Page 1

October 2015

Turlock Livestock Auction Yard

Serving Ranchers from the Sierras to the sea what’s inside this issue... the varying degrees of drought cautious optimism for el niùo season bull sale recap: records made to be broken October 2015 California Cattleman 1


e v i l s u n i o J r online! o UPCOMING EVENTS... SHASTA LIVESTOCK, COTTONWOOD

SHASTA LIVESTOCK, COTTONWOOD CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE OCTOBER 21

SILVER LEGACY, RENO,NEV. CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE NOVEMBER 11

bid online at www.wvmcattle.com

Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy. 2 California Cattleman October 2015


Teixeira Cattle Co.

21st Annual

October 9•4 p.m. Offering: Spring & Fall, Open & Bred Heifers • Bulls • Cows • Steers Embryos • Heifer Pregnancy TEX Wendy 4711

TEX Adam 4101

Sire: EXAR Denver 2002B • Dam: TEX Wendy 2713

Sire: Ankonian Adam 8288 • Dam: Basin Heather Bloom 065N

TEX New Day 41

TEX Lucy 3906

Sire: Basin Payweight 006S • Dam: MJB Lucy 3081 992

Sire: B/R New Day 454 • Dam: B/R Destination 727-928

Allan & Cecilia Teixeira (805) 595-1404 John & HeatherTeixeira (805) 595-1416 • (805) 448-3859

WITH GUEST CONSIGNORS

J/V Angus

Bill Traylor, (530) 304-2811 Veenendaal Angus Eddie Veenendaal, (559) 259-5631

SALE MANAGED BY: 855 Thousand Hills Rd., Pismo Beach, CA 93449 LARRY COTTON www.teixeiracattleco.com (517) 294-0777 cattle@thousandhillsranch.com RYAN COTTON Psalms 50:10 (706) 206-8361 October 2015 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

CIRCLING THE DRAIN OF POLITICAL CORRECTNESS

Billy Flournoy, Likely FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS

Mark Lacey, Independence Jack Lavers, Glennville Rich Ross, Lincoln TREASURER Rob von der Lieth, Copperopolis

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS

Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE

Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS

Malorie Bankhead

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR

Jenna Chandler

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING MAGAZINE EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen (208) 996-4922 stevie.ipsen@gmail.com

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES

Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net

by CCA Second Vice President Jack Lavers

To some of you who know me, you might read this title and think to yourself, ‘That sounds nothing like Jack Lavers.’ But indeed these are my words and my opinions of the coming apocalypse that is liberalism. The weapons of choice for the four horsemen are political correctness, sensationalism and appeasement. One does not need to look far to find examples of the left using simpletons to pontificate unfounded attacks on the everyday hardworking Americans. We need only look to the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service’s handling of our grazing allotments through ut the western United States. Environmentalists have, at taxpayer’s expense, continued to sue the interior department over our grazing. In doing so we have continued to watch the number of cattle on public ground dwindle. It has not been taken into account that the grazing of cattle is scientifically beneficial to our public lands, wildlife and also to our economies. The protection of endangered and threatened species has been the deadliest blow to our way of life and the health of these public lands. It has never been more evident than the last few years. Forest fires have ravaged much of our prized national treasures causing still unknown damage to local economies, endangered or threatened species, individuals homes and to air quality. Forest fires have even taken the lives of those who are fighting to protect these precious resources. Why must we even defend ourselves? Many biologists and range experts openly admit that we need logging, we need grazing, we need brush management. However, the leaders of government bureaucracy wish to appease the leftist thinking rather than fight for what is best. I once heard Dan Dagget talk of how he

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917

BILLING SERVICES

Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

wanted to improve the environment and that is why he had to quit as one of the leaders of the Sierra Club. It seems the leftist are not really concerned with helping but insisting on keeping it natural and cattle apparently aren’t natural. But are domesticated horses that run free on public ground natural? You cannot share a post on Facebook about the “wild” mustang without creating a huge ruckus about the poor management of the BLM. The problem is it generally has to do with the BLM’s handling of “roundups.” Many people will opine of the need to let these animals roam free. However, they are blinded by a stigmatism that no matter how often it is pointed out, horse slaughter is still evil and the destruction of the rangeland in which these mustangs run is acceptable because it is natural. What of the devastation caused to the Sage Grouse and its habitat by these “wild” mustangs and forest fires that have burned out of control? I would insist, with great urgency, that now is the time for our association to be at the forefront in attacking political correctness and going after those that make policy that negatively impacts our industry. I would encourage resources to be used to advertise to the public and to the government agencies cold hard facts. Such as “Log it, graze it or watch it burn!” I would encourage litigation against the many different agencies and environmental groups who wish to destroy our way of life and the economies of rural America. From the times of our great founders at the beginning of this great country, to the founders of our own family farms and ranches, our freedoms have been eroding. As a great association, lets stand up together and start taking those freedoms back.

Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

4 California Cattleman October 2015


OCTOBER 2015 Volume 98, Issue 9

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

ON THE COVER

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN Telling it like it is

4

BUNKHOUSE Keeping CCA in the black

9

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 10 CCA working to prevent further wildfire catastrophe VET VIEWS 22 The expense of preg checking could keep you dollars ahead BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD Australia beef finally seeing downturn

30

CHIMES 38 California CattleWomen making names for themselves

SPECIAL FEATURES

The many faces of California’s drought More rumors of El Niño UC seeking ranchers for ranch-to-rail program Kester to be honored at Cow Palace Getting to know the CCA Executive Board

READER SERVICES

Cattlemen’s Report Buyers’ Guide New Members and New Arrivals Advertisers Index

16 32 42 44 46

48 50 56 58

This month’s cover features Turlock Livestock Auction Yard (TLAY), where business is always done with a handshake. A longtime family-owned and operated marketing business known across the West, TLAY has a reputation for providing second-to-none service to California ranchers “from the Sierras to the sea.” Shown on the cover this month is is Col. Max Olvera with longtime customers Jim Hadyn-Myer and his wife Jan, Oakdale. As the choice market yard for many California beef producers, the employees and management at TLAY work tirelessly to ensure that all parties – both buyer and seller – are happy with the marketing process. An NHTC-Certified auction yard, TLAY markets more than 100,000 head of cattle each year and prides itself on carrying on the personal service of which its foundation was built upon. The team at TLAY takes great pride in assisting with your livestock merchandising needs, where you can always be assured that they are big enough to compete, yet small enough to care. The TLAY family offers a special “thank you” to all of the cattle producers and buyers who helped make the 2015 spring and summer a tremendous success and extend a special invitation to join them this month at their 9th Annual TLAY Special Fall Feeder sale on Oct. 6 and the 9th Annual TLAY Fall Female Replacement Sale on Oct. 10. For more information on upcoming events and fall specials, see the ad on the next page. TLAY representatives also represent customers through the Western Video Market, based in Cottonwood. For more information about consignments or upcoming specials, feel free to contact the stockyard office at (209) 634-4326 or any of the below representatives.

Col. Max Olvera....... (209) 277-2063 Col. Steve Faria........ (209) 988-7180 Col. Eddie Nunes ���� (209) 604-6848 Col. Chuck Cozzi..... (209) 652-4480

Bud Cozzi................ (209) 652-4480 John Luiz ���������������� (209) 480-5101 Brandon Baba �������� (209) 480-1267 Jake Bettencourt......(209) 262-4019

October 2015 California Cattleman 5


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

DON’T MISS THESE FALL EVENTS

TUES., OCTOBER 6 9 ANNUAL TLAY SPECIAL FALL FEEDER SALE SAT., OCTOBER 10 CALIFORNIA ANGUS & CHAROLAIS BREEDERS’ BULL TH

SALE & TLAY ANNUAL FALL FEMALE REPLACEMENT SALE

FEATURING 300 TOP QUALITY PAIRS, BRED, AND OPEN FEMALES FROM REPUTATION RANCHES. THIS SALE WILL ALSO FEATURE TOP QUALITY BRED AND OPEN FEMALES.

•70 FANCY FIRST CALF ANGUS HEIFER PAIRS FROM IRON HOUSE CATTLE CO. WITH CALVES SIRED BY ANGUS BULLS WITH EXCELLENT EPDS & QUALIFY FOR NHTC. •25 ANGUS & BWF PAIRS FROM JIM THOMAS. COWS ARE 3 TO 5 YEARS OLD & THE CALVES ARE SIRED BY RANCHO CASINO/DAL PORTO ANGUS BULLS.

•40 TOP QUALITY ANGUS PAIRS FROM MATHESON RANCHES.

•100 FIRST AND SECOND CALF PAIRS FROM 3 DIFFERENT RANCHES. •100 ANGUS PAIRS FROM STEELE RANCH.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR THESE SPECIAL FEEDER SALES: OCT. 20 • NOV. 3 • NOV. 17 • DEC. 15 CALL US TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CONSIGNING CATTLE TO UPCOMING WESTERN VIDEO MARKET SALES!

JOIN US IN COTTONWOOD, CA OCT. 8 AND OCT. 29!

FROM THE SIERRAS TO THE SEA, OUR TEAM IS ALWAYS HERE TO ASSIST YOU IN MEETING YOUR BUYING AND SELLING NEEDS! TLAY REPRESENTATIVES

MAX OLVERA.......................... 209 277-2063 STEVE FARIA .......................... 209 988-7180 EDDIE NUNES......................... 209 604-6848 CHUCK COZZI ........................ 209 652-4479 BUD COZZI .............................. 209 652-4480 JOHN LUIZ ............................... 209 480-5101 BRANDON BABA................... 209 480-1267 JAKE BETTENCOURT ........... 209 262-4019

6 California Cattleman October 2015

TURLOCK LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD OFFICE: 209 634-4326 209 667-0811

10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381 www.turlocklivestock.com


HORNED

4027 BW +2.6

WW +52

4051

3076

SIRE: NJW 98S R117 RIBEYE 88X ET MGS: C 212 DOMINO 4011 ET YW +82

MILK +30

RE +.15

MARB +.23

$CHB +$29

BW +5.2

SIRE: C 212 DOMINO 4011 ET MGS: /S BOTTOMLINE 6420 ET WW +54

YW +96

MILK +26

RE +.55

BW +2.8

MARB +.21

$CHB +$33

25

SIRE: /S LR HONCHO T32 2648Z MGS: HARVIE TAILOR MADE ET 7W WW +55

YW +82

MILK +26

RE +.50

MARB -.10

$CHB +$24

BW +4.6

SIRE: H5 001 DOMINO 906 MGS: /S BOTTOMLINE 6420 ET WW +62

YW +103

MILK +27

RE +.20

$CHB +$35

81

SIRE: SB LR 61N DONE RIGHT 31X ET MGS: LAMBERT REMEDY 2030 75R

BW +2.4

MARB +.35

POLLED

HORNED

POLLED

9

HORNED

HORNED

WW +52

YW +78

MILK +22

RE +.48

MARB -.05

$CHB +$23

SIRE: SB LR 61N DONE RIGHT 31X ET MGS: SB 122L PRIDE LINE 32N ET

BW +2.9

WW +59

YW +95

MILK +22

RE +.29

MARB -.03

$CHB +$25

October 2015 California Cattleman 7


BUNKHOUSE CRUNCHING THE NUMBERS

cca closes the books on 2014-2015 fiscal year by CCA Director of Finance Lisa Pherigo It is hard to believe, but the California Cattlemen’s Association 2014-2015 fiscal year is officially in the books. Thanks to you – the dedicated members – I am pleased to report that once again this year CCA ended up in the black. I wish I had more time to reflect on what a great year the 2014-2015 was, but October is one of my biggest months of the year, and you will soon see why. The first week in October marks our annual visit with our current auditors, Singleton and Aumen. After a grueling few days of auditor analysis, with the help of CCA staff and the officer team, I begin preparation of the budget for the 2015-2016 fiscal year. This is the time of year that I am taking a close look at areas that we can continue to cut our expenses and increase gross revenue. Throughout the year I have a close eye on the association’s in- and out-flows. Generally speaking, fiscal year end is the time to ask our suppliers to sharpen their pencils a bit to help improve our bottom line. My main objective is to present a balanced and profitable budget at this year’s annual convention. For those of you who have attended the CCA/CCW Annual Convention in the past, you know that during the annual board meeting the annual budget is presented to the general membership for approval for the current year. But did you know that before the budget ever gets presented to the board it needs to be approved by the finance committee? The Finance Committee is made up of chairs from all policy committees, along with past presidents, CCA’s current president, first vice president, second vice presidents and the current treasurer. To the right, you will find a list of CCA’s current Finance Committee appointees. As with most non-profit trade associations, the main purpose of CCA’s finance committee is to maintain the fiscal stability of the organization. The committee is charged with reviewing and providing guidance and feedback for CCA’s financial matters. The committee reviews all financial statements and reports on financial activity to the full board of directors. It is also the responsibility of this committee to work with CCA staff to ensure that audited financials are prepared and all necessary tax forms are filed on an annual basis. The finance committee meets on a semi-annual basis, CCA’s Midyear Meeting and the CCA/CCW Convention. For a numbers girl like me, these meetings are by far the most interesting committee meetings. As with any of CCA’s committee meetings you do not have to be a committee member to attend the semi-annual meetings. If any CCA member has any finance-related questions, these meetings 8 California Cattleman October 2015

