Cattleman 1


400 Bulls

100 Geldings

20 Stock Dogs

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Tues. January 21: Range-Ready Bull Show Wed. January 22: Halter Bull Show Thurs. January 23: Gelding Sift and Dry Work WVM Feeder/Replacement Female Sale

Fri. January 24: Stock Dogs - Final Work 42nd Annual Stock Dog Sale & 58th Annual Gelding Sale Sat. January 25: 79th Annual Red Bluff Bull Sale Cinch’s Bull Bash

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2 California Cattleman December 2019

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WISHES YOU AND YOUR FAMILY HAPPINESS THIS HOLIDAY SEASON! PLEASE JOIN US FOR THESE UPCOMING SALES

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, RED BLUFF

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December 2019 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION OFFICERS

PRESIDENT Mark Lacey, Independence FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Tony Toso, Hornitos SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Steve Arnold, Santa Margarita Greg Kuck, Montague Cindy Tews, Fresno TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin VICE PRESIDENT OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Kirk Wilbur DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS Jenna Chandler DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & EVENTS Lisa Brendlen DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Katie Roberti OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Morgan Lyman

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION CCA Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com BILLING SERVICES Lisa Brendlen lisa@calcattlemen.org

TURNING TO 2020 by CCA President Mark Lacey

By the time this appears in the December issue I will have all the cattle home for the winter, and survived the only time of the year that I look forward to eating turkey and turkey sandwiches the next day. After that I don’t even want to hear the “T” word until next year. Also, the 2019 convention will hopefully have been productive, successful and everyone who attended will have enjoyed the new venue at the Peppermill Casino. As we close out 2019, CCA completes another active and successful year that included passage of the Cattle Council referendum, some major legislative wins and at least one legal case in which we prevailed. I want to thank our dedicated staff for all the hard work. Officers and staff will be meeting in December to review the year and set out goals and priorities for 2020. We will however have one empty chair at that meeting where Justin Oldfield normally sits. Justin is the new executive director of the California Cattle Council and luckily that means he will still be advocating on behalf of ranchers and beef producers, but his absence will have an impact. I would like to thank Justin for his many years of extraordinary service to cattle producers in California — he has been an integral part of the legislative team that has built a reputation in the Capitol that we can all be proud of. Legislatively, the team did some really great work stopping some bills that were very adverse to ranching. Once again an estate tax bill was introduced that would have only exempted $3.5 million and taxed the rest at 40 percent the good news is that even though we are likely to see this again it is easier to assemble a coalition against something like this. The other major bill would have encouraged schools to replace meat with plant-based protein. This bill was effectively killed. The last bill of the year that would have been extremely regressive was SB1, which would have locked, in all

the Obama era regulatory mandates. Through a lot of effort by the team working with a coalition, and a little luck because of some political miscalculation the governor vetoed it. CCA did sponsor a couple of bills. One passed that allowed counties to access highway maintenance funds to service cattle guards. The other bill that would have provided some relief to landowners, and streamlined the stock pond registration process was pulled because the water board strongly opposed it, but we will continue to look for ways to get regulatory relief in that area. I’m sure when folks read this they are thinking it doesn’t seem like a lot of work, but to give a little perspective there were more than 3,000 bills introduced. Of which CCA tracked a moderate percentage because so many different issues affect ranching like air quality, water, taxes, land use, endangered species, truck regulations, animal welfare, nutrition, climate change and because of the Democrat super majority CCA has to join with diverse coalitions to fight so many of these issues. Advocacy in Sacramento today is requiring CCA to be more creative that ever. Looking to 2020 since it is a presidential election year — and, since it is already a total clown show — it's possible that not much legislative work will get accomplished on a federal level. Sacramento on the other hand will undoubtedly be as busy as ever, so your staff, officers and board will have a strategy in place to cover Justin’s former role. CCA can ill afford to be shorthanded especially in this coming year. To all our members and friends have a Merry Christmas and a happy New Year. We are praying for good health for all, adequate rain and improving markets.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman (Publication # 8-3600) is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman December 2019


DECEMBER 2019 Volume 102, Issue 11

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

ON THE COVER

BUNKHOUSE 6 Back in the Golden State YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK Mountain lion petition NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE Eye on the enemy

This month's cover photo was taken by Timothy Hearsum in Cedarville.

8 14

UPCOMING EVENTS

RANGELAND TRUST TALK 22 Well-respected conservationist HERD HEALTH CHECK 24 The challenges of stored forage

JAN. 21-25

SPECIAL FEATURES

FEB. 5-7

CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION AND NCBA TRADE SHOW San Antonio, Texas

JUNE 16-18

CCA & CCW MIDYEAR MEETINGS Paso Robles

Staff evolution at CCA Angus breeders attend convention in their back yard Real MEAT Act welcomed Report: Ag is big business in Califfornia

READER SERVICES

10 12 16 18

Cattlemen's Report 28 Obituaries 30 Wedding Bells 31 Buyers’ Guide 32 Advertisers Index 38

RED BLUFF BULL & GELDING SALE Tehama District Fairgrounds, Red Bluff

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

December 2019 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE

LOCALLY-RAISED

PASSION FOR AG BRINGS YOUNG ADVOCATE HOME by CCA Office Administrator Morgan Lyman Growing up in rural Amador County, I acquired a deep passion for agriculture at a young age, in particular, the beef industry. I grew up immersed in understanding agriculture’s role in our society and the importance of every aspect of the industry. I was blessed with the opportunity to raise and show cattle at our county fair as a youth. Although I was involved in many other activities, including high school rodeo, my desire was to spend my time with cows. It was during this time that my passion grew and it became important to me to share why we do what we do. I was able to share about the beef industry through our local CattleWomen’s beef ambassador program. Through this, my love for cattle and the beef industry grew as I did as well. In 2017, I earned the opportunity to work with the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) as an intern. During my internship, I came to the realization that working for cattle producers was where I wanted to be. OCA provided many opportunities for me to grow as a young professional and gave me responsibilities that pushed my skill set. This experience solidified my desire to pursue a career in this industry promoting ranchers and their cattle. The Steer-A-Year (SAY) program is a student run activity at Oregon

State University (OSU) that provides a hands-on opportunity for students to learn about the management and care for cattle in a feedlot-type situation. In this unique situation, students can watch and care for the cattle from weaning through the slaughter and marketing process. I had the opportunity to be involved in this club throughout my time at OSU and served as the president my senior year. This leadership role challenged me to think outside the box and pushed me to develop relationship skills that have created a path for my future. During my time at OSU I developed acquaintances with some of Oregon’s cattlemen. Through these connections I was able to provide opportunities for club members to tour and learn about their operations. I believe it is important to see what a day in the life of a cattle producer looks like. Each operation is different and unique, which is a great way to learn about the different pieces that make up the industry. Listening to producers talk about the creative ideas that have made their operations work, and even their struggles, have opened my mind to see a broader picture of the industry as a whole. Some of my favorite memories are standing in a field listening to a rancher share his or her story and seeing the pride he has for his livestock. I have yet to meet a producer that doesn’t radiate

6 California Cattleman December 2019

MORGAN LYMAN with passion as they share about their operation. I graduated in June from OSU with a Bachelor of Science in Animal Science with an emphasis in Leadership. Throughout my time at OSU, I pushed myself to be involved and gain as many experiences as I could in those four short years. Networking with people from the agriculture industry helped me gain a deeper understanding as to how my skills and strengths would fit into this industry once I graduated. I couldn’t feel more blessed to have this opportunity to represent the ranchers and producers in California in my new role with CCA. It is your stories that have pushed me to not give up on my dream to be involved with this association. I look forward to connecting with many of you in the future and cannot wait to see what we have in store as we work together.


