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April 2016

Charolais : How breed Progress Has influenced industry Also OF Interest.... CCA Provides Clarity on State Transportation Regulations April 2016 California Cattleman 1


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April 2016 California Cattleman 3


CALIFORNIA

CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Feeders Give Praise Despite Market Volatility by CCA Feeder Council Chairman Bill Brandenberg CattleFax had an article titled Back to Back Extreme Years in a December 2015 update. 2014 started with fed prices at a record $1.37 per hundredweight (cwt) and yearlings at $1.60/ cwt. By year-end in 2014, prices had increased to a high of $1.72/cwt for fed cattle and $2.30/ cwt to $2.40/cwt for yearlings after a year we can now look back on as the “perfect storm” for increasing demand and higher prices. Low cattle on feed numbers as fewer heifers were fed, rising export demand, great domestic demand, poor pork and poultry production, very low retail margins and an upward bias from the outside folks trading the futures market were all factors leading us higher. While we all knew this record high move in the cattle complex was probably not sustainable, few analysts a year ago predicted the drop we saw in 2015, with fed cattle dropping about $.40/cwt and yearlings dropping $.60/cwt with stable to lower feed prices. The structure of the futures market today has big discounts built in with deferred futures about $.05/cwt to $.20/cwt below front months so the market is very cautious going forward indicating lower prices as beef production increases. The cattle feeding business in general has gone through a bloodbath over the last 8 to 10 months with feeding margins running $200 to $500 per head in the red. Obviously, as feeders buy cheaper replacements we will have a chance to turn things black again but I am sure most cattlemen do not like the sound of lower feeder prices in 2016 after taking a big drop last year. These back-to-back extreme years have illustrated how our cattle market is now more unpredictable since I believe the outside influences we have no control over, like the volatility in the futures market and the strength of the U.S. dollar, are now a much larger component to the value of beef and contribute heavily toward market psychology. This dynamic makes marketing decisions much tougher for all segments of the cattle business. We need to commend our CCA and National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) staffs for the work done to end Country of Origin

Labeling (COOL) restrictions so quickly after the World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling against the U.S. foreign labeling requirements and the huge impact tariffs by Mexico and Canada would have had if the beef and pork provisions were not removed. The work NCBA did on keeping beef as a center of plate recommendation in the government’s dietary recommendations was outstanding since we are dealing with a very adversarial administration. Free trade, especially with our Asian trading partners, is the best way to get export demand up and we need to support our NCBA staff in their efforts to open markets and our checkoff foreign marketing plans and the Meat Export Federation to help us get there. This is my last year as chairman for the CCA Feeder Council, so I would like take this opportunity to thank CCA for including the Feeder Council in the organization 30 years ago. It has been a great partnership for both of our groups and I would like to express my gratitude on behalf of all the feeders in California to the great leaders and staff that CCA has had over that span keeping CCA an effective and progressive state organization and representing the feeders during that time frame. While we will always have some differences between feeders and cow-calf producers on a few issues due to our segments competing for prices, on most policies we are in agreement and our goals and objectives are the same in building demand for beef and keeping the government out of our business and provide an opportunity for the free enterprise system to work. On May 25 to 27 we will have our annual joint Arizona Cattle Feeders Association – CCA Feeder Council Meeting in Coronado. This year the California Beef Council will join us and sit in on our program of speakers on Thursday, May 26. I hope to see many of you there. If you are unable to make it, a number of issues addressed at the meeting will be featured in both the May and June issues of this publication.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917

4 California Cattleman April 2016

Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814


ON THE COVER This month’s cover photo, taken by Matt Macfarlane of M3 Marketing, Sheridan, was shot in Clements at the Sparrowk Feedlot, owned and operated by Jeff Sparrowk. Like the commercial calves in the photo, cross-bred Charolais cattle have been known to perform well in the feedlot setting. To learn about other benefits within the Charolais breed today, see the article on page 20.

APRIL 2016 Volume 99, Issue 4

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN

4

BUNKHOUSE 6 What today’s political environment means for the future VET VIEWS Avoiding stress at weaning

12

BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD U.S. beef in the Middle East

14

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER Improving feed efficiency through RFI

18

APRIL 5 YOUNG CATTLEMEN ON THE CAPITOL Sacramento

RANGELAND TRUST TALK Hearing from the Trust’s 2016 board chairman

28

APRIL 9

COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR Pairing wine and beef

32

APRIL 12 TO 14

SPECIAL FEATURES

California livestock transportation regulations 8 Evolution in the Charolais breed 20 Cargill works to minimize antibiotic use 30 Representing you on CCA’s Executive Board 34

READER SERVICES

Cattlemen’s Report 36 Buyers’ Guide 38 Obituaries 44 Advertisers Index 46

UPCOMING EVENTS

CALIFORNIA BEEF AMBASSADOR CONTEST San Jose NCBA LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE Washington, D.C

APRIL 30

CALIFORNIA RANGELAND TRUST’S A WESTERN AFFAIR Orland MAY 26 & 27 CCA FEEDER COUNCIL’S ANNUAL FEEDER MEETING San Diego JUNE 22

CCA LEGISLATIVE STEAK & EGGS BREAKFAST Sacramento

JUNE 22 TO 24 CCA & CCW ANNUAL MIDYEAR MEETING Sacramento

Does your local cattlemen’s association or cattlewomen’s unit have an upcoming event they would like to share with other beef and ranching enthusiasts? Please contact the CCA office to have your events listed in this publication!

April 2016 California Cattleman 5


BUNKHOUSE

Sacramento’s Changing Political Landscape by CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin The 2016 Presidential Primary is in full swing and dominating nearly every news cycle. It’s hard to turn on the news or pick up a newspaper and not hear or read about Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders upending the political establishment in Washington, D.C. While the two hold vastly different political views, it is clear that they have tapped into a deep anger and frustration amongst the electorate and have ignited a political revolution that has sent shock waves through the Democratic and Republican establishments. Win or lose, Sanders and Trump have changed American politics. What about California politics? California is in the midst of its own political revolution due to changes in how we conduct our elections. California’s top-two primary system has shifted politics in Sacramento towards the center, and I believe the elections in June and November of this year will bring even more moderation to Sacramento. If you’re a conservative Republican you probably couldn’t disagree with me more right now. I completely understand your doubt. After all, Sacramento is still dominated by Democrats. Every statewide elective office is held by a Democrat; Democrats control 52 of the 80 seats in the Assembly and 26 of the 40 seats in the Senate. And consider for a moment that Republicans don’t make up a majority of the voters in any county in the state. In fact, statewide Republican registration has dropped to 27.62 percent, an all-time low. Sacramento is controlled by Democrats and will be for the foreseeable future. We live in a state

6 California Cattleman April 2016

where Republicans are not only vastly outnumbered by Democrats but will soon be outnumbered by Independent (Decline to State) voters. Given this bleak picture for the Republican Party in our state, it is clear that the future of our state’s ranching industry cannot solely rely on our traditional Republican allies. If CCA is to be successful we will have to work with both Democrats and Republicans. Fortunately, the top two primary system has provided the opportunity for moderate Democrats to defeat liberal Democrats in heavily Democratic districts. The shift towards the center is not the result of electing more Republicans but is the result of Republican voters helping to elect moderate Democrats. Conversely, Democratic voters in Republicandominated districts have helped elect moderate Republicans over the more conservative candidates. Extreme Conservatives and Liberals alike have been pushed out of California politics and replaced with moderate politicians. In a Jan. 14 Sacramento Bee article, Dan Walter’s wrote, “aided by the ‘top two’ primary system, the business coalition has adroitly intervened to elect enough moderate Democrats to the Assembly to thwart many, if not most, business-opposed bills.” Like the rest of the business community, CCA’s many legislative victories over the last four years have been the result of Republicans and moderate Democrats working together on behalf of ranchers. The top two primary system

BILLY GATLIN continues to provide increased opportunities for us to help elect and engage moderate Democrats that share our views and will advocate for our industry. These common-sense Democrats are not just changing the game for ranchers but the entire business community. Additionally, the increase of term limits from 6 years to 12 years has decreased turnover in the legislature and keeps moderate Democrats in the legislature longer. After the election this November, no Assemblymember will be forced out of the Assembly until 2024. If liberal environmental groups want to change this new dynamic they will be forced to challenge and defeat moderate incumbent Democrats. While Sacramento politics are far less liberal in 2016 than they were in 2006, it’s still an extremely difficult environment to work in on behalf of ranchers. However, I am optimistic that over the next decade, as we work to elect and educate common-sense Democrats and Republicans the opportunities for CCA to advance meaningful legislation on behalf of our members will only increase. I truly believe our best days are ahead of us.


The Central California Livestock Marketing Center

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April 2016 California Cattleman 7


California Livestock Transportation Regulations There are extensive California and federal rules and regulations governing the use of vehicles. This fact sheet provides an overview of rules and regulations for the legal operation of pickups and trailers commonly used in California’s beef cattle industry. Please note: licensing, permitting, inspection and other regulations mentioned in this overview have different requirements and should be reviewed separately. For example, an operator may only need a Non-Commercial Class C License to operate a pickup and/or pickup and trailer combination but may need a Motor Carrier Permit, adhere to hours of service restriction, etc.

Key Definitions Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR): The total weight a single vehicle or trailer can carry as specified by the manufacturer. This total weight includes the total unloaded (unladen) weight of the vehicle, passengers, fuel and cargo. Typically, the GVWR for a pickup can be found on the driver’s side door jam and the GVWR for a trailer can be found stenciled on a plate near the tongue or gooseneck. Exceeding the GVWR or a pickup or trailer may be dangerous and is illegal (CVC §350). Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR): The total weight of a vehicle and trailer coupled together. You can establish your GCWR by adding the GVWR of the truck to the GVWR of the trailer (CVC §350). Motor Truck: As defined by the federal government, a motor truck is any vehicle that is designed, used or maintained primarily for the transportation of property (CVC §410). Typically, a motor truck is also defined as a pickup with a GVWR exceeding 10,000 pounds. Pickup Truck: As defined by California, a pickup is a vehicle with a GVWR of less than 11,500 pounds and an unloaded (unladen) weight of less than 8,001 pounds equipped with the standard box bed installed by the manufacturer (§471). Please note, a vehicle with a flatbed or utility bed is not considered a “pickup” under California law and likely requires added conditions to operate. A vehicle with a flatbed that has aftermarket sides or rails is not considered a pickup.

Permitting & Identification California law requires certain vehicles to operate with a Motor Carrier Permit (MCP) depending on their weight or configuration. The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) reviews and issues MCPs. While the annual processing fee for a single private MCP is a minimal $35, the application requires that an operator carry extra liability insurance as a condition of receiving the permit. The average amount of liability insurance that is required by an MCP is $750,000, but may vary depending on the size and type of cargo being transported. You can apply for an MCP by visiting the DMV website at: https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/wcm/connect/2a78b76ab722-4924-84f4-e038d832b9b7/mcp706app.pdf ?MOD=AJPERES Vehicles or vehicle combinations required to operate with an MCP are (CVC §34600): • • •

A pickup with a GVWR of more than 11,500 pounds, including some three-quarter-ton and one-ton pick ups with standard box type beds based on their weight. Any pickup with a flatbed, utility box or having another bed configuration that does not include the original “box-type” bed installed by the manufacturer. A pickup and trailer, regardless of gross vehicle or combined weight, which exceed 40 feet in total length when coupled together.

California law also requires certain vehicles or vehicle combinations to have a unique identification number known simply as a “CA number.” An individual can request a CA number from the California Highway Patrol (CHP) by calling (916) 843-4150. Listing your CA number may be required on many permit and inspection applications including an application for an MCP. Vehicles or vehicle combinations required to obtain a CA number are (CVC §34507.5): • A pickup with a GVWR of more than 11,500 pounds, including some three-quarter-ton and one-ton pickups 8 California Cattleman April 2016


• •

with standard box type beds based on their weight regardless of whether a trailer is being towed. Any pickup with a flatbed, utility box or another bed configuration that does not include the original “box-type” bed installed by the manufacturer regardless of whether a trailer is being towed. A pickup and trailer, regardless of gross vehicle or combined weight, exceeding 40 feet in total length when coupled together.