are the perfect opportunity to get those questions answered. With the CCA/CCW 99th Annual Convention coming up next month, I would like to encourage you to participate in this year’s finance committee meeting. The group will meet Friday, Nov. 20 from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. in Sparks, Nev. at the Nugget Casino LISA PHERIGO Resort. If you have any questions about this year’s convention or other opportunities to get involved, please contact me at (916) 444-0845 or lisa@calcattlemen.org. See you at the 99th CCA/CCW Convention at the Nugget!

CCA FINANCE COMMITTEE MEMBERS Ag & Food Policy BQA Chair Cattle Health Chair Cattle Marketing & Intl. Trade Feeder Council Chairman Feeder Council Chairman First Vice President Past President Past President Past President Past President Past President President President’s Choice President’s Choice President’s Choice President’s Choice President’s Choice President’s Choice President’s Choice President’s Choice (Feeder) President’s Choice (Feeder) Property Rights & Envir. Mgt. Public Lands Chair Second Vice President Second Vice President Second Vice President Tax & Credit Treasurer

Mike Miller Holly Foster Tom Talbot Pat Kirby Bill Brandenberg Paul Cameron Dave Daley Bruce Hafenfeld Tim Koopmann Kevin Kester Mark Nelson Tom Talbot Billy Flournoy Bill Thomas Bud Sloan Lawrence Dwight John Lacey Dean Hunt Jack Hanson Myron Openshaw Dave Wood Jesse Larios Adam Cline Mike Byrne Rich Ross Jack Lavers Mark Lacey Justin Greer Rob von der Leith


LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD

Cottonwood, California

JOIN US EVERY FRIDAY AND FOR THESE SPECIAL EVENTS! FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9 Shasta Co. Cattlemen’s Special

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30 Lassen Co. & Fall River-Big Valley Cattlemen’s Special

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 50th Annual Shasta Bull Sale

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13 Lake Co. (Oregon) Cattlemen’s Special TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE LOWEST COMMISSION RATES IN CALIFORNIA! For Information, Please Call Shasta Livestock (530) 347-3793 or visit our website at www.shastalivestock.com October 2015 California Cattleman 9


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK Wildfires Highlight Need for Forest Health Reform There is no question that the ongoing drought has caused immeasurable harm to California’s cattle industry. The lack of forage and stock water have caused many ranchers to scale back herd expansion and in some cases liquidate cattle. Another impact of California’s drought is increasingly being made known to Americans across the country – the growing ferocity, destruction and frequency of wildfires. Although public policy cannot result in additional rain, bad public policy has clearly exacerbated the challenges ranchers and rural residents face when challenged with forest fires under extremely dry conditions. At press time, California was experiencing 12 fires across the state including two large and destructive fires in Northern California known as the Butte Fire and the Valley Fire that have received national and international press attention. The Valley Fire located in Lake County has burned over 70,000 acres so far and has – up to this point – destroyed hundreds of homes and other structures. Together, both fires are being fought by nearly 6,000 brave and dedicated firefighters from all over the country as well as some who have volunteered to help from overseas. Unfortunately, the ferocity of this year’s wildfire season is not groundbreaking. The Butte and Valley fires follow other destructive fires that have ravaged California in past years including the RIM Fire and the Boles Fire, which virtually leveled the town of Weed in Siskiyou County. CCA extends our heartfelt sympathy to all those that have been affected by the current fires raging across California and those that are continuing to recover from past fires. CCA will never hesitate to take appropriate actions to help those ranchers in need so please reach out to our office in Sacramento. It doesn’t take an expert to realize that California’s wildfire season has grown in length and the intensity of wildfires has generally increased. The drought is not

10 California Cattleman October 2015

completely to blame. In fact, California and the federal government can take swift actions to reduce the number and severity of California’s wildfires. The ongoing mismanagement of our forests and public wildlands is shocking. A steady reduction in grazing on public lands over the past three decades, a substantial decrease in forest thinning and logging and state owned lands that have been left completely mismanaged have all contributed significantly to the severity of California’s wildfires. The majority of these issues are the result of increased regulatory oversight by state and federal agencies and the threat of litigation by fringe environmental groups who seek an end to use of public lands for the resources for which they were originally intended to be used. Now is the time to elevate the importance of proper forest management which critically relies on forest thinning, logging, grazing and, in some cases, the use of controlled fire. The U.S. Forest Service alone currently spends $1.1 billion annually and over 60 percent of their budget to fight wildfires. California has invested an additional $209 million of its own funds and will be seeking over $70 million more to continue funding efforts by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection throughout the rest of the season. California and the federal government cannot address these soaring costs and the ongoing damage that is being done to agriculture, our rural communities and the environment without changing those policies that challenge logging and grazing. CCA is taking the opportunity to educate state and federal legislators, land management agencies and the public on the positive benefits of grazing and forest thinning on overall forest health to reduce the severity and intensity of California’s wildfires. Real policy changes are likely to be proposed as additional attention by the public is drawn to this issue and rest assured CCA will be there to support those policies. The time for action is now.


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RED RED A

Calving Ease, Growth,

2015 Fall

October 10th,

30- 18 month old Bulls

sired by Prime Time, Right Kind, Alliance & Conquest

Selling Herd Sires & their progeny Including Sires like Prime Time 001Z

Reg: 1525587 beckton lancer f442 t buf crk lancer r017 buf crk juliet n036

Herd Builder 118~35% Grid Master 55~1%

bfck cherokee cnyn 4912 lpar selma na359 par selma k1220 CED

Bw

ww

yw

Milk

ME

hpg

CEM

stay

5

-2.8

95

140

18

4

10

-2

12

MarB

yg

Cw

rEa

fat

1.13

0.15

48

0.31

0.02

Combines some of the rarest genetics found today! Ranks in the top 1% for WW, YW and Marbling.

“B209” is an exciting 18 month old sired by “Prime Time” and out of the exciting donor dam “777”

“B205”, a 18 month old bull sired by “Prime Time”

Bieber Take Over A150 Reg:

1616937

hxc conquest 4405p lsf takeover 9943w lsf wideload r5014 u8061

RED ANGUS www.vfredangus.com

Everett Flikkema• 406/580/2186

Jack Vollstedt• 818/535/4034

12 California Cattleman October 2015

Herd Builder 161~8% Grid Master 52~7%

bieber outrider w388 bieber sierra 1884y beiber sierra 9182 CED

Bw

Milk

ME

hpg

CEM

stay

13

-3.4

61

90

23

0

6

7

15

MarB

yg

Cw

rEa

fat

-0.05

18

0.46

0.01

0.86

ww

yw


D ANGUS ANGUS Maternal & Carcass Traits

Cattleman’s Classic Terrebonne, Oregon

75 Bred Heifers • 75 Bred Cows

sired by Prime Time, Conquest, Alliance, Night Calver & Redemption

Selling All of the 8 & 9 Year Old Cows

Including Donors like Larson Lady Katya 777-8104 Reg:

1168877

Calf due mid-September to Drought Breaker

bjr make my day 981 beiber make mimi 7249 beiber sirena 6708 lchmn hevn’s sake 1002f larson lady katya 8104 larson lady 388 CED

Bw

ww

yw

Milk

ME

hpg

CEM

stay

9

-1.3

60

95

31

9

10

9

11

MarB

yg

Cw

rEa

fat

0.27

-0.04

25

0.04

-0.01

Double Eagle

You Pick ‘Em Replacement Lots

Pitchfork Ruby Canyon

Reg: 1688853

Reg: 1688849

914039 buf crk chf 824-1658 bfck cherokee cnyn 4912 mrm 1431 8611 9109 Reg:

santiam’s robber 8515 cd bar ruby 1028 dunn 9842 CED

Bw

ww

yw

Milk

ME

hpg

CEM

stay

3

-1.3

70

105

24

5

12

-6

11

MarB

yg

Cw

rEa

fat

0.12

-0.02

30

0.37

-0.01

Reg: 1721371

Reg: 1686460

October 2015 California Cattleman 13


Public lands Council Holds Annual Meeing in Wyoming The Public Lands Council hosted its annual meeting in Cody, Wyo., the first week in September to discuss issues critical to the western ranching industry. Session topics included the need for modernization of the Endangered Species Act, sage grouse, invasive species, wildfire management, water rights issues, and management of wild horses among others. These hot button items drew a wide attendance and speakers from national affiliate organizations, the Western Governors’ Association, Western Resources Legal Center as well as Bureau of Land Management, the US Forest Service and the Natural Resources Conservation Service. “The western ranching industry is unique in the fact that it faces an added layer of federal bureaucracy in dealing with lands managed by the government,” said Dustin Van Liew, PLC executive director. “Nearly 22,000 ranchers utilize grazing permits to graze on federal lands equating to nearly 40 percent of western cow herd and 50 percent of the nation’s sheep herd spending some time on federal lands. I’m pleased this year’s meeting brought great insight and discussion to the table.” The potential listing of the Greater Sage Grouse under the Endangered Species Act was top of mind, as the habitat improves and even thrives, specifically in properlymanaged ranching areas. Experts stressed the importance of individual state involvement in land management decisions

such as the potential listing of the Sage Grouse, which would not only harm the ranching industry, but potentially halt the successful conservation programs already underway by ranchers and the states. Western Resources Legal Center Executive Director Caroline Lobdell gave an eye-opening presentation on emerging issues in animal law. One particular issue of concern being tried in the courts, she said, is attributing human rights and personhood onto animals and livestock. The Public Lands Endowment Trust allocated nearly a half a million dollars to invest in the protection, enhancement, and preservation of the western ranching industry, including a continuation of the communications project that serves to educate policy influencers and the public on the beneficial uses of grazing on federal lands. Since inception four years ago, the Trust has distributed over $1.3 million to projects across the west. “Grazing continues to represent a multiple use that is essential to the livestock industry, wildlife habitat, open space, and the rural economies of many western communities,” said Van Liew. “This meeting always fosters insightful conversation about the future of the industry, and we greatly appreciate those who sacrifice their time and energy to join the meeting to shape the direction of our industry.”

The Brand That Covers the Nation

fa l l b u l l & female sale

Selling 250 Bulls • 200 Females

Females Will Sell Immediately Following Bulls SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

14 California Cattleman October 2015

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com


Offering 100 Top Quality Bulls at the 50th Annual

Tuesday, November 3 • Noon

SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CALIF.