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YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

CDFW TO RELEASE EVALUATION OF MOUNTAIN LION PETITION At this month’s meeting of the California Fish and Game Commission, to be held Dec. 11-12 at the Natural Resources Building in Sacramento, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife will provide its evaluation of a petition to list Southern California and Central Coast mountain lions as a threatened “Evolutionarily Significant Unit” (ESU) of the species. On June 25, the Center for Biological Diversity and the Mountain Lion Foundation filed the petition, which seeks threatened-species status under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA) for mountain lions throughout the species’ Southern California and Central Coast range, “including the Eastern Peninsular Range, Santa Ana Mountains, San Bernardino Mountains, San Gabriel Mountains, Santa Monica Mountains, and north along the coast to the Santa Cruz Mountains,” according to a CBD press release. Under the California Fish and Game Code, the Department’s evaluation must include a recommendation as to whether listing mountain lions as threatened “may be warranted” based on the information available to the Department. The Department’s analysis is only a recommendation, and is not binding upon the Commission, which will ultimately determine whether listing mountain lions within the region as threatened “may be warranted” at a later Commission meeting in 2020. Statewide, mountain lions are a “specially protected mammal” under Proposition 117, adopted by California voters in 1990. Proposition 117 contains numerous provisions protecting mountain lions, but importantly allows for lethal take of mountain lions confirmed to have killed livestock or domestic animals or mountain lions which are caught in the act of such depredation. When the Fish and Game Commission formally received the petition on August 7, CCA was on hand to oppose the petition and delivered a detailed letter arguing that CESA protection for mountain lions is inconsistent with Proposition 117. Proposition 117 included a provision that neither the Commission nor the Department may “adopt any regulation that conflicts with or supersedes a provision of ” Proposition 117, and extending CESA protection to mountain lions would conflict with at least four provisions of the proposition: (1) Proposition 117 allows CDFW to issue take permits when the Department determines that a lion has depredated livestock or domestic animals. Under CESA, take is generally prohibited, resulting in a conflict between CESA protection and Proposition 117. (2) Likewise, Proposition 117 allows the Department to give oral authorization for take of lions. CESA would prohibit such oral authorization, in clear conflict with Proposition 117. (3) Proposition 117 provides for targeted take of 8 California Cattleman December 2019

specific, individual problem mountain lions. To the extent that CESA allows any take, it is limited to “incidental,” as opposed to targeted, take, conflicting with Proposition 117. (4) Finally, Proposition 117 allows for immediate take of lions discovered in the act of killing or injuring livestock or domestic animals. CESA listing prohibits such immediate take, conflicting with Proposition 117. CCA believes that even a finding that listing “may be warranted”—a procedural determination which does not necessarily reflect whether the species will ultimately receive CESA protection—would violate Proposition 117. Under California law and regulation, a determination that listing “may be warranted” establishes a species as a “candidate species” for CESA protection, and the Department extends full CESA protections to the species while it is in candidacy. Thus, merely finding that listing “may be warranted” would be a “regulation that conflicts with or supersedes a provision” of Proposition 117, in violation of the law. CCA will appear at the Dec. 11 Commission meeting to continue opposing CESA listing for mountain lions in California. It is important to note that the Commission will take no definitive action at its December meeting, however; Commissioners will simply receive the Department’s evaluation, as dictated by California law. As early as February 2020, however, the Commission may make its own substantive determination as to whether listing “may be warranted.” CCA will continue to keep you apprised of any developments in this matter. For more information, contact Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.


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Facebook for sale and event information andCalifornia market update s! December 2019 Cattleman

9


CCA STAFF UPDATE

OFFICE EVOLUTION ENTERING NEW DECADE

STAFF ROLES SHIFT AS CCA STICKS TO STRATEGIC PLAN As the end of the year quickly approaches and we close the book on 2019, the CCA staff is already beginning to make adjustments to prepare the team for success in 2020. The shifting of staff roles in the office is one change that has already taken effect. Using CCA’s strategic plan to provide direction, these changes in responsibilities were made to align CCA staff with the Association’s top strategic priorities: 1. Government Affairs; and 2. Enhance, Engage and Grow Membership. The first of the staff shifts came in October, as we welcomed Morgan Lyman to the office as CCA’s administrative assistant. Having just graduated from MORGAN LYMAN Oregon State University, Lyman joins the CCA team with a passion for agriculture and a love for the beef industry. You can learn more about Lyman in her article on page 6. Lyman is responsible for coordinating day-to-day office operations, assisting with meeting and event planning and scheduling, as well as personal contact with

CCA members and the public as they contact the office. As the first point of contact with potential new members, Lyman will continue to play a vital role in growing CCA membership. With the addition of Lyman to the team, Katie Roberti has shifted into a full-time communications role as CCA’s Director of KATIE ROBERTI

Communications. With a lifelong background in cattle production, coupled with a master's degree in media innovations, Roberti is fully ready to take the lead on CCA's communications efforts. From digital content to monthly publications, Roberti is now directing CCA’s communication with the goal of keeping members informed, while also engaging with prospective members to show them the value of joining CCA. She will also design and develop content targeted at educating legislators and regulators, as well as the general public on the issues impacting the beef community. As Lyman and Roberti will primarily focus on the strategic

10 California Cattleman December 2019

priority of enhancing, engaging and continuing to grow membership, Jenna Chandler will direct her attention to working on the strategic priority of government affairs. Many CCA members will remember that Chandler actually came to CCA JENNA CHANDLER directly from the legislative arena. Knowing her way around the capitol building, she is excited to move into a new capacity. As the CCA Director of Government Affairs, Chandler will play an essential role in the success of CCA’s legislative and regulatory matters in this new year. She will strive to serve and support members by helping tackle the issues impacting them, and additionally will keep members informed on the Association’s government affairs work by continuing to write for CCA’s publications. Chandler KIRK WILBUR will also work


closely with Kirk Wilbur, as he transitions from the role of director of government affairs to CCA Vice President of Government Affairs. Wilbur now serves as CCA’s leading advocate on legislative, regulatory and legal issues impacting California’s cattle ranchers. He will continue to lean on his legal training to navigate California’s complex legal and regulatory environment for the benefit of the state’s livestock producers. In their mission to meet the strategic goals set for government affairs, Chandler and Wilbur will also work closely with CCA’s officer team and CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin to coordinate CCA’s federal BILLY GATLIN

and state government affairs efforts, providing California ranchers and beef producers a clear and decisive voice on key national, state and local issues. Lisa Brendlen will remain as an integral part of the team at CCA, as she will continue to serve as CCA's Director of Finance and LISA BRENDLEN Events. Not only is Brendlen role in keeping the lights on and bills paid, vital but as members have come to know, balancing all things financial is her strong suit. She will also continue to streamline all CCA event processes and keep our successful events running smoothly. As changes for this new year begin taking effect, our staff remains committed to focusing on delivering

the strategic priorities outlined in our strategic plan. CCA's strategic plan will continue to guide not only each staff member's role but all of the work being accomplished in our office as we continue to grow as an association. To learn more about the strategic plan and the goals CCA staff are working towards visit calcattlemen.org/strategicplan. CCA thanks its members for helping to fuel the tremendous growth we have had and look forward to continuing on that trajectory heading into 2020. As we get ready for a new year of opportunities to represent California’s ranching families, we hope you will play a part in all the Association has to accomplish in this new decade.

The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

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A CALIFORNIA CROWD West Coast producers represent as the Business Breed meets in Reno by CCA Director of Communications Katie Roberti

