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June 2016

Topics this month... selling with WVM in today’s market why should you be Insuring your feed? factors affecting ag land values June 2016 California Cattleman 1


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2 California Cattleman June 2016 THD ©

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June 2016 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

The Power of Positivity by CCA Second Vice President Jack Lavers It is very easy to get caught up in life and forget as an industry how blessed we are. Whether it is federal and state politics, family life or Murphy’s Law, we can get lost or down on ourselves. Fortunately, our industry (especially the cow/calf segment) can be very healing for the mind, body and soul. Every presidential election year we hear how this election is the most important. The consequences could be catastrophic if the wrong choice is made. Yet every year we march on. Each year in California can be seen as harder than the last, and we all talk of greener pastures in places like Texas. Whether dealing with the utterly mind numbing Senate Bill 88 or the impotence-inducing idea of a Trump or Hillary presidency, we can survive and will. Through a great staff and officer team, and a state and federal political action committee that have made many in-roads for our industry in the game of politics, we are able to push back against inept and misguided legislation. All of this effort originates from the very men and women who work in our industry everyday. An overbearing government can be the least of your problems when a loved one is seriously injured or sick, or in the worst case scenario, passes away. We have all been there. Most recently in my own family, my dad fell ill. He has a history of poor health due to too many ranch-related accidents that he was not supposed to live through. Add the fact that he may be one of the most pain tolerant men (read as stubborn) I have ever met and you get a mom yelling at him to go to the hospital and a doctor saying why weren’t you here a week ago. It’s at these times that I’m so thankful for the great opportunities we spent together horseback, the knowledge and stories of our families past that my dad shared with me and the examples of his toughness that were cultivated in the lifelong

pursuit of being an everimproving cattleman. It was a tearful moment earlier this spring to watch as he described each of the spring flowers to my daughter and to see how excited she was to describe each flower in the bouquet she picked for her mom. After two weeks in the hospital, my dad is heading home to share more of the history and love our 158-year-old ranch. Whether it’s a crippled prize bull, a broken trailer axel or the second time the pump in the well burned up, Murphy’s Law is always ringing true. However, with Murphy’s Law, not far behind is Jack’s Law. Pray tell what is Jack’s Law you ask? Keep reading, and I’ll tell you. Every time a neighbors bull tears up the fence and gets in your field many things can happen that could negatively impact your bottom line. But, how lucky was it that you saw the first poppy of the season from the back of that colt that needed to be ridden? How great was it to see a couple of does and a fox? Or how about that time you tried to catch those wild piglets up that draw with your dad? That was the same time you found out your horse “Pinky” was scared of a charging boar and that some jeans just aren’t worth washing. Jack’s Law is very simply, if life has got you down - and it always will at some point look at the bright side. I’ll bet you smile. The cow you gave a second chance may have the best calf in the herd. While fixing fence you found a half buried antique bottle of hooch that had a really a great story about the Woody Ranch inside. Or maybe it’s a 4-yearold little girl who wants to be a “makeup” girl when she grows up and then says, “and a cowboy like you dad!” I’ll bet you smile. In our industry we are truly blessed and I personally wouldn’t give up any of the bad, because I know there is always something good following right behind that mama cow.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917

4 California Cattleman June 2016

Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


JUNE 2016

ON THE COVER

Volume 99, Issue 6

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE CCA compiling commemorative history book

6

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK 12 Legislative year off to good start VET VIEWS A reminder on anaplasmosis

20

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD U.S. beef and Croatian consumers

22

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER EPA measure on the minds of producers

26

COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR Beef and its benefits for your physical health

34

SPECIAL FEATURES

Selling on the video with today’s beef market Do you have range and forage protection? A Western Affair hosted by Wood Family Rangeland values in your neck of the woods CCA Executive Board member’s love of ag

READER SERVICES Buyers’ Guide Obituaries & New Arrivals Advertisers Index

This month’s cover photo was taken by Julie Cano, a member of the Glenn-Colusa CattleWomen’s unit from Williams. Cano’s photo, The Green Ranch, was winner of the California Landscapes category in the 2015 CCA & CCW Photo Contest. To learn more about the 2016 contest, see upcoming issues of this publication or contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845.

UPCOMING CCA & CCW EVENTS JUNE 22

10 16 24 28 36

38 44 46

CCA LEGISLATIVE STEAK & EGGS BREAKFAST Sacramento

JUNE 22 TO 24 CCA & CCW ANNUAL MIDYEAR MEETING Sacramento JULY 13 TO 16 DEC. 1 TO 3

2016 CATTLE INDUSTRY SUMMER BUSINESS MEETING Denver, Colo. 100-YEAR CCA & CCW CONVENTION The Nugget Casino Resort, Sparks, Nev.

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

June 2016 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE COMMEMORATING CCA’S CENTENNIAL BIRTHDAY order your CCA coffee table book today! by CCA Director of Communications Malorie Bankhead Have you ever had an intense feeling of déjà vu? A feeling so strong, that you are certain you’ve been there before or already experienced that memory first-hand? How about déjà-moo? When you’ve heard this bull before? Ok, that was a little beef humor. But, this feeling happens to the best of us. It may have happened to many of you as you were scouring over old scrapbooks and family newspaper clippings and pulling out the family archives to build your 100 Years of CCA coffee table book profile. It’s been said that history has a peculiar way of repeating itself, and the coffee table book that will help CCA celebrate a century of our member-driven organization is proving to be no exception from generation to generation. It has been so fun in the collection process of this project to see what you’ve chosen to showcase when it comes to sharing your history. Our deadline could have used a bit of improving, right smack dab in the middle of spring calving

and tax season, but we appreciate your hard work in getting your profiles completed and taking part in the book. I’d personally like to extend my sincere thanks for the time and effort you all put into crafting your book entries. It was important to you and your families to get it right and not to leave any piece of the puzzle to the imagination. A lot of you said it would be difficult at the start, but you came out on top with old photos galore and wonderful showcases of your family ranch’s progression over the years. It has been a true pleasure to work on this project and get a small glimpse into the ranching families who have made CCA what it is today over the past 99 years and counting. Inspiration for the 100-year celebration book has me looking all sorts of places like our magazine archives, the tubs of old photos in the back of our office, and the 75th year book, The Long and Winding Trail. I think it’s fun to think about

CCA President LeRoy Rankin signs a proclamation at the 50th CCA Anniversary. Submitted by Rankin Ranch. 6 California Cattleman June 2016

MALORIE BANKHEAD where we have been and how far we’ve come. But it’s especially fun for me to think about what CCA’s Director of Communications in 2117 will think when celebrating the 200th anniversary of CCA. I can just imagine how the conversation will go. “Gosh, 2017 was SO old school. There aren’t even any holograms in this book. What’s with all these words?” “Print media was SO 2017,” and so on. Maybe my grandchildren will be

CCA President Blair Smith presents a cowboy hat to Ronald Reagan. Submitted by Blair Smith and Sons.

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 8


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center JOIN US FOR THE 2016 CONTRA COSTA, ALAMEDA, SAN JOAQUIN, STANISLAUS COUNTY CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATIONS’ SPECIAL SHOWCASE FEEDER SALES FEATURING NHTC, NATURAL, AND AGE & SOURCE PROGRAM CATTLE. NO MATTER WHAT PROGRAM YOU ARE ON, WE WILL PROMOTE YOUR CATTLE!

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 able to witness that one day. After all, an underlying theme in all of your stories has been successfully leaving what you have worked so hard to develop to the next generation. And a good job you are doing of that, might I add. Since I’m a very visual person, my favorite part of the project so far has been looking at the photos you’ve submitted. They are so neat! As a sort of a sneak peek, so you might have déjà vu when you’re flipping through your own copy of the coffee table book soon, I wanted to share some of my favorites with you. They’re scattered around this page. You might even recognize one of your own! If you’ve been living under a rock (or calving, branding or gathering cattle in the mountains, etc.) and you missed your chance to be in the book and are kicking yourself for it, please give me a call. Let’s chat. We’ve got about 15 more slots to fill in the book before we hit 100, and how cool would that be to have 100 profiles for 100 years! If you’d like to order your own copy or copies, you can pre-order the coffee table book for $40 each. They will be available at the 100th CCA & CCW Annual Convention for inperson pick up in December. If you won’t be able to join us in Sparks, we can ship the books to you for a flatrate shipping fee. And if you order five or more, you’ll get a discount for your bulk order. To order, call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 and we can process a credit card overthe-phone, or fill out and mail in the order form to the right. We are very excited for this book project to actually live on coffee tables inside and outside of the California ranching community, leaving the legacies of generations past to provide a glimpse back in history for those who turn its pages in many future generations to come. 8 California Cattleman June 2016

1941 photo submitted by Vanoni Ranch.

Celebrating 100 Years of CCA

< special edition coffee table book >

Pre-order copies for you, your family and your friends before Oct. 1 to receive special pre-sale prices! Pre-order until Oct. 1: $40 per book + flat rate shipping* After Oct 1: $50 per book + flat rate shipping - Call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 for special pricing on orders of 5 or more books -

*Pre-ordered books can be picked up in person at the 100th Annual CCA & CCW Convention Dec. 1-3 in Sparks, Nev. or shipped for an additional flat rate fee. Detach and fill out the form below and mail with a check or call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 to pay over the phone by credit card.

Name: ______________________________________ Phone number: _________________ Please reserve _____ coffee table books @ $40 each = _______ Shipping: $14 (up to 2 books) = _______ + $7 per each add’l book x _____ books = _______

___ Yes, I will pick up my order in person at Convention ___ No, I won’t be able to make the convention, please ship to:

Total: _________

_____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ Make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association and mail to: California Cattlemen’s Association, Attn: 100 Year Coffee Table Book 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

< No refunds will be granted >


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What’s Your Marketing Plan?

Video helps producers market cattle to full potential by Holly Foster, video operations manager, Western Video Market

FOSTER©

I

f you pay any attention to cattle futures, you know it’s been a wild ride the last several months. The cattle feeding industry has experienced a sustained period of never-beforeseen losses. While there was some optimism early this spring, it has quickly dissipated with continued volatility. The dramatic swings have made it difficult to develop any sort of profit forecast based on the futures market and historical trends. It is also important to recognize that cattle buyers have lost an enormous amount of equity and will be trying to mitigate future losses as much as possible. That being said, there are some things you can do to help ensure that your calves are as marketable as possible. One way to publicize the potential value of your cattle is by selling via video sale where you have an opportunity to fully describe your genetic, health and management 10 California Cattleman June 2016

plan, and also highlight third-party verification programs to differentiate your cattle from the pack. Many western producers also look to summer video markets as a means of forward contracting for a fall delivery. Western Video Market, the largest video sale company in the West, is gearing up for its summer sale season, most notably its 27th annual signature sale that will be held at the Silver Legacy in Reno, Nev. July 11-13. The sale typically markets more than 100,000 head of cattle and attracts an on-site crowd of approximately 500 people, plus a national viewership via the Internet and Dish Network. That is a lot of potential publicity for your cattle.

Laying the foundation Before you start to think about adding bells and whistles to your cattle, you’ll want to make sure you have the

basics covered. Reputation means a lot when marketing in this outlet, as well as past performance, so it is important to optimize your management program to meet basic expectations from buyers and mitigate their risk as much as possible. A solid preventative health and preconditioning program has been shown to provide a premium in the marketplace. In an analysis of 2014 and 2015 Western Video Market data through a partnership with Zoetis, weaned calves following the Zoetis SelectVAC, WeanVAC protocol brought almost $7.00 more per hundredweight than the average. Since 2008, Western Video Market has partnered with Zoetis to provide a verified vaccination and health program certification to buyers that cattle meet minimum specifications. WVM also offers its own recommended vaccination protocol for producers to participate in. That


program has been updated in 2016 to better reflect the type of preconditioning program that buyers are looking for to minimize health risks. Any consignors who meet the minimum specifications for either the SelectVAC or WVM Vaccination protocol receive a special notation in the catalog and on-screen during the sale broadcast

“Circle 25” Slide Another new option for consignors to consider is the introduction of the “Circle 25” Slide. When selling cattle on a video sale, you are expected to accurately estimate what your cattle will weigh at delivery, sometimes months in advance. Since that can be a difficult task, the concept of a “price slide” has evolved and is a mechanism to reduce the risk when a seller’s estimate of delivery weights is inaccurate. It can also be an important merchandising technique for selling cattle in a video sale format, as it conveys how much confidence you have in your estimated delivery weights. Live weight and the amount of the slide are inversely related—as delivery weights increase, the slide decreases. The slide is an adjustment to price that is typically applied when the average per head delivered weight exceeds a specified limit that is outlined in the contract. In another effort to stay current with today’s market, Western Video Market introduced the “Circle 25” Slide in 2016. When we were seeing record high cattle prices in 2014 and 2015, our consignors were asked to increase the amount of their slide in order to mitigate buyer risk. Now, as we head into a down market, in an effort to give consignors some “price insurance,” WVM

has introduced an optional 25-pound “up and down” slide that provides a weight insurance policy for both buyers and sellers. We feel this will also benefit our buyers by encouraging representatives and consignors to be as accurate as possible in their weight estimates. This new option was made available beginning with our April 13 sale in Visalia. For clarification, see the examples to the right.