BULLS WILL BE GRADED AND SIFTED ON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2 Hereford • Angus • Red Angus • Charolais • Composites

2015 Wester n Her itage Night HOSTED BAR & STEAK DINNER Monday, November 2

Cottonwood Community Center, Cottonwood

2015 Consignors:

Sale Book Request & Western Heritage Night Reservations GREG OR MAUREEN THOMAS, SALE MANAGERS (541) 545-3417 OR YCROSS@CENTURYLINK.NET

Gregory Magee Red Angus Siskiyou Herefords Kaaekrest Angus Kohl Creek Angus Avila Cattle Co Kodiak Ranch Sammis Angus Ranch Running Star Ranch Stardust Farms Sunbright Angus Tara Farms CB Ranch Oak Knoll Herefords Morrell Ranches Steve Smith Angus Genoa Livestock Oak Knoll Herefords Jim England Bar-N-Bar Angus P & M Waltz Ranches KK Bar Ranch Rose Ranch October 2015 California Cattleman 15


THE DEGREES OF CALIFORNIA RANCHERS THINK OUTSIDE

THE BOX DURING DRY TIMES By Malorie Bankhead, CCA Director of Communications ith over 800 miles between California’s north and south borders, the drought seems to disregard any and all boundaries. For much of the last four years, farmers and ranchers have been working overtime to keep agriculture alive and well in the number one food producing state in the nation. They’ve been successful, but their success has not been without sacrifice and would not be possible without a sprinkling of optimistic attitude. The California Cattlemen’s Association is made up of 9 zones across California and each area is experiencing a different scenario as the drought continues to hold California in its tight grip. As unforgiving as Mother Nature has been to most ranchers across the state, CCA wants to paint a picture of how differently circumstances may look in each corner of the state and how drought is impacting ranchers overall. If there’s one thing in common among those interviewed who are working in the trenches each day to get through the drought, it’s the can-do attitude of those upholding their livelihoods and the ultimate conclusion that one day, near or far away, it must rain.

“We were lucky and had a phenomenal spring, but there’s no snow pack to work with, so that makes raising cattle more difficult,” said Scott Gooch, Cedarville.

16 California Cattleman October 2015

Ranchers in his area have two choices in regards to drought: cull or reach out to find additional pasture. A combination of the two has kept Gooch in business. He bought hay last year to sustain his herd, and he also leases federal lands. The spring rain made grazing hit or miss on those properties. However, the reduction he’s noticed in animal numbers or duration on leased ground is not a result of the drought, but rather a result of other issues like fire and wild horses. While stock water has been better than expected, Gooch says coming into the spring was bad. Last summer, when dry times were worse for the area, he hauled in a little water to keep stock water levels up. Gooch says a rancher can read a lot of weather reports but can’t afford to stretch his or her neck out too far. However, he maintains a positive attitude looking forward. “One good rain won’t fix this drought; we’ll need several,” said Gooch. “But if we can remain optimistic enough, we’ll get through these tough times like we always do.”

“Humboldt County is fortunate in our geographic location that we aren’t as bad off as the remainder of the state,” said Jay Russ, Ferndale. Decreased stocking rates, increased culling patterns,


outside pasture and supplemental feeding needs have not impacted Russ during the drought yet, he says. “It’s tough to say you’re doing ok when others in different areas of the state are struggling because of drought,” said Russ. Russ says his area is on the northern end of the El Niño impact, but normal rain fall is expected. He says what has impacted ranchers in the area most was coming up short on rain late last spring, as the season usually provides a boost for their forage. Noting the rain divide, as he referred to it, separating the northern and central and southern parts of the state from each other, it makes sense that some regions are hit harder than others when it comes to dry conditions. Russ said he wishes his fellow ranchers well as they navigate these dry times.

The drought has really made impacts across the board in Zone 3, according to Todd Swickard, Susanville. Stocking rates have been reduced anywhere from 10100 percent in the area and by his estimation herds are about 60 percent of normal. While he’s not seeking outside pasture, he has supplemented his herd with hay. He says the same diversity in impact has been occurring on federal lands in the area. Some allotments have been reduced by a certain percentage and others haven’t been grazed at all. “Stock water has been limited in some places and we’ve been hauling water, but some places are too rocky to haul so we haven’t grazed them,” Swickard said. When dealing with the drought, flexibility is key, says Swickard. “You’ve got to be able to change your management techniques and take it as it comes,” said Swickard. “In the meanwhile, we’re all hoping for the El Niño.”

Sometimes tough times call for difficult sacrifices and retaining replacement heifers didn’t make the short list

last year for Mike Miller, Mt. Hamilton. In order to find another solution to the difficulties of the drought, Miller sold his calves early. Usually selling his calves in June, this year he took them to a local livestock market allowing him to save the grass he did have for his cow herd. He reports during the first two years of the current drought his area got 12 inches of rain, when their average is about 18 inches for the year. The third year he got 9 inches and had to supplement his herd with hay. Last year, Miller says he got 18.5 inches, noting how thankful he was to be in a small bubble – as he called it – because his neighbors didn’t receive that much moisture. However, some rains last December helped fill a few stock ponds that were able to retain water to sustain cattle through the summer. He says his fellow ranchers in San Jose, Morgan Hill, Gilroy and south have had to increase their culling patterns to the point that some of them don’t have any cows left at all. Miller recommends searching ‘outside of the box’ for new ideas on how to manage cattle during drought. “We would have never sold calves at 350 or 400 pounds in March before,” said Miller. “In fact, we didn’t really know there was a market for them, but were grateful to learn that the option was available.” Miller has heard several meteorologists say October is supposed to be wet, but like many of his fellow ranchers in California, he’s a bit of an El Niño skeptic. “In these times, all we can do is adapt and overcome,” said Miller. He said he believes that strategy will help him and his fellow ranchers come out of the drought successfully.

Stock water availability has really impacted Sherri Brennan’s family ranch in Sonora. According to Brennan, each decision a rancher makes must pencil out in order to work. “You have to really get your figurative pencil sharp as you look at what to do,” Brennan says. “It might be the sharpest pencil you’ve ever held, but it will help you find some alternative solutions.” Her hope is that this fall, rain will help utilize the forage that she and her family had to leave behind in some areas this year, which isn’t usually a normal grazing practice. As victims of the RIM Fire, Brennan and her family have feed ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

October 2015 California Cattleman 17


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 on the pastures that were burned but grew back to a level they haven’t seen in decades. Balancing that forage and water component can be tricky, however, Brennan is thankful for that flexibility provided to her. With culling rates higher than they’ve been in a very long time, decreased heifer retention is also impacting her herd numbers and she’s also been weaning earlier to cope. Brennan says competition for additional pasture is fierce. She and her husband Bob have two kids in their 20s who have been trying to establish their own herds. She commends their creativity when looking for smaller pieces of ground to utilize for their cattle as they navigate the business. When you compound one natural disaster with another like drought and fire, Brennan said it puts a tremendous pressure on feed patterns and herd numbers and unfortunately, permittees on the Stanislaus National Forest are experiencing that management dilemma. Brennan says University of California Cooperative Extension and CCA have been great partners to those affected by fire. “What limited turn out we did get the first year back was really because of the cooperation and effort of UC and CCA. We would not have had a turn out if we had not been able to call on their assistance,” said Brennan. “All of us were getting turn out with smaller numbers, but typically the agency holds us off for two years. I don’t know that we would be in business today had we not had access to those allotments.” Like many across the state, Brennan is praying for rain. “If you believe the models that are out there, we have a 95 percent chance on this El Niño,” said Brennan. “We’re putting up hay in the event it doesn’t happen, but we’re sure hoping that it does. We are praying that it does.”

From the market perspective in Fresno County, Cindy Tews, Fresno Livestock, says cattle supply is dwindling. She says the breeding stock is not available at the market like in previous years and she estimates about a 30 percent decrease in herd size overall that she points out could be more due to limited federal land permits in areas struck by wild fire. Personally, Tews has not had the need to feed anything additional to her cattle yet, but she says they likely will even after making the decision to decrease their herd. Tews says she’s been able to withstand some of the setback of drought with irrigated pasture, but even now those pastures are struggling too. Many producers in the area, she says, have been hauling water to replenish stock ponds and troughs. Learning how to make your resources last will prove most beneficial in battling the drought, suggests Tews. “We always say, ‘Well tomorrow will be better, or maybe next year will be,’” said Tews. “Well, it’s year four and we’re struggling along.” She hopes through cattlemen’s association meetings and other resources ranchers will be able to continue to learn new things to help them. 20 California Cattleman October 2015

“You have to be an optimist,” said Tews. “When you’ve got pressure for our water, outside pressure with public perceptions and pressure from fires, it warms my heart to see how people will rise up and support each other. It’s a good feeling in a bad situation.” When it comes to looking to the future, Tews says the beef cattle community can’t bank on anything until it happens. “I’ve heard a lot about the El Niño,” said Tews. “If it happens, that would be great. But I will remain cautious.”

Beef Operations Manager at California State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) Aaron Lazanoff, San Luis Obispo, says the university herd is down to 60 percent of normal. Last year culling patterns increased, but now Lazanoff says the amount of cattle they kept is the right amount to balance out the rangeland available to them. Last year they fed supplement hay, which was out of the ordinary, except for the first-calf heifers, which are usually fed hay. This year, though, because of the heavy cull last year, supplemental feeding isn’t necessary. In order to prepare for the hot, dry summer, they reduced the herd to a smaller amount of cattle and weaned early in March. Their preparation helped them in the long run. Aside from the university pastures in San Luis Obispo,


the campus also operates Swanton Pacific Ranch in Davenport. Last year, the ranch did not accept outside cattle like it usually does and this year they only took half of what they normally do. For Cal Poly, stock water has been one of the most limiting factors when it comes to managing through the drought. They have been unable to utilize upper pastures because springs have dried up. However, purchasing a booster pump to get water to a higher elevation has allowed the cattle to graze higher because of newly available water sources. “Pasture management has really helped us as well,” Lazanoff said. “Rotating the cattle helped our pastures and allowed us to save feed for the long summer.” For Cal Poly, the uncharacteristic summer rain proved beneficial because of the perennial grasses on Cal Poly pastures. Summer rain usually doesn’t help annual grasses, Lazanoff explains, but it helped the perennials maintain their green for one to two months longer than usual. As far as the future goes, Lazanoff is confident that the size of their current cow herd will serve his students well, all the while hoping for more moisture on the horizon.

Bill Rankin, Caliente, felt the effects of the drought early on after losing most of his ranch’s winter feed to fire than burned nearly one third of his ranch in September 2011. While Rankin’s culling patterns did not change significantly, retention of replacement heifers did decrease. “We had been operating as a cow-calf-yearling operation and during this drought we have become strictly a cow-calf operation,” said Rankin. “Selling our calves earlier has given us the opportunity to hold on to more of our cows. In our rough country a native cow is a valuable asset.” In order to tide his cattle over until the next green period, Rankin has been feeding a combination of hay grown on his farm and outside supplemental hay typically during the September and October months. Rankin says the stock water, springs, creeks and stock dams have gotten progressively worse throughout the drought, but his year has been the worst. The drought and the decrease in available feed have gone hand in hand with this factor, so the availability of stock water has not been the sole limiting factor.

“With El Niño on the horizon, the forecast is promising, however I do not expect one wet winter to rejuvenate the rangeland to where it was prior to this drought,” said Rankin. “I expect that it will take our mountains three to four good years to make a full recovery.” For his area, a normal mix of rain and snow would be the most desirable forecast, but a warmer El Niño with more rain would obviously be better than another dry winter, he says. Each dry spell has its own character, as does every ranch,” Rankin said. “I really can’t advise any rancher how to best handle a drought on his or her ranch. I can only say that every dry spell does end and it will rain again!”