"I’ve never entered a contest and won before." At least that’s what Daniel O’Connell, Sacramento, thought as he filled out his contact information for the chance to win a package to attend the 2018 Angus Convention. While walking the many acres of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s Trade Show in Phoenix, Ariz. Little did O’Connell know his name would be drawn. Having never attended an Angus Convention, Daniel, along with his father, Dan O’Connell, Colusa, took advantage of the prize and flew east to Columbus, Ohio, in November of 2018 to experience all the American Angus Association had to offer producers. After a great experience at their first Angus Convention, fast-forward 12 months, and the O’Connells, along with many other California producers, were able to attend the 2019 Angus Convention, this time with a much shorter travel time via a quick drive to Reno, Nev. From all over the country, to just a state away in California for the O’Connell family, who are also members of the Angus family, made their way West for the 2019 Angus Convention and the 136th Annual Convention of Delegates, Nov. 1-4. For six years, the Angus Convention has offered education, networking, business meetings, entertainment, and an excellent excuse to enjoy meals from Certified Angus Beef for a few days with cattle producers from across the United States and even the world. This year, California brought more attendees to the Convention than any other state, and visitors from five countries made their way to Reno. “This was the first time for our convention to head West, and we are thrilled with the outcome," Katy Holdener, Digital Content Manager for the American Angus Association, said. “Close to 2,000 cattlemen and 12 California Cattleman December 2019

women from all segments of the industry convened in Reno for Angus education, a bustling trade show, and great country music entertainment.” As a California native, Holdener was particularly excited for the Convention to come West for the first time. “We brought captivating keynote speakers, cutting-edge genetic research and helpful cattle management solutions to our folks out West,” Holdener said. "Anytime you can pack that much information into one exciting weekend we consider that a true success." Although the Convention is organized by the American Angus Association and focuses on the Angus breed, Daniel O’Connell believes 80 percent of the information could apply to any producer in the cattle business. The 2019 Angus Convention kicked off with the National Angus Tour on Friday, as close to 400 members traveled 50 miles south of Reno to the Bently Ranch in Minden, Nev. Hosted by the California Angus Association, the tour gave attendees from all over the country a look at a diversified and vertically-integrated cattle operation, as well as the landscape of ranching in the West. Throughout the day, attendees rotated between touring Bently Ranch, the Bently Ranch Butcher Shop and their sister company, Bently Heritage Estate Distillery. At the ranch, Matt McKinney, Bently Ranch General Manager, previously the manager of the cattle division for Bently Ranch for over a decade, introduced the group to Bently Ranch’s grass-fed and finished cattle program, consisting of 1,500 head of cows that run on pastures in Nevada, as well as in Bridgeport and west of Red Bluff. McKinney talked about the ranching heritage of the Carson Valley and what it takes to operate at 5,820 feet inelevation, with an average of 10 inches of moisture per year—noting that water is heavily regulated in Nevada. “Water is probably the most important thing in Nevada,” Mckinney said, adding that labor is a huge problem for the ranch as well. In addition to getting a tour from McKinney on the ranching side of the business, Woody Worthington, Bently Ranch Sales and Marketing Manager, also greeted the tour buses to explain the farming side of the operation.


Worthington shared how being vertically integrated offers the ability for quality control of the products being sold both in the Bently Ranch Butcher Shop and the Bently Heritage Estate Distillery. “We want to make sure our steaks and spirits are consistent,” Worthington said. As the group toured all the parts of the ranching and farming business from hops, to compost, to cattle, Worthington shared that Bently Ranch wants to continue to give back to the land and the community. “People are excited to learn what we do, and we're excited to share that,” Worthington said. One opportunity for the community to learn about the ranch is with a visit to the Bently Ranch Butcher Shop. Operating out of an old, renovated gas station, the shop has been processing Bently Ranch meat for about a year and a half. After being harvested at Wolf Pack Meats in Reno, the meat is brought back in quarters to be processed in Minden. The shop processes about 400 head of cattle a year and allows customers to work with a butcher to customize the cuts they would like to purchase. Completed with a walkthrough of the Bently Heritage Estate Distillery, attendees learned how the grain grown at Bently Ranch is processed and got a tasting of one of Bently Heritage’s spirits.

Matt McKinney guides the Bently Ranch tour.

As the Convention continued Saturday through Monday, California producers played an active part in participating in general sessions, genomic workshops, keynote sessions, educational speakers, and the 136th Annual Convention of Delegates. “As a delegate, I realize how important this American Angus Convention is, as so many decisions are made for the future and our livelihoods,” Carole Silveria, Firebaugh, a California Delegate for the American Angus Association said. Silveria has not missed one of the six Angus conventions since its inception after the American Angus Association moved away from having their meetings in Louisville at the same time as the North American International Livestock Exposition. In addition to meetings and educational sessions, many from California stayed busy hosting booths, networking with members and enjoying entertainment in the tradeshow throughout the weekend. Although the Angus Convention won’t be in California’s backyard next year, it is heading home to Kansas City, just a short drive from the Association’s headquarters in Saint Joseph, Mo. To learn more about all the Business Breed has planned for the 2020 Angus Convention, happening on the first weekend in November, visit angusconvention.com.

David and Paula Holden, cruised the tradeshow Sunday morning.

JJ Reinhardt and friend, Chris Sankey at Leo McDonnell, Lucy Rechel and Art Butler talk on bull development in the Breed the California Angus booth after months Improvement Angus University session. of organizing and planning for the tradeshow display.

Chico State University was one of the many California booths in the tradeshow..

Richard and Jerrie Libby chat with Jake Pickering, Angus Association Regional Manager

December 2019 California Cattleman 13


NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE NCBA EXECUTIVE HAS AN EYE ON HSUS AS ADVERSARY DISPLAYS ARTIFICIAL INTENT by the National Cattlemen's Beef Association Chief Executive Officer Colin Woodall If you still doubt the mission of the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), look no further than its website. The group notes that each consumer who chooses a “meatfree” diet and a “plant-based” lifestyle spares 100 animals annually from “a painful life on a factory farm.” Which is why it has teamed up with groups like the Organization for Competitive Markets (OCM) to attack the Beef Checkoff. We have long known that OCM has been working with HSUS to attack NCBA and the work we do as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. It’s a surprise to see those attacks openly supported by the CEO of HSUS, an organization which raised $230 million last year and that’s dedicated to reducing meat consumption. Although some beef producers may have gotten comfortable accepting the help of HSUS to further their personal agenda, it is appalling to most of us. HSUS has a long history of attacking production agriculture. According to an article in the Washington Examiner, HSUS spent $17.3 million between 2005 and 2009 to lobby for and fund ballot initiatives “attacking the livestock industry and promoting veganism.” In 2018, HSUS and its supporters spent more than $10 million to support California’s Proposition 2, an initiative which drove most poultry producers out of the state and increased food costs for consumers. HSUS and R-CALF’s attorneys at Public Justice, along with allies at PETA and other activist groups, have spent millions using the court system to strike down laws that protect livestock and poultry producers from trespassing animal rights activists. These efforts were also supported by HSUS, the Animal Legal Defense Fund, Western Watersheds Project as well as several other notable antiagriculture organizations. They’ve notched several wins fighting battles against production agriculture, and they’re a long way from being finished driving their vegan plan to put animal agriculture out of business. Recently, in an effort to further the anti-meat agenda, groups like HSUS have been touting the benefits of fake meat and promoting products like the Impossible Burger, as they work toward the ultimate goal of ending animal agriculture. HSUS has made it clear where its supporters stand. You don’t have to look very far into their website before finding the following statement: “Factory farming causes billions of animals to suffer 14 California Cattleman December 2019

every year, but they are not the only ones paying a heavy price. Animal agriculture accounts for a large percentage of the greenhouse gasses associated with climate disruption. Waste from factory farms also makes its way into the air and water supply, poisoning rural communities.” The HSUS mission is clear. Animal rights activists have bought their way into the beef industry by promising to attack the checkoff. They’re successfully dividing the beef industry by fueling these attacks. The only question that remains is why is HSUS interested in the Beef Checkoff ? It’s certainly not reform. Why would HSUS, a group bent on putting beef producers out of business, want a more successful checkoff program? Do they want consumers eating more beef ? HSUS is applauding OCM and working against NCBA because it knows that a divided beef industry is an unsuccessful beef industry. By driving the Beef Checkoff out of existence, HSUS can end a program that has helped increase beef demand and made producers more successful. Ask yourself: If the Beef Checkoff wasn’t working, would HSUS line up to help us axe it? If the Beef Checkoff was failing, would HSUS work to help us prop it up? If demand was falling, would HSUS step in and support beef producers? If HSUS could help you add an animal to your herd, or help reduce it by one, where would it put its effort? The answers seem clear to me.