Bottom line As we head into the summer marketing season, the market will be tough to predict. However, if you have done your homework and laid the foundation with an investment in genetics and herd health, marketing via video provides you one of the best opportunities to promote your cattle with the added advantage of reduced stress, no freight costs to market and national market exposure for your cattle. We encourage you to work with your video representative to determine the best options that fit your ranch management and marketing target. For more information, visit www. wvmcattle.com or contact our office directly at (530) 347-3793.

HOW IT WORKS: Example 1. A 25# Weight Stop above the base weight. A load of cattle is based at 500 pounds and sells for $2.00/pound with a $0.20 slide. At shipping, cattle net 535 pounds, 35 pounds above base weight, but with a 25-pound weight stop. 25 pounds over base x .20 slide $5.00 deduct from base price Price per animal would be $1.95 X 525 pounds. Example 2. A maximum 25-pound slide/ price stop below the base weight. At shipping, cattle net 465 pounds, 35 pounds below the base weight*, but with a 25 pound slide/price stop. 25 pounds under base x .20 slide $5.00 added to base price Price per animal would be $2.05 X 465 pounds. *When figuring the price on cattle that come in under the base weight, the actual net weight is used. Sellers only receive a maximum 25 lbs. of slide/price adjustment.

SETTRINI©

Western Video Market’s Col. John Rodgers films a set of cattle for an upcoming video sale. June 2016 California Cattleman 11


YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK

CCA EARNS EARLY LEGISLATIVE SUCCESS

MEMBERS ENCOURAGED TO REACH OUT TO LAWMAKERS by CCA Vice President of Government Affairs Justin Oldfield It’s only six months into the second year of the current legislative session in Sacramento, however ranchers and beef producers have benefited from some early legislative victories. Specifically, AB 1960 by Assemblymember Tom Lackey (R-Palmdale) sponsored by CCA, which seeks to exempt pickups and trailers used in agriculture from the Basic Inspection of Terminal (BIT) program administered by the California Highway Patrol (CHP), has advanced to the Assembly floor. AB 1960 previously received a 15-0 vote in the Assembly Transportation Committee and a 20-0 vote in the Assembly Appropriations Committee. On Thursday, May 12, the full Assembly voted to advance the bill to the California State Senate with a vote of 76-0. The bill will

now be referred to the Senate Rules Committee where it will ultimately be scheduled for a hearing in the Senate Transportation & Housing Committee likely sometime in mid-June prior to the summer legislative recess that begins July 1. Legislation opposed by CCA and numerous other agricultural and business stakeholders has also been defeated and is no longer eligible for a hearing this year. Specifically, AB 2162 by Assemblymember Kansen Chu (D-San Jose) was not scheduled for a hearing in the Assembly Natural Resources Committee due to overwhelming opposition. Likewise, AB 2725 by Assemblymember David Chui (D-San Francisco) failed to pass the Assembly Health Committee with a vote of 9-4. At least 10 votes are needed in the Assembly Health Committee to

CCA MEMBER CALL TO ACTION Members of the Senate Transportation & Housing Committee include: Sen. Jim Beall (D-San Jose) – Chair Sen. Anthony Cannella (R-Ceres) – Vice Chair Sen. Ben Allen (D-Santa Monica) Sen. Patricia Bates (R-Laguna Nigel) Sen. Ted Gaines (R-El Dorado Hills) Sen. Cathleen Galgiani (D-Stockton) Sen. Connie Leyva (D-Chino) Sen. Mike McGuire (D-Healdsburg) Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia) Sen. Richard Roth (D-Riverside) Sen. Bob Wiechowski (D-Fremont) Please use this link http://findyourrep.legislature.ca.gov/ to find your California State Senator. If your Senator happens to be a member of the Senate Transportation & Housing Committee, please call their office immediately and register your support for AB 1960. Please identify yourself as a constituent and ask for an “aye” vote on AB 1960 (Lackey). 12 California Cattleman June 2016

advance legislation. More detailed information about both AB 2162 and AB 2725 can be found below. CCA also continues to strongly oppose AB 2757 by Assemblymember Lorena Gonzalez (D-San Diego) that seeks to end the current 10hour day and six-day work week afforded to agriculture before paying overtime. CCA played a critical role in defeating similar legislation in 2012. AB 2757 was placed on the Assembly Appropriations Committee suspense file, however it is expected to advance to the Assembly floor by the end of May, because the bill’s author is also the Chair of the Assembly Appropriations Committee. CCA and other agricultural organizations are gearing up for a fight on the Assembly floor with the intent to block the legislation from moving to the Senate prior to summer recess. AB 2162 (Chu) -Failed PassageThis bill would circumvent regulatory authority currently held by the counties and prohibit the harvest of an oak tree without a permit from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. At CCA’s urging, the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection has declined twice to regulate the harvest of oak woodlands. Counties currently regulate the removal of oak trees as they see fit. AB 2725 (Chui) -Failed PassageThis bill would require the California Department of Public Health to identify a list of foods that if consumed after the specified date on the label might pose “a high level of risk” to consumer health. In addition, this list would be required to be posted online.


June 2016 California Cattleman 13


ranchers host cattle handling Workshop for law enforcement In a world where fewer and fewer people commonly come into contact with livestock, the Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento (AES) Cattlemen’s Association is working to ensure those who may encounter livestock on the job can do so in the safest manner. Approximately 50 law enforcement officers from Tuolumne, Calaveras, Amador, El Dorado, Sacramento and Sonoma counties attended an animal handling training held at the Amador County Fairgrounds on April 15. California Highway Patrol personnel, county sheriff and animal control agencies also attended the training. Hosted by the AES Cattlemen’s Association, the training was meant to help law enforcmento best handle situation when they may need to work with livestock. The information they were given will help them proceed in ways that is best for the animal, the public and the law enforcement officers themselves. AES President Col. Jake Parnell said the group thought that in light of multiple incidences where law enforcement has been faced with the challenge of dealing with stray and sometimes difficult livestock, it was a good opportunity for ranchers to play a proactive role in trying to help educate law enforcement personnel on working with livestock. “Not only is it in their best interest to learn how livestock need to be handled, but it is also in our best interest as cattle owners,” Parnell said. “No matter how good your fence is, sometimes circumstances are out of our control and it is important to plan for those events before they arise. Communication between ranchers and agencies is vital. I hope we see events like these will be adopted by other groups throughout the state.” The presenters for the seminar were Gib Gianandrea, San Andreas, representing AES Cattlemen; Dave Fisher from the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA); and Rygh Olson from Olson Training. Coffee and donuts were served at registration and a deli sandwich lunch was sponsored by the association. Carla Gianandrea organized and served lunch and Cathy Jauch handled registration for the event. There was a live cattle handling segment which included hands-on officer training. A hand out was provided by Olson Training on cattle handling and a handout was also given out from CDFA with tips on identification, transportation paperwork, and cattle identification by breed, color and sex. 14 California Cattleman June 2016

Gib Gianandrea speaks to a group of law enforcement personnel at an animal handling training at the Amador County Fairgrounds.

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five star 1027 blackcap 5016 4-26-2015

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YW I+121

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FIvE STAR 1027 BLACkCAP 5016

Selling a confirmed heifer calf pregnancy out of this female (at right) that sold for $50,000 for 1/2 interest that was a many-times champion for Stevie Guess. The heifer calf pregnancy is sired by Silveiras First Reaction2510 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;the $120,000 2015 National Western Angus Bull Sale Champion.

silveiras juanada 4349 2-26-2014 Sire silveiras first reaction2510 10-4-2012 dam

Calf Mating

Silveiras First Reaction 2510 x Silveiras Style 9303

SilveiraS Juanada 4349

This Dal Porto Livestock young donor (at right), which posts a WWR of 3@113, is a complete outcross to all of the popular sires being used, offering an abundance of possibilities. Two daughters have been retained in the herd. A son will sell as a herdsire prospect in their fall production sale.

DPL foxy goldie 0079 9-11-2010

H A Image Maker 0415 x S S Traveler 6807 T510 Son BW +.6

WW +56

YW +98

MILK +34

MARB RE $W $B +.57 +.13 +60.20 +146.53

DPL Foxy GoLDIE 0079

This donor sells open and ready to flush with a March bull calf at side by Casino Aberdeen H64.

1521 (at right) is a spring bred heifer that sells safe to Quaker Hill Rampage 0T26, a powerful Daybreak son with incredible growth and performance.

GMA 3L WAf MiSSie 1521 4-14-2015

S A V Resource 1441 x TC Gridiron 258 BW WW I+3.2 I+61

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June 2016 California Cattleman 15


PASTURE, RANGELAND, FORAGE INSURANCE A Solid Strategy for California Ranching

R

by Aaron Tattersall, Silveus Insurance Agency

ecent droughts and fire have many California ranchers worried about their livelihood—and with good reason. California is in its fifth year of drought, with the latter three years among the driest and warmest on record. As bleak as this is, programs are available to assist ranchers in mitigating the enormous risk that lack of rainfall presents. In 2007, the Risk Management Agency (RMA), an arm of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) which oversees the programs for crop insurance, released its first-ever program specifically designed for ranchers. It’s only been available in California for a few years, but it’s already begun to relieve some of the anxiety of drought conditions. DECLINING HERD NUMBERS

The current state of affairs has many California ranchers feeling uneasy, as snowpack was almost 25 percent of normal levels in February 2014, averaged across the state, according to the University of California (UC), Davis, Center for Watershed Sciences August 2015 report “Economic Analysis of the 2015 Drought For California Agriculture.” The USDA’s Economic Research Service weighed in on the situation, too. The state was so overwhelmed that in January 2014, “the State

16 California Cattleman June 2016

Water Project, which provides surface water to about 750,000 acres of agricultural land, announced that it would not be able to deliver any water to these users, the first so-called ‘zero allocation’ in the project’s history.” In March 2015, the State Water Project said it was projecting 20 percent of deliveries in 2015. THE ECONOMICS OF DROUGHT

According to the Davis Center report, such conditions could cause “further deterioration of pasture conditions, which means further declines in the cattle herd in California.” In the report, the Center said it expected losses in 2015 to be about $100 million. The Center isn’t optimistic about 2016, either reporting, “With smaller irrigation water deliveries, irrigated pasture acreage may be eliminated in many areas as any remaining water is diverted to trees, vines, and vegetables or high quality silage and hay. Irrigated pasture would remain in areas where water transfers were not feasible. For this analysis we estimate the cost of drought to livestock and dairies in 2016 and 2017 is the same as 2015.” Less than favorable conditions in years past can have far-reaching effects, as the Davis Center suggests: “Lack of rain in early 2015 caused cow/ calf numbers to be lower than normal and the shift away from irrigated pasture will decrease forage for feeder cattle. Pasture conditions varied widely with


some pasture receiving normal precipitation and others very little precipitation and thus little forage.” FEELING THE PINCH

Ranchers were hit particularly hard in 2014, which caused many to pack up cattle and haul them to states like Nevada, Texas and Nebraska, according to an April 2014 Reuters story. The severity of the situation was unknown at the time, but as the article states, “... up to 100,000 California cattle have left the state in the past four months alone.” Consumers felt the pinch, too, as direct, indirect, and induced effects came into play. According to the Davis Center, direct costs pertain to crop revenue losses, dairies and livestock revenue losses, and increased pumping costs. The economy was impacted indirectly, as ranchers reduced spending on fertilizers, agrochemicals and farm services. “The induced effects account for the overall changes in household income due to the drought,” a Davis Center report says. These costs hit home with California ranchers, who have experienced the smallest cowherd since the 1950s. PEACE OF MIND

If there’s one lesson in this reality, it’s that you can’t control the weather, but you can have measures in place to mitigate disaster. Insurance offerings provided through RMA can provide extra peace of mind and are typically much more affordable. Specifically, the Pasture, Rangeland, Forage (PRF) Insurance Program, which is designed to provide insurance coverage on native rangeland or any perennial forage, has been enormously helpful with California ranchers. PRF is administered by the RMA and was first available in limited areas in the U.S in 2006. PRF expanded incrementally each year, finally making its way to California in 2011. In 2013, Silveus Insurance Agency became CCA’s exclusive PRF insurance provider. This relationship provides CCA access to proprietary software tools, faster rainfall updates, and producer education that is second to none. Coverage is currently available in all 48 contiguous states, which began with the 2016 crop year. For California, in 2011, only 185,000 acres were insured.