In order to cope with the drought, Glenn Drown, Santa Ysabel, reduced his cow-calf herd by 25 to 30 percent. Last year he sold cows a year before he normally would have including older animals rather than breeding them back. He explains that he is able to sustain the pasture he has with his reduced numbers, therefore not necessarily needing to seek outside pasture, but water availability for his cattle is an issue. Some springs have dried up, and in some cases he’s leaving pasture sooner with good feed still available because of the lack of drinking water for his cattle. Finding alternative solutions has helped Drown navigate the drought. “We’ve cut the replacement heifers by 50 percent,” said Drown. “We’ve drilled some wells in places where we can get to them, but that’s not an option on some Forest Service lands, so we had to stop grazing them earlier.” He’s also implemented rotational grazing to different pasture so cattle will utilize feed better. While some water sources were drying up, he moved his cattle to places with new water sources, so when the water comes back he’ll have water in more areas for his cattle. Drown says the developing weather pattern will help producers out some. While the smaller showers this summer weren’t big rain makers, the fact that they occurred is a step in the right direction. ____________ Regardless of the type or location of your operation or how long you and your family have been in the cattle business, CCA supports your efforts in these dry times and reminds members to contact your CCA officer team and staff if we can be of any service to you at all as we all continue to pray for rain and wetter times ahead.

October 2015 California Cattleman 21


VET VIEWS

IS SHE OPEN?

PREGNANCY EVALUATION CAN PAY YOU BACK by Anita Varga, DVM, DACVIM, Gold Coast Veterinary Service and Consulting Pregnancy evaluation of beef cattle is an important management procedure in order to detect any cow that has not become pregnant or has aborted the calf during the pregnancy. Based on the NAHMS report 2007/2008, 33 percent of cows sold were sold due to their reproductive status, either open or the fetus was aborted. The general goal is for well managed herd to have over 90 percent of cows pregnant. Pregnancy examination can help determine if your operation has reached its reproductive goal. If the number of pregnant cows is much lower then the goal, then it is important to evaluate other factors that can play a role in establishing and maintaining the pregnancy. In particular, nutrition, mineral status and infectious diseases can all have a significant influence on pregnancy rates. To avoid losses due to infertility from the bull, it is important that the bulls are semen tested before exposing them to the cows. If a pregnancy examination of the cow is not performed, the economic impact can be significant because of the additional feeding cost of a non-pregnant cow. Culling of an open cow is an important management tool to reduce additional feed costs. The money saved can otherwise be used for cows that are productive members of the herd. The only way to know if your cow or heifer is pregnant is to pregnancy diagnose. However, data by

NAHMS indicates that less than 20 percent of ranchers use any form of pregnancy diagnosis. This number is low considering the economic benefit of detecting open cows in a herd. Based on a recent article by the University of Florida IFAS Extension, the annual feed/forage costs were estimated to be $400 to $500 per year for maintenance of a mature cow. Culling of a non-pregnant cow can save as much $200 per head. This money can be used for the purchase of new heifers, cows or bulls or for nutritional support of the pregnant cows. Pregnancy detection can be integrated to regular management procedures at the same time as vaccines are administered or other herd health procedures are performed. Pregnancy can be diagnosed by rectal palpation, rectal ultrasound or by blood test. Rectal palpation is easily performed by your veterinarian and an experienced veterinarian can detect pregnancy as early as 35 days. The advantage of rectal palpation is that culling decisions can be made directly chute side. The veterinarian can give an estimation of pregnancy duration which can be used to group cattle based on gestation length for better management at calving. It has been estimated that the cost per head for rectal pregnancy detection is between $2.50 and $15. This number varies highly depending on the distance your veterinarian needs to travel to reach your operation, hourly fee and set up of the processing area. If the set up is good and the cattle move smoothly through the system, up to 100 cattle can be checked per hour by an experienced veterinarian. Some disadvantages of rectal palpation are that fetal viability cannot be assessed and because it is less sensitive than ultrasound guided pregnancy detection, early pregnancy can be missed. Ultrasound in cattle requires expensive equipment for the veterinarian but it is more sensitive then rectal examination. After 26 days of pregnancy the accuracy of detecting a fetus is 100 percent. If an early ultrasound is performed, ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

22 California Cattleman October 2015


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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 22 management strategies should be put in place for any open cows. Please check with your veterinarian for additional strategies on how to get these cows pregnant. Between 55 and 80 days of gestation, ultrasound can also be used to sex the fetus. When performed by an experienced ultrasonographer the accuracy of the sexing can be as high as 100 percent. In beef operations, sexing is most commonly performed in seedstock operations where a bull or heifer calf might be sold prior to calving. This may be particularly important after embryo transfer. Furthermore, ultrasound can detect twin pregnancies allowing owners to watch the cow closer to calving and provide any additional aid she may need. Another advantage of using ultrasound for pregnancy detection is that it can be used for the detection of uterine or ovarian pathology, such as metritis and uterine tumors. These conditions inhibit the normal implantation leading to an open cow. Another method of pregnancy diagnosis is blood testing of cows after 30 days of gestation. The available tests check for a specific protein that is only produced by the placenta. This method would require that either the rancher is able to obtain the blood or it can be taken by the veterinarian. Blood testing cows can be more accurate in the early

24 California Cattleman October 2015

stages of pregnancy when compared to rectal palpation. The cost for testing is relatively low for the rancher but there is a longer turn around time for the test and decisions cannot be made chute side. Another disadvantage is that the test can not give the owner information about the stage of the pregnancy. For more information about how pregnancy evaluation in your cowherd can benefit your operation, contact your local veterinarian.

Anita Varga, DVM, based in Esparto, is the owner of Gold Coast Veterinary Service and Consulting and has expertise in diagnosing and treating medical and surgical cases and can help set up preventative care programs for different types of operations. She is Board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.


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from the University of California, Davis When Graysing Cattle Company, based in Vacaville, needs to diagnose pregnancies in their cows and determine the fetal sex of the unborn calves, they call on the Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction Service from the University of California Davis (UC Davis) Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH). Their small operation (about 20 head) raises beef cattle, specifically club calves, and has used the VMTH’s service for more than 10 years. Fetal sex determination offers Graysing valuable information that can be used for herd management. By knowing whether the calf will be male or female, especially in smaller herds, they can plan for the next year of replacement animals and animals to be sold. Graysing likes to balance growing the herd and selling steer calves to 4-H and FFA students for livestock projects, and this technique allows marketing of those calves even before they are born. Many of Graysing’s cattle have gone on to win awards at county fairs throughout California. Using transrectal ultrasound (performed by UC Davis veterinarians with a portable unit at the client’s ranch), the pregnant uterus and fetus can be identified. The livestock veterinarians look for the genital tubercle, a structure that will go on to become the external genitalia of the calf. Based on the location of the genital tubercle (near the tail for females and near the umbilical cord for males), they are able to determine

the sex. The optimum window for determining fetal sex in a cow is 58 to 70 days, as this is when the genital tubercle can easily be identified. Before 58 days, the fetus has not formed enough to determine sex, and after 70 days, the fetus has usually grown too much and moved to an unidentifiable position in the uterus. While this is a narrow time frame, it can reliably be used in cows with a known breeding date, such as those that were artificially inseminated. During their latest visit to Graysing, the service checked four cows for pregnancies. Only three of the four showed fetuses growing – in cows Sonja, Mally and Catalina (named after UC Davis veterinarian Catalina Cabrera, DVM). Ultrasound images showed that all three were pregnant with females.

On visits to Graysing and other ranches throughout Northern California, residents and students training with the Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction Service gain valuable hands-on experience in many aspects of livestock reproduction, including advanced techniques such as this fetal sexing. Reproductive ultrasound is a widely used imaging technique in livestock medicine, so it is important that the school’s veterinary students graduate being skilled in transrectal ultrasonography. It is equally important to have clients like Graysing who are supportive of the school’s clinical teaching programs. Their utilization of the hospital’s livestock services plays an integral role in the training of future veterinarians.

Veterinarians have a narrow time frame to utilize ultrasound in determining the sex of livestock fetuses.

26 California Cattleman October 2015


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BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD FINALLY A SLOWDOWN IN BEEF PRODUCTION EXPORTS DOWN UNDER from the U.S. Meat Export Federation Heading into 2015, the Australian beef industry was expected to undergo a significant reduction in slaughter, beef production and exports as producers began rebuilding herds after more than two years of drought-induced slaughter levels that were the largest since the 1970s. At the beginning of the year, Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) projected a year-over-year decline of 14 percent in beef production and a 20 percent drop in exports from the record levels of 2014. Through the first half of 2015, this scenario had yet to materialize. Slaughter levels remained record-large, with disappointing rainfall dampening the prospects for herd rebuilding. Beef exports did not skip a beat, as large supplies and weak Australian dollar helped push first-half export volume to 738,166 metric tons (mt), 9 percent ahead of last year’s record pace. Exports were also buoyed by strong demand for grinding beef in the United States and lower import duties in Japan, which were achieved through the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement that took effect in January. A slowdown finally began to surface in July, though exports were still steady with last year’s large volume at 121,568 mt. In August, exports dipped below year-ago levels for only the second time since 2013, with volume slowing by 5 percent to 106,010 mt. The United States has remained the big growth market for Australia’s exports, with exports through August up 37 percent from a year ago to 309,926 mt. The combination of high lean beef prices and the strong U.S. dollar is pulling more beef into the United States – in fact, Australia will fill its duty-free quota for imports entering the U.S. for the

AUSTRALIA’S CHILLED/FROZEN BEEF EXPORTS

first time since the U.S.-Australia Free Trade Agreement was implemented in 2005. Exports to Australia’s other top markets have grown at a more modest pace compared to last year, with results through August as follows: Japan South Korea China

187,487 mt, +1 percent 105,845 mt, +8 percent 94,696 mt, +7 percent

Exports to Korea have been supported by high domestic beef prices and implementation of the Korea-Australia Free Trade Agreement. However, U.S. beef has captured a greater share of Korea’s chilled imports as it regains popularity with retail consumers. While U.S. beef remains locked out of the Chinese market, Australia is its largest supplier. Australia’s exports slowed in May 2014 following enforcement of China’s hormone ban, but exports started to regain momentum in March 2015. August exports slowed from the pace of the previous five months but were still up 36 percent from a year ago at 12,519 mt. Exports trended lower for many of Australia’s smaller markets, including Indonesia where erratic import policies create great uncertainty for the trade. U.S. beef has gained market share in Taiwan while imports from Australia slowed. But Australia is shipping much larger volumes to Canada, reflecting a similar situation as in the U.S. – tight supplies of lean grinding beef due to significantly reduced cow slaughter. For the final quarter of this year, MLA expects Australia’s beef production to be down about 7 percent from last year’s record pace. This should support continued strength in Australia’s cattle and beef prices as production and exportable supplies slowly return to more normal levels. At the start of September, Australia’s cattle indicator price kept its record-setting paces, averaging A$5.76/kg, up 61 percent from last year. In U.S. dollars prices were $1.84 per pound, up 21 percent and reflecting the ever-weakening Australian dollar. Since Australia is the primary competitor to U.S. beef in key Asian markets, tightening of its supplies should be supportive of U.S. exports over the next year. Data sources: Australian Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry and Meat and Livestock Australia

30 California Cattleman October 2015


Steve sold two loads of yearlings while waiting for his coffee.