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December 2019 California Cattleman 15 Farm Credit West


REAL MEAT REAL SOLUTION OFFERED TO COMBAT ARTIFICIAL PROTEIN MARKETING from the National Cattlemen's Beef Association To the delight of its members and livestock producers nationwide, in early November, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association's Center for Public Policy introduced The Real Marketing Edible Artificials Truthfully (MEAT) Act of 2019. It's also being called the Real MEAT Act. THE PROBLEM: In recent years, ultra-processed alternative protein products have begun to proliferate the marketplace. These products “bleed” like real meat, “sizzle” like real meat, and are being marketed to real meat eaters under the guise that these products are more than just an imitation, they are a superior replacement to real meat products. Rather than empower consumers to make informed purchasing decisions by way of accurate and truthful labeling, a growing number of imitation products are relying on clever marketing campaigns and flagrantly deceptive labeling practices as a means of growing their market share. Consumers have the right to expect that the information on food labels is truthful and not misleading, just as all food products should expect to compete on a fair, level playing field. The federal government understands this, too. That’s why the various laws governing food product oversight all include a universal standard that labels are truthful and not misleading. Unfortunately, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has failed to initiate meaningful enforcement action against a host of legally misbranded products for decades. FDA’s willful ignorance of the law has created a de facto loophole that is now being exploited by an entirely new, niche industry whose marketing tactics rely solely on deception. THE REAL MEAT ACT WILL: 1.Codify the Definition of Beef for Labeling Purposes a. Establish a federal definition of beef that applies to food labels b. Preserve the Congressional Intent of the Beef Promotion and Research Act 2. Reinforce Existing Misbranding Provisions to Eliminate Consumer Confusion a. FDA has misbranding provisions for false or misleading labels b. Prevent further consumer confusion with alternative protein products c. Clarify the imitation nature of these alternative protein products 16 California Cattleman December 2019

3. Enhance the Federal Government’s Ability to Enforce the Law a. FDA will have to notify USDA if an imitation meat product is determined to be misbranded b. If FDA fail to undertake enforcement within 30 days of notifying USDA, Secretary of Agriculture is granted authority to seek enforcement action THE SOLUTION PART 1: CODIFY THE DEFINITION OF BEEF FOR LABELING PURPOSES The Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985 recognized the importance of U.S. beef production to the American economy and defined the terms “beef ” and “beef products” as part of an effort to strengthen the beef industry’s position in both domestic and foreign markets. While these definitions were codified in 1985, they are not applicable for labeling purposes. The United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspection Service (USDA FSIS) regulates meat labeling under the statutory authority of the Federal Meat Inspection Act (FMIA). FSIS enforces the law’s misbranding provisions in two important ways: 1) a mandatory labeling preapproval process; and 2) the Agency’s Food Standards and Labeling Policy Book, which offers guidance to help manufacturers prepare product labels that are truthful and not misleading. The FSIS Labeling Policy Book defines certain terms and sets specific product ingredient parameters, but to date, the term “beef ” is what’s referred to as a “common or usual name.” The ‘‘Real Marketing Edible Artificials Truthfully Act of 2019’’ or “Real MEAT Act” will codify a definition of “beef,” preserving the integrity of the Beef Promotion and Research Act of ’85 and strengthening the federal government’s ability to enforce appropriate labeling standards. THE SOLUTION PART 2: REINFORCE EXISTING MISBRANDING PROVISIONS TO ELIMINATE CONSUMER CONFUSION Proper labeling to provide the consumer with useful, factual information was the rationale for the original FDCA misbranding provisions, and that motivation has not changed in more than half a century. Over the years, there has been a tremendous change in the types of food products available to the American consumer, as well as some significant changes in the way food products are packaged and marketed. As new iterations of imitation


meat products enter the market, data indicates that there enforcement proceedings, the Secretary of Agriculture is is considerable consumer confusion surrounding these granted the authority to seek enforcement action. products. When choosing between real meat and imitation meat, both of which are in the meat case, most consumer CONCLUSION: The Real Meat Act will be a strong don’t realize that these products are regulated by two signal to the FDA that the labeling of food products must different government agencies and are held to an entirely be honest and accurate. The enforcement of truthful different set of standards. In a recent nationwide survey labeling will encourage fair and honest competition in the conducted by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, marketplace and benefit consumers. Consumers will be 55 percent did not understand that “plant-based beef ” assured that the labels they see in the grocery stores is a was an entirely vegan or vegetarian product. Further, when truthful representation of the product and allow individuals asked to compare plant-based meat to real beef, a majority to make purchasing decisions that are best for them in of respondents believed plant-based meat products were terms of health and affordability. healthier, more natural, less processed, lower in sodium, and better for the environment. A quick look at the ingredient labels indicate none of those beliefs could be further from Merry Christmas the truth. happy new yeaR

THE SOLUTION PART 3: ENHANCED THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT’S ABILITY TO ENFORCE THE LAW Under FFDCA, a food is considered misbranded if it: has a false or misleading label; is offered for sale under the name of another food; if it is an imitation of another food unless prominently labeled “imitation”; or if its container is so made, formed or filled to be misleading. While the law requires FDA to enforce these provisions, the Agency takes a fundamentally different approach than USDA. For example, FDA does not preapprove food product labels. In order to properly fulfill its statutory mission, FDA must seek enforcement action after a product has already entered the market and the damage has already been done. FDA oversees roughly 80% of the grocery store and it has been well documented that FDA’s oversight and enforcement efforts have not kept pace with the everincreasing number of food products sold in the U.S. in part due to a lack of resources. The Real MEAT Act addresses this issue by closing the regulatory gap that exists between USDA and FDA. If enacted, FDA will be required to notify USDA immediately, in writing, whenever the Agency determines that an imitation meat food product is legally misbranded or if said product’s labeling or marketing is misleading to consumers. After 30 days of receipt of notification, should FDA fail to initiate formal or informal

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BIG BUSINESS California’s working landscape generates $333 billion in sales, 1.5 million jobs from University of California College of Agriculture and Natural Resources California's working landscape and the industries associated with agriculture and natural resources contribute significantly to the state's economy, according to a new study by the California Community Colleges Centers of Excellence for Labor Market Research, California Economic Summit and the University of California's Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. “When people think of California's economy, they think of entertainment, information technology and other industries. They may not think of working landscape,” said Glenda Humiston, University of California vice president, agriculture and natural resources. “People may be surprised to learn that California's working landscape accounts for 6.4 percent of the state's economy, supports more than 1.5 million jobs and generates $333 billion in sales.” To measure the economic impact of the working landscape, researchers from the Centers of Excellence, California Economic Summit and UC Agriculture and Natural Resources analyzed federal data associated with employment, earnings and sales income of the nine segments that are essential to the working landscape: agricultural distribution, agricultural production, agricultural processing, agricultural support, fishing, forestry, mining, outdoor recreation and renewable energy. Their analysis of 2018 data from the North American Industry Classification System showed the value of the working landscape in California comes in ahead of the health care, real estate, retail and construction industries. The top five economic drivers were government (21.9 percent), manufacturing (10.2 percent), information (9.3 percent), professional, scientific and technical services (7.5 percent), and finance and insurance (6.4 percent). The researchers found the nearly 70,000 businesses associated with the working landscape paid $85 billion

18 California Cattleman December 2019

to workers in 2018 and generated $333 billion in sales income. In terms of job numbers, earnings, sales income and number of establishments, four segments dominate: agricultural distribution, agricultural production, agricultural processing and agricultural support. Agricultural production provides the greatest number of jobs, more than 325,000, and generates the second highest sales income, $61 billion in 2018. Although agriculture accounts for 79 percent of working landscape sales income, it is important to note that other working landscape segments are still sizeable when compared to the rest of the nation. In addition to evaluating the contribution of the industries to the state's economy, the researchers measured the importance and impact of the nine working landscape segments by region. For example, some segments, although relatively small in terms of employment or sales income, are cornerstones of local economies and play a critical role in the livelihoods of communities. The Los Angeles/Orange County region, the San Francisco Bay Area, and San Joaquin Valley have the greatest concentration of jobs for agricultural distribution, agricultural processing, agricultural support, mining and renewable energy. The San Joaquin Valley leads in agricultural production, followed by the Central Coast. Los Angeles/Orange County has the most forestry, fishing and outdoor recreation jobs. This report does not include economic values for ecosystem services provided by California's working landscape such as clean water, nutritious food and a livable climate, or intangible goods that contribute to human wellbeing, such as recreation, aesthetic inspiration and cultural benefits.