In 2016, however, 2.6 million acres were insured—a testament to the overwhelming success of the program! FLEXIBLE COVERAGE

The program offers some flexibility because it provides protection, while allowing ranchers to insure only those acres critical to operations. Different options are available to provide coverage for a ranch. Premiums vary by the selections made by the producer. By selecting a productivity factor, ranchers can establish a value between 60 and 150 percent of the county base value and match the amount of protection to the value of forage that best represents the specific grazing operation. Only Silveus agents have access to proprietary software tools that take the guesswork out of customizing a policy. No two policies are identical because rainfall data, grid locations and producer risk tolerance are all major factors in building a unique plan for each operation. This insurance coverage is for a single peril: lack of precipitation. Coverage is based on the experience of the entire grid. It is not based on ranches or specific weather stations in the general area. Instead, it’s based on data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Prediction Center (NOAA CPC) and each grid is 0.25 degrees in latitude by 0.25 degrees in longitude, which translates to approximately 17-by-17 miles at the equator. NOAA has kept records since 1948, which are used in calculating the “normal” rainfall index for each interval and grid ID. The benefit for a producer in having rainfall data collected by NOAA is that if the rainfall falls below the trigger level they have indicated in their policy, an indemnity is paid. There are no claims adjustors. Ranchers must select at least two two-month periods when precipitation is important to the operation. These periods are called intervals. Ranchers will be asked to make several choices taking into account practice, productivity factor and the number of acres they wish to enroll. Each ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 June 2016 California Cattleman 17


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 interval acts like a mini-insurance period. If actual precipitation doesn’t meet the insured’s coverage level, losses are generated more frequently instead of waiting until the end of the year. This frequency provides operations with quicker financial relief and income to purchase hay for feed or cover additional costs. SOUND RISK MANAGEMENT

give the producer the best protection and net return. Ranchers can trust the Silveus name, as it’s one of the oldest providers of crop insurance. We’ve worked with RMA to implement insurance plans that have benefited ranchers across the nation. Working as an advocate for producers, we have had the opportunity to recommend and lobby for improvements to the program, which would benefit ranchers in California and nationwide. CCA members interested in securing coverage for the PRF insurance program should contact one of our agents, as listed in the advertisement below.

The insurance really comes down to making an investment in a sound drought mitigation plan. And the ROI is there: Due to federal premium subsidies, PRF is the only dryweather risk management program where operations pay for less than half the cost, but receive 100 percent of the indemnity when precipitation comes in below average. Providing these options to ranchers gives them the stronger safety net they need to continue ranching, even after particularly bad years. Ranchers have always had two primary risks they cannot control: prices and weather. They have always been able to use commodity markets to help mitigate Aaron Tattersall Jim Vann financial risk, and now they can ‘put 303.854.7016 530.218.3379 a pencil’ to their dry-weather risk aaron.tattersall@cropins.net jimv@wsrins.com Lic #0H15694 Lic #0B48084 through Pasture, Rangeland, Forage coverage. There are benefits to using Silveus over non-Silveus agents. First, I emphasize the importance of excellent customer service— Silveus Rangeland agents have the most experience and education Matt Griffith Dan VanVuren of any agent offering PRF in the 530.570.3333 209.484.5578 matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com industry. The technology is also dan@dvvins.com Lic #0124869 Lic #0E44519 second to none. Our exclusive suite of proprietary software and When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), highly trained agents assist ranchers there’s no one better! in designing customized risk management plans. Only Silveus Insurance Agency uses RangeCalc™, the industry’s most extensive dry-weather risk management software. With a single click, we can show historical payments back to 1948 and tell the producer which coverage intervals

IT’S A WIN-WIN To do business with those looking out for you!

Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you!

18 California Cattleman June 2016


special stocker and feeder sales every monday in JUNE & juLY Slaughter Cattle at 10 a.m. Feeder cattle at 1 p.m.

THD ©

Monday Specials at Famoso June 6: Kern County ‘off the grass’ sale featuring a large run of calves and yearlings from local ranches, plus fall-calving bred cows

July 11: Opportunity bred cow sale

san juan ranch gelbvieh purebred herd dispersal (1 of 2)

San Juan Ranch Gelbvieh, Shandon, Calif., will offer 62 fall-calving bred cows, 32 replacement heifers that are ready to bred, plus 56 weaned calves in the first part of the dispersal of its purebred Gelbvieh herd.

also selling 250 black, fall-calving cows and pairs featuring top-notch, 3-year-old fall-calving cows

october 15: 51st Annual Famoso all-breeds bull sale

selling farm equipment, females and bulls in this annual event

including the complete and final dispersal of san juan ranch gelbvieh This year’s event will feature the final dispersal of San Juan Ranch Gelbiveh, including 30 service-age bulls and 4 herdsires, as well as 70 spring bred cows and 37 weaned calves, in addition to the tremendous offering of females and all-breed bulls offered annually in the Famoso All-Breeds Bull Sale.

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DWIGHT MEBANE ........................................... 661 979-9892 JUSTIN MEBANE ..............................................661 979-9894 Frank Machado ..........................................805 839-8166 Bennet mebane............................................661 201-8169 Office .................................................................... 661 399-2981 June 2016 California Cattleman 19


VET VIEWS

ADVICE ON ANAPLASMOSIS

tips for controlling outbreaks from Zoetis Animal Health It is difficult to quantify the risk of anaplasmosis in any given herd in any given time of year, but when an outbreak occurs, it can result in devastating consequences for a cow/ calf herd. Anaplasmosis is most commonly caused by Anaplasma marginale, a microorganism that invades red blood cells and causes severe anemia. Transmitted through the blood, the main culprits in spreading the disease include biting flies or ticks or infected blood transferred on contaminated needles or other equipment. The disease can result in death, aborted calves, bull infertility, weight loss and diminished milk production as well as additional treatment expenses. The risk for disease increases when mixing noninfected cattle with those that carry the disease or when environmental conditions favor increased activity of biting flies or ticks. “Anaplasmosis is sporadic, not all factors that cause outbreaks in a herd are known but when they occur, consequences can be significant,” said Daniel Scruggs, DVM, managing veterinarian with Zoetis. Anaplasmosis causes special concern for cow/calf producers since mature animals have higher susceptibility to the disease than younger animals. Cows in the late stage of pregnancy and those nursing calves have particularly high death loss. Signs of anaplasmosis can include: · Orange-yellow coloration of the mucous membranes · Thin, watery blood · Slow, reluctant to move or short of breath cattle · Aggressive behavior shortly before death · Sudden, unexplained death of adult cattle · Abortions One of the most commonly used and predictable methods of controlling anaplasmosis includes incorporating a feed-grade chlortetracycline, such as AUREOMYCIN®, in the animal’s feed or mineral

20 California Cattleman June 2016

supplements. In endemic regions where ticks and flies remain active all year, AUREOMYCIN administration can occur year-round in feed or minerals. In other areas, producers often focus on late spring through fall, the time of highest transmission. “It’s really a factor of diligence in making sure cattle are protected,” Scruggs said. “With spring-calving herds, the bulls are out during the spring and summer vector season. When bulls are experiencing an acute infection of anaplasmosis, and they become anemic or dead, they’re not good at settling cows. Whether a producer is running a spring-calving or fall-calving herd, there’s never a good time to go to sleep on anaplasmosis control.” Producers should consult with their feed or mineral supplier to ensure their mineral mix containing AUREOMYCIN delivers adequate levels for their herds’ needs. Adding AUREOMYCIN offers one of several measures producers can take. Preventive measures include: · Implementing fly and tick control to help reduce transmission · Changing needles and disinfecting instruments between cattle when working cows and bulls · Consulting your veterinarian early for diagnostics on unexplained death seen in adult cows or bulls “If you believe you can control anaplasmosis by just controlling flies, ticks and horseflies, you probably believe in the Easter Bunny, too,” Scruggs said. “It’s important to keep anaplasmosis control top of mind to help avoid unnecessary surprises and run a healthy, profitable cattle operation.” For more information on controlling anaplasmosis, contact your veterinarian, feed company nutritionist or Zoetis representative. To learn more about AUREOMYCIN, visit CattleFeedAdditives.com. the fall/ winter in great shape. The key is to be proactive.


Planning Ahead to Avoid Summer Pasture Slump The sight of fresh, green pastures as the summer months approach can be a welcome sight for many cattle producers, especially after feeding costly forages throughout the winter. But just as quickly as that green grass comes, the pasture quality can diminish leaving both pasture and cows’ nutrient deficient. These potential nutrient deficiencies come at a critical time frame when the cow likely has a calf at side and is either on target for re-breeding or is already re-bred and trying to grow her developing calf. The nutrient requirements are high during this period, but there are a few ways to prepare for a decline in pasture quality. “Producers may see cows slip in body condition score throughout the summer,” says Dr. Kelly Sanders, cattle nutritionist for Purina Animal Nutrition. “Forages mature as the summer goes on, losing nutrients, specifically protein and allowing cows to lose body condition.” If forages are running under seven percent protein, then you likely don’t have enough protein to support the cow and her calf. The majority of producers across the United States, unless they have some high-quality forages stockpiled, are not above that level and will need to find additional nutrient sources. Sanders recommends using protein supplements to avoid this slip in condition, especially late summer and into fall when grasses are lowest in nutrient value. “Adding protein tubs or cubes are two ways a producer can supplement their cow herd during this time of high nutrient requirement,” says Sanders. “Protein tubs can be fed from mid to late summer through mid-fall, then cubes can be fed upon the first freeze or in the later fall months.” Protein supplements should be added before cattle start losing body condition, so it pays to plan ahead for pastures that may become nutrient deficient. In most cases, pastures see a significant decline in nutrients in the August to September timeframe. Sanders recommends evaluating your pasture at various times throughout the summer, specifically mid to late

summer, and adding a supplement before the pasture quality is too far diminished. If pastures are not adequately managed, protein deficiency may become a herd health challenge with symptoms including reduced intake and forage digestibility, reduced growth rate (both fetus and calf), loss of weight, inadequate intake of other nutrients, delayed estrus, irregular

estrus, poor conception rate and reduced milk production. “It all narrows down to making sure your cows have what they need, when they need it,” says Sanders. “If they’re not getting the complete nutrition they need when the pasture is at its worst quality, you will likely see challenges develop. These challenges may be easily avoided by implementing a protein supplement program.”

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June 2016 California Cattleman 21


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD

U.S. BEEF CUTS SHOWCASED IN CROATIA from the U.S. Meat Export Federation The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) recently teamed with a major international food wholesaler to showcase U.S. beef for dozens of chefs and foodservice buyers in Croatia, a country of 4.3 million people located in southeastern Europe on the Adriatic Sea. The U.S. beef promotion, which was conducted in collaboration with the U.S. Embassy, took place at the Mano restaurant in Croatia’s capital city of Zagreb, with funding support from the Beef Checkoff Program. Julieta Valls Noyes, U.S. Ambassador to Croatia, USMEF Representative Felipe Macías and Marc Carena, CEO of Metro Cash and Carry Croatia, welcomed guests for a firsthand look at the U.S. beef products available in the market. Well-known European butcher and chef Jack O’Shea demonstrated different ways to cook U.S. beef fillet, striploin, ribeye and sirloin, pairing the dishes with Croatian wines. O’Shea’s two-month aged U.S. beef ribeye with sprouted grain porridge, wild asparagus and oatmeal jus was very wellreceived. During the meal, Noyes took to social media and tweeted to her followers, “Yum! Great event tonight promoting #USBeef with Metro Cash and Carry at Mano. Delicious and now available in Croatia!” Macias said event host Metro Cash & Carry – a company with a client list that includes hundreds of hotels, restaurants, institutions, caterers and food retailers across Europe and Asia – has been a consistent purchaser of U.S. beef. “USMEF has built a solid relationship with Metro Cash & Carry and partnered with it in seminars and promotional events in different European markets,” said Macias. “This company is very confident about the potential for U.S. beef in Croatia. In fact, some of the guests who attended the event at Mano have already showed great interest in purchasing U.S. beef.” Croatia is the newest member state of the European Union, having officially 22 California Cattleman June 2016

joined the EU on July 1, 2013. According to USDA trade figures, Croatia’s beef imports have shown steady growth in recent years – more than doubling in value from $30.4 million in 2010 to $66.1 million in 2014. “Currently, the United States exports negligible amounts of beef to Croatia, but the potential is there to expand exports of beef from non-hormone treated cattle to Croatian consumers willing to pay a premium,” explained John Brook, USMEF regional director for Europe, Russia and the Middle East. “Although Croatia only has 4 million inhabitants, it has a solid middle class. With economic recovery the Croatian middle class will grow, and consumption of high-quality meat will grow along with it.” Brook said Croatian importers source many U.S. products from other EU member states to reduce the costs and challenges of smaller shipments. In addition, many of the larger supermarket chains that operate in Croatia have central warehousing in other EU member states. “Croatia imports most of its beef — including U.S. beef — through the Netherlands and exports $33 million of beef to its neighbors, which also could be a reason to explore the Croatian market,” he added.