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by Meteorologist Brian Bledsoe As fall has arrived, I know you are sick of wildfires, smoke and exceptional drought. As I have lamented before, I do think help is coming this fall and winter for California. The image to the right shows a composite model forecast for the current/developing El Niño and it is forecasted to be a strong one. The yellow line takes this event into record territory, but some of the models have it being a bit weaker. Either way, a decent event is underway, likely to max out in the late fall and early winter, before weakening considerably this spring. In general, a strong El Niño significantly ups California’s chances of seeing significant drought relief. Basically from wildfires and drought, to heavy rain and flash flooding. Also keep in mind, while one wet winter would do wonders for drought relief, this drought needs sustained relief over time to fix it. As the year has progressed, we have been looking to weather pattern models from the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). Let’s see what these models below on the right have to say about the fall and winter we can expect. In the first image, the Pacific Northwest and parts of Northern California still look pretty dry. The core of that dry signal resides over Washington, Oregon and Idaho, so Northern California will likely be a bit wetter than its northern neighbors. Folks in the southern part of the state likely do much better in terms of overall moisture. The next map model shows the core winter months (December, January and February) are likely to be wetter than normal - and in some cases significantly wetter. If this El Niño is going to do its work, this will likely be the time. While the El Niño is weakening during the spring, the signal is still somewhat present. Per the JAMSTEC model, this weakening signal will not be kind to all in California. Right now, it is favoring the southern half of the state for the best moisture, with the northern half being somewhat drier than normal. Other models do not necessarily show this drying trend for Northern California in the spring. In fact, it is the opposite and keeps most of the state wet. I bring this up because the longer range models likely do not have a good handle on how this El Niño will end, and what transpires thereafter. So, while the models are split I am still somewhat optimistic about some moisture in the spring, especially early spring. My advice is to be cautious thereafter. I also want to add that the El Niño that is currently in progress and developing is a little bit of a different character. While it has presented classic signals, every El 32 California Cattleman October 2015

JAMSTEC MODEL PRECIPITATION FORECAST FALL (SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER, NOVEMBER)

JAMSTEC MODEL PRECIPITATION FORECAST WINTER (DECEMBER, JANUARY, FEBRUARY)


Niño is different and it is a constant learning process. So while the models and history suggest that this event will benefit California with some much needed moisture this winter, I am still somewhat cautious until I see the pattern truly turn for the better. As I am sure all of you are too. JAMSTEC MODEL PRECIPITATION FORECAST WINTER (DECEMBER, JANUARY, FEBRUARY)

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Building on Tradition & Innovation November 19-21, Sparks, Nev.

Event Registration REGISTRATION IS AVAILABLE ONLINE OR VIA MAIL. VISIT WWW.CALCATTLEMEN.ORG TO REGISTER ONLINE OR FILL OUT THE FORM AT RIGHT AND MAIL TO THE CCA OFFICE: 1221 H STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814. REGISTRATION PRICES INCREASE AFTER OCTOBER 28.

Event Accomodations RESERVE YOUR ROOM TODAY! ROOM RESERVATIONS ARE DUE BY OCT. 29 West Tower Deluxe Rooms = $76 per night East Tower Premier Rooms = $82 per night Call: 800-648-1177 • Mention Group Code: GCCA15 for discounted rate

Questions? FOR REGISTRATION QUESTIONS, CONTACT THE CCA OFFICE AT (916) 444-0845. FOR TRADE SHOW INQUIRIES, CONTACT LISA PHERIGO VIA E-MAIL: LISA@CALCATTLEMEN.ORG OR (916)444-0845.

34 California Cattleman October 2015


# TICKETS

12 – 5 p.m. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. 1 – 2 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m. 2 – 5 p.m. 4 – 7 p.m. 6 – 7 p.m. 7 – 9 p.m. 6:30 – 7:30 a.m. 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. 7:30 – 8:30 a.m. 7:30 – 9:30 a.m. 8:30 – 10 a.m. 9:45 – 10:30 a.m. 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 12 – 1 p.m. 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 1:30 – 4 p.m. 2:30 – 4 p.m. 2:30 – 4 p.m. 2:30 – 4 p.m. 4 – 5 p.m. 4 – 5 p.m. 4 – 6 p.m. 5 – 6 p.m. 5 – 6:30 p.m. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. 6 – 7 p.m. 7 – 8:30 p.m. 9 – 11 p.m. 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. 6:30 – 7:30 a.m. 7 – 9 a.m. 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Registration Open CCA Scholarship Interviews California Rangeland Trust Board Meeting CBCIA Finance Meeting YCC Officer Interviews Media Training CBCIA Board Meeting CCA Officers Meeting CCW Executive Committee CCA Local Presidents’ Reception Prayer Gathering Registration Open Exhibitor Move-In CCA Finance Meeting followed by Convention Committee CCW President’s Breakfast Cattlemen’s Breakfast CCW Heritage Meeting CCA Cattle Health & Well Being/BQA CCA Cattle Marketing & International Trade CCA Federal Lands Committee California CowBelle of the Year Lunch Beef Promotion Lunch General Session CCW Education Workshop CCA Property Rights & Environmental Management CCA Agriculture & Food Policy CCA Tax & Credit YCC Networking in Tradeshow Cattlemen’s College Session #1 CCA General Resolutions Meeting Cattle PAC Reception YCC Meeting CCW President’s Reception Allied Industry Council Wine & Cheese Reception CCA Cattlemen’s Dinner Reception & Entertainment By the California Rangeland Trust

Registration Open CCA Nominating Committee CCW Awards Breakfast Allied Industry Council Trade Show Wake Up! Coffee Break 7 – 8 a.m. Bloody Mary Bar Open 7 – 10 a.m. Lunch in the Trade Show 12 – 1 p.m. 8 – 9:15 a.m. Cattle-Fax Breakfast 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. LMRF Meeting 9:30 – 12:15 p.m. CCW Board Meeting 10:15 – 11:15 a.m. Cattle PAC Meeting 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Cattlemen’s College Session #3 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. CCA Membership Committee 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. POSSEE Meeting 12 – 1:30 p.m. Lunch in the Trade Show 1 – 4 p.m. CCA Board & Membership Meeting 5 – 6 p.m. CCA President’s Reception 7 – 10 p.m. CCA/CCW Awards Banquet

ALL INCLUSIVE REGISTRATION

$275

FULL REGISTRATION

$100

FULL NON-CCA MEMBER REGISTRATION

$200

YCC MEMBER REGISTRATION

$40

Save $30! Includes full registration, Cattlemen’s College, meals. *denotes inclusion

Includes access to meetings, tradeshow, Wake Up! Coffee Break, Friday Cattlemen’s Breakfast and lunch in trade show on Saturday Includes access to meetings, tradeshow, Wake Up! Coffee Break, Friday Cattlemen’s Breakfast and lunch in trade show on Saturday

Includes access to Cattlemen’s College sessions 1, 2 & 3, trade show, Wake Up! Coffee Break and lunch in trade show on Saturday FULL REGISTRATION REQUIRED FOR BADGE AND ACCESS TO MEETINGS AND TRADE SHOW

CCW PRESIDENT’S BREAKFAST Coffee and pastries will be served

$15

*CATTLEMEN’S BREAKFAST

$25

CCW COWBELLE OF THE YEAR LUNCH

$25

*CCA BEEF PROMOTION LUNCH

$25

*CATTLEMEN’S COLLEGE SESSION 1

$15

ALLIED INDUSTRY WINE & CHEESE RECEPTION

$10

*CCA DINNER

$55

CRT COCKTAIL & ENTERTAINMENT RECEPTION

$25

CCW AWARDS BREAKFAST

$25

*CCA CATTLE-FAX BREAKFAST

$25

*CATTLEMEN’S COLLEGE SESSION 2

$15

*CATTLEMEN’S COLLEGE SESSION 3

$15

* CCA/CCW AWARDS BANQUET

$55

2015-2016 CATTLE-PAC MEMBERSHIP

$200

Includes 2 drink tickets

Market Update with Duane Lenz

Please write a separate check to Cattle-PAC

PRE-REGISTRATION PRICES REFLECTED HERE WILL INCREASE AFTER NOV. 9

TOTAL

Name(s) attending: __________________________________ __________________________________________________ Local Affiliation: _____________________________________ Payment method: CHECK

Please make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association

Card #: _______ _______ _______ _______ Exp. ___/___ Cardholder’s Name: _________________________________ Cardholder’s Phone Number: __________________________ Billing Address: _____________________________________ __________________________ ________ ___________ City

State

Zip Code


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36 California Cattleman October 2015


Wyoming Division Bull Sale N ov e m b e r 1 7 , 2 0 1 5 Yoder, Wyoming

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Selling 125 Summer Yearling Bulls

Pasture-conditioned and ready to work.

Selling Sons of Baldridge Waylon, GAR Prophet, Ten X, Power Tool and Summitcrest Complete.

Rob & Lori Thomas 42734 Old Trail Rd. Baker City, OR 97814 Home: (541) 523-7958 517-546-6374 Office: (541) 524-9322 www.cotton-associates.com Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 SALE CONSULTANT: thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com SALE MANAGED BY:

Matt Macfarlane M3 Marketing 916-803-3113

Darrell L. Wilkes Genetic Solutions Manager 3883 Hwy 85 Yoder, WY 82244 Cell: 303-570-9207 Office: 307-532-BULL docwilkes4@gmail.com

www.thomasangusranch.com October 2015 California Cattleman 37


CHIMES TOGETHER WE CAN ACCOMPLISH MORE

CALIFORNIA’S CATTLEWOMEN MAKING A POSTITIVE IMPACT ON RANCHING COMMUNITY by California CattleWomen, Inc., President Sheila Bowen It has been a year of activities and accomplishments for the California CattleWomen. Thirty CattleWomen units around the state of California have been busy with youth development, beef promotion and education activities through ranch visits and classroom presentations. This is what CattleWomen do in their “spare time.” They are also busy working on the ranch, working outside jobs and participating in community activities. CattleWomen know how to get a lot done on a tight schedule. They work dawn to dark-thirty. It was my privilege to gather the work and accomplishments of the California Cattlewomen into a report that was presented to American National CattleWomen (ANCW) in May. It was part of a contest at the national level to promote growth in membership and showcase what gets done at the state level. Thanks to the hundreds of hours of work that our ladies have put into their communities to spread the good news about beef and because we met the required growth in our membership at the state and national level, California won the contest! Powder River donated a calf table as the grand prize. We will use this as a fundraising opportunity for CCW. California CattleWomen would like to thank ANCW and Powder River for this generous prize and the opportunity to share what we do as a state CattleWomen organization. Compiling this report has given me a greater appreciation for the good work CattleWomen do in our state. By way of example, each year some of the Siskiyou County CattleWomen travel 700 miles round trip to Gordon Lau Elementary School in San Francisco. They present beef lessons to more than 1,400 students at the day-long event. Every other year they take live animals to the school. Imagine driving a gooseneck trailer through the narrow streets of China Town to get the animals to the school. CattleWomen make frequent classroom visits to present lessons on various topics including beef by-products, Life on a Cattle Ranch presentations and beef nutrition incorporating fun activities like 38 California Cattleman October 2015

preparing Spooky Spiders using ground beef and biscuits. CattleWomen also sponsor many awards for youth at county fairs across the state. A number of units host ranch visits where folks are invited to the ranch to learn about our way of life. Often activity stations, cowdog demonstrations SHEILA BOWEN and cattle handling are part of the day’s events. The state Beef Ambassador Contest was held in April. Jill Bright and the Santa Clara County CattleWomen did a beautiful job of putting on this competition with the help of Jill Scofield at the California Beef Council. The junior winner was Angelee Dowling from Siskiyou County and the senior winner was Abby Grisedale from Kern County. These two ladies competed in Denver at the National Contest on September 25 and 26. Both of these students are impressive public speakers. We were very proud to have them represent California and are pleased with how they performed This year, as a primary fundraiser for CCW, we are selling raffle tickets for a chance to win Powder River panels. Please contact your local CattleWoman president if you would like to purchase tickets. Part of the proceeds help fund the CCW scholarships that we give out each year. It was announced at The Beef Industry Summer Conference in Denver that Barbara O’Connell, a Glenn/ Colusa CattleWoman, was named the ANCW Outstanding Educator of the Year. Glenda Rankin, from Kern County, was named the ANCW Outstanding Promoter of the Year. Both of these ladies use their ranches as outdoor classrooms to teach others and promote ranching. Both hosted ANCW “Mom’s Day on the Farm” events at their ranches in 2014. Their resumes of beef promotion and education efforts are truly impressive. We will be honoring these ladies during our Awards Breakfast at the 2015 CCA/ CCW Convention. We have a full schedule of activities at this year’s convention. Our workshop will focus on improving our communication through a better understanding of the technology we have at our disposal. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 40


(209) 988-8932

October 2015 California Cattleman 39


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 38 Constant Contact training and the potential of our website and Facebook page will be among the presentations. We will also receive a legislative update from CCA’s Justin Oldfield. Leadership skills will be polished during our President’s Breakfast with the help of Susie Magnuson, a past ANCW president. We will honor local unit CattleWomen during our Cowbelle of the Year luncheon and hear about exciting changes at the national level, from ANCW President Melanie Fowle. The Awards Breakfast will be a fun event. It is here we find out which unit wins the Walt Rodman Award sponsored by California Beef Council. Our Board of Directors Meeting should be productive as we recap this past year and set our sites on 2016. On behalf of the CCW Executive Committee, I would like to invite our members and those who are considering joining CCW to attend the convention in Sparks, Nev., Nov.