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Biozyme Release: California Breeder raises cattle with Commercial Producers’ Bottom Line in Mind Among the hills of Northern California exists a threegeneration seedstock operation that is striving to produce the kind of cattle that will add profit to their commercial bull buyers’ herds. Dan and Chris Byrd started Byrd Cattle Co. at Red Bluff., more than 40 years ago. Ty and Brooke, their two children enjoyed showing cattle, so the early years were focused on both the show ring and the commercial bull market. Though the marketing focus and the cattle have changed over the years, the family’s goals have not. The Byrds stay committed to raising high-quality, structurally sound, economically efficient bulls that will work for the commercial cattle producer. The Byrd family runs about 350 registered Angus cows over multiple ranches. They manage their cattle much like their commercial customers would, and the cows graze on native forages. The primary difference is at Byrd Cattle Co., they do use 100 percent artificial insemination (A.I.) to get females bred, and nearly 50 percent of their calf crop is the result of embryo transfer (E.T.). “Believe it or not, California is a pretty challenging environment to get cattle bred in, not just because of the different climates, but the different temperatures and different grasses coming on in different times of the year. We had tried a lot of different mineral that cattle would eat great for two months and then stop cold turkey. Literally on one day, they would all stop eating it,” Ty said. Tight calving windows mean tight breeding windows for the Byrds. A majority of their herd – 70 percent – calves in the spring, during a 60-day calving window, and the fall calvers are even tighter – 48 to 50 days – since they sell bulls as yearlings in their fall sale. Cow herd nutrition is vitally important to them, and they knew they needed their cows on mineral more than just two months out of the year, so they set out looking for a new mineral program. “In our program, we’re not so much concerned with what something costs, we’re concerned with the total picture and what we can get back. If we can make more pregnancies, then ultimately, we are putting more money in our pocket. We were basically looking for something that our cows would consume. We tried some of this Concept•Aid® one day, and it appears

to be the only thing we can get our cows to consistently consume,” Ty said. Byrd Cattle Co. has been feeding VitaFerm® Concept•Aid in both the loose mineral and tub form now for three or four years, and has seen marked improvements in its conception rates, both A.I. and E.T. Ty said their IVF conception rates are also running close to their embryo transfer conception rates, something he gives a lot of credit to the use of feeding Concept•Aid. “I would also tell you we are making better embryos when we flush here, and the only change we have made the last 3 to 4 years is in the mineral,” he said. VitaFerm Concept•Aid is a vitamin and mineral supplement for beef cattle specifically designed for reproductive success when fed 60 days pre-calving through 60 days post-breeding. It is especially beneficial in A.I. and E.T. breeding programs. A key ingredient is Amaferm®, a precision prebiotic designed to enhance digestibility by amplifying nutrient supply for maximum performance. It is researchproven to increase the energy available to the animal resulting in more milk production as well as to the ability to initiate and maintain pregnancy and fertility. With an increase in conception rates, Ty knows he’s getting more calves. He can offer more high-quality cattle to his customers so they can continue to remain profitable in the cattle business. He said that is an advantage to having big cow numbers; he’s been able to make them more efficient, thereby eliminating problem cattle and making the entire operation more profitable. “The cattle have to play by our rules. We sell about 120 bulls in the fall, some of which are only a year of age so thy need to be very uniform. As for the females, we sell those privately, and we’ll sell one or a semi load,” Ty said. Some things have changed at Byrd Cattle Co., during the last 40 years. However, as the younger generations become more involved, one thing won’t change. This family operation will continue to raise low birth, high growth cattle with marbling, muscle and feed efficiency to help their customers stay more profitable.

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December 2019 California Cattleman 21


RANGELAND TRUST TALK

LEADING A NEW CONVERSATION ABOUT AGRICULTURE by Keely Brazil for the California Rangeland Trust After meeting ranchers across the United States as 2018 of global emissions, but the U.S. Environmental Protection president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Agency found beef production was responsible for just (NCBA), Kevin Kester is hopeful for agriculture in 1.9 percent of emissions,” he explains. Although the UN America. eventually corrected the report to reflect the minimal “Everywhere I go, I’m seeing an influx of smart emissions output of U.S. beef compared with other and savvy young people coming to events, engaged and areas of production, the damage had already been done. participating. I’m really excited about the future of ranching “Everyone still uses the vastly incorrect numbers of the and agriculture when I see the engagement of millennials.” 2006 report.” Kevin has served on the NCBA Board of Directors The Green New Deal introduced earlier this year is an since 2007. He was president of the California Cattlemen’s example of how failing to communicate the reality about Association (CCA) for two years, and the San Luis Obispo food production can lead to misguided solutions. County Cattlemen’s Association. Kevin had never planned “I don’t think the congresswoman from New York has on getting into politics. A fifth-generation rancher, his ancestors have been ranching on California’s Central Coast since 1867. Kevin, his wife June and their children—Kayleen, Kody, and Kara—are all involved in ranch operations. But when Kevin’s grandfather passed away, the Kesters got a $2 million bill from the federal government. Through his work in estate tax policy, Kevin saw how desperately ranching families need spokesmen. “I’m a real advocate for the Rangeland Trust and what they stand for and all the good they can do to keep multi-generational farming and ranching operations in business,” Kevin says. His family was the first to partner with California Rangeland Trust in a start-to-finish ungifted pilot project which helped save Kester's Bear Valley Ranch. “I get asked if there is anything in our conservation easement I would change, and my honest answer is no. The Rangeland Trust wanted to make it successful for all of us. I’m very In 2018, Kevin Kester and the Kester family were the recipients of the pleased and satisfied with how our easement was Rangeland Trust's Conservationist of the Year Award. executed and how we have partnered together since. I think the organization has been very, very good for ranching interests in California.” Ranchers need all the support they can get. When asked about the challenges they face, Kevin names regulatory compliance as the heaviest burden. “The cost of compliance for regulatory issues, environmental issues, air and water quality and the multitude of bureaucracies in charge of emissions from federal to state to regional to local levels—you add all those bureaucracies up and you’re left with a real pyramid of regulatory requirements that makes it tough to stay in business.” Over-regulation is fueled by misinformation about agriculture. Kevin’s career in the political arena requires constantly correcting such misconceptions, including the oft-quoted United Nations 2006 report “Livestock’s Long Shadow.” “The report claimed livestock causes 18 percent Kevin Kester with daughter Kayleen Abati, grandaughter Keslee Abati and son-in-law Jared Abati 22 California Cattleman December 2019


animosity toward ag, but she doesn’t understand it,” Kevin says. “Many people have no connection to anyone in production agriculture. They just know what they see in the grocery store and on social media. That’s a huge challenge for us. We have to educate our consumers globally and domestically on how we actually grow and produce food. We have a good story to tell.” Thanks to advancements in genetics and technology, high-quality protein production in the U.S. is leaving a smaller environmental footprint than ever. By exporting U.S. beef to global markets, Kevin believes we could help lower global emissions while supporting nutrition across the world. “Going into the future, our domestic demand will stay relatively stable—but our export market is growing pretty rapidly. That’s where our profit center lies for future generations. Not only can the U.S. produce protein much more sustainably than other areas of production, we also provide a good, safe, healthy product that consumers across the world want. This will keep ranchers in business, and it’s good news for the global environment.” The key is learning how to share that message. This year, the Kester family hosted the U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Beef at their Parkfield ranch. With 115 members ranging from cow-calf ranchers to major retailers such as Walmart and McDonalds, the group’s goal is to collect and communicate definitive

sustainability metrics for the beef and cattle sector. Kevin says this research should have been done decades ago, and he’s committed to making up for lost time. “The data tells a great story. This is a prime example of where we’re starting to engage in social media and public relations; efforts where we should have been active 30 years ago. People want to team up with the industry to tell this story of how raising cattle is good for the environment, the economy, and the world.” Communicating this story effectively will require the support of food producers. During his term as NCBA president, Kevin spent 300 days on the road. Everywhere he went, he talked to America’s farmers and ranchers about the importance of their voices and leadership. “A food producer’s perspective carries a lot of weight with elected officials and agency staff. I’ve seen it many, many times. When you take the time to show up in person or send a letter or make a phone call, it is really true that a single voice can make a difference.” For many Americans, that perspective is needed more than ever. With a positive message and exciting new research to share, the time is now. “In a lot of people’s minds, we still wear the white cowboy hat,” Kevin says. “When we speak up—though we are small in numbers and we are fighting above our weight class—it makes a difference. Together, we can be very successful.”