Licensing An individual may operate a vehicle or combination of vehicles meeting the following conditions with a Non-Commercial Class C License (CVC §12804.9): • •

A two-axle vehicle with a GVWR of 26,000 pounds or less. A vehicle or combination of a vehicle and a trailer that has a GCWR of 26,000 pounds or less so long as the vehicle and/or vehicle and trailer operate under the following conditions: • Operated exclusively by a farmer, rancher or employee of a farmer or rancher or an instructor credentialed in agriculture employed at a high school, community college or university. • Not used in a for-hire capacity (an individual is not compensated to haul cattle or other agriculture commodities or equipment). For-hire does not include hauling your own livestock to market. • Used exclusively in agriculture. This does not include hauling non-agricultural goods, equipment, etc., in a livestock trailer or on a flatbed trailer.

An individual hauling cattle or agricultural products for compensation, having a truck and trailer combination with a GCWR of more than 26,000 pounds or otherwise meeting the criteria but not using their vehicle and trailer for a routine agricultural use is required, with few exceptions, to have a Commercial Class A License. Generally speaking, an individual operating a two-axle vehicle towing a trailer that has a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds is required to obtain a Commercial Class A License. Individuals with a Class A license must adhere to different blood alcohol standards when operating any vehicle and, with some exceptions, must conduct routine physicals in order to maintain the license.

Basic Inspection of Terminals & Highway Weigh Stations California law requires certain vehicles to undergo a safety inspection conducted by CHP at least once every six years. The inspection includes a physical inspection of the vehicle and a review of maintenance and driving records. The law requires fees to be assessed for this inspection. Contact your local CHP office to learn more about the BIT program. Vehicles or vehicle combinations required to participate in the BIT program generally include (CVC §34501.12): • •

A pickup and trailer, regardless of gross vehicle or combined weight, exceeding 40 feet in total length when coupled together. Beginning Jan. 1, 2016, motor trucks (pickups that have a GVWR greater than 11,500 pounds) regardless if the motor truck is not hauling a trailer.

Federal and state law also require those operating motor trucks to pass through highway inspection stations. In California, these are operated and manned by the CHP and require a driver to pass over a scale to ensure the actual weight of the vehicle and whatever is being towed falls within the permitted weight or declared weight fees of the vehicle. Vehicles or vehicle combinations required to pass through CHP inspection sites are (CVC §2813): • •

A vehicle with a GVWR of more than 11,500 pounds, including some three-quarter-ton and one-ton pickups with standard box type beds based on their weight regardless of whether a trailer is being towed. Any vehicle with a flatbed, utility box or another bed configuration that does not include the original “box-type” bed installed by the manufacturer regardless of whether a trailer is being towed.

Blood Alcohol Content Vehicles or vehicle combinations that must be operated using a commercial Class A License are held to a different Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) standard of .04 percent compared to .08 percent which is the general BAC limit for all California drivers. To determine whether your vehicle or vehicle and trailer combination requires a commercial Class A License to be operated legally, please refer to the licensing section of this fact sheet. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 April 2016 California Cattleman 9


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

Air Quality California has had a long-standing air quality regulation for diesel vehicles known as the Periodic Smoke Inspection Program (PSIP). This program has been in law since 1997 and requires diesel vehicles with a GVWR of more than 6,000 pounds to conduct an annual smoke opacity test at a licensed facility. The vehicle’s owner must keep his or her records and the California Air Resources Board (ARB) does have the authority to conduct a fleet audit and inspection that could result in fines for noncompliance. CCA successfully advocated for a change to the regulation by no longer requiring 1998 and newer diesel vehicles with a GVWR of more than 6,000 pounds but less than 14,000 pounds to receive an annual PSIP test. Diesel vehicles with a GVWR of greater than 14,000 pounds are likely regulated under the statewide diesel truck and bus regulation adopted by ARB in 2008. In most circumstances this excludes pickups, but to be sure, please check the GVWR rating of your pickup. In 2007, 1998 and newer diesel vehicles with a GVWR of more than 6,000 pounds were enrolled in the California smog check program. A notification requiring you to conduct a smog check will be provided with your registration paperwork.

Log Books & Hours of Service Restrictions California law requires that operators of certain vehicles and/or vehicles towing trailers keep a detailed log of the hours they operate the vehicle in order to comply with federal and state restrictions on how many hours these vehicles can operate. Generally speaking, operators are limited to 12 hours of driving before taking a mandatory 10-hour break before operating the vehicle again, but restrictions are different for those operating in interstate or intrastate commerce. A detailed overview of the federal hours of service restrictions implemented at the state level can be found here: http:// www.fmcsa.dot.gov/rules-regulations/topics/hos/index.htm. Operators of vehicles identified below are required to adhere to the hours of service restrictions and keep detailed log books (CVC §34500): •

A pickup and trailer, regardless of gross vehicle or combined weight, exceeding 40 feet in total length when coupled together.

A pickup with a GVWR of more than 11,500 pounds, including some three-quarter-ton and one-ton pickups with standard box type beds based on their weight, regardless of whether a trailer is being towed.

Any vehicle with a flatbed, utility box or another bed configuration that does not include the original “box-type” bed installed by the manufacturer regardless of whether a trailer is being towed.

Interstate Commerce California administers many of the same programs required by the federal government for individuals operating only in California. As soon as an individual crosses state lines with a motor truck, certain federal requirements and permits may also be required. Anyone operating in interstate commerce should visit the U.S. Department of Transportation’s website at http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration-licensing/registration-us dot.htm to determine if the vehicle must be registered with the department. Most licensing, permits, etc., required at the state level will suffice when applying. This factsheet serves as a basic overview to address the common transportation issues agriculture faces in California and may not address very specific or unique situations. For help with other transportation issues not found here, feel free to contact Justin Oldfield in the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or justin@calcattlemen.org.

10 California Cattleman April 2016


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DWIGHT MEBANE ...................................... 661 979-9892 JUSTIN MEBANE .........................................661 979-9894 Frank Machado .....................................805 839-8166 Bennet mebane.......................................661 201-8169 Office ................................................................661 399-2981 April 2016 California Cattleman 11


VET VIEWS

Optimizing Immunity

sound vaccination programs can cut weaning stress from Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. Cattle experience a variety of stressors throughout their life that can hinder their overall productivity. Combining good management practices with a solid vaccination program creates a preconditioning plan designed to help calves perform at the best possible levels. “Cattle producers should have a desire to produce quality calves that perform well in the feedyard and beyond, giving the cattle industry a positive image and producers a marketing advantage,” says Travis Van Anne, DVM, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. professional services veterinarian. Preconditioning calves can optimize their immune system and nutritional status while minimizing stress. Several factors can contribute stress on cattle, and weaning is one of the most stressful. Castration, transportation, disease challenges, social mixing, inadequate diets and dietary changes can cause reduced performance, increased morbidity and even death. It’s important that producers do everything they can to reduce the stress on calves at weaning. A sound vaccination program can protect calves from potentially devastating diseases or pests. Van Anne recommends a clostridial product be administered at birth or turnout, followed up by a second dose during preconditioning, three weeks prior to weaning. A five-way modified live viral with pasteurella should also be given at turnout and a booster given at preconditioning. A good deworming product is invaluable to reducing calf stress at weaning and beyond. By controlling parasites, calves will better utilize feed and respond more completely to vaccinations. In addition to a strong herd health program,

12 California Cattleman April 2016

producers should look at the age of calves at weaning to reduce stress and optimize performance. Van Anne says producers should consider weaning at times when the calf ’s age and the weather are more consistent with good health. He explains that calves that are weaned at a younger age, less than four months, can get along well at the feedyard because they still have colostral protection. In addition, when weaning occurs earlier in the year, the weather is consistent. “Although it may be a hot time of year, the weather is consistently hot,” says Van Anne. “So temperature swings that can compromise a calf ’s immune system are reduced.” Van Anne adds that waiting until calves are approximately seven months of age to wean allows their immune system to further develop, assuming they are vaccinated correctly. At this time, the calf has started the weaning process naturally because the cows are reducing milk output. This increases a calf ’s ability to handle comingling, feed changes and other potential stressors. Training calves to eat from a feed bunk and drink from a water trough, as well as exposing them to people and machinery are critical experiences to their success in the feedyard. Van Anne adds, “Supplementing calves at the ranch, on or off the cow, gives producers the chance to have contact with animals frequently, ultimately familiarizing them with people, machinery and feed.” This familiarity will improve their overall disposition and relationship with people, ultimately reducing stress. Van Anne recommends that cattle producers work with their local veterinarian to formulate a preconditioning program that works for their operation, environmental conditions and management needs.


Zoetis offers rebate for CIDR customers Beef producers who use Eazi-Breed™ CIDR® (intravaginal progesterone cattle inserts) to synchronize their cows can now receive a $27.70 per bag rebate toward purchase of GeneMax® Advantage™ to select heifer replacements. Combining genetics and reproduction programs helps producers effectively manage breeding programs for tighter calving windows and a higher value, more uniform calf crop. “GeneMax Advantage helps producers identify and select animals that fit herd genetic goals, and CIDR helps to synchronize herds to allow better reproduction management and outcomes,” says Paulo Moraes, senior marketing manager, beef genomics and reproductive at Zoetis. “By combining both of these products in a simple rebate program, we are giving producers an opportunity to take advantage of the benefits offered by both products.” Beginning March 1, producers who use CIDR are encouraged to upload a photo of their purchase receipt to www.CIDR.com. Shortly after, a rebate code will be provided via email. This should be sent along with their GeneMax Advantage DNA sample order form to Angus Genetics, Incorporated (AGI). Upon receipt, a rebate check will be issued within approximately 4 to 6 weeks after requests are received. Producers can receive $27.70 for each bag of CIDR purchased now through June 30, 2016 when testing heifers with GeneMax Advantage from March 1 through Oct. 31, 2016. Rebates are available only for U.S. cow-calf producers who purchase and use CIDR on their own beef cow herds during the promotion period. Further, CIDR customers must use GeneMax Advantage on heifers only. For more information about this rebate program, producers can contact their Zoetis representative or visit www.CIDR.com.

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April 2016 California Cattleman 13


BEEF AT HOME AND ABROAD Despite Oil Slump, Gulfood Still a Strong Venue for U.S. Beef from the U.S. Meat Export Federation Regional economic concerns did little to slow buyer enthusiasm at Gulfood 2016, a major food exhibition held Feb. 21 through 25 at the World Trade Centre in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Gulfood is an important annual event for the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) and its member companies, a record number of which exhibited at this year’s show. USMEF’s participation was supported by the Beef Checkoff Program and the USDA Market Access Program. While depressed oil prices have definitely impacted the Gulf Region’s economy, John Brook, USMEF regional director for Europe, Russia and the Middle East, explained that interest in U.S. beef was still very strong among retail and restaurant representatives attending Gulfood. “The Middle East remains a region which is very much dependent on imports for all foodstuffs, and so obviously this steep decline in the price of oil is going to have some impact on the economies of the region,” Brook said. “But that doesn’t change the fact that these countries still have to import all of their food requirements.” While U.S. beef is a popular item at high-end restaurants and hotels in Dubai and other major metropolitan areas in the Middle East, Brook noted that U.S. suppliers have diversified their business presence in the region, finding success in the supermarket and family dining sectors. “There has been very consistent expansion in family dining and in the retail sector – especially in the UAE, but also in other Gulf Region markets,” Brook said. “Growth in these sectors has been strong in Saudi Arabia, but unfortunately we are unable to serve that market. We hope to see this change very soon.” Saudi Arabia was once a $30 million-per-year market for U.S. beef, but closed following the 2012 BSE case in

14 California Cattleman April 2016

California. U.S. trade officials are working to resolve this impasse and restore access for U.S. beef. Another important attribute of Gulfood is that it has expanded over time to be much more than just regional trade show for buyers from the Middle East. This year’s event attracted about 90,000 attendees from more than 170 countries, including food industry professionals from across Africa, Asia and Europe. USMEF recently launched an initiative to expand opportunities for U.S. red meat in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region that was well-represented at Gulfood. “A growing number of buyers from the countries we are targeting in the Sub-Saharan Africa initiative were present at Gulfood, and we expect to see this more and more going forward,” explained Dan Halstrom, USMEF senior vice president of global marketing. “With the emerging nature of some of these market economies – including Ghana, Benin and Angola – there is excellent potential for U.S. beef products.” South Africa was also a hot topic of discussion at Gulfood, Halstrom noted. This market recently reopened to U.S. beef for the first time since 2003, and USMEF is planning in-market visits and a buyers’ event later this year. “South Africa has a very well-developed, modern retail sector that allows us to showcase and differentiate U.S. beef,” he explained. “At the same time, we also see opportunities for items such as beef livers, which are needed by South Africa’s processing sector.”