CDFA ANNOUNCES PROJECTS FOR STATE WATER EFFICIENCY AND ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) has selected 129 projects totaling $16 million for the State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program (SWEEP). SWEEP projects will result in on-farm greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions and water savings. “With more than 100 grants covering thousands of acres of California farmland, these projects represent real-world gains in water use efficiency and greenhouse gas reductions,” said CDFA Secretary Karen Ross. “This program provides an important incentive for our farmers and ranchers to accelerate the adoption of scientifically proven technologies and practices that make our state’s agricultural community more sustainable.” The 2016 SWEEP funding arises from Budget Act of 2015, SB 101, (Chapter 321, Statues of 2015), which authorizes CDFA to “support greenhouse gas emission reductions through water and energy efficiency grants promoting water and energy savings.” SWEEP is funded through the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund referred to as the “California Climate Investment” program. The program’s objective is to provide financial incentives for California agricultural operations to invest in irrigation systems and practices that reduce GHG emissions and save water. The 129 selected projects will leverage an additional $9.7 million in private cost-share dollars. The funding will support GHG emission reductions through projects that include irrigation water-efficiency modifications like drip and microsprinkler systems, energyefficient water pumps, soil moisture sensors and irrigation scheduling programs that apply water based on crop needs. Applications undergo a

quantitative scientific and technical review for greenhouse gas reductions and water savings by academic experts with the University of California and California State University systems. The program is implemented under the CDFA Office of Environmental Farming and Innovation and the Office of Grant

Administration. Authority for such incentive programs comes through the Environmental Farming Act of 1995. The Act mandates that the Department establish and oversee an Environmental Farming Program to provide incentives to farmers whose practices promote the well-being of ecosystem and air quality.

It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

WILD Doug Winnett 800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com General Insurance Brokers www.andreini.com

License 0208825

June 2016 California Cattleman 23


A Western Affair2016

A Showpiece for California Ranching by California Rangeland Trust Communications Director Jessica Kong The hills were alive on April 30. Silver lace of grass just turning to seed, rippled across the plush green and gold carpet covering the hills as far as the eye could see as gusts up to 40 miles per hour threatened to blow tents, tables, and décor into Butte County. Thanks to an incredible facility with an army of volunteers and dedicated supporters who converged seamlessly to pull this event off, A Western Affair 2016 at the Wood Ranch in Orland was a showpiece for California ranching despite the potentially adverse conditions. Trailers began lining the wide gravel ranch roads early Saturday morning and horses were unloaded and warmed up in preparation for the ranch horse events scheduled for the day. The premiere horse training facility on Wood Ranch is no stranger to ranch horse events. It is home to Crooked River Ranch Horses where Bubba Kelly and Brett Behlen host clinics, sortings, and schooling shows throughout the year. They and their crew were instrumental in carrying out the two sorting competitions – the Two-Man In and By and the Three-Man Sort and Doctor. Austin Prince of Prince Ranch Horses operates out of the same facility and was also heavily involved in making the day’s events a success. In the meantime, a group of trail riders assembled to ride the hills dotted with purple and yellow wildflowers. The wind blew their horses’ tails sideways as they climbed their way to altitudes offering views of Mt. Shasta, Mt. Lassen, and the Sutter Buttes across the Sacramento Valley. By 3:30 p.m. guests were checking in to the main event located in the huge covered arena. String lights, succulents, sunflowers, and wooden planters transformed the venue while the Texas imported mesquite posts lining the arena that make it perfect for working cattle, also provided the perfect backdrop for a magical evening. Thanks to the hard work of local middle school, 4-H, Chico Alpha Gamma Rho, and Cal Poly YCA volunteers, everything was

EGLY ©

24 California Cattleman June 2016

ready to go. A Western Affair 2016 host and Rangeland Trust emeritus director Darrell Wood welcomed the crowd and introduced Congressman Doug LaMalfa, who reassured guests in attendance that in this uncertain political climate, they have a friend in Washington. He indicated that as a 4th generation production agriculturist, he understands the struggles ranchers face and is well equipped to represent California’s vast and underpopulated 1st District. After everyone was seated, the program commenced with California Rangeland Trust board chairman Jack Hanson as emcee. First, Karen and emeritus director Scott Stone presented the colors while local talent Chad Bushnell sang the national anthem. Then, Tim Koopmann, a past CRT director, gave the invocation. The centerpiece of the locally sourced dinner was fork tender ribeye steaks donated by Panorama Grass-Fed Meats. Light seasoning served to highlight the natural flavor of this product of expert management and California sunshine and it handled the limelight with ease. Then came the moment many were waiting for as Bubba Kelly took the stage to announce the winners of the day’s sorting events. Danielle Wood and Dallice Nuttall showed us that “sometimes the best cowboys ain’t cowboys at all” by winning the 2-Man In and By Sorting champion buckles. But the next event went to the cowboys with Austin Prince, Bubba Kelly, and Logan Nutall named the 3-Man Sort and Doctor champions. As dinner wound down, California Rangeland Trust CEO Nita Vail prefaced the announcement of the 2016 Conservationist of the Year recipient with a brief introduction. After a short video, Jack and Zera Varian of the V6 Ranch in Monterey and Fresno Counties were asked to come to the stage to receive the award. Even the wind was silent when Jack Varian began speaking of how he came to realize that the land is a living thing and must be protected. In just a few impassioned words he reminded the audience of why they attended and what unites them – a fierce and fervent love for the land. At the conclusion of the award presentation, Celeste Settrini introduced an exciting lineup of all-new and signature items and experiences for the live auction. 1986 World Champion Auctioneer Col. John Rodgers kept the action going while ringmen Brad Peek, Justin Niesen, and JC Niesen spotted bids. Thanks to sponsors Tyler and Patti Martinez, Chad Bushnell was the final act of the perfect evening. A top 10 American Country Star finalist and opening act for some of the biggest names in Nashville, Chad gave an all-star performance, and even managed to keep the dance floor at capacity throughout the night despite the bar being located across the arena. By the time the night was over, the wind was just a memory, but the impact of A Western Affair 2016 lives on.


016 CALHOUN ©

CALHOUN ©

CALHOUN ©

At left, Bubba Kelly of Crooked River Ranch Horses presents the two-man Sort In & By Champion buckles to Danielle Wood and Dallice Nuttall. At right, three-man Sort & Doctor Champions Austin Prince, Bubba Kelly and Logan Nuttall with future cowboy champions.

Rangeland Trust emeritus director Darrell Wood, CEO Nita Vail, and Rep. Doug LaMalfa (CA-1).

CALHOUN ©

Brett Behlen of Crooked River Ranch Horses grabs some dessert To three generations of the Wood family and friends, thank you for hosting A Western Affair 2016! after a long day in the sorting pen. CALHOUN ©

CALHOUN © CALHOUN ©

Top hand Frankie Nuttall.

Sorters warm up their horses and manage to keep their hats on despite gale force winds.

Thank You to Our Sponsors! Panorama Grass Fed Meats

DIAMOND SPUR Raleys

GOLD SPUR

American Ag Credit Farm Credit West

AT&T

SILVER SPUR California Rangeland Trust board chairman Jack Hanson with his wife, Darcy.

CALHOUN ©

Rangeland Trust CEO Nita Vail and 2016 Conservationist of the Year Award to Jack and Zera Varian.

CoBank Golden State Farm Credit

SIDEKICK Rabobank

Monsanto

CALHOUN ©

DX Wood Ranches

DONATED PRODUCTS & SUPPORT

Panorama Meats

Prince Ranch Horses

Yamaha

California Cattlemen’s Assn.

Martinez Ranch Mgmt & Real Estate

Crooked River Ranch Horses

Cinch Jeans

Ariat

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LELY ©

June 2016 California Cattleman 25


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

HOW FSMA WILL IMPACT YOU

MEASURE CHANGING THE WAY WE SEE FOOD SAFETY by Amanda Gipe McKeith, Ph.D., assistant professor, California State University, Fresno As cattle producers, most of us know that food safety is a huge part of the final end product that we all raise, beef. Since 1996, the meat and poultry industries have been implementing HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) in their slaughter and processing facilities. Beef has been a safe, wholesome product for consumers to consume, but there has been concern in regards to food safety of food in general. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been the major regulatory agency that has played a role with livestock animals, but with new regulation the FDA (Food & Drug Administration) will be more involved. On Jan. 4, 2011, President Obama signed into law the most sweeping reform of food safety laws in more than 70 years, the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). It may seem by the name that this law will not affect cattle production, but in fact this law will have reaching affects into the industry we all love so much. One of the first things that will begin affecting the livestock industry is the portion of the law relating to food for animals. The FSMA Preventive Controls for Animal Foods rule is now final, and compliance dates for some businesses will begin September 2016. The final rule did not come about just from government agencies, but input from industry, consumer groups, academia and industry stakeholders. This outreach began before the rule was proposed in October 2013. By September 2014 following the comment period, there were proposed revisions designed to make the originally proposed rule more practical, flexible, and effective for industry, while still advancing the FDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food safety goals. So what does this mean to the livestock industryâ&#x20AC;Śwell the companies that produce food for our livestock will have new rules and regulations to comply with. Many of these rules have their roots in HACCP, so many will seem familiar to those whom have been involved in the meat and poultry industries. There are several key requirements that animal food production facilities will have to comply with. Current Good Manufacturing Practices (CGMPs) must be established for animal food production. This should be very familiar for those who are knowledgeable about HACCP. Covered facilities must establish and implement a food safety system that includes an analysis of hazard and risk-based controls. The rule sets requirements for a written food safety plan that includes: hazard analysis, preventive controls, oversight and management of preventive controls (monitoring and verification) and recall plan. The final rule does not have a compliance date for all establishments; the compliance dates are based on the size and scope of the company. The scope of operations determines if a company has to follow the regulations. If the feed mills associated with farms (vertically integrated operations) are not mandated to follow the 26 California Cattleman June 2016

Preventive Controls for Animal Food final rule. If you would like more information visit http://www. fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/ucm366510. htm. For many it seems that the current FDA FSMA will not affect your cattle operation, but you may start noticing a price difference in your feeds and it will not be due to increased commodity costs. However, the FDA FSMA has already began to change the way we think of food safety, but I have no doubt that it will have far more reaching affects not only in the livestock industry, but the agricultural industry in general. There are food safety procedures in place for human food and animal food, but I would not be surprised if in the next 25 years HACCP type regulations are not required on the farm or ranch. As a result, the Department of Animal Sciences and Agricultural Education at Fresno State will begin teaching an Agricultural Food Safety Systems class this coming fall. The department wants students to be prepared for their respective career goals and ensure they are in the forefront entering careers in the food animal industry.


Angus Midyear Reports Set Pace for Quality in 2016 The American Angus Association’s (AAA) more than 25,000 members continue to set the pace for the beef cattle industry, bolstered by a growing demand for registered Angus genetics nationwide. According to reports released by AAA, breeders have registered 7 percent more Angus animals during the first half of the fiscal year compared to the same time period a year ago. Reports for March alone showed an 18 percent boost in registrations compared to the same month in 2015. “The Angus business is performing really well halfway through the year,” says Allen Moczygemba, AAA Chief Executive Officer. “We’re on pace again for an outstanding year in registrations following one of the breed’s best years on record. If we continue this growth, we could see our15th largest registration level in the history of our 133-year-old organization. That’s significant from a historical perspective since Angus comprises a larger portion of market share today in the total U.S. cattle inventory.” Breeders saw a collective increase in the number of head sold in sales reported to the Association, October 2015 through March 2016. Despite an expanding marketplace, however, Angus sale averages remain steady, and packer premiums paid for quality genetics have never been greater. “Sales are going well. They’re a bit softer than last year, but the cattle markets are a lot softer as a whole, and we’ve marketed more animals this year,” Moczygemba says. Fiscal figures through March show members have sold nearly 35 percent more registered-Angus females over last year, with nearly 13,000 reported that averaged nearly $5,000 per head. More than 41,000 registered-Angus bulls were sold for the same period, which is an increase of nearly 20 percent. The sale average for bulls is almost $6,000 per head. Together, sales of registered-Angus genetics has resulted in more than $336 million in gross sales, up nearly $10 million over year-ago levels. Another indication that Angus breeders remain committed to herd improvement: Total weight records submitted through the Association’s Angus Herd Improvement Records (AHIR®) are up nearly 6 percent, and the number of females enrolled in the organization’s inventory-based reporting system MaternalPlus® has grown so far this year by 138 percent. MaternalPlus is a voluntary program that allows breeders to access in-depth reports on reproductive and fertility performance within the cow herd while also building the foundation for Association-developed reproductive and longevity selection tools in the future. “The American Angus Association’s leadership position continues its growth,” says Jim Sitz, Montana Angus breeder and AAA president. “The members and leaders of the organization have a historically progressive spirit and a healthy tradition of exploring opportunity while adopting the most advanced technological capabilities.” AAA continues to make strides in genomic-enhanced selection tools. In mid-April, Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI®) released its fifth calibration of genomic-enhanced expected progeny differences (GE-EPDs). This latest release from AGI allows producers to make more accurate genetic decisions than ever before, Moczygemba notes, and the technology continues to evolve and add value at various levels of the supply chain.