The Kester family worked with the Rangeland Trust to conserve the Bear Valley Ranch in Parkfield, California.

December 2019 California Cattleman 23


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HERD HEALTH CHECK

STORED FORAGE FOR CATTLE: WINTER FEEDING CHALLENGES by Chris Forcherio, Ph.D., beef research manager, Purina

Forage is a cow’s number one nutrient source, but it’s also the most expensive, especially come winter. Stored forage for cattle can create challenges, but it’s important to make the most of it. Here are some common stored forage challenges and remedies: 1. The cattle hay fed is only as good as the grass cut. It’s common to push pounds of dry matter (DM) per acre, which usually means mature, less nutritious grass. You can make use of poor-quality cattle hay with proper supplementation, but you must know what the quality is. Test forage samples from multiple bales, and use the results to help determine if you need to use cattle supplements. 2. Interpreting the forage test. The key things to consider from forage testing results are dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and total digestible nutrients (TDN). TDN is an estimate of the total amount of nutrients that may be digested by the animal. The greater the TDN value, the more energy the animal consumes. Also look at the Relative Feed Value (RFV) or Relative Forage Quality (RFQ) estimates. These are indexes that estimate the quality of the forage tested. Hay with an RFV or RFQ of 100 is about average. Forage for cattle at this level is nutritious but will likely only meet the maintenance needs for a dry, pregnant cow. A lactating female needs higher quality. As RFV or RFQ increases, the forage is more nutritious and digestible.

26 California Cattleman December 2019

3. There’s mold in the cattle hay. What should you do with moldy hay? We don’t recommend feeding moldy hay, but sometimes it’s the only option. If you must use moldy forage for cattle, peel off and discard sections with heavy mold. Dilute the moldy cattle hay you feed with some that’s less moldy or not moldy. Beware: Mold can cause pregnant cows to abort. It can also cause challenges for people. If you have frequent exposure to moldy hay, you can develop a condition called farmer’s lung from breathing mold spores. 4. Cattle hay quality varies. Feed high-quality hay to cows with the highest requirement – cows that are close to calving or that just calved. Nutrient requirements spike when cows begin lactating. You can also feed high-quality hay to replacement heifers or cows that need to gain weight over winter. Cows that need to maintain weight, not gain, can be fed a lesser-quality cattle hay. 5. Wasted forage. If you have a choice, use forage stored indoors. Wetness and mold are less likely to develop indoors, compared to forage for cattle stored outdoors. If you have both hay types – indoor and outdoor stores – use the outside hay first to minimize the loss of nutrients over time. You’ll also help curb dry matter loss, which happens when weather impacts forage. We recommend using cattle hay feeders to minimize loss.


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December 2019 California Cattleman 29


In Memory JOHNY ROEN

Albert John “Johny” Roen passed away on October 30, 2019 surrounded by his family. He had a great love of life, family, hard work and told all he had a “Great Run” in life to the very end. Johny was born in Oakdale, on Sept. 6, 1933 to Albert and Marie Roen. He married the love of his life, Betty on March 21, 1953. They had four children: Albert John III (preceded his dad in death), Erik, Paul (Sheri), and Jennifer (Tyler) Holzum. He had 14 grandchildren and four great grandchildren. He served honorably in the Army Corp of Engineers for four years after being drafted in 1953 and served in the Army Reserves for four more years. Johny was a third-generation cowman, running cattle in all the west coast states. His passions in life were his family, friends, cowboying, trucking, fishing and fire-fighting. He raised his family on the same ranch he grew up on and relocated to the Sierra Valley in 2011 where he and his wife were very active in the community, making many friends and continuing his cattle operation. His greatest joy came from spending time with his children, grandchildren, friends, and traveling to their

sporting events and rodeos. Johny’s grandfather immigrated from Norway in 1869 and sponsored 220 fellow Norwegians, giving them a mule and seed to farm with upon arrival in our country. Service and involvement were pivotal in Johny’s life. He was a volunteer fireman, commissioner, fire chief of the Waterford Volunteer Fire Department, trustee for the Oakdale Joint Union High School for 12 years, president of the local cattlemen’s association, a state director for the California Cattlemen's Association and was honored as Cattleman of the Year from the county cattlemen's organization. He served as director for the Resource Conservation District, director for the Farm Bureau, and arena director for the La Grange Rodeo Association. He received the Agriculture and Community Service Award from the town of Waterford, he was a server for the Oakdale Cowboy Museum’s Annual Fundraiser for many years, and he was a lifetime member of the Pro Rodeo Historical Society. A Celebration of Johnny’s life will be held on Saturday, Nov. 23 at 2 p.m. at the Sierra Valley Grange in Vinton. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Loyalton Athletic Scholarship Fund at P.O. Box 1000, Loyalton, CA 96118, or a charity of your choice. The Family would like to request that you share your written “Johny” stories or memories to Betty Roen, P.O. Box 38, Sierraville, CA 96126 or holzumqh@aol.com.

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Check out our new line of ArrowQuip products!

Financing Available!

Stop In or visit us online to see how we can help you! Shipping available statewide! (530) 347-5077 • 3748 Main St. Cottonwood, CA 96022 • www.shastafarmequipment.com 30 California Cattleman December 2019


PHIL RAYNARD

Philip Norman Raynard, 95, of Rocklin, California, passed away on Aug. 6, 2019. Born Feb. 7, 1924, in North Platte, Neb., he was the oldest of five children born to Harvey and Eunice Raynard (“four hired men and a daughter”). Growing up on the family’s Sandhills farm during the Depression, he rode a horse three miles to a oneroom schoolhouse before attending high school in Stapleton. Phil enrolled at the University of Nebraska in the fall of 1941, but his studies were cut short by WWII: he turned 18 two months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and enlisted in the U.S. Navy as an Aviation Cadet. He became a Naval Aviator in September 1944 and flew PBM Mariner flying boats in Squadron VPB-28 in the Philippines. He returned to college in the fall of 1946, where he was a member of Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity and Sigma Delta Chi, the honorary journalism fraternity, and was founding president of Kappa Alpha Mu, the honorary photographic fraternity. He graduated in 1949, acquiring a bachelor’s degree in Agriculture and a Journalism certificate, along with a lifelong passion for Cornhusker football. While working in Denison, Iowa as an ad manager for agribusiness firm Foxbilt, Phil spotted “a pretty, dark-haired girl” in a local restaurant. Her name was Ann Norman; after a long-distance courtship, they married in 1960. In 1962 they moved to California, where Phil worked as a field editor for the Western Livestock Journal and started Phil Raynard Livestock Services, which provided advertising, photography and insurance services for horse and cattle breeders. In 1968 they moved from La Mirada to Auburn. Phil was publisher of the California Cattleman magazine for 16 years, during which time he became a real estate broker. He established Raynard Ranch Realty, working with his close friend and longtime business partner, Dave Van Cleve, until his retirement in 2013. In his spare time, he enjoyed visiting his grandkids, writing, working in his garden, and relentlessly sharing his mandarins, plums and tomatoes. Phil’s optimism and sense of humor will be missed by family and friends, including daughters Coral Flood (Harold) of Rocklin, and Holly Raynard (Amlan) of Gainesville, Fla., grandson Ryan Flood and granddaughter Mackenna Flood, sister Barbara Manhart (Garvin) and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife; and brothers Jack, Richard and Rolland. At Phil’s request, no funeral services were held. Memorials may be sent to the Alpha Gamma Rho scholarship fund or one’s charity of choice.

Wedding Bells new arrival AVILA & NAILLON

SAGE EDWARDS Tyler and Katie Edwards, Sara Jo Avila and Logan Sacramento welcomed their daughter Naillon were married in Sage Leigh on Nov. 14. She weighed 7 Chowchilla on Nov. 2. poiunds, 3 ounces and was 20 inches The bride, employed by long. Zoetis is the daughter of Sam Proud Avila and the late Katie White. grandparens The groom is the son of Steve are Gary Ward, Naillon, Auburn and Leslie Tonelli of Greenwood and works Gardnerville, Gail Simas, as large equipment operator for Teichert Construction in addition Latrobe and Rick and Susan to being a horse trainer. The Edwards, couple has made their home in Monterey. Chowchilla.