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DEATLEY Recieves Inaugural Society for Range Management Award Kasey Lane DeAtley, Ph.D., received the first ever Young Professional Conclaves Outstanding Apprentice Award at the Society for Range Management’s (SRM) 69th Annual International Meeting, Technical Training and Trade Show which was held in Corpus Christi, Texas, in February. The YPC Outstanding Apprentice Award is presented by the SRM to an individual member who has shown outstanding dedication to the Society within the first five years of their career. This award is meant as an encouragement for young professionals that make the difficult transition from SRM student member, to fullyengaged professional members of the society. DeAtley completed her bachelor’s degree at California State University, Chico (Chico State), in 2005 and her masters and doctorate degrees at New Mexico State University in animal physiology and beef cattle genetics in 2009 and 2012. Following a post-doctoral position at University of California Davis, Kasey returned to her alma mater as an assistant professor in the College of Agriculture at Chico State where she established a range management course, added a range committee to the undergraduate young cattlemen’s association and prepared students to compete in the 2015 and 2016 SRM Rangeland Cup and Undergraduate Range Management Exam.

In 2015, at Chico’s first competition with the SRM student events, they placed second in the Rangeland Cup and third in the University Chapter Display competition. DeAtley has also been an active proponent of improving the quality and availability of range education across multiple institutions in California. In addition to promoting and KASEY DEATLEY, PH.D. improving range opportunities for her students at Chico State, DeAtley has also taken a strong service role in her first year as a member of the Society for Range Management by volunteering to serve as a Young Professionals Conclave Advisory Council Co-Chair, as well as sitting on the Targeted Grazing Committee and various planning committees for the 2015 SRM Annual Meetings in Sacramento. DeAtley is a strong proponent of range management education and has been actively engaged in promoting the mission of the SRM and is most deserving of the 2016 YPC Outstanding Apprentice Award.

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• WWW.CONLINSUPPLY.COM • 16 California Cattleman April 2016


New GeneStar test can help identify incidence of horned animals Commercial beef producers have long-established breeding programs that propagate polled animals. Now, by using a new genomic test called GeneSTAR® Horn/Polled available from Zoetis, beef producers can identify homozygous and heterozygous polled for Brahman, Brangus, Limousin and Simmental at an early age. This latest innovation from Zoetis has the opportunity to positively support the welfare of these animals as well as the beef industry overall, proliferating the number of polled animals in the marketplace. “Dehorning animals is a management practice that costs beef producers money in terms of time, labor and lost performance, and there are animal wellness elements associated with the practice that cause sensitivity among some consumers.” says Paulo Moraes, Ph.D., senior marketing manager for beef genomics and reproductives at Zoetis. “We are committed to delivering new resources like GeneSTAR Horn/Polled to help beef producers and the larger beef industry.” Animals that are visibly polled may either be heterozygous or homozygous genetically, meaning they carry either one or two copies of the polled gene, respectively. Heterozygous polled animals possess one copy each of the polled and horned alleles, and consequently transmit the horned allele to onehalf of their progeny. Animals with horns have two copies of the recessive horned allele,

and thus do not need to be tested in order to determine their horn/polled genotype. Homozygous polled animals carry two copies of the dominant polled allele and produce only phenotypically polled offspring. The GeneSTAR® Horn/Polled

test is currently available and can be ordered as a stand-alone test or in combination with applicable i50K™ or SireTrace® testing. For more information, please contact your Zoetis representative or call (877) 233-3362.

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April 2016 California Cattleman 17


PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER

Residual Feed Intake to Improve Feed Efficiency

save bottom line now, future of the industry later by Casey Dykier, Masters Degree candidate, UC Davis Animal Biology Graduate Group More pounds of beef produced. Less pounds of feed consumed. Producing more with less sounds as cliché as “feeding the growing population,” and “reducing the carbon footprint of beef.” An industry-wide effort may accomplish such endeavors in coming decades, but selection for feed efficiency has potential to improve profitability of the cow-calf operation now. Approximately half of the feed resources consumed in the beef industry are used for maintenance of the cow herd, leaving about 20 percent for reproduction and 30 percent for feedlot growth. Genetic progress will focus on efficiency in the cow herd without a compromise in reproductive or growth performance. Feed conversion ratios (FCR, F:G, G:F) have a negative genetic correlation with mature body weight, therefore an attempted selection for feed efficiency over 30 years has increased mature cow size by more than 300 pounds. Residual feed intake (RFI), or Net Feed Efficiency, is a measure of feed efficiency that has no relationship with mature body weight or average daily gain. RFI is the difference between actual and predicted intake, where intake is predicted using a regression of dry matter intake (DMI) on body weight and average daily gain (ADG). RFI is a moderately heritable trait (about 40 percent), with ability to make progress in one generation of selection. Selection for a low, or negative, RFI will result in progeny that eat less without compromise in weight or gain. A trial concluded this year at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) categorized 98 weaned calves from the UC Davis herd as Low, Medium or High RFI (Figure 1). Average intake of Low and High RFI groups was 17.8 pounds/day and 20.5 pounds/day, respectively. There was no

difference in age, weight, frame score, ribeye area or rump fat between the groups, however there was a difference in back fat. After 70 days on feed, the Low RFI group had an average of 0.15 cm less back fat than High RFI (p =0.012). Table 1 shows an example of two animals with very similar performance, yet a 3 pound/day difference in intake. The feed cost on this trial was $240/ ton, resulting in a $26 increase in feed cost for ‘Steer B’ over ‘Steer A’ during a 70-day trial. RFI has proven useful outside the realms of growing and finishing cattle. Heifers ranked Low RFI post weaning consume less forage than High RFI counterparts at maturity; in gestation and lactation. Several studies have shown a 10 to 20 percent difference in DMI between High and Low RFI, with less prominence during lactation. Even a 10 percent decrease in intake is 25 pounds/head/day versus

18 California Cattleman April 2016

22.5 pounds/head/day. As an example, 100 acres with 2,000 pounds/acre of forage to utilize in a year could sustain 21 High RFI cows or 24 Low RFI cows. Another question is if selection for feed efficiency based on a grain diet will translate to efficiency on forage, or vice versa. More research will be needed to answer that, however one 2015 study published in the Journal of Dairy Science found that more than half of lactating Holsteins ranked in the same RFI group from a concentrate to roughage diet. Of those that didn’t, less than 4 percent switched from High to Low, or vice versa (Potts, et al, 2015). Environment effects any phenotypic measurement, but there is confidence in the value of RFI rank. For example, a bull with a -1.0 RFI on a concentrate diet from Nevada consumed 1 pound less per day than expected for his weight and gain,

FIGIURE 1. PREDICTED VERSUS ACTUAL DRY MATTER INTAKE (KG/DAY) RFI within GROUP that Low Medium High RFI -0.97

Figure 1. Graph of Residual Feed Intake of 98 animals. The black line is where Pred_DMI = DMI. Medium RFI animals are near average, shown in red. High and Low RFI animals are considered half a standard deviation away from the mean of the group.


TABLE 1. PERFORMANCE OF TWO STEERS RANKED AS HIGH OR LOW RFI Initial Age (days) Mid-Test Weight (lbs.) Hip Height (cm) Average Daily Gain (lbs/day) Backfat (cm) Ribeyey (cm2) Expected Dry Matter Intake (lbs.) Actual Dry Matter Intake (lbs.) Residual Feed Intake (lbs.)

Steer A 235 825.6 118 4.4 1.05 75.14 20.9 19.1 -1.8

Steer B 234 829.8 118 4.4 1.19 72.18 20.9 22.2 1.1

contemporary group. That bull probably won’t eat exactly 1 pound less per day in California rangelands, but he is likely to eat less than a High RFI bull from the same test. As found in this study, Low RFI cattle tend to be leaner than High RFI cattle. Several studies, including a 2016 published in the journal Animal, have found no difference in marbling, quality grade, palatability and yield grade between High and Low RFI cattle despite a difference in ultrasonic back fat measurement. This may be less prominent in maturity, as some results show no difference in body condition score or ultrasonic back fat depth between High and Low RFI beef females tested on hay, silage or pasture. When back fat is different between RFI groups, it can be fit into the equation along with weight and ADG to adjust RFI accordingly. The main concern with an association between RFI and composition is potential effects on fertility.

Several results show no difference in scrotal circumference, semen quality and overall breeding soundness between High and Low RFI bulls. One study suggests a delay in sexual maturity of Low RFI bulls (Fontoura, 2016). Delayed heifer age at puberty has also been noticed. In a 2011 study in the Journal of Animal Science, it was found that each 1-unit decrease in RFI corresponded with a 7.5-day increase in age at puberty (Shaffer et al, 2011). A difference in pregnancy rate, conception rate or calving rate has not been found. As research and market interest in feed efficiency progresses, expected progeny differences (EPDs) and genomic tools will become available for identifying feed efficient sires. We know that RFI is heritable, however there is uncertainty of the exact mechanisms that make an animal more efficient. There are hundreds of characteristics that contribute to the RFI; appetite, digestibility, composition, heat production, methane emission, digestibility, organ mass, activity, behavior and mitochondrial efficiency to name a few. The benefit of RFI is that it is independent of mature size and gain. However, identifying correlations with other traits, such as fertility, is difficult because not all animals will rank as High or Low RFI for the same reasons, and large numbers are needed to see differences in reproduction. As with all, RFI will not serve well with single-trait selection. RFI is a tool to identify animals that perform in all the same traits currently selected for, but simply eat less. On average, Low RFI cattle consume 10 percent and up to 20 percent, less than High RFI counterparts with no compromise in performance. Feed costs are the largest expense to any livestock producer, therefore thoughtful selection for feed efficiency can certainly change the profitability of an operation.