The availability of commercial genomic tests like GeneMax® Advantage™ allows Angus cow-calf producers to better select the females that will contribute to their operation’s future by providing less guesswork and more insight into how replacement females will perform. In fact, AGI is working with scientists at Zoetis to update the GeneMax family of tests, with some updates and new features expected for release midsummer. Finally, the rising value of the Certified Angus Beef® (CAB®) brand is evident in recent survey results that show packers pay Angus producers $1 million per week for hitting the brand’s target. A survey of CAB-licensed packers Cargill, JBS, National and Tyson showed they paid a record $51.8 million in grid premiums in 2015, and more than $550 million over 20 years. According to the latest data, the annual 3.6 million cattle accepted for the brand now account for 16 percent of all North American fed beef. “The growing desire of consumers for a quality eating experience and the continued efforts of our members across the country makes for an extremely strong market for registered Angus animals,” Moczygemba says. “With more females in the U.S. herd, there’s a much bigger need for bulls in the marketplace; we anticipate the need for somewhere between 65,000 and 80,000 Angus bulls. That’s significant demand for quality genetics, and Angus members have the animals to provide it.”

June 2016 California Cattleman 27


GRAZING LAND VALUES IN YOUR REGION

EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTE: This article highlights real estate values and commodity market data relevant to cattle producers in California and Nevada. It is compiled from the 2016 issue of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trends in Agricultural Land and Lease Values,â&#x20AC;? a publication from the California Chapter of the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers. SACRAMENTO VALLEY Land values for large, winter range/dry pasture ranches have been stable to fairly strong, with several bona-fide sales occurring in early to mid2015. Strictly based upon transaction count there appears to be a slight pickup in activity over 2013 and 2014 although price levels appear to have remained stable to possibly slightly increasing. The vast majority of the larger current sales of winter range/ dry pasture have been for continued cattle grazing; however, there were some medium sized generally open low elevation dry pasture properties on the west side of the valley that sold for development to permanent plantings. The cattle commodity market seen in 2014 was very strong; however, as 2015 played out it has proved to be very challenging due to poor finished cattle commodity prices, relatively high replacement costs, and unstable feed prices. This uncertainty surfaced in mid-2015 and has continued thru the end of the year. These conditions are expected to continue into at least mid-2016. Despite this uncertainty, purchase and lease demand has remained fairly strong for winter range grazing units. The drought remains a major concern, however most regional ranches received enough rain to have decent 28 California Cattleman June 2016

to nearly average feed conditions in the 2015 season. Late season 2015 rains have given hope for a better water situation going forward, but drought is still a substantial concern. A fair number of the sales noted were traditional tenants purchasing lands they have leased for in most cases several years. It is difficult to ascertain how the current ongoing drought situation will affect values on these winter range ranches. The projected El Nino rains for the 2015/16 season have created a hopeful but uncertain current situation. The cattle market saw record commodity prices in 2014; however as the end of 2015 approaches substantial commodity market and feed market uncertainty still exists. This could have an activity slowing effect on ranch land property as well as possible downward pressure on values this year. Over the past decade, the driving force behind high ranch land values was 1031 exchanges, done primarily by outside investors rather than livestock producers. This has slowed considerably the past few years, predominantly bon-a-fide livestock operations now pur- chasing winter range for expansion. Out of all of the sales noted in 2015, only one was obtained by an investor planning to lease out operations. Although, the

relatively poor commodity market conditions is expected to have a softening effect on the demand from the cattle market, there remains a very tight supply of desirable rangeland parcels available for purchase. The commodity market conditions are somewhat offset by the ongoing tight realty market and attractive interest rates. NORTH COAST While muchof this region is centered around the wine and grape industy, the agricultural area is described as coastal foothill pasture and hardwood forested lands within Southwestern Sonoma County and Northwestern Marin County. Most of the area is devoted to agricultural uses of livestock pasture and dairies, in addition to a limited number of equestrian facilities, poultry facilities, vineyards, olive orchards and specialty vegetable production. Average to estate quality homes are also positioned throughout the area. The residential appeal is attributable to the desirable coastal climate, rural foothill settings, and proximity to San Francisco and Bay Area employment centers. Land values continued to increase in 2015 primarily due to the demand for organic pasture by local dairies. Premiums are also being paid for properties that are comprised of


multiple legal parcels or have the potential to be subdivided. For local dairies and livestock producers, the sale of development rights to conservation organizations has provided a means of offsetting the high cost of purchasing pasture. In Humbolt, Del Norte and Trinity counties, most natural resource production revolves around timber, dairy and beef production. The market has seen very few sales or significant value trends over the past 10 years. Marked demand for pasture is strong but most properties are closely held and seldom available for sale. Pastureland sales are often between a long-term tenant and the landlord. In recent years there has been an increase in the number of properties listed by realtors. This is because sellers are realizing that their properties must be well marketed to garner the best price. NORTHERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY Activity for rangeland was very limited in 2015, but supports a stable trend. Traditionally values for rangeland in the south and west portions of the region define the low end of the range, while rangeland in the north and east portions of the region (with higher rainfall and better access to populated areas) define the high end of the range. Rangeland in the north and east portions of the region at lower elevations also has experienced pressure for conversion to permanent plantings over the last decade, due to fairly good access to groundwater and positive climactic conditions. However, this land poses substantial risk for such uses: poor soils, high slopes and potential for erosion, environmental constraints on land uses, shrinking groundwater supplies, and a growing local backlash against rangeland conversion. Concern regarding overdraft of groundwater supplies has prompted Merced and Stanislaus Counties to enact groundwater ordinances and more restrictive well permitting processes. These combined risks have substantially slowed demand for permanent-planting adaptable rangeland; in fact, only those with well permits in-place, wells already drilled, or water available from an

adjacent property owned by the buyer sold in 2015. Sales of rangeland intended for conversion to permanent plantings is expected to decline further or halt in 2016, though development of rangeland purchased and permitted over the last few years will continue. CENTRAL SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY Market activity for rangeland

properties in the westside and eastside markets of Fresno County and the eastern Madera County market slipped from limited to very limited with few current transactions. Market demand and values appear stable as the rural home site and recreational buyer influence has diminished since the economic crisis of 2008. The high end ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL AG REAL ESTATE IN CALIFORNIA?

• CURRENT LISTINGS •

• 600+/- Acre Amador County Ranch. This ranch has historically been farmed in alfalfa and other row crops. Excellent water, class 1 and 2 soils, this property has tree and vine potential, or you could plant permanent pasture or keep farming alfalfa. •

1,488+/- Acre Montague Ranch. This ranch should summer 800 pair or 1,500 yearlings, or a combination thereof. Two sets of metal corrals, large feedlot perfect for backgrounding calves, district water plus two ag wells, 4 residences, located in the Little Shasta Valley with Mt. Shasta in your view.

• 2,500+/- Acre Fresno County Ranch. Fresno county native feed ranch with a BLM sheep permit that should be able to transferred to Buyer. Easily accessible to I-5, the majority of the ranch is low rolling hills with some larger hills. •

33+/- Acre Merced County Horse Training Facility. Covered arena, two 13 stall MD Barns, outdoor cutting pens, vet room, cattle working facilities, two residences, all fencing, arenas, etc are all pipe construction. 15+/- acres of farm ground with good water currently in orchard grass hay.

HAVE YOU SOLD YOUR FARM OR RANCH GROUND? Call us to help you find your triple net leased investment to satisfy your 1031 Tax Deferred Exchange requirement. We have Buyers looking for GOOD farm and ranch ground. We have requirements for large and small open ground for both row crops and tree crops, planted orchards and vineyards, 50+, 100+, 500+, and 1,000+ cow ranches, both summer and winter ranches.

Put cattlemen to work for you! MARK NELSON, BROKER (916) 849-5558 BRE 00346894

RYAN NELSON, AGENT (916) 804-6861 BRE 01883050

LEARN MORE AT: WWW.5STARLANDCOMPANY.COM June 2016 California Cattleman 29


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29 of the range in the eastside markets, at $3,000 per acre, is reflective of smaller parcels suitable for rural home sites. SOUTHERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY In the eastern portio of this region, Sales activity was limited from the level of 2014, with a decreasing number of significant rangeland transactions. Prices did not increase from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s levels. Sales of smaller parcels, reflected in the Recreation Land segment, were limited. In the western part of the region, traditionally there is little rangeland sold for grazing purposes on the west side of Kern County. The economics of grazing land in this area do not vary much from one year to the next. There is no home site influence and limited recreational potential. Land values did not increase in 2015, with a stable value trend is projected going forward. CENTRAL COAST In Santa Clara County, livestock and recreational rents alone do not support the purchase price of ranch properties, but demand for such properties along the Central Coast remains strong. The area remains an important, if somewhat limited, range for many producers due to large tracts held by public entities for wildlife and watershed. These continue to be rented at competitive levels economic to ranchers, as the land owners are primarily interested in conservation, good land stewardship and fire control. There is strong demand for leased ground and pasture rents in the market

30 California Cattleman June 2016

area typically range from $18 to $30 per acre. Central Coast dry pasture/ rangeland sales are divided into two main groups: parcels of 1,500 acres and smaller, and parcels 1,500 acres to 15,000 acres. The first group generally ranges from $800 to $7,500 per acre, while the second group ranges from about $300 to $1,200 per acre. The primary influence that drove prices up on the smaller parcels was residential and/or recreational uses. The larger parcels may also be further divided into those parcels that can be purchased for recreational, retreat and homesite desirability, versus those parcels purchased for grazing land. The larger ranches that offer scenic vistas, hunting, and other forms of recreation are typically forested, watershed land and of little use for grazing. These ranches tend to set the upper limit of the price range. For several years, the Temblor Mountain Range/Carrizo Plains market was influenced by out of town buyers purchasing ranches for recreational, retreat, and home site purposes. Since the downturn in the economy, the demand from these types of buyers has been reduced. Parcels along the Pacific Ocean and Coastal Mountain Range with rural residential appeal have continued to remain stable to strong during the past several years. After 2007, this market saw a decline in activity and prices; however, it has shown substantial recovery over that past several years. This area is very attractive for large, rural homesites, with these properties typically being less than 1,000 acres in size. Sales range

from $2,500 per acre for large dry pasture ranches with limited usability and/or without ocean views, to $15,000 per acre for smaller, desirable parcels with coastal influence, ocean views, and/ or cultivatable land. Coastal ranches along the San Luis Obispo County Coast from Morro Bay to Cambria are recently selling for about $6,000 per acre. These transactions continue to underscore the notion that the area is desirable and attracts buyers willing to pay a premium for the lifestyle ranch. EASTERN MOUNTAIN REGION Prior to the downturn in the economy, the rangeland market was influenced by buyers looking for ranches for recreational, retreat, and home site purposes. At the present time, the demand from these types of buyers has decreased. There was very limited sales activity in most of the market area in 2015, and the very limited sales that did occur indicated stable prices. During the mid-2000â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, values of rangeland ranches were being driven by 1031 Exchange transactions, primarily by outside investors and not livestock producers. This type of transaction has slowed considerably due to other weak sectors of the economy. At the same time, there appears to be limited interest from livestock producers in purchasing these large ranches at current listed prices, as there is no justification for a positive return. The cattle market continues to look strong with record prices being seen due to the historically low cattle inventory and a growing export market.


ELDER CREEK RANCH

CORTINA RIDGE RANCHES

MORRO BAY

Colusa County, California $18,500,000 Water! 21,659 acres and 10+ miles of year-round Bear Creek plus reservoirs, springs, five solar-powered wells, holding tanks for summer watering and runoff tanks for additional water storage. The ranch includes a ranch home in the near-by town of Colusa. Ideal for cattle operation; runs 2000 pair, hunting retreat or recreational ranch. Exceptionally private and diverse. *Working with Justin Hill of Gary Miller Realty

San Luis Obispo County, California $10,000,000 A rare find! 2,240 acres of land in Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo County only 3.5 miles from the ocean; some areas with views of Morro Rock and the blue water bay. 60+ acres of Class 2 soil; mild climate due to coastal proximity. Rolling grass-covered hills with oaks, sycamores, bay, and pepperwood. Several highly productive, developed springs + creeks and small reservoirs. Caretaker’s quarters, good domestic well. Has run up to 200 pair of cattle year-round.

Tehama County, California $7,965,000 Exceptionally beautiful ranch consisting of 5,918 +/acres. Runs 400-500 pair for the season. Very private, with views of Mt. Lassen and Mt. Shasta at an elevation of approximately 1,000 ft. Lots of year-round live water on the property and abundant wildlife. This ranch would make a great all-natural cattle operation, hunting retreat, or just build your dream home and enjoy the privacy, gentle terrain and spectacular views.

12 MILE RANCH

SHILLING YOSEMITE RANCH

Glenn County, California $6,250,000 8,184 deeded-acres offering 7 year-round ponds and over ½ mile of Briscoe Creek, a year round creek with trout. Runs 200 pair for the season or 100 pair year round. Beautiful private ranch for the outdoor enthusiast to enjoy hiking, horseback riding, hunting, fishing, and ATVing. Improvements include a barn, shop, guest cottage, and caretaker home.