SHOULD YOU ORDER THE ANAPLASMOSIS VACCINE?

Anaplasmosis is an infectious parasitic disease in cattle, spread primarily by ticks and blood sucking insects like mosquitoes. The killed anaplasmosis vaccine protects cows and bulls of any age from infection and requires a booster given 4 to 6 weeks after the initial vaccination. Find out below if you should order the vaccine!

Do you own cattle?

NO

You don’t need it, but should still support the California Cattlemen’s Association

YES

YES

YES

Do they graze in areas where Anaplasmosis is a problem?

NO

(Consult your local veterinarian to find out)

Do you want to prevent the effects of the disease including severe anemia, weakness, fever lack of appetite, depression, constipation, decreased milk production, jaundice, abortion and possibly death?

NO You don’t need to order it

ORDER TODAY BY CALLING (916) 444-0845! Available in 10 or 50 dose bottles 10-40 doses: $8.50 per dose 50+ doses: $7.50 per dose *10 dose minimum and $10 flat rate shipping

SOLD ONLY TO CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION MEMBERS

December 2019 California Cattleman 31


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

SEPTEMBER 20

M i d Va l l e y

9th Annual

Thanks to all our buyers at the annual BCC Bull Sale!

THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS! 5031 Jersey Island Rd • Oakley, CA 94561

BAR BAR KD KD RANCH RANCH Elevating Angus to Greater Horizons

“PERFORMANCE, GROWTH & CARCASS GENETICS” Look for our “Distinctly Different” Angus Bulls at the 2020 Red Bluff & Modoc Bull Sales

KENNY & DIANNE READ

CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE!

1485 SW King Lane • Culver, OR 97734 Ranch: (541) 546-2547 Cell: (541)480-9340

BULLS, FEMALES, EMBRYOS AND SEMEN FOR SALE AT THE RANCH IN LOS MOLINOS

Lee Nobmann, owner Morgon Patrick, managing partner (530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com

E-mail: barkdranch@msn.com visit us online at: www.barkdangusranch.com

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! VISIT US AT WWW.DONATIRANCH.COM!

PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

32 California Cattleman December 2019

September 12, 2019


Angus

RAnch

CONTACT US FOR SEMEN ON THESE TOP ANGUS HERDSIRES!

Annual Sale: September 1, 2018 Join usBull Oct. 14Sat., for our elite annual Inaugural Female Sale:female Mon., October bull and sales! 15, 2018

O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR PF Churchill 2825

SIRE: V D A R Churchill 1063 MGS: V D A R Really Windy 4097

Tim & Marilyn Callison............................... Owners Chad Davis ..................................... 559 333 0362 Travis Coy ...................................... 559 392 8772 Justin Schmidt................................ 209 585 6533 Ranch Website ................. www.ezangusranch.com

VDAR Black Cedar

SIRE: V D A R Black Cedar 8380 MGS: Cole Creek Cedar Ridge 1V

SEPTEMBER 20

M i d Va l l e y

9th Annual

O’NEAL RANCH — Since 1878—

Join us Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020

for the Performance Plus Angus Bull Sale

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2019.

O’NEAL RANCH BULLS OFFER THE COMPLETE PACKAGE GROWTH • PERFORMANCE ADAPTABILITY • CARCASS

We hope to see you in Firebaugh Oct. 12 for our annual female sale! Contact us for information on cattle available private treaty.

Gary & Betsy Cardoza

PO Box 40 • O’Neals, CA 93645 (559) 999-9510

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

Gerber, CA

Offering bulls at California’s top consignment sales! Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882

Call today about private treaty offerings!

RED RIVER FARMS 13750 West 10th Avenue Blythe, CA 92225 Office: 760-922-2617 Bob Mullion: 760-861-8366 Michael Mullion: 760-464-3906

Simmental – SimAngus™ – Angus December 2019 California Cattleman 33


Thank you for attending the annual TAR bull sale! Join us again in 2020!

(530) 385-1570

E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS Call us today for information on private treaty bulls or females. 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

Chris Beck • 618-367-5397

Registered Hereford Cattle & Quarter Horses

A FAMILY TRADITION

Thank you to our 2019 production sale customers!

Angus and SimAngus Cattle John Teixeira: (805) 448-3859 Allan Teixeira: (805) 310-3353 Tom Hill: (541) 990-5479

Annual Sale First Monday in March 42500 Salmon Creek Rd Baker City, OR 97814

Ranch: (541) 523-4401 Bob Harrell, Jr.: (541) 523-4322

www.teixeiracattleco.com | cattle@thousandhillsranch.com

CHAROLAIS

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR 2019 BUYERS!

Feedlot • Rice • Charolais 2015 AICA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Jerry & Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760 Williams, CA bbr@citlink.net

Mobile: (530) 681-5046 Office (530) 473-2830 www.brokenboxranch.com

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199 Call AHA today for assistance or information on buying or marketing of Hereford cattle! THURSDAY, SEPT. 12, 2019

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

11500 N Ambassador Drive, Suite 410 | Kansas City, MO 64153 | (816) 842-3757 | aha@hereford.org

34 California Cattleman December 2019

3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

THANK YOU TO OUR BUTTE AND MODOC BULL SALE BUYERS! Oroville, CA LambertRanchHerefords.com


REGISTERED HEREFORD CATTLE

“THE BRAND YOU CAN COUNT ON”

Call us about our upcoming consignments or private treaty cattle available off the ranch.

BARRY, CARRIE & BAILEY MORRELL Barry: (530) 6825808 • Carrie: (530) 218-5507 Bailey (530) 519-5189 morrellranches@yahoo.com 560 County Road 65, Willows CA 95988

JoinususOct for15, our2018 annual production sale iu Modesto! Join for our annual production sale!

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

SPANISH RANCH Your Source for Brangus and Ultrablack Genetics in the West!

Hereford Bulls Now AvAilABle!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

P.W. GILLIBRAND Cattle Co.

Horned and Polled Hereford Genetics

Private treaty bulls available or watch for our consignments at Cal Poly! Dwight Joos Ranch Manager P.O. Box 1019 • Simi Valley, CA 93062 805-520-8731 x1115 • Mobile 805-428-9781 dwight.joos@pwgcoinc.com Simi Valley, CA

pwgillibrandcattle.com

THE DOIRON FAMILY (707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

h

Building Extremely High Quality Beef Since 1978

Bulls and females available private treaty!

La Grange, CA • Greeley Hill, CA Stephen Dunckel • (209) 878-3167 www.tubleweedranch.net twd@tumbleweedranch.net December 2019 California Cattleman 35


J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

DRILL STEM FOR FENCING

Good supply of all sizes from 1.66 to 6 5/8. 2 3/8", 2 7/8" and 3 1/2" cut posts 7, 8 & 10 ft.

CABLE SUCKER ROD CONTINUOUS FENCE Heavy duty gates, guard rail and the best big bale feeders on the market today with a 10-year warranty, save hay.

Pay for itself in first season!

(530) 949-2285

SALE MANAGEMENT

M3CATTLEMARKETING@GMAIL.COM (916) 803-3113

& Semen Distributor

• A.I, CIDR & heat synchronization • Extensive experience • Willing to Travel • Well-versed in dairy & beef pedigrees

JORGE MENDOZA • (530) 519-2678 jmmawss@gmail.com 15880 Sexton Road, Escalon, CA

FARM EQUIPMENT BALE WAGONS

M3 MARKETING SALE MANAGEMENT & MARKETING PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY ORDER BUYING PRIVATE TREATY SALES PRODUCTION SALE RING SERVICE ADVERTISING

Full Service JMM GENETICS A.I. Technician

Over 30 years of excellence in ag fencing & animal handling design-build

Christopher L. Hanneken 800-84-FENCE

www.southwestfenceandsupply.com

Ranch Fencing Materials and Accessories & Ranch Supplies

www.runningMgroup.com Monique Hanneken 805-635-4940

New Holland self propelled and pull-type models/parts/tires

sell/buy/deliver/can finance

(208) 880-2889

www.balewagon.com Jim Wilhite, Caldwell, ID 35 Years in the Bale Wagon Business!