April 2016 California Cattleman 19


CHAROLAIS TODAY How breeders have evolved traits to impact the beef industry for the better by Managing Editor Stevie Ipsen

F

or any beef breed, the basic requirements are simple. Cows should breed easily, raise a healthy calf unassisted each year, be relatively low maintenance and easy to work with. It is also important for a cow to pass those traits on to her offspring. For bulls, staying sound in a variety of environments and passing on genetic merit in the form of expected progeny differences (EPDs) is paramount. No rancher wants to pull calves, and all ranchers want calves that will grow well and perform, whether as retained stock or when sold and passed on to the feedlot and consumer. For some cattlemen and women the idea of raising Charolais cattle to fit these described attributes may raise an eyebrow. But, the ranchers who raise Charolais seedstock or use Charolais genetics in their commercial herds, say there are many misconceptions of Charolais genetics and that clearing up those misconceptions is long overdue. When they were originally brought to the United States from France in the 1930s, their migration was brief. An outbreak of foot and mouth disease in Mexico barred any further entry of foreign livestock to North America until the mid 60s, when France and Canada resumed the importation of livestock, subsequently allowing Charolais cattle from Canada across the U.S. border as well. Charolais cattle came into widespread use in the United States at a time when producers were seeking larger framed, heavier cattle than the traditional British breeds. The increased use on the range indicates that the cows have performed well under a variety of environmental conditions. Their ability to walk, graze aggressively in warm weather, withstand reasonable cold and raise heavy calves has drawn special praise from those who have raised them. Bulls have developed a well-earned reputation when used in grading-up for herd improvement. This is especially noted when they are used in herds where size and ruggedness are lacking. In regards to the possible misconceptions surrounding 20 California Cattleman April 2016

this white-hided breed, size and aggressive nature are two traits that Charolais breeders say are manageable and should not discredit Charolais cattle and their myriad of benefits. Weston Geppert, Mitchell, S.D., the western region representative for the American-International Charolais Association (AICA), which is based in Kansas City, Mo., said calving-ease within the Charolais breed is one area where many cattlemen are misled. “Over the course of the past 10 years, calving-ease has improved significantly,” Geppert said. “No one has a need for 100-pound birthweight bulls and Charolais breeders have worked independently to help alleviate that issue. When it comes to calving-ease bulls, a producer can’t have enough of those and breeders have taken it upon themselves to meet their customers’ needs.” Bill Romans of Romans Ranches, Westfall, Ore., is one of those cattlemen who has worked to bring birthweights down within his own herd. “Ten years ago, I couldn’t guarantee a bull buyer that they wouldn’t run into calving problems,” Romans said. “But we have worked diligently in our own herd to bring birthweights down and in the last five years, I have felt confident guaranteeing buyers that when they purchase a Charolais bull, they can rely on that bull to produce moderate-sized calves for their cows.” “Overall, average birthweight within the Charolais breed has become much more middle of the road. Today you see the majority of our Charolais birthweights around 80 pounds whereas the Angus average is in the low 70s,” Romans explained. According to Romans, the average Charolais cow, while still hearty and a great calf factory, has gotten more moderate in size compared with Angus cows. “For us, 1,800-pound cows don’t work in this environment,” he said. “There is a misconception that you can’t run a cross-bred Charolais cow. But I’ve learned a nice, moderate cross-Charolais cow will last longer and raise a


better calf than many other cross-bred cows. We breed for smaller framed animals that are feed efficient.” At Romans Charolais, the cross-bred Charolais cow performance was one of the key factors in continuing on into the Charolais seedstock business. “We had raised a variety of other commercial cattle using Hereford, Angus, Simmental and Limousin bulls. It was when we purchased some cross-bred Charolais heifers that we really saw how great they could be,” Romans said. “We had a really good experience with them and decided to try Charolais bulls as well.” Today Romans Ranches runs about 600 Charolais cows in addition to a commercial herd of about 400. Another myth that Geppert says unfairly follows the Charolais breed is temperament – specifically aggression. But again, he credits producers with eliminating a lot of the illtempered cattle. Orland Charolais breeder Fred Jorgensen says disposition is definitely something that can be managed by a producer. “I admit, the Charolais breed does have that reputation [for being aggressive]. I have had some close calls with Charolais cattle. That said, I have had close calls with other breeds of cattle as well. To say Charolais cattle are mean isn’t really accurate – all cattle can be aggressive,” Jorgensen said. He goes on to explain that disposition in cattle is both learned and inherited. You can take a gentle cow and make her wild but its nearly impossible to take a wild cow and make her gentle, he said. “The mean ones don’t stick around on our place and that way our cows with better dispositions also breed for better dispositions,” said Jorgensen. Geppert says most Charolais breeders – and beef breeders in general – have a no non-sense approach when it comes to docility. He said cattle who aren’t easy to get along with wear out their welcome in a hurry. Perhaps where the most obvious benefit lies with Charolais cattle is in their performance. Aside from any perceived drawbacks of Charolais cattle, the positive traits they bring, specifically to the feedlot setting, outweight any possible negatives. For a feeder, the ability for calves to stay healthy, gain weight and provide a positive eating experience for the consumer is the main goal. “In talking with a South Dakota feeder just today, they can’t get enough black-nose Charolais-cross calves,” Geppert said. “You know what they are and how they will preform whereas with black cattle you don’t always know exactly what they are. They could be the result of a number of different breeds.” Simply put, Geppert says Charolaisinfluenced calves gain weight, yield well and perform in any environment. “As I travel the West, I see cattle in all conditions and I have come to know that if, for example, I took high desert Charolais cattle and moved them to the Midwest they’d flourish.” Geppert said. “Because if they can perform under those demanding circumstances, they could definitely perform in more optimal conditions.” While he says marbling in Charolais will never be as good as Angus, that is where crossbreeding and heterosis come into play and make up the difference. “Crossbred Angus and Charolais cattle gain better than other crosses and marbling is

enhanced. It’s the best of both worlds,” Geppert said. “One of the most common misconceptions I face as a Charolais breeder are cattlemen who think Charolais-cross cattle won’t grade Choice, but our intramuscular fat (IMF) scores have increased almost two full points since we started ultrasounding for marbling.” Romans said. Marbling scores are obtained through the use of ultrasound tests that the Romans have conducted on all sale and retained females for the past 17 years. “We have focused on this trait from the beginning and by using A.I. sires that have above-average IMF scores, we’ve moved that trait from an average score in the low twos to an average IMF score of four on the bulls and around five on the heifers. The industry says that an IMF score of four should grade Choice,” Romans explains. Additionally, Bill Romans said he began feed efficiency testing in the GrowSafe units at J.R. Simplot five years ago with the goal of eliminating bloodlines from the herd that were not as feed efficient, since Charolais cattle as a whole are a very feed efficient breed. “This was not supposed to have been a very heritable trait but we have identified cows in our herd who consistently produce very efficient, top-gaining bulls and have found that by mating feed efficient bulls to feed efficient cows we are consistently getting offspring that are feed efficient, which makes it a much more heritable trait than it was believed to have been,” Romans said. “What’s more is they don’t stall out at 1,200 pounds and often times heifers will bring as much as much as the steers. Especially in the recent past when demand for cattle has been high.” “At the end of the day, the math is simple. As long as input costs are acceptable, the more an animal gains, the more money you will make,” Romans said. Romans Ranches holds one of the Northwest’s largest Charolais production sales each spring and generally when new buyers come looking to add heterosis to their cowherd through Charolais genetics, it is because a cattle buyer told them that is the route they should go, Romans said. As more Northwest feeders have taken note of the performance of Charolais-influenced calves in the feedyard and on the rail, they have found value in not just investing in Charolais genetics themselves but also in documenting ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

April 2016 California Cattleman 21


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21 and studying the results of Charolais-crossed calves on feed. For example, J.R. Simplot Company, Land and Livestock division, in Grand View, Idaho, has invested in its own Charolais seedstock herd, created its own EPD system and closely monitor the impact of feed efficiency on their Charolais cattle. Simplot’s Randall Raymond, DVM, says he likes what he sees from Charolais calves in the feedlot setting. The Charolais-cross calves grow into a feeder calf that fits Simplot’s feeding scenario nicely. He said the crossbred calves are healthy, feed efficient, rapid growers that produce nice carcasses in the packing house. “We entered the seedstock business to try and improve the feed performance of our cattle,” says Raymond. “At the end of the day, we are cattle feeders, and we want to feed profitable cattle.” AgriBeef, another Northwest feedyard entity has also seen promise with Charolais cattle. As such, they have entered into an alliance with Romans Ranches that is a great benefit to Romans’ customers. Producers who purchase bulls at the

Romans Ranches Charolais Production Sale and market feeder calves to AgriBeef, are given a rebate in the form of a credit for the following year’s sale. The rebate is a percentage of the total bull purchases made at the previous year’s Romans Ranches Charolais Production Sale. The rebate increases each year a producer markets their calves to AgriBeef for up to three years. In the first year a bull buyer receives a 10 percent rebate with 15 percent the following year and 25 percent in the third year and beyond. Through his experience in seeing the Charolais breed evolve, Romans has come to a basic but common-sense conclusion, “Rather than just breeding for what you do want, it is just as vital that you don’t breed for what you don’t want.” And it is that conclusion that has helped propel the Charolais breed past some of it drawbacks, both real and perceived. Geppert says Zoetis and AICA now offer a 50K DNA analysis that a lot of breeders are taking advantage of and through CharAuctions.com, an online sales venue, more and more producers are able to access top quality genetics no matter what their location. Those seeking live cattle, embryos or semen can go to CharAuctions.com.

USDA AMS WITHDRAWS GRASS-FED MARKETING CLAIM STANDARD The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) withdrew its grassfed marketing claim standard and the naturally raised marketing claim standard earlier this year as the agency decided these marketing claims did not fit within their statutory mandate. “Without express authority from Congress – as with the National Organic Program – AMS does not have the authority to define labeling standards and determine if marketing claims are truthful and not misleading,” Craig Morris, deputy administrator of the AMS wrote in a blog post. “Therefore, it is inappropriate for the agency to offer these as AMS-defined marketing claims.” The voluntary standard for grass-fed marketing claims had been in effect since 2006. It stated that livestock marketed under this claim only consume grass or forage after weaned from milk. Also, livestock marketed under this claim needed access to pasture throughout the growing season. All labeling issues and questions under the marketing claim standards were to be approved by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). Morris said FSIS has the “authority to ensure meat and poultry 22 California Cattleman April 2016

labels contain information that is truthful and not misleading.” “By AMS having marketing claim standards for such things as grass fed and naturally raised, people were wrongly thinking AMS had standing statutory authority to determine what standards would merit those other, very controversial claims (non-GE, GMO, responsible use of antibiotics),” Morris said in the call. “The fact is that AMS does not have authority to regulate those terms – no different than we do not have authority to regulate grass-fed or naturally-raised.” Instead, Morris said, AMS audits processes and provides transparency to claims by making standards available on the AMS website. Tammie Ballard of FSIS labeling and program delivery said, “Going forward, producers must explain their definition of grass fed to FSIS for label approval. FSIS does not restrict diet to 100 percent grass-fed.” “FSIS is only considering the feeding protocol in their label approvals — other issues such as confinement; use of antibiotics and hormones; and the source of the animals, meat and dairy products will be left up to the producer,” the American Grassfed Association wrote in an opinion piece.

Producers who used the AMS grass-fed standard must now update their paperwork with FSIS. Producers who have not used the claim, but wish to, should also contact FSIS.

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WESTERN

Charolais

BREEDERS

POUNDS=PROFIT

AVILAMike& CATTLE CO. Char Avila

19760 Amen Lane, Cottonwood, CA (530) 347-1478 • cavila1956@att.net Bulls sell at the Red Bluff Bull Sale and off the ranch. Select females for sale private treaty.

BAR 6JimCHAROLAIS Ansbach

43861 Burnt Ranch Rd. Mitchell, OR 97750 (541) 462-3083 Annual Bull Sale • Jan. 21, 2017 • Madras, OR

BIANCHI RANCHES Robert, Chris & Erica Bianchi

6810 Canada Rd. Gilroy, CA (408) 842-5855 • (408) 804-3153 Erica’s cell (408) 804-3133 Robert’s cell Bianchiranches@aol.com Bulls and females available at the ranch. Call early for best selection. Watch for bulls at leading sales as well.

BROKEN BOX RANCH Jerry and Sherry Maltby

PO Box 760, Williams, CA (530) 681-5046 Cell • (530) 473-2830 Office BBR@citlink.net • www.brokenboxranch.com Bulls available at Red Bluff, Fallon and off the ranch.

FRESNO STATE AGRICULTURE FOUNDATION California State University, Fresno

2415 E. San Ramon, Fresno, CA Randy Perry (559) 278-4793 http://fresnostate.edu/jcast/beef Cody McDougald • Student Herdsman (559) 284-4111 Bulls available each June during our private treaty bull sale, as well as leading fall sales.