Modoc County, California $4,500,000 12 Mile Ranch extends 5,980 +/- acres across Modoc County, and Lake County, Oregon. Runs 250-300 pair. Dotted with well-watered meadows, the ranch is suitable for a smallscale cattle operation or would make the perfect private oasis for the seeker of almost any type of adventure or recreation. Hunting, fishing, endless trails, old west artifacts, Eastern Warner Mountains. 3/bd 2/ba farmhouse, 3-car garage, large metal barn, and old orchard.

Mariposa County, California $3,999,000 Price Reduced! This magnificent 3,680-acre property is located just 25 miles from Yosemite National Park and is a recreational playground. Ranching, horseback riding, hunting, hiking, mountain biking, camping, and gold mining. Build your dream home and live on this beautiful fenced & crossfenced ranch with springs and ponds supplying year round water. You are in the D-6 zone and can hunt for trophy black tail deer and black bear on the ranch.

CROOK RANCH

LOST VALLEY RANCH

WEST VALLEY RANCH

Tehama County, California $3,485,000 Price Reduced! This is your classic California winter grass ranch. 5,101 deeded acres that usually run 300 pair from November 15 to May 15. It is 21 miles from Red Bluff, CA and is currently in the Williamson act. The ranch sits at 1000 ft. elevation and rises to a high of 1520 ft. elevation. Miles of trails and beautiful scenery make the camping, hunting, fishing, swimming, and horseback riding fantastic experiences, all without ever leaving your own ranch!

Modoc County, California $3,450,000 2,026.8 acres; 895 irrigated acres, 605 under production and 290 acres irrigated pasture. Fully fenced and crossfenced running 350 mother cows year round. WATER! Four ag wells producing over 10,000 GPM, two domestic wells, one stock well, three reservoirs, Pine Creek and a pond. The ranch has three 500-ton pole barns, 5,200 sq. ft. metal shop, corrals, covered chutes, and 125 head concrete feeder. Three homes and 6 R.V. hook-ups. This amazing ranch is in the Williamson Act.

Modoc County, California $2,700,000 3,342 +/- acres; free water, easy irrigation and capacity to run 225 pair of cows from May to November. Over 3 miles of private spring fed streams and West Valley Reservoir lays primarily with-in the ranch boundaries with 970 acres of surface water, 7 miles of shoreline and 30 ft deep at its peak. There is an old ranch home, several outbuildings and large pole barn. Located in the X3b zone, qualifies for 2 landowner tags and the creeks are full of brown and rainbow trout.

BRISCOE CREEK RANCH

TODD RENFREW

BROKER/OWNER • calBRE #01838294 707 Merchant St., Suite 100 Vacaville, CA 95688 Office: (707) 455-4444 info@caoutdoorproperties.com

OVER 145 LISTINGS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: CALIFORNIAOUTDOORPROPERTIES.COM FIND LISTING VIDEOS AT /USER/CAOUTDOORPROPERTIES 2011-2015

June 2016 California Cattleman 31


JBS loss in lower revenue in US beef nears Billion Dollar mark Brazil’s JBS S.A. announced in early May it had a BRL 2.7 billion ($795 million) net loss in the first quarter of 2016, once again affected by high expenses from its hedging strategy and revenue decrease from its North American and Australian cattle businesses. The world’s largest beef processor posted a BRL 5.8 billion (US$ 1.7 billion) loss related to its derivatives contracts betting on Brazil’s exchange devaluation against the U.S. dollar. Nevertheless, JBS continues to defend its hedging policy, and pointed out that from the first quarter 2015 to the first quarter of this year, it had BRL 4.8 billion (US$ 1.4 billion) in gains with that strategy. JBS’ net revenue rose 29.8 percent to BRL 43.9 billion (US$ 12.7 billion), driven primarily by sales increases in Brazil’s poultry, pork and processed foods units JBS Foods, and in JBS USA Pork. On the other hand, revenues at JBS USA Beef, which includes operations in Australia and Canada, fell 10.4 percent in the first quarter compared to the same period last year, to US$ 4.6 billion, due to a drop in prices in domestic and international markets. Net revenues also decreased in the U.S. Pilgrim’s Pride unit by 4.4 percent, to US$ 1.9 billion. Moy Park, JBS’ poultry unit in Europe, had a 1.6 percent drop in net revenue, to GBP 347.5 million (US$ 502.6 million). In Brazil, JBS Foods’ net revenue rose 10.4 percent, to BRL 4.3 billion (US$ 1.2 billion). JBS USA Pork had a 64.8 percent increase in net revenue, to US$ 1.2 billion in the quarter, and JBS Mercosul recorded a 3 percent increase in net revenue, to BRL 6.9 billion (US$ 2 billion). 32 California Cattleman June 2016

A 22.5 percent drop in JBS’ total EBITDA, to BRL 2.1 billion (US$ 609 million), was attributed to Pilgrim’s Pride and JBS USA Beef negative performances. A reduction in poultry prices both in the U.S. domestic market and in international export markets affected Pilgrims Pride EBITDA, which fell

35.8 percent, the company said in a press release. JBS’ EBITDA margin was 4.9 percent at the end of the fist quarter, compared to 8.2 percent one year ago, the consequence of a decrease in margins of all its business units, with the exception of JBS Mercosul and JBS Europe.

FINANCIAL PARTNERS

YOU CAN TRUST

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DAN WHEELER

Chandler, Arizona (480) 855-0161

HUGH CAHILL

Lakeview, Oregon (541) 219-1021

RANDY ALVES

Klamath Falls, Oregon (541) 891-5348

(800) 778-8734 (916) 570-1388

E-mail: info@TSLCC.com www.tri-statelivestockcredit.com

When it comes to financial assistance for your operation, you want someone you can depend on, someone who understands the livestock industry. TRI-STATE LIVESTOCK CREDIT CORPORATION is that partner. We have been providing on-the-ranch financial services to cattle ranchers in California, Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Texas and Wyoming for 85 years!


CRATER LAKE REALTY, INC. Linda Long, Principal Broker & Owner

Cell: (541) 891-5562 • E-mail: Linda@CraterLakeRealtyInc.com Junction of Hwy 62 and 97 • P.O. Box 489 • Chiloquin, OR 97624 BLACK DRAKE RANCH

TURN-KEY PRODUCTION

SEVEN BAR SIX RANCH

420 acres of privacy w/miles of year-round streams w/ native wild redband & brown trout, prolific insect hatches, thrilling for the fly fishing enthusiast! Overlooking stream step pools, Gearhart Mt, timber, meadows & sage sits the one-of-a-kind Ranch House; ceiling-tofloor windows, pine beam ceiling, hickory, granite, & barn wood finishes, rock fireplace, wrap around deck & 3 car garage. Plus! The Fish Camp cabin, bunk house, & 3/2 MF home tucked in next to a water fall & 75 acre pasture. Well priced at $1,760,000. Klamath County MLS #89162

Of high dollar crops on 338.58 acres/321.5 acres irrigated with district water using state-of-the-art systems, including 3 newer pumps, 5 newer pivots controlled remotely for maximum production/ minimal labor. Soils for alfalfa, grains, pasture, hay. Buildings;108’x30’, 108’x50’, 108’x66’, 30’ X 60’, and a beautifully renovated 1228sf home w/great views of the Cascades. All located within half mile of Hwy 97, in an area of top fishing, hunting, Crater Lake National Park, unlimited outdoor recreation. $1,500,000 Klamath County MLS #87692

218 acre Bonanza cattle and hay ranch with well & district irrigation. 2502 sf farm house, nestled against protective treed ridgeline, has big open rooms, large vinyl windows, cozy certified wood stove, decks, patio, beautiful garden and landscaping surrounding the garage, pump house and shop/equipment storage. Additional improvements include pole hay barn, horse barn, arena, storage bldg. and hay barn with feed bunks. Pride of ownership and production are very apparent here at $1.2 million. Klamath County MLS #88726

LOST RIVER PASTURE RANCH

DOUBLE R RANCH

71 acres, KID Class A flood irrigation water, productive soils rated 5 ton alfalfa, 330 sacks potatoes, 9 AUM grazing. Lovely owners 3 bdr 2 bth, home, blacktop & carport, 2nd home 2489 sf rental plus apartment rental. Milking parlor, 2 loafing sheds, equipment storage, shop, garage, rec hall & more. Fenced & cross fenced; good set up for goat dairy or your choice. Good rental & pasture lease income. Well priced at $535,000! Klamath County MLS #89116

Along ¾ mi of Lost River in Henley area. 240 acres, approximately 195 acres irrigated with estimated stocking rate of 300 yearlings. Perfect for horses or purebred operation. Fenced, cross fenced, corrals, scale, livestock/hay barn & shop, pumps, mainline, 5 guns, much equipment included. 3 bedroom home overlooking the river valley with an abundance of waterfowl, cranes and birds of prey along peaceful, private Lost River frontage. Geothermal lease and wooded butte with beautiful buildings sites. $950,000 Klamath County MLS# 86024

Income producing property!! 333 acre ranch near Lakeview, Lake County, Oregon. Very private, with spectacular high desert and mountain views. 3 homes, 3 barns, 2 shops, corrals, fenced and cross fenced. Cottonwood Creek runs the full length of the property. Water rights with wheelines on property. 2 LOP tags in S. Warner hunting unit. Excellent cattle or horse set up. $975,000 MLS#87617 Contact M.T. Anderson, Broker. 541-377-0030 MTAnderson@CraterLakeRealtyInc.com

HOG CREEK RANCH

ROUND LAKE GRASS RANCH

MT SHASTA VIEWS—IRRIGATION WELL!

1252 deeded acres plus USFS permit for 235 pair 6/1 THRU 10/15 for approximately 500 pairs of excellent summer and fall cattle grazing. Improvements include cabin, 2 sets of corrals, 20,000# scale and 16’ x 20’ shed/tack room. PLUS! 30,000+/- acre USFS permit. 3 creeks feed into huge meadow with irrigation permit for 750 acres. Private and secluded, yet easily accessible. $2,100,000 Klamath County MLS# 81292

Just 10 miles from town, gracious 3769sf, 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home on 191acres. Wonderful brick fireplace with insert, coved ceilings, lots of built-ins, super country kitchen with double ovens and triple sinks, storage galore including a huge pantry. 3-car garage, 2br/1ba apartment, 1 ba studio apartment, hay/livestock/equipment barn, sheds, covered squeeze chute. 185+/- acres water rights. Includes some irrigation equip. $635,000 Klamath County MLS# 85441

Private 167 acres, 2 pivots, 5 wheel lines, new variable speed pump and boles. 108 irrigated acres; excellent soils for alfalfa, grain & pasture, has been in spuds. Balanced for cattle & hay rotations w/ pole & livestock barns, corrals, fenced/cross-fenced. Gorgeous 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2706 sq ft manufactured home w/high ceilings, hardwood floors, huge kitchen w/island & new granite counters, grand master suite. Views every direction, decking on 3 sides, garage/shop, beautiful landscaping and garden. $795,000 Klamath County, MLS# 86927

CROPS – HUNTING –TIMBER

IRRIGATION WELL!