YOLO COUNTY CATTLEMEN & WOOLGROWER’S ASSOCIATION Annual Fall Dinner, Dance and Raffle

NOVEMBER 7

SOCIAL HOUR AT 6, DINNER AT 7 PM. ZAMORA COMMUNITY HALL Admission includes a ribeye dinner with all the trimmings, and a hosted bar.

The event is the primary fundraiser for the YCCWGA and their efforts to support educational opportunities for agricultural students, promote ranching interests in the county and promote increased animal production knowledge to its members. Donated raffle items from local business are raffled off as well as a picnic table marked with Yolo County cattle brands.

Live music will follow with dancing and socializing until midnight. For more information or to join the YCCWGA, go to yccwga.com, find the YCCWGA on Facebook, or call Adam Cline, President, at 530-723-2326. 40 California Cattleman October 2015

19 through 21. I always leave the CCA/CCW Convention better informed. The opportunity to meet the people that make up our cattle community is well worth the trip and the effort. Please join us for a fun and informative gathering. California CattleWomen is growing in membership. Our activities across the state make a significant impact on our communities. Between the state and local units, CattleWomen give out over $100,000 in scholarships each year. Classroom visits and community events see CattleWomen front and center carrying the torch for community outreach and youth development activities. Telling the story of the beef community is at the heart of what we do. If you would like to become a member of the California CattleWomen please contact Karen Moller by emailing membership@cattlewomen.org, or email me at Sheila Bowen at president@cattlewomen.org. I hope to see you next month in Sparks!

OFFICIAL POSTED NOTICE

Attention: Yolo County Cattle Producers The Yolo County Cattlemen’s Association (YCCA) will be holding a vote to repeal the Modified Point of Origin (MPO) regulations currently in place in the Yolo County brand inspection area. Only cattle producers (beef and dairy) who are property taxpayers, lessees or residents of the MPO area are permitted to vote.

WHEN: Oct. 22, 2015 TIME: 4 to 7 p.m. WHERE: Esparto Fire Hall 16960 Yolo Ave. Esparto, CA

In order to proceed with amending California Code of Regulations (CCR), section 850, the proposal to repeal the regulation must be passed by two-thirds margin of those voting. Only one vote per family, partnership, corporation or other business entity. If you qualify to vote you should plan to attend. To read the code, Google search California Department of Food and Agricultural Code and scroll down to Sections 21111 through 21112.


Varga Wins Bruce Wren Continuing Education Award from AgriLabs Beef cattle veterinarian Anita Varga, DVM, Capay, will be presented the prestigious $5,000 Dr. Bruce Wren Continuing Education Award from AgriLabs, at the 2015 American Association of Bovine Practitioners Annual Conference, Sept. 17-19, in New Orleans, La. This award honors Bruce Wren, DVM, a long-time AgriLabs technical services veterinarian, and recognizes his lifelong commitment to practical and formal continuing education for veterinarians. Each year one beef and one dairy practitioner who have been out of veterinary school 10 or fewer years is selected to receive this award. These grants seek to encourage veterinarians who have expressed a desire to expand their skills and knowledge to further develop skills through continuing education. King was selected to receive the beef award. “Because we encourage continued education for veterinarians, it’s an honor to present this award to Dr. Varga, an individual who will participate in programs that will allow her to better serve her clients and the beef industry,” said Steve Schram, AgriLabs President and Chief Executive Officer. Varga, a 2005 veterinary graduate of Tierärztliche Hochschule University of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover,

Germany, is a solo practitioner of a mobile veterinary practice, Gold Coast Veterinary Service and Consulting, in Yolo County, California. She plans to use this award to improve her knowledge in the beef cattle nutrition area on hay, silage and pasture analysis. Dr. Varga has identified AABP nutrition seminars and other nutrition courses, nutrition textbooks and other opportunities for the expansion of her beef nutrition education. Joining Varga, the Dr. Bruce Wren Continuing Education award for dairy goes to Dr. Gabe Middleton, Orrville Veterinary Clinic, Orrville, Ohio. Aside from being a young practitioner, applicants must specifically outline the type of continuing education they are seeking, its approximate costs, and the benefits it will provide to the applicant, his/her practice and the practice’s clients. The selection process is undertaken by an awards committee from AABP. For more information, visit www.aabp.org.

COWBOY COMEDY

“Okay. Now let’s check your weight.” October 2015 California Cattleman 41


UC Davis seeks Ranch-to-Rail Program participants The University of California Davis (UC Davis) Animal Science Department, UC Cooperative Extension and California Beef Cattle Improvement Association Ranch-toRail Program is seeking additional participants. This oneof-a-kind program is designed to improve California beef cattle producers’ understanding of the feeding and carcass attributes of their cattle. To date, eight ranches have sold nearly 100 head of cattle into this educational program. Each participating producer has received feedlot performance and carcass data associated with the cattle they sold. This data included average daily gain, feed intake (pen basis), cost of gain and carcass data. Figure 1 to the right illustrates an example of the close out participants received. Additional individual animal information was provided. Cattle Acquisition and Protocol The UC Davis feedlot purchases 10-15 steers from cooperating producers. Interested producers will be scheduled several months in advance. The cattle participating in the program need to represent a producer’s breeding program, be weaned a minimum of 30 days and have backgrounding and vaccination information available. The producers will deliver the cattle to the UC Davis Feedlot. Acquired steers will weigh between 700 and 900 pounds and will be Bos taurus. No Holsteins, Brahman-cross or Mexican type cattle will be considered. Producers will be asked to fill out a background information sheet including a vaccination history of the cattle. Cattle will be purchased based upon the current average price

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42 California Cattleman October 2015

received for similar weight cattle. Upon arriving at the feedlot, cattle will be immediately weighed, and pay weight will be actual weight across the scale at delivery. The producer will receive the mid-price for the weight class of cattle sold that week. Price will be agreed prior to delivery. UC Davis retains the right of refusal to accept cattle that are unhealthy or do not meet specifications. On the day of delivery, participants will be given a tour of the Department of Animal Science Facilities on the Davis Campus (feedlot, processing plant, etc.). Educational Opportunities The data derived from this project will be presented to beef cattle producers across the state at the CCA meeting in 2015 and into the future. Identities of producers and ranches will not be included in educational outreach materials. Producers who participate in the program will receive recognition for their efforts. FIGURE 1. UC RANCH TO RAIL EXAMPLE SUMMARY CLOSE OUT JANUARY 2, 2020 Date In: 9/12/2019 Number In: 10 Average Pay Weight: 809

-FINAL-

First Date Out: 1/3/2019 Last Date Out: 1/3/2019 Number Out: 10 PERFORMANCE Average Out Weight: 1302 Average Dressing Percent: 62.6 Average Days on Feed: 113 Average Yield Grade: 2.8 Average Daily Gain: 4.41 Average Back Fat: .53 Average Feed Intake/Day: 23.1 Average REA: 14.2 Feed/Gain: 5.2:1 Average KPH: 2.3 Average Carcass Weight: 816 Average Quality Grade: 90% Choice, 10% Select Cost / Head / Day: $3.16 Cost of Gain ($/100 lb): $.72 Veterinarian Costs Per Head: 0 Other Costs (transportation, vet, etc.): $42 TOTAL COST PER HEAD: $2,119.27

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Anyone interested in participating in the program or wanting additional information may contact their local UC Cooperative Extension office or any of the following individuals: JAMES MOLLER, UC DAVIS FEEDLOT (530) 752-1200 JIM OLTJEN, PH.D. (530) 752-5650 LARRY FORERO, PH.D. (530) 224-4900


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CHAMBER TO HONOR KESTER AS LIVESTOCK PERSON OF THE YEAR by Malorie Bankhead, California Cattlemen’s Association Director of Communications The California Chamber of Commerce will recognize fifth generation California cattle rancher Kevin Kester as the 2015 Livestock Person of the Year on Oct. 17 during Cattlemen’s Day at the Grand National Livestock Exposition, Horse Show and Rodeo at the Cow Palace in San Francisco. Kester currently ranches on his family’s Bear Valley Ranch in Parkfield, where he, his wife June and their three children, Kayleen, Kody and Kara, own and operate a stocker and cow-calf operation in addition to growing wine grapes. Born and raised in Parkfield, a rural town in southern Monterey County where his family has ranched for the better part of the last 150 years, Kester is actively involved in the beef industry and is a well-respected member of the beef cattle community. Kester earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture Management from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and upon graduating, he earned his real estate license and went on to become the co-owner of a real estate agency. After spending some time in the real estate industry, he became a police officer and worked full time for the Paso Robles Police Department, later working part-time as a deputy for the San Luis Obispo County Sherriff ’s Department for about 12 years. After marrying the love of his life and beginning a family together, he’s been farming and ranching full-time ever since while maintaining an active involvement in the beef industry. Kester is a true family man. A 49ers fan to the core, Kester can often be found in the Levi’s Stadium cheering on his team with his family. Kayleen, 28, who works as a nurse, and her husband Jared are new parents to baby Keslee. Kody, 26, works as an agricultural appraiser and also helps on the home ranch in Parkfield. Kara, 18, just began school at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Okla., where she plans to double-major in agricultural communications and agricultural business while participating on the university’s rodeo team. Based on his experience in the ranching industry, Kester

44 California Cattleman October 2015

is fully immersed in the California and American beef industries and has served in numerous leadership positions over the past decade or so, exhibiting his full dedication to the industry. He served as second vice president, first vice president and president of both the San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen’s Association and the KEVIN KESTER California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), holding each position for its two-year term. Previously he served as CCA’s Wildlife Management Committee Chair, and he currently serves as vice chairman of the CCA Cattle-Political Action Committee. On a national level, Kester has served on the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Board of Directors since 2007. He currently serves as the NCBA Policy Division Chairman, in which capacity he oversees the NCBA Policy Committee chairs. Kester has also served as the chairman and vice chairman of the NCBA Joint International Markets Committee and chairman of the NCBA Tax and Credit Committee. For his membership recruitment efforts, he was awarded third place in the NCBA Top Hand Award Program in 2013 for persuading ranchers to become members of NCBA. In addition to his involvement in the beef industry, Kester is also involved in the wine grape industry and is a member of the California Association of Wine Grape Growers, the Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance and the Central Coast Vineyard Team. In his community, he served on the Shandon School Board of Trustees and the California Mid-State Fair Heritage Foundation Board of Directors for 12 years. He currently sits on the California