W

e believe strongly in the value of crossbreeding and the benefits of heterosis or hybrid vigor. Crossbred calves are more vigorous at birth, they are more resistant to disease and they have increased performance levels or weight gain. In addition, crossbred beef cows have higher fertility levels, they are also more disease resistant and they are superior in terms of longevity, an often overlooked but very economically important trait in a beef herd. These combined factors result in the generation of more total pounds of beef being produced from a commercial cowherd when crossbreeding is utilized. We believe that Charolais bulls are the logical and best choice to use on the Angus-dominated commerical beef cowherd that currently exists in this country. They will infuse the benefits of heterosis and produce the “smokies” and “buckskins” that have been popular with cattle feeders and packers for decades Look for these Charolais breeders from throughout the West as your . or at leading source for Charolais genetics available off the ranch California, Oregon and Nevada sales.

JORGENSEN RANCH Fred & Toni Jorgensen 25884 Mollier, Ave, Orland, CA (530) 865-7102

Top quality bulls available at the ranch and through Snyder Livestock’s ‘Bulls for the 21st Century’

NICHOLAS LIVESTOCK CO.

Nicoli Nicholas 6522 Vernon Rd., Nicolaus, CA • (916) 455-2384 Breeding Charolais cattle for 56 years, 150 bulls available private treaty in 2016.

ROMANS RANCHES

Bill & Cindy Romans • (541) 538-2921 Jeff & Julie Romans • (541) 358-2905 romansranches@hotmail.com www.romanscharolais.com Annual Production Sale • March 14, 2017 • Harper, OR

April 2016 California Cattleman 23


NCBA, PLC: BLM and USFS Plans Are Detrimental The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and the Public Lands Council (PLC) along with other livestock interests filed an amicus brief in March regarding the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service’s restrictive land management plans that came as a back door alternative to not listing the Sage Grouse under the Endangered Species Act. Brenda Richards, PLC president and federal lands rancher said the associations are concerned these plans will undermine conservation efforts already underway by ranchers. “It is critical for the livestock industry’s voice to be heard in this case, particularly because these plans have such a damaging impact to ranchers operating on or near public lands throughout the West,” said Richards. “The agencies made the right decision to not list the grouse, but these plans are detrimental to the conservation efforts already in place that have allowed the bird to thrive.”

Richards stressed that conservation efforts and land-use decisions are best made as close to the ground as possible. A report released in February showed that since 2010, private landowners have worked with USDA and its partners through the Sage Grouse Initiative to restore 4.4 million acres of habitat for Sage Grouse while maintaining working landscapes across the West. Tracy Brunner, NCBA president, said imposing regulatory change on the grazing livestock industry without any scientific basis is unwarranted. “Ongoing state management has led to a 63 percent increase in Sage Grouse population in the past two years alone, further illustrating that these Range Management Plans and the Land-Use Plan Amendment are unnecessary,” said Brunner. “As these new standards are implemented, they will have a negative economic impact on ranchers and rural communities without any corresponding benefit to the grouse habitat.”

Bettencourt Named Contra Costa-Alameda Cattleman of the Year

Third generation cattleman and Bay Area rancher Michael Bettencourt was named the 2016 Contra Costa-Alameda Cattlemen’s Association Cattleman of the Year at the association’s spring meeting in March. Bettencourt grew up with aspirations of carrying on family traditions, values and the passion for raising cattle and ranching. Born and raised in the Bay Area, Bettencourt developed the passion for ranching while helping his grandfather on the ranch. He helped feed the cattle and other animals. While growing up he participated in many local activities and organizations. He was an active FFA member, Alameda County Fair participant and Nor Cal Jr. Rodeo contestant. The thrill of bull riding at one point peeked his interest but he quickly realized that this was not for him. This thrill however, was passed down to his son Erik. Team roping would be the event Bettencourt would excel in. This talent was passed down to his son, Ryan. At some point in life we are faced with challenges and how we face these times is a true reflection of our character and resilience. Bettencourt has shown his two sons strength, support, how to learn from life’s lessons and that it is ok to wear boots and Wranglers to

24 California Cattleman April 2016

school. Never giving up on his true passion of raising cattle and ranching, he and his wife Alison and his brother-in-law Benn Burns, are partners in Coelho Ranches, and continue to be instrumental in continuing a past cattleman’s legacy, for which the family is truly grateful. He has served as a director for Contra CostaAlameda County Cattlemen’s Association and is a past vice president and president of the organization as well. Is dedication and commitment to the beef industry does not go unnoticed, and the local association is very pleased to bestow this prestigious award upon him this year.

ANADA 200-591, Approved by FDA

For intramuscular and subcutaneous use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. BRIEF SUMMARY (For full Prescribing Information, see package insert.) INDICATIONS: Norfenicol is indicated for treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) associated with Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni, and for the treatment of foot rot. Also, it is indicated for control of respiratory disease in cattle at high risk of developing BRD associated with M.haemolytica, P. multocida, and H. somni. CONTRAINDICATIONS: Do not use in animals that have shown hypersensitivity to florfenicol. NOT FOR HUMAN USE. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. Can be irritating to skin and eyes. Avoid direct contact with skin, eyes, and clothing. In case of accidental eye exposure, flush with water for 15 minutes. In case of accidental skin exposure, wash with soap and water. Remove contaminated clothing. Consult physician if irritation persists. Accidental injection of this product may cause local irritation. Consult physician immediately. The risk information provided here is not comprehensive. To learn more, talk about Norfenicol with your veterinarian. For customer service, adverse effects reporting, or to obtain a copy of the MSDS or FDA-approved package insert, call 1-866-591-5777. PRECAUTIONS: Not for use in animals intended for breeding. Effects on bovine reproductive performance, pregnancy, and lactation have not been determined. Intramuscular injection may result in local tissue reaction which persists beyond 28 days. This may result in trim loss at slaughter. Tissue reaction at injection sites other than the neck is likely to be more severe. RESIDUE WARNINGS: Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days of the last intramuscular treatment. Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 33 days of subcutaneous treatment. Not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows as such use may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established in pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. ADVERSE REACTIONS: Inappetence, decreased water consumption, or diarrhea may occur transiently. Manufactured by: Norbrook Laboratories Limited, Newry, BT35 6PU, Co. Down, Northern Ireland.

Michael Bettencourt being presented with 2016 Cattleman of the Year Award by Contra Costa-Alameda Cattlemen’s President Clayton Koopmann.

The Norbrook logos and Norfenicol ® are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited.


SOMETHING GOOD JUST GOT BETTER Shorter Sub-Q Withdrawal Time Than Nuflor速 Less Viscous and More Syringeable Than Nuflor* New Plastic Bottles Eliminate Breakage FDA-Approved for Sub-Q Use in Cattle at High-Risk of BRD Broad Spectrum Treatment and Control Against BRD Unique Formulation

ER SHORT SUB-Q L RAWA WITHD HAN TIME T 速 R NUFLO

orfenicol

(florfenicol)

*Data on file

www.norbrookinc.com

Observe label directions and withdrawal times. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. For use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. Not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 28 days of the last intramuscular treatment or within 33 days of subcutaneous treatment. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Intramuscular injection may result in local tissue reaction which may result in trim loss at slaughter. See product labeling for full product information, including adverse reactions. The Norbrook logos and Norfenicol are registered trademarks of Norbrook Laboratories Limited. Nuflor is a registered trademark of Merck Animal Health. 1115-591-I01C

FOR VETERINARY USE ONLY

April 2016 California Cattleman 25


32-Year-Old Cow still raising calves in Tehama County Any good cattle rancher knows that once a cow ages, her productivity will generally decrease. Most cows, after coming open, will be sent down the road by the time they are teenagers. But at the Kerstiens Ranch in Red Bluff, there is a cow that has surpassed nearly all statistics. Born sometime between 1983 and 1984, the 32-yearold Hereford cow has never given her owner, Bob Kerstiens, Sr., a reason to cull her, says Kerstiens’ daughter Vickie Mahoney. Raising calves year after year has earned her a home on the property until her time runs out. This spring, “Grandma Cow,” as the family fondly refers to her, is raising a calf out of the 2013 Red Bluff Bull Sale Charolais Halter

Champion Bull. “She was born on his ranch here in Red Bluff and was the biggest heifer, and out grew all the heifers,”Mahoney said. “That is why he retained her. She has had a calf every year, by herself. She is very healthy and has become a pet on the ranch.” Mahoney attributes the quality care of the cow and the good feed produced on the ranch for Grandma Cow’s longevity.

Brief

RED BLUFF DAILY NEWS ©

It’s still the

WEST

We just make it a little less

WILD Doug Winnett

800-969-2522 dwinnett@andreini.com General Insurance Brokers www.andreini.com

26 California Cattleman April 2016

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landtrust.org www.rraannggeela

April 2016 California Cattleman 27


RANGELAND TRUST TALK

Looking Back to Look Forward

Facing Current Challenges by Revisiting Roots by California Rangeland Trust Board Chairman Jack Hanson Looking back 18 years to the day California Rangeland Trust was born, it seems not much has changed. Ranchers faced economic challenges that made it difficult to make a living grazing livestock. The confiscatory “death tax” befell too many families. Regulations increased. And so, unbridled development converted the great grazing lands of California to housing or intensified agriculture – especially “trees and vines” – at an unprecedented rate. The rapid extinction of grazing land has become normal; the paradox is that it often takes real change on the part of ranchers to keep the land from changing. Today, I am proud of what we have helped them to change and what we have helped keep the same these past 18 years. What has changed is that ever encroaching developmental growth will never threaten 287,234 acres of privately owned California grazing land ever again. This land will stay the same. Forever.

This was accomplished by helping rancher’s place conservation easements on their ranches. Eighteen years ago, conservation easements were not a viable tool for most ranching families. A conservation easement should have helped a rancher to stay on his land and continue grazing livestock. However, it was a challenge to find a trusted, committed partner to hold and monitor the easement. California Rangeland Trust was created to be that partner. This is why I believe that the service California Rangeland Trust offers to the California beef cattle industry and my fellow California ranchers is so valuable. It is not just the citizens of California who receive positive, enduring benefits through our work. I am truly honored to have been selected by my fellow board members to serve as chairman of the board for the next two years. Representing California Rangeland Trust is a privilege and serving in this way is

truly an altruistic calling for me. Upon returning to the board after a 12-year hiatus, I took note of how the organization grew professionally and financially. Credit for this growth, nothing short of spectacular, falls squarely on the shoulders of the Trust’s dedicated, knowledgeable, professional staff and the many California ranchers who have generously given their time and energy to serve as Board members, providing guidance and leadership to the organization. Staff and the board of directors should justly be proud of the Trust’s progress and accomplishments over the years. But, we must now turn our focus to the challenges we face. Current demand is so high that ranchers, owning a combined half million acres are waiting to partner with the Trust and the list is growing. While the Trust’s commitment to helping these ranchers is as strong as it ever was, traditional public funding sources continue to diminish.