NORTH HILLS HORSE RANCH

All on 4,240 diversified Klamath County acres. Over 400 irrigated acres for potatoes, alfalfa, grain & pasture with 3 irrigation wells, 2 pivots plus wheel lines. Summer grazing on timbered acreage, with good stock water. Excellent elk and deer habitat, eligible for Land Owner Preference tags. 2 homes, equipment shed, shop, 2 hay barns, steel corrals, plus a historic stage stop barn. A private paradise just minutes from Klamath Falls, OR. $3,950,000 Klamath County MLS# 87439

Alfalfa & Pivot on 212 acres with water rights for 172 acres. Approx 80 acres new alfalfa this spring, with balance of irrigated in alfalfa and grain for more alfalfa this spring. 8-tower Center Pivot, four wheel lines, variable speed pump, solar panels help power costs. South exposure with Mt. Shasta view & beautiful building sites. $795,000. Klamath County MLS# 87920

“RETIRED” DAIRY

105.78 acres of scenic setting viewing mountains. 90 acres of Enterprise District irrigated pasture, fence & cross fenced with 4 wheel lines & pump. Stately 3,110sf brick home; granite counters, travertine tile, open kitchen dining, 3 bdrm/3 bth, decks, huge covered patio, 3 car garage. Features indoor & outdoor riding arenas, inside stalls, corrals. 96 acres in Klamath Falls UGB (land could be purchased separately, MLS#89037) and is zoned RM. Beautiful setting & investment, priced right at $949,000! Klamath County MLS#89207

VIRTUAL TOUR AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AT WWW.CRATERLAKEREALTYINC.COM June 2016 California Cattleman 33


COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR

Checking in on Your Beef Checkoff

checkoff brings health awareness to consumers by California Beef Council Director of Producer Relations Jill Scofield Cardiologists and Heart-Healthy Beef The California Beef Council (CBC) and the American Heart Association – Los Angeles Chapter (AHA LA) recently held the first ever “Beef Can Do a Heart Good” meeting at STK Steakhouse in Beverly Hills. The goal of the meeting was to increase awareness of the CBC and Beef Checkoff ’s nutrition research and literature among an elite group of 25 physicians, cardiologists and dietitians, who influence nutrition recommendations provided by AHA. The event featured Dr. Donald Layman, a University of Illinois professor emeritus and expert on dietary protein intake. His presentation tied in directly with the “Beef Can Do a Heart Good” theme of the meeting by covering optimal protein intake, nutrient density from animal-based proteins, resistance exercise and protein intake, and reducing carbohydrate rich foods, and was well-received by the group of health and medical professionals. Layman has done extensive research and published a number of scientific articles and books on the importance of dietary protein, bringing a balanced, thirdparty perspective to the group that helped highlight the important role of high-quality protein found in beef. “This event provided us with an opportunity to connect with high-profile cardiologists, doctors and other health professionals about the critical importance of beef ’s protein in a healthy diet,” said CBC Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist James Winstead. “These are often the people giving advice to patients about what foods to eliminate in order to maintain a heart-healthy diet, and we don’t want there to be any question that beef should be

one of those foods. The attendees came away with a better understanding of some of the research proving that beef does in fact belong in a heart-healthy diet.” Protein Challenge, Part Two In early May, the Beef Checkoff launched the second annual 30-Day Protein Challenge - the program designed to help consumers meet nutritional and lifestyle goals by monitoring and altering protein intake to spread protein consumption throughout the day. Last year’s overwhelming success of the Protein Challenge saw more than 14,000 email campaign subscriptions – with over 1,000 of them generated here in California. In addition, there were more than 81,000 email opens and click-throughs, and more than 164,000 visits to the Protein Challenge landing page on BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com during the campaign period. In addition to the tools launched during the first year, including a food journal, protein cheat sheet, and tips for dining out, this year’s challenge includes several upgrades to increase engagement and visibility of the program. Upgrades include the addition of a weekly e-mail option, which will provide tips and tools for success at the beginning of the week rather than every day. The Protein Challenge also will be supported through a variety of checkoff-funded advertising tools, such as Facebook advertising, Google search advertising, banner advertising and targeted ads within consumers’ Gmail inbox accounts to help further increase awareness of the program. Although this is a national program, the Protein Challenge will also be promoted heavily in California with health, nutrition and fitness professionals through the CBC’s Food and Nutrition program. Additionally, James Winstead, RDN, will supplement the national Protein Challenge updates with nutrition tips and information about positive dietary changes for the California participants in the program. To get involved, either by participating yourself or sharing with your social media circles, visit BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com and click on the “protein challenge” banner. Calling All Entries for 2017 BQA Awards!

34 California Cattleman June 2016

The CBC, in conjunction with the California Cattlemen’s Association, is seeking nominations for the 2017 National Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Awards. The National BQA Award recognizes outstanding beef, marketer and dairy producers that best demonstrate animal care and handling principles as part of the day-to-


day activities on their respective operations. A common trait among all contest entrants must be a strong desire to continually improve BQA practices on their operations while encouraging others to implement the producer education program. Four National BQA Awards (Beef Cow-Calf and Feedyard, Dairy, and Marketer) are funded in part by The Beef Checkoff program with additional financial support provided by Cargill Meat Solutions. The program promotes beef quality assurance in all segments of the industry, including commercial cowcalf, seedstock, stocker operators, feedlots and dairy operations. Previous National BQA Award winners from California have included Ira and Kim Brackett, Brackett Ranches (2015 Cow-Calf BQA Award Winners), John Maas, DVM, UC Davis (2013 BQA Educator of the Year), and Jim Warren of 101 Livestock Auction Yard (2010 BQA Award). If you have suggestions for a beef producer, educator, or auction market that would be an ideal candidate for the BQA Award, please e-mail Jill Scofield at the CBC at jill@calbeef.org no later than June 15. For more information about BQA and this award program, visit www.bqa.org. For more information about the CBC or the Beef Checkoff, visit or www. mybeefcheckoff.com.

BRE# 00656930

Pete Clark, Broker www.clarkcompany.com

(805) 238-7110 | info@clarkcompany.com

New Cuyama, CA | $4,750,000 The captivating Salisbury Canyon Ranch is a working cattle ranch encompassing 2,121± acres with stunning vistas of Los Padres National Forest & the Sierra Madres. Salisbury Canyon Ranch is an outdoorsmen’s paradise improved with a historic adobe Ranch House, guest house, hay barn and appurtenant structures. Comprised of 15 certificated parcels, Salisbury Canyon Ranch is ideal for cattle operation, hunting, or a recreational retreat.

Cuyama, California | $6,000,000 A portion of a historic Land Grant, North Fork Cattle Company Headquarters comprises 3,065± acres of grazing land & rolling grasslands. Improved with main & manager’s house, hay barn, outbuildings, corrals, loading chute, livestock scale & arena. Water is plentiful with two wells and 2.5+ miles of the Cuyama River traversing the ranch. Ideal for cattle operation, hunting, or recreation, this ranch offers the opportunity to own a piece of California history.

1031 Pine Street | Paso Robles, CA 93446 | (805) 238-7110 | Fax: (805) 238-1324

Zesty Barbecue Cheeseburgers

Time: 25 to 30 minutes • Makes 4 servings INGREDIENTS

1 pound Ground Beef 1/4 cup finely chopped red onion 4 tablespoons barbecue sauce 4 slices white Cheddar, pepper Jack, smoked Gouda or provolone cheese 4 Hamburger buns or pretzel rolls, split, toasted lettuce leaves, tomato slices and red onion slices.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Combine Ground Beef, onion and 2 tablespoons barbecue sauce in medium bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. Shape into four 1/2-inch thick patties.. 2. Place patties on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 8 to 10 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 7 to 9 minutes) until instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center registers 160°F, turning occasionally. About 1 minute before burgers are done, brush with remaining 2 tablespoons barbecue sauce and top with cheese.. 3. Line bottom half of each bun with lettuce leaves, tomato and red onion slices, as desired; top with burger. Close sandwiches. June 2016 California Cattleman 35


Bev Bigger grew up on a small avocado orchard in Santa Paula, and agriculture has always been all around her. After meeting some friends who had cattle and invited her to brandings, she and her partner started a herd of Longhorn cows in 1982. No longer in the Longhorn business, they have leased the same ranch for 26 years and currently run a commercial Angus cross cow/calf operation. Bev served as treasurer of the Ventura County Cattlemen’s Association (VCCA) from 2003-2013. She currently serves as vice president and is looking forward to serving as president in the Fall. She is also the VCCA representative in a start-up advocacy group called Treasure Our Farms, whose focus is to educate consumers on farming and ranching. Bev is a member of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the Ventura chapter of the California Women for Agriculture, and the Ventura County Coalition Of Labor Agriculture and Business. In 2015, Bev was named one of the Top 50 Women in Business by the Pacific Coast Business Times for her work in the agriculture sector.

Question: What does being involved in the beef community mean to you? Answer: Being involved in the beef community means that I have a collective voice. Being a part of the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) allows members to have one large voice versus a small voice. You will get a lot farther that way. I’ve learned a lot being a member of CCA. Specifically, to not let my tendency to speak first and regret later take over, and I wouldn’t enjoy working with government entities on my own. I’m impressed by the knowledge of our CCA staff and how they handle certain situations. Question: What’s your day job? Answer: I am an assistant vice president/loan officer for Farm Credit West, a company I’ve been with for 34 years. I started in loan documentation then accounting, and I was even secretary to the association president, but for last 22 years I’ve been a loan officer. I serve all kinds of farmers, primarily vegetable and berry, but I do have a couple of cattle accounts and that’s where my heart is. I love agriculture and my customers. 36 California Cattleman June 2016

Farmers and ranchers are the best people. They’re sensitive, smart and honest, and those relationships are what I enjoy about my 34 years with Farm Credit West. Honesty that comes from individuals who are involved in agriculture and producing food to feed people; that’s what I love. Question: Why do you ranch? Answer: I love cows, and it’s something that started FEATURING CCA EXECUTIVE MEMBER out as a hobby. It was fun to have horses and ride and ZONE 9 DIRECTOR BEV BIGGER gather our own cattle. In BRBIGGER@SBCGLOBAL.NET | (805) 340-3755 1990 we found the ranch that we currently lease to raise cattle and keep the Question: What issues matter most to horses. I’m very proud of you in the beef industry? the quality of cattle that comprise our Answer: I’m very passionate about land herd today. Having to cull our favorite and property rights. I’m not very good old cows over these drought years was at handling people who tell me what I very difficult. We made some hard should do. When people try to tell us that business decisions during that time, but we need a permit for a pond or whatever the end result is this year we have our you are trying to do on your own ranch best calf crop ever. I love being at the to make it better and sustainable and ranch and driving up a canyon to see the cows. There’s something incredibly serene government tries to regulate and get their hands on a few extra dollars, that doesn’t observing something like that after being in an office five days a week. All the work sit well with me. That’s what I’m fired up about, and I’m thankful that CCA helps week everyone wants something from keep these issues in line. you every day. It’s great to soak in the space and nature; that refreshes my soul. Because Ventura County is subject The work part of ranching like feeding, to a strong urban influence I am also fixing fences and monitoring water passionate about changing the public’s doesn’t seem like work at all, though. It’s conception about how we raise beef. pleasure. There are no better land stewards than Question: Why are you serving on the cattlemen, and educating the public about CCA Executive Committee? our industry is extremely important. Answer: Tom Crocker encouraged me to serve as an alternate on the CCA Question: Why should someone join Executive Committee. When Mike CCA? Williams was elected to board, I moved Answer: Everybody should be a member of CCA, because the more members that into my current position. I am looking we have to present a large united front, forward to meeting and interacting with everyone on the board. I think I can learn whether it’s state or local, CCA has the expertise to represent us. Cattlemen have so much from others and there is always a lot of the same issues, but we also have new things to learn. When you’re in a location specific issues. CCA staff attends room and listen to everyone it’s amazing our local meetings and go to bat for us. the depth of knowledge that comes with These are things we can’t do ourselves, and that on our executive committee. I want things we probably couldn’t do properly if to soak some of that up! we were alone in this.


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June 2016 California Cattleman 37


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

THANK YOU TO ALL THE BUYER’S WHO MADE THIS YEAR’S HERITAGE BULL SALE A SUCCESS!

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

Join us Friday, Sept. 2 for our annual bull sale at the ranch in Los Molinos!

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016 38 California Cattleman June 2016


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2016.

O’Connell Consensus 2705

JUNIOR HERDSIRES O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR Really Windy 7261

THANK YOU TO OUR 2015 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2016 bull sale!

SIRE: VDAR Really Windy 4189 MGS: Sinclair Telecast 01S3

FCR Final Answer 0103 SIRE: SAV Final Answer 0035 MGS: N Bar Prime Time D806

+1.5 +56

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WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN NEXT YEAR!

PRESIDENT'S DAY 2017, TERREBONNE OR JOIN US FALL 2016 FOR THE

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

June 2016 California Cattleman 39


Thank you to the buyers at our 41st “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale!

The Best of Both Worlds (530) 385-1570

Phone 707.448.9208 E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

Join us Sept. 7, 2016 for our annual “Partners for Performance” Bull Sale! Oct. 8, 2016 “Partners for Performance” Angus Female Sale

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

THE DOIRON FAMILY

Celebrating 42 Years of Angus Tradition

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

JOIN US AT OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE 9/1/16!

Progressive Genetics for over 36 years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2386

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H R

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

(530) 200-1467

• (530) 227-8882

40 California Cattleman June 2016

h

Join us once again October 2016 in Kenwood, CA!


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULLS BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS We hope to see you out for our 2016 Production Sale in Lodi! 14298 N. Atkins Rd • Lodi, CA 95248 Nellie, Mike, Mary, Rita & Families Nellie (209) 727-3335 • Rita (209) 607-9719 website: www.mcpheeredangus.com

v THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Red Angus Located in the heart of the Northwest

Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits Everett Flikkema 406-580-2186

Jack Vollstedt 818-535-4034

Cattleman's Classic, October 18, 2014

www.vfredangus.com June 2016 California Cattleman 41


“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

2015 AICA Seedstock Produer of the Year

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

WE BUILD THE FINEST FENCING FAST!