Mid-State Fair Agriculture Committee. “Kevin’s straightforward, honest approach has earned Needless to say, Kester’s experience on local, state him the ear and respect of legislators and the reputation of and federal ranching issues make him a well-rounded being a highly effective advocate for ranchers,” Gatlin said. spokesperson for the beef and agriculture industries. “We all appreciate the time he sacrifices on our behalf and Kester makes it his mission to ensure that cattlemen and know that it’s only possible because the support of his wife women are well represented in California and in Washington, June and their three kids, Kody, Kayleen and Kara.” D.C. He does not shy away from opportunities to share his The honoree is determined by a committee of peers beef story and act as a face for the American beef industry from CCA, California Beef Council, California Wool when it comes to media interviews and working with Growers, California Pork Producers, California Farm Bureau, reporters. He has participated in numerous media interviews, past award recipients and recognized leaders in the California always putting his best face forward for the beef industry to agriculture industry, as well as members of the California address tough issues facing the beef industry, himself and his Chamber of Commerce. The California Livestock Person fellow ranchers. of the Year Award has been bestowed upon the greatest Most recently, Kester has dedicated his time to helping ranchers annually since 1950. enhance the U.S. beef trade platform, as he believes the future growth of the beef industry depends on trade. He has served on the United States Meat Export Federation (USMEF) Executive Committee for the past three years representing the beef industry. USMEF has 18 offices world-wide and aims to develop existing international markets for U.S. beef, pork, lamb and veal. For the last four years beef export sales have hit record GATES, CHUTES, PANELS & MORE! export values each year. Looking ahead, Kester sees himself AVAILABLE FROM: continuing his involvement in state and national issues pertaining to the beef industry and focusing on welcoming in the next generation. “We’ve got the sixth and now seventh generation to look forward to now,” Kester said. “We will continue working to keep them involved and help set them up to take over the reins.” Kester said he was surprised when he received the phone call alerting him that he had been chosen for this year’s Livestock Person of the Year Award. “I am very honored and humbled to have been chosen as this year’s recipient based on the list of prior winners,” Kester said. “It is a great honor to be able to follow in their footsteps and be chosen by a wide range of industry leaders in California.” Kester’s son, Kody, says his dad is a daily inspiration for he and his siblings. “As a family, we are fortunate to have parents as our role models who have passed the value of maintaining sound ethics and working hard onto us,” Kody said. “Our dad puts in a lot of hours both to the ranch and his family, and for that we are forever 576 WARNERVILLE ROAD • OAKDALE, CA • (209) 847-8977 grateful.” Billy Gatlin, CCA Executive Vice 717 E. CHILDS AVE. • MERCED, CA • (209) 725-1100 President says Kester is a tireless advocate DELIVERY AVAILABLE for the beef industry whose commitment to representing ranchers in the state Capitol and WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM in Washington, D.C., is unmatched. October 2015 California Cattleman 45

THE FARM & RANCH SUPPLY DESTINATION


As a fifth generation cow/calf rancher from Northern Lassen County, an avid hunter and fisherman and past president of Fall River-Big Valley County Cattlemen’s Association, Buck Parks answers a few questions about his involvement in the beef industry and what it’s like serving as a member of the CCA Executive Committee. Question: What does being involved in the beef community mean to you? Answer: What does it mean to me? Well, I get to be involved in an industry that’s full of really good people, and I get to do what I love. Most of the time if it rains and the market’s good, it’s a good life. Question: So, what’s your day job? Answer: Simply put, my day job is the cow business. Question: Why do you ranch? Answer: I ranch because it’s a family heritage. I got the passion for the beef business from my dad, and carrying on our family’s legacy is something I take very seriously every day. Question: Why are you serving on the CCA Executive Committee? Answer: I’ve been a member of the CCA Executive Committee since the last annual convention, because it’s good to get involved. It’s good to stay involved and learn what’s going on in our industry to be a part of taking action when it’s necessary. It’s also a great way to stay informed on the most important issues impacting the industry at any given time. Question: What issues matter most to you in the beef industry? Answer: I am mostly involved in the public lands or public lands grazing issues. I like to stay up to speed on the grazing improvement act and other legislation that the

46 California Cattleman October 2015

FEATURING CCA ZONE 1 DIRECTOR BUCK PARKS, PARKS RANCH, INC., ADIN BUCKPARKS@YAHOO.COM | (530) 640-0715

Zone 1 includes Siskiyou County, Modoc County, Lassen County and Fall River-Big Valley cattlemen’s associations Public Lands Council (PLC) is working on. I’ve also helped organize a PLC social to get more people involved in what they do, because it’s important. Question: Why should someone join CCA? Answer: The CCA and its staff represent us in Sacramento so that we don’t have to be in Sacramento; we can stay on our ranches and do the work that needs to be done here. If you’re in the cattle business, desire to become a part of it or care about the beef business at all, join CCA. CCA is the only organization in CA that will represent our issues the right way.


Not a CCA Member?

JOIN TODAY! CCA is the ONLY group working SOLEY to protect California beef producers. • Because you have to be at home tending to the herd and need to have a presence in Sacramento and Washington, D.C., the California CAttlemen’s Association is your eyes and ears on all things legislative and regulatory.

• Whether you own cattle or not, you can support CCA efforts. producer members, supporting members and young members are welcome at all CCA functions and have access to all publications and information.

• Being a CCA member gives you a voice and a vote on how your association will lobby on your behalf.

• CCA Provides members-only educational opportunities to help your beef operation and bottomline.

• Being a CCA member gives you access to a full-time staff who can answer your questions about hot button issues at the local, state and federal level.

Want to learn more? Feel free to contact us to learn what we are doing for you!

916.444.0845 • www.calcattlemen.org

October 2015 California Cattleman 47


Buyers and sellers agreed that the 2014 bull sale season was one for the record books, but early in the fall of 2015, it was quickly made apparent that records were made to be broken as heifer retention and optimism for a wet winter was in the air. Despite the national cowherd finally being on the rise for the first time in several years, commerical calves are still fetching a good price at marketing time and producers showed ringside this fall that they were not afraid to invest in quality genetics that would continue to improve their calf crop. With sale averages well into the $7,000 range and beyond,

seedstock producers are pleased in the demand for their product and are prepared to help their commerical bull buyers with their marketing needs throughout the year in order to keep them coming back for bulls in the future. With the fall season off to a tremendous start, it seems everyone is on the edge of their seats to see what the remainder of the sale season has in store. CCA extends a sincere congratulations to these seedstock producers on the success they’ve reaped and wishes good luck to the sales still ahead this fall!

2015 FALL BULL SALE

RESULTS & AVERAGES O’NEAL RANCH “PERFORMANCE PLUS” BULL SALE SEPT. 1, MADERA, CA

Col. John Rodgers and Marty Williamson at O’Neal Ranch.

Rob Von der lieth with Bill Jameson.

Matt Macfarlane, Garrett Blanchard and Ryan Nelson at the Silveira Bros. Bull Sale.

Col. John Rodgers 70 ANGUS BULLS

$7, 063

SILVEIRA BROS. “PARTNERS FOR PERFORMANCE” BULL SALE SEPT. 2, FIREBAUGH, CA

Col. John Rodgers and Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 101 ANGUS $7,082 12 RED ANGUS BULLS $4,979

Bull buyers Suzie and Bob Ericksen with Zoetis’ Larry Gran and Geoff Gates at Silveira Bros.

Molly Pezzuto and Lucy Rechel, Snyder Livestock, with Lana Trotter.

VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH & SIERRA RANCHES “CARCASS MAKER” BULL SALE SEPT. 3, LA GRANGE, CA

Col. John Rodgers and Col. Rick Machado 158 ANGUS BULLS $10,411 35 HEREFORD BULLS $5,501

BYRD CATTLE CO. “BEST OF BOTH WORLDS” BULL SALE SEPT . 4, LOS MOLINOS, CA

Vintage Angus Ranch Owner Jim Coleman and Manager Doug Worthington welcome buyers to the annual bull sale in La Grange.

CCW President Sheila Bowen with Barbara and Shayleen Mastagni.

Col. Rick Machado 85 ANGUS BULLS

$ 8,921

RAY-MAR RANCHES “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” SALE SEPT. 5, ESCALON, CA

Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 91 ANGUS BULLS $6,582

HERITAGE BULL SALE

Five Star Land and Livestock & Bar R Angus SEPT. 6, WILTON, CA Col. John Rodgers Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing $7,490 The ring crew at Byrd Cattle Company’s bull sale was (L to R): Devin Murnin, Western Livestock Journal; Adam Conover, 55 ANGUS BULLS American Angus Association; Matt Macfarlane, California Cattleman; Dennis Metzger, Superior Livestock; Col. Rick Machado; Logan Ipsen, Western Livestock Journal; and Terry Cotton, American Angus Association

CALIFORNIA BULLFEST

with Genoa Livestock & Schohr Herefords SEPT. 8, OAKDALE, CA Col. Rick Machado Managed by James Danekas and Associates 36 HEREFORD BULLS $6,298

GMA ANGUS

SEPT. 9, DOS PALOS, CA Dan Byrd (right) pictured with bull buyers Tom and Dee Hill.

CCA President Billy Flournoy briefly spoke at the BCC sale.

48 California Cattleman October 2015

Ty Byrd welcomed buyers at the annual sale.

Col. Rick Machado 42 ANGUS BULLS

$5,032


Ray Alger welcomes buyers to the Ray-Mar Ranches Bull Sale.

Brad and Cindy Worthington at the Heritage Bull Sale.

The Alger grandchildren sang the National Anthem and posted the colors prior to RayMar Ranches Bull Sale in Escalon.

Jeanene Dal Porto and Craig Reinhardt at the Heritage Bull Sale.

Five Star Land and Livestock’s Ryan Nelson welcomes buyers to the sale.

IMI Global’s Jason Judge and Loomix California’s David Absher.

Julie (J.J.) Reinhardt (left) and Abbie Nelson (second from right) with bull buyers Mike and Urrutia and Georgette Andreis.

BLACK GOLD BULL SALE

Donati Ranches, O’Connell Ranches, Wulff Brothers Livestock SEPT. 10, COLUSA, CA Col. Rick Machado Managed by Matt Macfarlane Marketing 135 ANGUS BULLS $7,656

TEHAMA ANGUS RANCH “GENERATIONS OF PERFORMANCE” BULL SALE

SEPT. 11, GERBER, CA Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers 123 ANGUS BULLS $7,943

BARTON ©

Pictured at the Black Gold Bull Sale are: Daniel, Dominic and Dan O’Connell, Tom Donati, and Carl, Charlie and Chester Wulff.

We Believe...

ARELLANO BRAVO PRODUCTION SALE

SEPT. 12, MADERA, CA Col. Rick Machado

64 Angus Bulls

$4,861

OAK RIDGE ANGUS BULL SALE SEPT. 13, CALISTOGA, CA

Col. John Rodgers

72 ANGUS BULLS

BARTON ©

BARTON ©

Karen and Duane Fredricksen at the Tehama Angus Bull Sale.

Tehama Angus bull buyers Greg and Carol Renz.

Mike Bettencourt and sons Erik and Ryan at the Arellano Bravo Bull Sale.

Joey Gonsalves presents a handmade bit to Kirt Eriksen for being a loyal customer.

$8,334

BULLSEYE BREEDERS BULL SALE

Gonsalves Ranch, Diamond Oak Cattle Co., Flood Bros. Cattle, and Double M Ranch SEPT. 16, OAKDALE, CA Col. John Rodgers

44 ANGUS BULLS 26 SIMANGUS BULLS

$7,240 $6,063

RANCHO CASINO AND DAL PORTO LIVESTOCK BULL SALE SEPT. 17, DENAIR, CA

Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers

119 ANGUS BULLS

$9,563

SEPT. 19, GALT, CA

81 ANGUS BULLS

$6,394

...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

Calving ease. Carcass. Cows. 1-800-278-8254 www.selectsiresbeef.com contact@allwestselectsires.com

MID-VALLEY BULL SALE Col. Jake Parnell

Tehama Angus Ranch’s Bill, Kevin, Bryce and Clayton Borror.

Oak Ridge Bull Sale Buyers Kim Gill-Favier, Richard Hamilton and Henry Gill.

October 2015 California Cattleman 49


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

THANK YOU TO ALL THE BUYER’S WHO MADE THIS YEAR’S HERITAGE BULL SALE A SUCCESS!