Anyone interested in conserving ranch lands or those with questions or comments on the California Rangeland Trust’s activities, are encouraged to contact the Trust at:

Springtime at the Willow Creek Ranch near Susanville. 28 California Cattleman April 2016

INFO@RANGELANDTRUST.ORG WWW.RANGELANDTRUST.ORG (916) 444-2096


In facing challenges, the Trust can learn much from its ranching partners. These ranchers use conservation easements to change the status of their land so that it will remain the same, forever. The California Rangeland Trust is following their lead, changing strategy, tactics and messaging so that the mission – to conserve California’s working ranches that provide stewardship, open space and natural habitat for future generations – will remain the same, forever. Be assured that the Trust’s staff and Board will continue to positively adapt to a changing environment to ensure California’s working ranches will continue to be conserved for generations to come. One shift in our approach is to invite significant private philanthropy to help us meet the substantial need. We conducted and evaluated a study with the help of consultants. Through in depth interviews, this study revealed that California Rangeland Trust had earned a strong, positive reputation and the trust of the agricultural community. Moreover, this trust factor was growing exponentially. We discovered that California Rangeland Trust had accrued a strong base of supporters, willing to invest philanthropically in our work if they were asked. Following this study and its review, the staff and board recognized the need to expand the Trust’s private funding base to allow more ranches sitting on our waitlist to be conserved – in time. The consensus is that looking toward our 20th year, we must launch our philanthropic profile. In anticipation of this, the governing board demonstrated that each member is contributing philanthropically. The board also appointed an advisory board, the Legacy Council, to help find support for the ranches on our wait list. While special events such as A Western Affair continue to connect us with the ranching community, California Rangeland Trust will soon be inviting even more significant gifts. Our work is important. The need is great. And our team is committed to change so that California ranchland can stay the same.

Jack Hanson was among a group of ranchers who created California Rangeland Trust in 1998 and served on the founding Board of Directors. He owns and operates Willow Creek Ranch, a traditional family cow/calf operation in Northeastern California with his wife, Darcy, and sons, Wyatt and Brad. Jack returned to the California Rangeland Trust Board of Directors following a 12-year absence in 2013 where he serves as chairman of the

board of directors. He is also past CCA vice president and treasurer, chair and current board member of the National Livestock Producers Association, chairman of the Tri State Livestock Credit Corp. Board of Directors, chairman of the Advisory Board at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, board member of Directors of the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, and past member of the Lassen County Board of Supervisors.

Celebrating 100 Years of CCA

< special edition coffee table book >

Pre-order copies for you, your family and your friends before Oct. 1 to receive special pre-sale prices! Pre-order until Oct. 1: $40 per book + flat rate shipping* After Oct 1: $50 per book + flat rate shipping - Call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 for special pricing on orders of 5 or more books -

*Pre-ordered books can be picked up in person at the 100th Annual CCA & CCW Convention Dec. 1-3 in Sparks, Nev. or shipped for an additional flat rate fee. Detach and fill out the form below and mail with a check or call the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 to pay over the phone by credit card.

Name: ______________________________________ Phone number: _________________ Please reserve _____ coffee table books @ $40 each = _______ Shipping: $14 (up to 2 books) = _______ + $7 per each add’l book x _____ books = _______

___ Yes, I will pick up my order in person at Convention ___ No, I won’t be able to make the convention, please ship to:

Total: _________

_____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ Make checks to California Cattlemen’s Association and mail to: California Cattlemen’s Association, Attn: 100 Year Coffee Table Book 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

< No refunds will be granted >

April 2016 California Cattleman 29


WALKING THE WALK CARGILL ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR MINIMIZING ANTIBIOTIC USE Cargill says it is eliminating 20 percent of shared-class antibiotics, those deemed important for human medicine and farm animals, from its four feed yards in Texas, Kansas and Colorado, and four additional feed yards operated by Friona Industries, which is a strategic business partner that supplies the company with cattle. The total number of cattle involved annually is approximately 1.2 million. This move comes after Cargill evaluated both existing third party research and research previously conducted by the company regarding reduced antibiotic use, and evaluated customer and consumer input. For the beef cattle covered by this announcement, Cargill does not use any antibiotics for growth promotion that are medically important for human health. “Our decision to eliminate 20 percent of the antibiotics used in our beef cattle, which are also used for human health, took into consideration customer and consumer desires to help ensure the long-term medical effectiveness of antibiotics for both people and animals,” stated John Keating, president of Cargill’s Wichita-based beef business. “We need to balance those desires with our commitment to ensure the health of animals raised for food, which contributes to the production of safer food.” Implementation of this decision builds upon Cargill’s 2014 decision to eliminate growth promoting antibiotics from its U.S. turkey business, which was completed in time for the 2015 holiday turkey season and underscores the company’s stated commitment to reduce the use of human antibiotics in food production. Cargill will also continue to explore alternatives to antibiotics that could further reduce their use in beef cattle. “Scientific research and yet-to-bediscovered innovative technologies could certainly help us further reduce,

30 California Cattleman April 2016

or eliminate, the need for antibiotics in the beef supply chain,” stated Keating. “We have an obligation to ensure that sick animals do not suffer, and that we prevent them from becoming ill, and we will use ongoing research efforts as the basis for any future additional reductions in antibiotic use. We’ve listened to consumers and our customers, we’ve taken this first step, and we believe there are more steps coming in the not-too-distant future.” Cargill will also increase to 90 percent the Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) certified feed yards that supply it cattle by 2018, becoming the first major beef processor to establish such a target. BQA is a stewardship certification program created by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), and includes training for cattle producers in best practices. Additionally, the company is working with the Canadian beef industry to create a similar program. Cargill is collaborating with cattle ranchers, researchers, universities and allied partners to identify production practices and viable alternatives that could result in further reduction in the use of medicines for food animal production. Research projects are underway with the focus on topics ranging from nutrition to feeding practices, including work done by Cargill Animal Nutrition, a leader in the development of feed ingredients and formulations that have the potential to reduce the need for antibiotics. “As part of the consumer research we’ve conducted, we learned that we need to be more transparent about practices such as use of antibiotics,”

explained Keating. “We will use our newly created webpage (www. cargillfreshmeat.com) to communicate our beef antibiotic policy, in addition to any newsworthy milestones that have the potential to further reduce antibiotic use in beef cattle. We will also engage with customers and other important stakeholders on a continual basis to better understand their expectations regarding antibiotic use in beef production, and how we can better meet those expectations. Accountability and credibility are crucial to the success of our longterm efforts to produce nutritious, affordable, wholesome and sustainable beef products our customers and consumers want to purchase and enjoy.”


Monterey Names Cattleman and CAttleWoman of the Year At the annual Monterey County Cattlemen’s Association and Monterey County CattleWomen’s Spring Meeting, at the King City Fairgrounds on Feb. 18, both respective associations honored their very deserving recipients of the 2015 Cattleman and CattleWoman of the Year Awards. This year’s recipients are each well known in their communities and beyond for their efforts to protect and promote the ranching and agriculture industries as well as for supporting local youth agriculture programs. Scott Violini, Salinas, a longtime supporter of both the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) and the Monterey County Cattlemen’s Association, was honored as the 2015 Monterey County Cattleman of the Year. Violini, who learned the ropes of cattle ranching from his late grandfather Joe and father Jim, continues to run the family’s Fatjo Ranch, which has been in operation since the Goldrush era, alongside his dad, his wife Marni and children Emily and Travis. Scott has served as a member of the CCA Board of Directors as well as president of the Monterey County Cattlemen and is known throughout the state as one of the ranching community’s toughest advocates. 2015 Monterey County CattleWoman of the Year Award winner Shirley Rasmussen, Parkfield, is known by cattlemen and cattlewomen alike for her enthusiastic dedication to the local beef industry. In addition to being intergrally involved in the CattleWomen’s beef promotion efforts throughout the state and county, Rasmussen has worked tirelessly to collect scholarship dollars for local youth through the Monterey County CattleWomen’s Scholarship Fund. Rasmussen was originally honored at the 99th Annual CCA & CCW Convention in Sparks, Nev., in November 2015. In addition to the annual awards, the annual spring meeting also included a Beef Quality Assurance workshop presented by the California Beef Council and local veterinarian Charlie Tobias, DVM, Tres Pinos. CCA staff were also on hand to update local cattlemen and women on the current issues SETTRINI © CCA is working Violini and Rasmussen upon being on in Sacramento recognized by their peers as Monterey and Washington, County Cattleman and CattleWoman D.C. of the Year.

Pettyjohn Ranch 16,000 cow/hunting ranch west side of tehama county miles of year-round cottonwood and cold fork creeks many reservoirs for livestock, game & fish

priced at $16,000,000

Van Cleve Associates

David Van Cleve, Broker Oregon - California Ranch Brokerage 530-906-3978 • www.VanCleveRanches.com April 2016 California Cattleman 31


COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR

Checking In On Your Beef Checkoff

appealing to the palate of the california consumer by Director of Producer Relations Jill Scofield California Beef Council

A Fresh Start

Spring signifies renewal in so many aspects of life, whether it is on the ranch, at home – or for us at the California Beef Council (CBC) – at the office. We continuously implement programs that strive to make an impact on consumers’ perceptions of beef – and their willingness to purchase more of it – all year long, but spring brings with it partnerships that we find especially exciting and refreshing.

Beef and Wine: A Winning California Combination What complements a delicious steak better than a great glass of wine? A recently launched partnership with a variety of retailers and a popular wine brand sought to tap into this popular combination and provide consumers with added incentive to purchase beef. At the end of February, the CBC and California

winemaker Don Sebastiani & Sons (specifically its popular Smoking Loon brand) began a consumer promotion pairing beef, wine and creative cost incentives for consumers purchasing both products. This broad promotion involved eight major retailers throughout the state and provided $3 in savings (in the form of an instant redeemable coupon provided as a “bottle necker” on all participating wines) on a purchase of fresh beef and a bottle of Smoking Loon wine. Participating retailers included Albertsons, FoodMaxx, Raley’s, Ralphs, Safeway, Save Mart, Vons and WinCo. The promotion carried through the Easter holiday, providing shoppers planning holiday menus a reason to reach for an easy and delicious beef and wine combination. Some of the retailers, Save Mart and WinCo specifically, also displayed the appropriate wines with the bottle-necker coupons near the meat case to make the joint purchase that much easier for shoppers. Additionally,

Pairing Tips From the California Beef Council’s Beef and Wine Pairing Brochure WHICH WINE VARIETAL OVERALL IS MOST “BEEF FLEXIBLE?” Cabernet sauvignon. Among the most powerful and concentrated red varietals, cabernet sauvignon can also be elegant at the same time. For its part, beef has a flavor that’s bold and yet refined at the same time. In this way, cabernet “mirrors” beef, creating a whole that’s greater than the sum of the parts. Cabernet sauvignon also possesses a considerable amount of tannin, which gives it the structure and intensity to pair well with beef. WHAT’S THE BIGGEST “NO-NO” IN BEEF AND WINE PAIRING? The biggest mistake in pairing beef and wine is adding blue cheese to the dish. Blue cheese is one of the most powerfully pungent, salty and microbial foods. It makes most wines – red and white – taste dull and insipid. So save the blue cheese for dessert and serve it with a sweet fortified wine such as port.

32 California Cattleman April 2016


WinCo featured a new brochure created by the CBC highlighting beef and wine pairing ideas. The brochure, which features a variety of beef and wine pairing tips, includes helpful advice from Karen MacNeil, who is author of the book The Wine Bible, host of the Emmy Award-winning television show Wine, Food and Friends, and chairman emeritus of the Wine Studies Program at the Culinary Institute of America, Greystone. This educational piece provided yet another way for consumers to learn new ways to incorporate beef into their menus and select the perfect wine to accompany the meal. The combination of beef and wine isn’t a new concept by any means, but the CBC’s partnership with the wine brand and various retailers reflects a shifting focus on broadening consumer promotions to help make a bigger impact on overall results and further stretch checkoff dollars by working with brand partners who help fund coupon incentives and promotional efforts. Further, by partnering with a popular and relatively inexpensive brand such as Smoking Loon, this particular promotion was consistent with a millennial winepurchasing trend. According to California-based wine research group Wine Opinions, millennials tend to spend less money per bottle than their older peers – 79 percent buy wines in the $10 - $15 range. And, according to Business Insider, the millennial generation is largely a fiscally conservative one and one that tends to use coupons even more than older generations. By launching a promotion that reflects these millennial values, the CBC hopes this will result in yet another successful partnership that drives beef sales at the retail level.