Specializing in livestock fence & facility construction and repair

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PO Box 1523 Patterson, CA 800-84-fence 209-892-9205 swfence.com

CA CONTRACTOR LICENSE #664846

42 California Cattleman June 2016


SALE MANAGEMENT SALES MANAGEMENT LIVESTOCK MARKETING LIVESTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY CONSULTING ORDER BUYING

MATT MACFARLANE

SHERIDAN, CA • (916) 803-8133 MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET WWW.M3CATTLEMARKETING.COM

TOM PERONA, DVM 209-996-7005 Cell

ANDER L VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

THD ©

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June 2016 California Cattleman 43


IN MEMORY Richard Gates Richard “Dick” Gates was born nearly 75 years ago in Clovis, on June 4, 1941 and passed away at St. Agnes Hospital on May 6, with his family by his side. He was a “larger-than-life” kind of gentleman that touched everyone he encountered. Dick made a memorable impression on people in all walks of life from his professional life to friends and family throughout the country. Dick went to Weldon Elementary School in Clovis and graduated from Clovis Union High School in 1959. He attended Fresno State College from 1959 to 1963. As a youngster, he was involved in many activities and organizations including: Clovis Future Farmers, Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity, Fresno State Block and Bridle Club, and the Clovis Chapter of Rotary International. While in high school, Dick was a proud member of the 1959 National Champion Meats Judging team. He also exhibited the 1959 Grand Champion Steer at the Grand National-Cow Palace in San Francisco,CA. Dick also was a member of the Fresno State Livestock Judging team where he developed lifelong friendships to this day. Professionally, from 1961 to 1965 Dick was the Editor of the Stockman’s Weekly and Pacific Stockman Magazine. In 1965, he began his cherished long career with Wawona Ranch, Wawona Frozen Foods and Lyons Magnus, all of Clovis where his duties began as a forklift driver and concluded as Executive Vice President in 1995. Dick had a huge heart for his family. He was married to his incredibly strong and serving wife Carol for 47 years. He was preceded in death by his parents; Clarence and Nina, as well as his sister and brother in law; Don and Dorothy Doris and a nephew David Doris. He leaves behind four children, eight grandchildren, and two great-granchildren. Surviving children are Joan Garcia and husband Rick of Lantana,TX; Russ Knutson and wife Tammy of Hanford,CA; Geoff Gates and wife Rhonda of Clovis,CA; and Ginger Gates Hergenroeder of Clovis,CA Dick was a huge servant to youth, serving as a 4-H leader,FFA Advisor,soccer coach,baseball coach, Indian Guides leader, and many other organizations. Dick’s personal trademark was his “cigar” of which many have stated was his “adult pacifier.” On behalf of Richard and his family they want to extend a heartfelt thanks to all of his doctors that included those at UCLA Medical Center and in the Clovis/Fresno area. A rosary was held in Clovis on May 15, with funeral services held May 16 The family requests any donations be made to the Divine Mercy Building Fund, Valley Children’s Hospital, Hinds Hospice, and UCLA Organ Transplant Center.

44 California Cattleman June 2016

Mark Eidman Mark Eidman, former CEO of the Tehama District Fair, passed away at his Red Bluff home on April 27. A secondgeneration livestock and wool judge, Mark was known for his professionalism in the show ring and his dedication to the youth and adults who showed under him. His humor and quick wit will be missed by a large circle of friends in the livestock barns of the western fairs. Eidman is survived by his mother Barbara Eidman of Strong City, Kan., wife Mary Jayne, of Red Bluff, son Patrick Eidman of Grass Valley, daughter Lesa Eidman of Sacramento and daughter and son-in-law Sara and Henry

Hollenbeck of Molt, Mont.; brother Brad Eidman and his wife Kimberlee of Willows, brother Kirk Eidman of Milton, Wis.. and his nephews and nieces. He was preceded in death by his father Glen Eidman of Saffordville, Kan. and his sister Marsha Eidman of Lakewood, Colo. A community gathering to celebrate Mark’s life was held at the Tehama District Fairgrounds sheep judging ring. At his family’s request, memorial contributions may be made in his name to the Chico State Alumni Association, CSUC College of Agriculture, 400 West 1st Street, Chico, CA 95929-0440.

NEW ARRIVAL Finn Parnell

Finnegan Crosby Parnell was welcomed by parents Luke and Erin Parnell, Auburn on April 25. He weighed 4 pounds 10 ounces and was 19 inches long. He is welcomed by grandparents Col. Randy Parnell and Julianne Parnell, Sandpoint, Idaho; and David and Janet Crosby, Sacramento.

Wedding bells Scorza-Macfarlane

Heather Scorza and Matt Macfarlane were married alongside family and friends at a ceremony in Loomis May 20. Scorza, who has two sons, Christian and Jackson, operates a dental practice in Rocklin. Macfarlane has two daughters Mazie and Makenzie, is the advertising representative for the Callifonia Cattleman and owner of M3 Marketing. The family makes their home in Rocklin.

SHARE YOUR FAMILY NEWS WITH US! Send birth announcements, wedding announcements or obituaries to us at stevie@calcattlemen.org or fax information to (916) 444-2194.


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Amador Angus............................................................................................38 American Ag Credit......................................................................................9 American Hereford Association ���������������������������������������������������������������40 Andreini & Company.................................................................................23 Bar R Angus.................................................................................................38 BMW Angus................................................................................................38 Bovine Elite, LLC.........................................................................................43 Broken Arrow Angus..................................................................................38 Broken Box Ranch.......................................................................................42 Buchanan Angus..........................................................................................38 Byrd Cattle Co..............................................................................................38 California Custom.......................................................................................42 California Outdoor Properties �����������������������������������������������������������������31 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc. ���������������������������������������������������������������42 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market ���������������������������������������������������������������������2 Charron Ranch............................................................................................38 Cherry Glen Beefmasters...........................................................................40 Clark Company Ranch Real Estate ����������������������������������������������������������35 CoBank...........................................................................................................9 Community West Bank..............................................................................37 Conlan Ranches California........................................................................42 Conlin Fence Company..............................................................................42 Conlin Supply Co. Inc.................................................................................14 Corsair Angus Ranch..................................................................................38 Crater Lake Realty.......................................................................................33 CSU Chico....................................................................................................41 Dal Porto Livestock.....................................................................................39 Diamond Back Ranch.................................................................................42 Donati Ranch...............................................................................................38 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc. .......................................................................42 Farm Credit West..........................................................................................9 Five Star Land Company............................................................................29 Freitas Rangeland Management ���������������������������������������������������������������35 Fresno State Agricultural Foundation �����������������������������������������������������41 Furtado Angus.............................................................................................39 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ������������������������������������������������������������������43 Genoa Livestock..........................................................................................40 Gonsalves Ranch.........................................................................................39 HAVE Angus................................................................................................39 Hogan Ranch...............................................................................................40 Hone Ranch..................................................................................................40

46 California Cattleman June 2016

Huffords Herefords.....................................................................................41 J/V Angus.....................................................................................................39 Kerndt Livestock Products.........................................................................43 Lambert Ranch............................................................................................40 Lander Veterinary Clinic............................................................................43 Little Shasta Ranch......................................................................................41 Matt Macfarlane Marketing.......................................................................43 McPhee Red Angus.....................................................................................41 Noahs Angus Ranch....................................................................................39 O’Connell Ranch.........................................................................................39 ORIgen.........................................................................................................43 Orvis Cattle Company................................................................................41 Pacific Trace Minerals.................................................................................42 Pitchfork Cattle Co......................................................................................41 Ray-Mar Ranches........................................................................................39 Razzari Auto Centers..................................................................................45 Sammis Ranch.............................................................................................39 San Juan Ranch............................................................................................40 Schafer Ranch..............................................................................................39 Schohr Herefords.........................................................................................41 Sierra Ranches..............................................................................................41 Silveira Bros..................................................................................................40 Silveus Rangeland Insurance ��������������������������������������������������������������������18 Skinner Livestock Transportation ������������������������������������������������������������42 Sonoma Mountain Herefords �������������������������������������������������������������������41 Southwest Fence & Supply Company, Inc. ����������������������������������������������42 Spanish Ranch..............................................................................................40 Superior Livestock.......................................................................................13 Tehama Angus Ranch.................................................................................40 Teixeira Cattle Co........................................................................................39 Tri-State Livestock Credit Corp. ���������������������������������������������������������������32 Tumbleweed Ranch.....................................................................................40 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard �����������������������������������������������������������������7 Universal Semen Sales................................................................................43 VF Red Angus..............................................................................................41 Vintage Angus Ranch...........................................................................40, 48 Western Fence & Construction, Inc. ��������������������������������������������������������42 Western States Angus Association �����������������������������������������������������������15 Western Stockman’s Market.......................................................................19 Western Video Market..................................................................................3 Wulff Brothers Livestock............................................................................39


2016 BULL BUYERS GUIDE

RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY! CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE

MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET â&#x20AC;¢ (916) 803-3113 DEADLINE: JUNE 5, 2016

June 2016 California Cattleman 47


VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH Carcass Maker Bull Sale “Data Preview” FIND YOUR NEXT HERD BULL AT VAR! 12 p.m. • September 1, 2016 • LaGrange, CA

TATTOO

Reg. No.

5018

18066036

SIRE Discovery

CED

BW

WW

YW

SC

MILK

CW

MARB

RE

$W

2

0.9

72

133

1.95

40

50

1.10

0.99

94.93

112.20

183.75

1%

1%

3%

1%

4%

3%

1%

1%

1%

1.53

0.74

0.82

Breed Ranking 5% or Better

5019

18066037

Discovery

4

1.5

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5027

18066043

Discovery

9

0.4

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5035

18066049

Discovery

3

2.1

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5038

18066052

Generation

9

0.5

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5056

18066064

Discovery

2

1.2

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5107

18066091

Discovery

9

1.1

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5117

18066098

Generation

11

0.2

4

1.3

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5152

18085489

Ten X

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5279

18104170

Ten X

10

1.3

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5368

18212167

Rampage

10

1.0

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5386

18212160

Rampage

11

0.6

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5394

18211438

Discovery

7

1.0

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5400

18212173

Rampage

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5403

18211444

Discovery

18211447

Discovery

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5408

18212175

Rampage

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5410

18211449

Generation

18212186

Rampage

18212150

Rampage

Breed ranking 5% or Better

73

136

1%

1%

75

139

1.79

39

74

1%

1%

4%

1%

1%

69

127

1.54

38

45

2%

1%

79

143

1%

1%

66

128

3%

1%

68

130

2%

1%

71

123

1%

1%

72

132

1%

1%

77

141

1%

1%

80

140

1%

1%

71

127

1%

1%

80

144

4%

5%

1%

1%

8

1.2

13

0

5%

13

0.3

5%

9

0.1

10

1.5

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5464

1%

-1.5

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5414

144

15

Breed ranking 5% or Better

5407

80 1%

9

0.9

76

133

1%

1%

65

121

4%

2%

72

132

1%

1%

67

118

2%

2%

79

140

1%

1%

73

132

1%

1%

1.18

36

73

1%

1%

37

65

1%

1%

1%

1.64 1.39 1.58 0.77 1.29 1.47 1.09 1.23 1.01 1.63 0.61 1.65

0.90 0.81

1.23

97.12

122.45

1%

1%

198.76 1%

96.13

111.64

193.04

1%

1%

1%

86.68

112.52

201.93

1%

1%

1%

1.19

85.01

104.72

174.36

5%

1%

1%

1%

1%

42

57

1.06

1.01

105.45

129.22

200.03

1%

2%

4%

3%

1%

1%

1%

0.87

1.12

78.71

100.51

188.33

1%

1%

1%

1%

0.99

1.03

90.81

104.67

195.52

2%

1%

1%

1%

0.68

84.38

97.27

204.77

1%

1%

1%

191.08

34

66

1%

1%

38

68

1%

1%

28

67

1.02

1%

5%

33

67

1.08

0.96

82.74

95.59

2%

1%

4%

4%

1%

1%

1%

32

84

0.73

1.39

93.42

115.02

214.78

3%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1%

1.49

92.90

112.55

199.35

1%

1%

1%

1%

0.67

94.49

101.97

189.20

1%

1%

1%

1.32

97.53

119.53

212.09

1%

1%

1%

1%

0.88

97.36

109.58

196.66

1%

1%

1%

82.98

98.39

181.53

1%

1%

1%

1.4

82.57

105.08

200.27

1%

1%

1%

1%

1.05

1.23

86.23

96.88

185.02

5%

1%

1%

1%

1%

0.98

1.58

88.75

108.72

206.13

1%

1%

1%

1%

1.22

73.10

100.65

202.86

1%

2%

1%

1%

36

70

1%

1%

36

59

1%

2%

32

81

3%

1%

0.58 1.00 0.76

37

60

1.17

1%

1%

2%

0.92

34

55

1%

3%

28

76

33

49

2%

0.87

0.76

$B

1.03

0.53

1%

1.04

0.69

$F

VAR GENERATION 2100

35

70

1%

1%

21

75 1%

0.79

0.62

VAR will offer the largest volume of high quality bulls on the West Coast. Whether you buy one bull or a truck load, the quality runs deep. Over 200 bulls rank in the top 5% of the breed for $Wean and 178 rank in the top 5% for $Beef.

VAR DISCOVERY 2240

VAR RANGER 3008

VAR INDEX 3282

VAR RESERVE 1111

2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET CALL, WRITE OR E-MAIL TODAY TO RECEIVE A SALE BOOK!

VAR COMMANDER 4152

California Cattleman June 2016  
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