A tremendous ‘Thank You’ to all our loyal bull buyers who purchased bulls in 2015!

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2015

50 California Cattleman October 2015


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2015.

O’Connell Consensus 2705

JUNIOR HERDSIRES O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR Really Windy 7261

THANK YOU TO OUR 2015 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2015 bull sale!

THANK YOU TO OUR SPRING BULL BUYERS! JOIN US OCTOBER 9 AT THE

SIRE: VDAR Really Windy 4189 MGS: Sinclair Telecast 01S3

FCR Final Answer 0103 SIRE: SAV Final Answer 0035 MGS: N Bar Prime Time D806

+1.5 +56

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WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN NEXT YEAR!

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

THURSDAY, SEPT. 10, 2015

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

October 2015 California Cattleman 51


Thank you to the buyers at our 41st “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale!

The Best of Both Worlds (530) 385-1570

Phone 707.448.9208 E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

Thank you to our 2015 bull buyers!

2015 Female Sale: Oct. 10

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

THE DOIRON FAMILY

Celebrating 41 Years of Angus Tradition

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

JOIN US AT OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE 9/3/15!

Progressive Genetics for over 36 years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2366

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 52 California Cattleman October 2015

h

Mark your calendars for Oct. 17 for our 2015 sale in Kenwood!


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR 2014 BUYERS!

JOIN US OCTOBER 17, 2015 IN KENWOOD

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS We hope to see you out for our 2015 Production Sale Sept. 26

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

v THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Red Angus Located in the heart of the Northwest

Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits Everett Flikkema 406-580-2186

Jack Vollstedt 818-535-4034

Cattleman's Classic, October 18, 2014

www.vfredangus.com October 2015 California Cattleman 53


REAL ESTATE

“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

2015 AICA Seedstock Produer of the Year

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

WE BUILD THE FINEST FENCING FAST!

Specializing in livestock fence & facility construction and repair

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PO Box 1523 Patterson, CA 800-84-fence 209-892-9205 swfence.com

CA CONTRACTOR LICENSE #664846

54 California Cattleman October 2015


VETERINARY SERVICES TOM PERONA, DVM 209-996-7005 Cell

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

THD ©

October 2015 California Cattleman 55


welcome new members PRODUCER MEMBERS Darin and Angie Akkerman, Akkerman Ranch, Montague Theresa and John Ballestin, Shasta Valley Veterinary, Montague Ed and Denise Boydston, Boydston Cattle, St. Helena Myron and Chad Cabral, Cabral Livestock, Rio Vista Edith Higgins, SH Livestock, Diamond Springs Ray and Linda Prock, Bear Valley Land & Cattle Company, Denair Frieda Roen, White Diamond Ranch, LLC, Oakdale Sue Shalvey, Linden Stan Smith, Rancho Allesandro, San Diego Rick Taggard, Lone Oak Springs, Ranch, LLC, Las Vegas, Nev. Jack Toledo, Tri T Farms, Visalia Adrian Vargas, Wheatland Ron and Robbie Warne, R&R Ranch, Moorpark Spencer Wohn, Rio Vista Wes Woolery, Woolery Livestock, Hat Creek Conley Creek Ranch, Blocksburg

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Reb Bisnett, Pro Earth Animal Health, Wilton Dan Chase, 4C Farming, Montague Johnathan Cockoft, CG Partners LLC, Newport Beach Tim Cox, ImmVac, Inc., Columbia, Mo. Richard Firman, Likely Ken Joling, 3Js, Grenada Stephen Reynolds, Montague Frank Rizzardo, Montague Cliff and Velma Rogers, Montague Justin and Beth Sandahl, Montague Pete Silacci, Salinas Frank and Christy Stonier, Shasta View Cattle Co., Montague Outlaw Saddles & Silver, Montague

New Arrival BRAY LYNN RIVERS

On Aug. 30, Vic and Carissa Rivers welcomed their daughter, Bray Lynn Rivers. Though born six weeks before her due date she was a healthy 5 pounds and 1 ounce. In addition to her proud parents, Bray was eagerly welcomed by grandparents Tim and Melinda Koopmann, Sunol, and Carol and Craig Rivers, Livermore. 56 California Cattleman October 2015

YOUNG MEMBERS Chelsea Alto, Loleta Emily Andreini, Davis Rebecca Barnett, Davis Selby Boerman, Yreka Elmer Bustillos, Rio Vista Zach Cahill, Chico Alden Caldwell, San Luis Obispo Shelby Clifford, Elk Grove Patrick Dossche, Chico Nigel Dreksler, Chico Katherine Dykier, Red Bluff Dallas Estrada, Chico Heather Foxworthy, Chico Ethan Francis, Bakersfield Amanda Hernandez, Angels Camp Allie LaMalfa, Richvale Jake Lewis, Chico Stephan Louis, Chico Kayla MacKaben, Chico Gina Marcucci, Chico Shae McElroy, Chico Victor Medina, Chico Kelly Pedrotti, Chico Sophia Roesch, Chico Mason Tarr, Sanger Ben Urricelqui, Palo Cedro Brianna Vinsonhale, Corning Kenneth Watkins IV, Linden Grace Woodmansee, Chico This list reflects new and rejoined CCA members who joined between July 1 through Sept. 21.

GOT NEWS? SHARE YOUR NEWS WITH YOUR CCA FAMILY! CALL (916) 444-0845 OR E-MAIL MAGAZINE@CALCATTLEMEN.ORG TO GET YOUR FAMILY WEDDING AND BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS OR OBITUARIES PUBLISHED.


brothers honored as siskiyou Cattlemen of the Year In deciding the recipient of its 2015 Cattlemen of the Year Award, Siskiyou County Cattlemen chose two local ranchers who were equally deserving of the honor. Roy and Keith Smith, of the Blair Smith & Sons family ranch in Little Shasta, were given the honor. Siskiyou County Cattlemen’s Association (SCCA) President Mark Coats presented the award in August at the annual SCCA field day and trade show. Roy and his wife, Cindy, have raised four children, and Siskyou county cattlemen of the year, are two brothers, Roy and Keith and his wife, Billie, have raised three. Between the Keith Smith from Montague. Also pictured are Greg Kuck (left) two, a number of years have been spent serving on various and SCCA President Mark Coats (second from right). boards, from the Little Shasta Elementary School Board to the Montague Water Conservation Board. Both received a brand new hat with a liner inscription reading “Siskiyou County Cattleman of the Year for 2015.” Roy and Keith are sons of past CCA President Blair Smith, Montague. In addition to the Cattleman of the Year Award, SCCA also gave their Ranch Hand of the Year Award to Carlos Aguiniga, who is employed by the Little Shasta Ranch in Montague. The annual SCCA Field Day serves as an educational opportunity for ranchers to hear the latest news from CCA, the California Beef Countil and UC Cooperative Extension regarding issues that may impact their operations. The event is also when SCCA gives out their annual scholarship. Stan and Libby Sears of the Little Shasta Ranch present the 2014 Ranch Hand Award to Carlos Aguiniga (Center). This year a scholarship was awarded to Kara Porterfield, MacDoel.

! n o s a e S e h t Celebrate Lazy Day Beef & Vegetable Soup

Time: 5 to 6 hours on high or 8 to 9 hours on low • Makes 6 to 8 servings INGREDIENTS

2-1/2 pounds beef stew meat, cut into 3/4-inch pieces 2 cans (14 to 14-1/2 ounces each) reduced-sodium beef broth 1 can (15 ounces) chickpeas, rinsed, drained 1 can (14-1/2 ounces) no-salt added diced tomatoes, undrained 1 cup water 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 2 cups frozen mixed vegetables 1 cup uncooked ditalini or other small pasta Shredded Romano cheese (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Combine beef, broth, chickpeas, tomatoes, water, Italian seasoning, salt and pepper in 4-1/2 to 5-1/2-quart slow cooker; toss to coat well. Cover and cook on HIGH 5 hours or on LOW 8 hours. (No stirring is necessary during cooking.) 2. Stir in mixed vegetables and pasta. Continue cooking, covered, 1 hour or until beef and pasta are tender. Season with salt and pepper, as desired. Stir well before serving. Serve with cheese, if desired. October 2015 California Cattleman 57


Advertisers’ Index Turlock Livestock Auction Yard.........1, 5, 6

Donati Ranch..............................................50

Ray-Mar Ranches.......................................51

Adreini & Company...................................55

Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc.........................54

Rick Machado Livestock......................28, 29

Agriclear......................................................31

Farm Credit Alliance..................................11

Sammis Ranch............................................51

All West/Select Sires...................................49

Five Star Land Company...........................54

San Juan Ranch...........................................52

Amador Angus............................................50

Freitas Rangeland Improvements.............41

Schafer Ranch.............................................51

American Hereford Association...............52

Fresno State Agricultural Foundation.....53

Schohr Herefords........................................53

Bar R Angus................................................50

Furtado Angus............................................51

Shasta Bull Sale...........................................15

BioZyme Incorporated...............................43

Furtado Livestock Enterprises..................55

Shasta Livestock Auction Yard....................9

BMW Angus...............................................50

Genoa Livestock.........................................52

Sierra Ranches.............................................53

Broken Arrow Angus.................................50

Gonsalves Ranch.........................................51

Silveira Bros.................................................52

Broken Box Ranch......................................54

HAVE Angus...............................................51

Skinner Livestock Transportation............54

Buchanan Angus.........................................50

Hogan Ranch...............................................52

Sonoma Mounty Herefords...................7, 53

Byrd Cattle Co.............................................60

Hone Ranch.................................................52

Southwest Fence & Supply Co., Inc..........54

Byrd Cattle Co.......................................50, 60

Hufford’s Herefords....................................53

Spanish Ranch.............................................52

California Custom......................................54

J/V Angus....................................................51

Sweetlix........................................................33

California Wagyu Breeders, Inc................54

Kerndt Livestock Products........................55

Tehama Angus Ranch................................52

California-Nevada Hereford Assn............39

Lambert Ranch.......................................7, 53

Teixeira Cattle Co...................................3, 51

NCBA Convention & Trade Show...........59

Lander Veterinary Clinic...........................55

Thomas Angus Ranch................... 14, 36, 37

Cattlemen’s Livestock Market...................25

Leachman/Top Line.............................18, 19

Tumbleweed Ranch....................................52

Charron Ranch...........................................50

Little Shasta Ranch.....................................53

Universal Semen Sales...............................55

Cherry Glen Beefmasters..........................52

McPhee Red Angus ...................................53

Veterinary Services, Inc.............................54

Conlan Ranches California.......................54

Multimin USA............................................24

VF Red Angus................................ 12, 13, 52

Conlin Fence Company.............................54

Noahs Angus Ranch...................................51

Vintage Angus Ranch................................52

Conline Supply Company, Inc..................45

O’Connell Ranches.....................................51

Western Fence & Construction, Inc.........54

Corsair Angus Ranch.................................50

ORIgen.........................................................55

Western Stockman’s Market......................23

CSU Chico College of Agriculture...........53

Orvis Cattle Company...............................53

Western Video Market.................................2

Dal Porto Livestock....................................51

Pacific Trace Minerals..........................42, 54

World of Bulls.............................................25

Diamond Back Ranch................................54

Pitchfork Cattle Co.....................................53

Wulff Brothers Livestock...........................51

58 California Cattleman October 2015


SET SAIL SAN DIEGO Soak up some sun and new ideas for your operation! CATTLE INDUSTRY CONVENTION NCBA TRADE SHOW

January 27-29, 2016 San Diego, California

#BEEFMEET www.beefusa.org


THD PHOTOS©

BYRD CATTLE COMPANY, LLC

THD ©

60 California Cattleman October 2015

Extends our most sincere thanks to all who bought bulls, the folks who bid and those who came to enjoy the evening at BCC on September 4, and made it our best bull sale ever!

California Cattleman October 2015 online  
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