Looking Back at Other Partnership Results

As with all CBC promotions, the results of the Smoking Loon partnership will be analyzed over the coming weeks to determine the program’s effectiveness. According to CBC Director of Retail & Foodservice Marketing Christie Van Egmond, “Closely monitoring the

results and overall impacts of our campaigns is just one way that we ensure the California Beef Council is making the best and most efficient use of producers’ checkoff investment. Our overall goal in programs such as this one is to increase beef movement at retailers throughout the state, ultimately benefiting California’s beef industry as a whole.” In other retail promotions, reviewing the beef pounds moved helps assess the impact on beef sales. To give you an idea of what those results often look like, here are some impressive results from some of the CBC’s recent promotions.

BEEF & RESER’S PROMOTION (AUG. 19 - SEPT. 22, 2015)

Total increase of 652,099 beef pounds sold at the following retailers*: • Save Mart/Lucky/FoodMaxx: increase of 41,590 beef pounds • Ralphs: increase of 296,863 beef pounds • Food4Less: increase of 313,646 beef pounds *numbers are reported for five-week promotion period versus the five weeks prior to the promotion period

BEEF & CROCK-POT PROMOTION (OCT. 7 - NOV. 3, 2015)

Total increase of 114,250 beef pounds sold at the following retailers**: • Raley’s/Bel Air/Nob Hill Foods: increase of 18,772 beef pounds • Stater Bros.: increase of 95,478 beef pounds.

**numbers are reported for featured slow-cooker beef cuts during the four-week promotion period versus the four weeks prior to the promotion period

As these and other partnerships are executed throughout the coming months, we will continue to share updates and results, providing assurance that the CBC strives to make the best and most impactful use of your Beef Checkoff investment here in California.

LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR CHECKOFF There are a variety of helpful tools to keep you informed of both Checkoff and CBC-related activities and offer insight on beef nutrition: • Visit us at www.calbeef.org, or sign-up for a monthly Checkoff update by e-mailing jill@ calbeef.org. • Check out Beefitswhatsfordinner.com, which features a robust section on beef nutrition. For more information about the CBC or the Beef Checkoff, visit or www.mybeefcheckoff.com April 2016 California

Cattleman 33


Mike Bettencourt is a third generation rancher from the San Francisco Bay Area, he, his wife Alison, their sons Ryan and Erik and brother-in-law Benn Burns currently operate Coelho Ranches, LLC a commercial Angus and Hereford cow-calf operation in the Bay Area, Modesto and Dixon. Ryan and Erik spend time on the ranch helping their dad and participate in their 4-H beef projects as well as rodeo. Mike has served as a Contra Costa-Alameda County Cattlemen’s Association Director, vice president and president and was recently honored as the 2016 Cattleman of the Year. He is also an active member of the American Cowboy Team Roping Association and the California Cowboys Professional Rodeo Association as an avid team roper, and serves as roping director for Nor Cal Junior Rodeo.

Question: What does being involved in the beef community mean to you? Answer: I have a passion for being a rancher. I enjoy working with the animals, being able to work outside, and producing quality beef. I love that my family is involved and I get to work with my kids on the weekends and during the summer when not hauling them to junior rodeos. Question: What’s your day job? Answer: I am a rancher. I look forward to checking animals and water. I love the whole aspect of it. Even when the day goes not as palnned. And you might have fence to fix or a spring that’s not working, it’s a lot better than most jobs and I’m very fortunate for what I get to do. Question: Why do you ranch? Answer: It’s a passion. I was brought up in a ranching family and grew up with friends from other ranching families. Ranching is what I’ve always wanted to do since I was a little kid. My dad and grandpa really helped instill the passion for ranching in me. Question: Why are you serving on the CCA Executive Committee? Answer:I really enjoy working with other CCA members and our staff in Sacramento. They are a great group of people. It’s important that everyone does their part to help better our industry and keep things going on the right track, and I feel serving on the CCA Executive Committee is part of my contribution.

34 California Cattleman April 2016

RIVERS ©

FEATURING CCA EXECUTIVE MEMBER APPOINTEE AT LARGE MICHAEL BETTENCOURT MBTEAMROPER@AOL.COM • (209) 499-0794 Question: What issues matter most to you in the beef industry? Answer: Private property, water rights and animal rights (being told how we can care for our animals) are issues that matter most to me. Communication is also a huge piece of the puzzle. My family and I graze a lot of park ground in Fremont, and I come across a lot of hikers when I’m out working cattle. One specific area where we graze is an extremely popular hiking spot. A lot of the time—in fact, 99.9 percent of hikers don’t have any idea what we are doing or why we are doing it. They’re just curious. I enjoy telling our story about why we do what we do, why we vaccinate and brand our calves, to spread word that we are giving the best we can for the animals. Educating the public on ranching is really important if you have the opportunity to do so. They might wonder, “Why are these guys roping those calves?” Once you talk to them and tell them how and why, they begin to understand, and that’s a good thing for us. Question: Why should someone join CCA? Answer: There is strength in numbers. The more membership CCA has, the stronger we are as an industry. The membership dollars that are generated help CCA staff continue to fight for our rights and continue our way of life in the ranching industry. I suggest going to the meetings and getting involved to get informed.


MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA 95814 916-444-0845 (Office) · 916-444-2194 (Fax) www.calcattlemen.org

NAME(S):

RANCH/BUSINESS NAME:

ADDRESS: CITY:

STATE:

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

PRIMARY PHONE:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE OUR WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE E-MAIL BULLETIN?

Yes

ZIP:

No

Recruited By_________________________

Step 1: CCA Membership Producer Membership

For cattle owners and those seeking a voting membership level

Cattle Numbers 2500 & Over 1600-2499 1000-1599 800-999 500-799 300-499 100-299 0-99 

Dues $1,765 $1,275 $970 $725 $615 $460 $325 $240

Calves under 6 months of age are not counted. Stockers pay at ½ the total number of stockers owned each year or minimum dues, whichever is greater.

Associate Membership

For those who support California cattle production but do not own cattle Non-Voting Membership level

Statewide Allied/Feeder Associate $220

REGULAR MEMBERSHIP

Cattle Numbers

Dues

2001 + 1751-2000 1501-1750 1251-1500 1001-1250 750-1000 501-750 251-500 101-250 0-100

$1,900 + .38/per head $1,900 $1,650 $1,400 $1,150 $900 $650 $450 $300 $150

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: $100 (ASSOCIATES CANNOT OWN CATTLE)

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $20.00 $25.00

Humboldt-Del Norte Inyo-Mono-Alpine Kern County Lassen County Madera County Mendocino County Merced-Mariposa Modoc County

$ 25

Statewide Stewards of the Land

$150

Applicant’s Birth Date:_______________

$100

if over 25 years of age Applicant’s expected date of Graduation:

(Available to non-producers that own land on which cattle could or are run.)

CCA Supporting Member

(Available to non-producers who support the industry.)

California Beef Cattle Improvement Association

MEMBERSHIP

CBCIA is an affiliate of CCA and is a producer driven organization that fosters beef cattle improvement and economical production based on information and education.

Regular Members:

$35

Associate Members: $35 Young Cattlemen: $ 5

$15.00 $25.00 NA $20.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00

Must own fewer than 100 head of cattle. Must be 25 years of age or younger or a full-time student

- OR -

Step 3: Total Payment

LOCAL ASSOCIATON MEMBERSHIP: (Circle up to four below) Amador-El Dorado-Sac Butte Calaveras Contra Costa -Alameda Fall River-Big Valley Fresno-Kings Glenn-Colusa High Desert

Non-Voting Membership

Young Cattlemen’s Committee

(includes Feeder Council Associate, Allied Industry membership and second membership. Second membership does not include Allied Industry voting rights.)

Step 2: Other Optional Dues National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

Young Cattlemen Membership

Monterey County $10.00 Napa-Solano $5.00 Plumas-Sierra $10.00 San Benito $20.00 San Diego-Imperial $10.00 San Joaquin-Stanislaus $5.00 San Luis Obispo $20.00 Santa Barbara $25.00

CCA

$

NCBA

$

CBCIA

$

Payment Options:

□ Check payable to CCA

Local (All) $ TOTAL

$

Card #___________________________________ Exp______/________ Name on Card ____________________________ Signature ________________________________ Santa Clara Shasta County Siskiyou County Sonoma-Marin Tahoe Tehama County Tulare County Tuolumne County

$25.00 $20.00 $10.00 $10.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00 $10.00

Ventura County Yolo County Yuba –Sutter

$35.00 $25.00 $25.00


Cattlemen’s Report

LORENZEN RANCHES RED ANGUS BULL SALE Pendleton, Ore. • Feb. 25, 2016 Col. Rick Machado and Col. Trent Stewart Col. Rick Machado and Larry Lorenzen at Lorenzen Ranches’ production sale in Pendelton, Ore.

115 Red Angus bulls...................................... $6,322 37 composite bulls......................................... $5,750 152 total bulls.................................................. $6,182

2016 WINNEMUCCA RANCH, ROPE & PERFORMANCE HORSE SALE Winnemucca, Nev. • March 5, 2016 Col. Rick Machado 44 horses averaged......................................... $6,443

HARRELL HEREFORD RANCH with Harrell-McKenzie Quarter Horses Baker City, Ore. • March 7, 2016 Sale Managed by United Livestock Brokers, Inc. Col. C.D. “Butch” Booker and Col. Rick Machado

Bryce Shumann, Thomas Angus Ranch’s Rob Thomas and American Hereford Association’s Mark Holt at Harrell Hereford Ranch’s Bull Sale in Baker City, Ore.

99 yearling Hereford bulls............................ $6,050 32 two-year-old Hereford bulls.................... $5,518 34 registered Hereford heifers..................... $3,474 21 commerical heifers.................................... $2,200 15 two-year-old started horses..................... $8,328 1 broodmare.................................................... $2,000

THOMAS ANGUS RANCH Spring Bull Roundup Baker City, Ore. • March. 8, 2016 Sale Managed by Cotton & Associates Col. Rick Machado and Col. Steve Dorran 107 two-year old Angus bulls....................... $5,221 90 yearling Angus bulls................................. $4,144 197 total registered bulls............................... $4,729 38 bred heifers................................................ $4,001 38 total registered females............................ $4,001

RIVERBEND RANCHES Genetic Edge Bull Sale Idaho Falls, Idaho • March 12, 2016 Sale Managed by Cotton & Associates Col. Trent Stewart and Col. Rick Machado CCA members Kathy and Tom DeForest, Adin, attended Harrell Hereford’s bull sale in Baker City, Ore., on March 7. 36 California Cattleman April 2016

431 registered bulls.........................................$6,836 101 commercial bred heifers.........................$2,546


Cattlemen’s Report

SNYDER LIVESTOCK Bulls for the 21st Century Bull test sale Yerington, Nev. • March 13, 2016 Col. Rick Machado and Col. John Rodgers 96 Angus bulls................................................ $5,006 1 Balancer bull................................................ $3,750 9 Charolais bulls............................................. $6,472 2 Gelbvieh bulls.............................................. $5,250 9 Hereford bulls............................................. $4,875 3 Limflex bulls................................................ $5,083 16 Red Angus bulls........................................ $4,006 136 total bulls averaged................................. $4,970

Janet and Mitt French, Hollister, attended Riverbend Ranches’ Genetic Edge Bull Sale in Idaho Falls, Idaho, March 12.

SPRING COVE RANCH & JBB/AL HEREFORDS The Cattlemen’s Connection Bull Sale Bliss, Idaho • March 14, 2016 Col. Rick Machado and Col. Kyle Colyer 125 yearling Angus bulls............................... $6,866 58 yearling registered Angus heifers.......... $1,835 21 yearling commercial Angus heifers........ $1,606 30 Hereford bulls........................................... $3,027 6 Red Angus bulls.......................................... $3,100 18 registered Hereford heifers..................... $1,839

Angus breeders Troy Adams, Fallon, Nev., and Kris Gudel, Wilton, at the 2016 Bulls for the 21st Century at Snyder Livestock in Yerington, Nev.