REAL ESTATE

J-H FEED INC. ORLAND, CA

KNIPE LAND COMPANY

Oregon - Purebred Cattle Ranch

1,050± acres has creek, home, shop, 1,018 AU grazing permit and irrigation. Cattle available by Private Treaty. $6,500,000

Idaho - Cascade Ranch

3300 Longmire Drive• College Station, TX 77845 (800) 768-4066 • (979) 693-0388 fax: (979) 693-7994 e-mail: info@bovine-elite.com

970± acres with over 600 irrigated. Excellent cattle ranch with development potential, about an hour from Boise. $5,900,000 Washington - Sassin Station Ranch 419± acre ranch with 4,000 sf home, barns, creek and large spring-fed pond. $1,900,000

208-345-3163 knipeland.com

your business could be here!

36 California Cattleman December 2019


from your friends at the california cattlemen’s Association December 2019 California Cattleman 37


Advertisers’ Index 7Up Ranch................................................................................. 35 Amador Angus......................................................................... 32 American Ag Credit................................................................. 15 American Hereford Association............................................. 34 Anderson Land & Livestock, Inc............................................ 27 Animal Health International.................................................. 36 Bar Ale....................................................................................... 28 Bar KD Ranch........................................................................... 32 Bar R Angus.............................................................................. 32 Bovine Elite, LLC...................................................................... 36 Broken Box Ranch.................................................................... 34 Byrd Cattle Company.............................................................. 32 Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show............. 27 Cattlemen's Livestock Market................................................. 17 Charron Ranch......................................................................... 32 CoBank...................................................................................... 15 Conlin Supply Company, Inc.................................................. 24 CSU Chico College of Ag........................................................ 35 Dal Porto Livestock.................................................................. 32 Datamars............................................................................. 21, 28 Dixie Valley Angus............................................................. 32, 39 Donati Ranch............................................................................ 32 EZ Angus................................................................................... 33 Farm Credit West..................................................................... 15 Freitas Rangeland Management............................................. 28 Fresno State Ag Foundation.................................................... 36 Furtado Angus.......................................................................... 33 Furtado Livestock Enterprises................................................ 36 Genex......................................................................................... 19 Genoa Livestock....................................................................... 34 Harrell Herefords..................................................................... 34 HAVE Angus............................................................................. 33 Hogan Ranch............................................................................ 33 Hone Ranch.............................................................................. 35 Hufford's Herefords.................................................................. 34 J-H Feed Inc.............................................................................. 36 Jim Whilhite Bale Wagons...................................................... 36 JMM Genetics........................................................................... 36

38 California Cattleman December 2019

Knipe Land Co.......................................................................... 36 Lambert Ranch......................................................................... 34 Little Shasta Ranch................................................................... 35 M3 Marketing........................................................................... 36 McPhee Red Angus.................................................................. 34 Morrell Ranches....................................................................... 35 New Generation Supplements................................................ 24 Noahs Angus Ranch................................................................. 33 Nobmann Cattle....................................................................... 39 O'Connel Ranch....................................................................... 33 Oneal Ranch.............................................................................. 33 P.W. Gillibrand Cattle. Co....................................................... 35 Pacific Trace Minerals.............................................................. 36 Pitchfork Cattle Co................................................................... 35 Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale................................................... 2 Red River Farms....................................................................... 33 Running M Group.................................................................... 36 Sammis Ranch.......................................................................... 33 Schafer Ranch........................................................................... 33 Schohr Herefords..................................................................... 35 Shasta Farm & Equipment...................................................... 30 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard................................................. 9 Sierra Ranches.......................................................................... 35 Silveira Bros.............................................................................. 33 Southwest Fence and Supply................................................... 36 Spanish Ranch.......................................................................... 35 Step Aside Farms...................................................................... 33 Superior Livestock.................................................................... 28 Tehama Angus Ranch.............................................................. 34 Teixeira Cattle Co..................................................................... 34 Tumbleweed Ranch.................................................................. 35 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard............................................. 11 VF Red Angus........................................................................... 34 Vintage Angus Ranch........................................................ 34, 40 Western Stockman's Market..................................................... 7 Western Video Market............................................................... 3 Wulff Brothers Livestock......................................................... 34


MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM ALL OF US AT DIXIE VALLEY RANCH!

BALDRIDGE ISABEL E318 A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR 2019 CAL POLY BULL BUYERS... ALTA GENETICS • AVILA RANCHES BOSTON RANCH • MATT SIMONIN • JIM SPREAFICO

watch for our ucoming consighents at Snyder’s “bulls for the 21st Century” in 2020! Lee Nobmann, owner • Morgon Patrick, managing partner 8520 5th Ave E., Montague CA 96064

(530) 526-5920 • morgon@nobmanncattle.com December 2019 California Cattleman 39


THE FEMALE SALE

VINTAGE ANGUS WOULD LIKE TO THANK OUR 2019 FEMALE BUYERS... 84 LOTS GROSSED $2,133,000

2019 “GENETIC GOLD” FEMALE SALE CUSTOMERS

V A R POWER PLAY DAUGHTER A special thank you to Lylester Ranch, NE, for the $140,000 selection of Vintage Blackcap 9134.

A special thank you to Edisto Pines Farm, SC, for the $110,000 half-interest selection of Vintage Blackcap 8583.

44 Farms, TX Jose Aguirre, AR Angus Hill Farm, NY Angus of Clear Creek, TX Baldridge Bros Angus, NE Bar Mule Shoe Ranch, CA Belle Point Ranch, AR Betts Angus Farms, UT Blue Lake Cattle Ranch, KY Boyd Beef Cattle, KY Charron Ranch, CA Cigar City Cattle Co, FL Circle G Angus Ranches, GA Cox Ranch, TX Crazy K Ranch, TN Dembi Angus, ID Dixie Farms, LA Dixie Valley Ranch, CA Edisto Pines Farm, SC Express Ranches, OK EZ Angus Ranch, CA

Faith Ranch, CA FB Genetics, TX Ficken Angus Ranch, CA Four Sons Farm, KY Friendship Farms, GA Gobbell Farms, TN Gonzales, Albert, CA Hartzell, Nicole, CA Hennagan Ranch, CA Hertlein Cattle Co., CA Huwa Cattle Co, CO Ingram Angus LLC, TN J&J Angus, PA Jason Judge, CA Keith Gardiner Farming, CA Linz Heritage Angus, IN Lockhart Angus, IL Lylester Ranch, NE Stephen Maddo, CA McDonald Cattle Co, MO Optum Angus, OH

Pollard Farms, OK Red Creek Angus Ranch, UT Riverbend Ranch, ID Rooney Angus Ranch, WI Rothlin, Arnold & Roseline, CA Rowh Angus, KS Jonathan Russell, MO Shining C Ranch, CA Soaring Eagle Farms, MO Spring Grove Ranch, VA Spruce Mountain Ranch, CO Stonewall Ridge Farm, TN Sun Valley Cattle, CA Teixeira Cattle Co, CA Glen & Tom Truckenbrod, IL Voss Farms, NE Walkers Branch Angus, NC Wall Street Cattle Co, FL Ward Ratliff Farms, KY Wilks Ranch Texas, TX XL Angus Ranch, WY

V A R POWER PLAY DAUGHTER A special thank you to Linz Angus, IN, and Herbster Angus, NE, for their $102,500 selection of Vintage Henrieta Pride 9387.

V A R POWER PLAY DAUGHTER A special thank you to Rooney Angus, WI, for the $100,000 half-interest selection of Vintage Isabel 9356.

From all of us at Vintage Angus Ranch JIM COLEMAN, OWNER DOUG WORTHINGTON, MANAGER BRAD WORTHINGTON, OPERATIONS MIKE HALL, BULL SERVICES (805) 748-4717 2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM OFFICE@VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM

Profile for California Cattleman

December 2019 California Cattleman  

December 2019 California Cattleman