ROMANS RANCHES Charolais Bull Sale Westfall, Ore. • March 15, 2016 Col. Dennis Metzger 78 fall Charolais bulls.................................... $4,354 26 spring yearling Charolais bulls................ $3,821 104 total bulls.................................................. $4,221

Spring Cove Ranch’s Art and Stacy Butler with third generation buyer Shalee Rutan at the Cattlemen’s Connection Bull Sale in Bliss, Idaho. April 2016 California Cattleman 37


California Cattlemen’s Association Services for all your on-the-ranch needs

Ranch-raised Angus cattle with industry-leading genetics! CALL US FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR PRIVATE TREATY CATTLE OR OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE! PAICINES, CA DANNY CHAVES, MANAGER

RANCH: (831) 388-4791 • DANNY’S CELL: (831) 801-8809

THANK YOU TO ALL THE BUYER’S WHO MADE THIS YEAR’S HERITAGE BULL SALE A SUCCESS!

2006 CBCIA Seedstock Producer of the Year

A tremendous ‘Thank You’ to all our loyal bull buyers who purchased bulls in 2015!

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016 38 California Cattleman April 2016


THANK YOU TO ALL THIS YEAR’S BUYERS!

LOOK FOR US AT LEADING SALES IN 2016.

O’Connell Consensus 2705

JUNIOR HERDSIRES O’Connell Consensus 2705 SIRE: Connealy Consensus 7229 MGS: HARB Pendleton 765 J H

VDAR Really Windy 7261

THANK YOU TO OUR 2015 “COMMITMENT TO PERFORMANCE” BULL BUYERS!

Call us for infor mation about pr ivate tr eaty cattle or our 2016 bull sale!

SIRE: VDAR Really Windy 4189 MGS: Sinclair Telecast 01S3

FCR Final Answer 0103 SIRE: SAV Final Answer 0035 MGS: N Bar Prime Time D806

+1.5 +56

+95 +31 +.94 +.71 +105.36

WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AGAIN NEXT YEAR!

PRESIDENT'S DAY 2017, TERREBONNE OR JOIN US FALL 2016 FOR THE

WOODLAND, CA • (916) 417-4199

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8, 2016

CWULFF@LSCE.COM WWW.WULFFBROTHERSLIVESTOCK.COM

April 2016 California Cattleman 39


Thank you to the buyers at our 41st “Generations of Performance” Bull Sale!

The Best of Both Worlds (530) 385-1570

Phone 707.448.9208 E-mail................................tehamaranch@gmail.com

Thank you to our 2015 bull and female buyers!

www.cherryglenbeefmasters.com

Brangus • angus • Ultrablacks

THE DOIRON FAMILY

Celebrating 41 Years of Angus Tradition

Daniel & Pamela Doiron 805-245-0434 Cell doiron@spanishranch.net www.spanishranch.net

THD ©

JOIN US AT OUR ANNUAL BULL SALE 9/3/15!

Progressive Genetics for over 36 years Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

Jared Patterson: 208-312-2386

GELBVIEH Gerber, CA

Registered Angus Cattle Call to see what we have to offer you!

H

Scott & Shaleen Hogan

R (530) 200-1467 • (530) 227-8882 40 California Cattleman April 2016

h

Join us once again October 2016 in Kenwood, CA!


3L

“Breeding with the Commercial Cattleman in Mind”

79337 Soto Lane Fort Rock, OR 97735 Ken 541.403.1044 | Jesse 541.810.2460 ijhufford@yahoo.com | www.huffordherefords.com

Pitchfork Cattle Co.

HEREFORD BULLS NOW AVAILABLE!

OFFERING HEREFORD BULL BUILT FOR THE COMMERCIAL CATTLEMAN

(707) 481-3440 • Bobby Mickelson, Herdman, (707) 396-7364

LITTLE SHASTA RANCH

Genetics That Get Results! 2014 National Western Champion Bull

Owned with Yardley Cattle Co. Beaver, Utah

Dave Goss PO Box 13 Vinton, CA 96135 530-993-4636

ZEIS REAL STEEL

Call anytime to see what we can offer you!

MCPHEE RED ANGUIS We hope to see you out for our 2016 Production Sale in Lodi!

Stan Sears 5322 Freeman Rd. Montague, CA 96064 (530) 842-3950

v THANK YOU TO OUR CALIFORNIA BULLFEST CUSTOMERS!

Red Angus Located in the heart of the Northwest

Calving Ease, Growth, Maternal and Carcass Traits Everett Flikkema 406-580-2186

Jack Vollstedt 818-535-4034

Cattleman's Classic, October 18, 2014

www.vfredangus.com April 2016 California Cattleman 41


“Specializing in farm and ranch properties” K. MARK NELSON

RYAN NELSON

BRE# 00346894 BRE# 01883050 (916) 849-5558 (916) 804-6861 kmarknelson@gmail.com ryan.nelson85@gmail.com

2015 AICA Seedstock Produer of the Year

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

WE BUILD THE FINEST FENCING FAST!

Specializing in livestock fence & facility construction and repair

OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE! PO Box 1523 Patterson, CA 800-84-fence 209-892-9205 swfence.com

CA CONTRACTOR LICENSE #664846

42 California Cattleman April 2016


SALE MANAGEMENT SALES MANAGEMENT LIVESTOCK MARKETING LIVESTOCK PHOTOGRAPHY CONSULTING ORDER BUYING

MATT MACFARLANE

SHERIDAN, CA • (916) 803-8133 MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET WWW.M3CATTLEMARKETING.COM

TOM PERONA, DVM 209-996-7005 Cell

LANDER

VETERINARY clinic Office 209-634-5801

THD ©

4512 S. Walnut Rd. • P.O. Box 1830 • Turlock, CA 95380

IT’S A WIN-WIN

To do business with those looking out for you! Silveus is the exclusive PRF partner of CCA.

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann 530.218.3379

Matt Griffith 530.570.3333

Dan VanVuren 209.484.5578

jimv@wsrins.com matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com danv@garibaldiins.com Lic #0B48084 Lic #0124869 Lic #0E44519

When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

Contact a Silveus agent today to see how they can help you! April 2016 California Cattleman 43


IN MEMORY Paul DeForest Paul Vernon DeForest was born Nov. 10, 1951 in Alturas, to Ches and Grace DeForest of Likely. When he was six months old his family moved to Oregon House. He attended school there, in a one-room school house, until 8th grade. When Paul moved on to Marysville High School his class size changed from three students to 300 students. Needless to say, this was quite an adjustment and he did not enjoy his high school years. He went as far as hiding from the bus and telling his dad that he missed the bus that day! The day after graduation, at 17 years old, he moved to Sierra Valley and began working for the Lucky Hereford Ranch. During this time he decided to attend a rodeo school in Oakdale and this is where he sustained his first of many occupational injuries. He became hung up on a bareback horse and spent months recuperating. Between 1969 and 1980 he held various jobs. He traveled the country with a show string of Hereford cattle, worked for the Flournoys in Likely and for Bill and Gwen Warren in Loyalton. Paul and Karin Alexander were married in 1981 and moved to Grandview. They returned to Sierra Valley and had three children: Tamsen, Summer and Thad. In 1990, Paul moved his family to Ash Valley. They were fortunate to get the opportunity to lease the original ranch, which had been homesteaded by his mothers’ family, the Baths, in 1881. They were eventually able to purchase it and another family ranch in Ash Valley in 2004 and moved a few miles down the road, where the familiy resides to this day. Paul valiantly battled cancer since 2012. He passed away on March 3, 2016 in his home in Ash Valley. He is survived by his wife Karin, his children Tamsen (Wynn) Myers of Adin; Summer (Jim) Neubert of Stonyford; Thad (Amanda) DeForest of Ash Valley; and grandchildren Case, Ashlyn, Ainsley and Annette Myers and Nathan Neubert. Siblings Cheryl DeForest, Tom DeForest (Kathy), Bev Tipton (Bo) and Charles DeForest (Becky) and many loving nieces and nephews, especially Drew Alexander. He was preceded in death by his parents Ches and Grace DeForest. Services were held at the Adin Community Bible Church in Adin on Saturday, March 12. Memorial contributions can be made to Intermountain Hospice, Intermountain Cattlewomen Scholarship Fund or a charity of your choice. 44 California Cattleman April 2016

Sheila Varian

Renowned horsewoman Sheila Varian, born Aug. 8, 1937 passed away the morning of March 6, after being diagnosed with cancer in 2013. Varian, who touched and inspired the lives of horse enthusiasts around the world for more than six decades was probably more legendary outside the Arabian horse industry than in it, even though she has been widely considered the leading Arabian horse breeder in the world. Her historic win at the 1961 Reined Cow Horse World Championships at the Cow Palace in San Francisco gave her iconic status in the Quarter Horse-dominated world of cow horse competition, being the first and only woman, the first amateur, and the first Arabian horse to ever win that prestigious award. Ask any cowboy today if he knows of her, and you’ll probably get a tip of the hat. Sheila’s induction into the Cowgirl Hall of Fame in 2003 placed her alongside every famous horsewoman from Annie Oakley to Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. And though her long career started in training horses, her accomplishments in breeding them are even more impeccable. The Varian family was among the very first to import purebred Arabians from Poland and did so at the height of communist occupation. This amazing accomplishment by a small family farm in Arroyo Grande, flung open the doors for the rest of the world, particularly Americans, to embrace Polish Arabians as the foundation horses they are. Soon after, Sheila brought up a 2-year-old colt named Bay-Abi, and showed him to the title of 1962 U.S. National Champion Stallion. He began a breeding program that has redefined how people breed Arabian horses. The birth of his son Bay El Bey in 1972 is perhaps the most significant occasion in modern Arabian history. Still today, the get of Bay El Bay rule the show ring. An amazing statistic

from the 2014 U.S. Nationals revealed that 84 percent of all U.S. Reserve and National Champions for purebred Arabian horses in the open halter and performance divisions carried the blood of Bay El Bey, including 98.6 percent in the halter division alone. But Sheila’s success didn’t end there. Her vision has created foundation horses for countless breeding programs around the world, and opened the minds of breeders to experiment with out-crossing. Her program has also involved the Ali Jamaal son, Jullyen El Jamaal, and the Fame VF+ son Audacious PS, among many others. Yet still, beyond all her accomplishments, her intangible qualities are what set her apart. Her wisdom, leadership, wit, inspiration, character and pioneering spirit have enraptured every person lucky enough to cross her path. It was Sheila’s profound wish that Varian Arabians continue. Under the direction of longtime farm manager Angela Alvarez, Varian Arabians will steadfastly continue its 60-year tradition of training, breeding, selling and showing world-class Arabian horses. Additionally, its next chapter includes its commitment to honor and extend Sheila’s profound legacy as a teacher, leader and storyteller by utilizing the ranch as an educational and historical event center for the Arabian horse. It is with great sadness that we say goodbye to one of the most iconic women not just in the Arabian world, but in all the world of horses. She leaves our world and our breed a better place because she was a part of it. May she rest in peace, and her legacy live on forever. Before she became ill with terminal cancer, Sheila Varian reached out to California Rangeland Trust with a dream to form a land preservation agreement that would protect the ranch for the people, the horses and the wildlife in the near future, and also ensure that her land, and eventually other working ranches, would be preserved forever. Memorial donations may be made to the Protect Varian Arabians Ranch campaign by visiting www.RangelandTrust.org/Varian


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All West/Select Sires.................................................................................. 22 Amador Angus.......................................................................................... 38 American Hereford Association ������������������������������������������������������������� 40 Andreini & Company............................................................................... 26 Avila Cattle Co........................................................................................... 23 Bar 6 Charolais........................................................................................... 23 Bar R Angus............................................................................................... 38 Bianchi Ranches........................................................................................ 23 BMW Angus.............................................................................................. 38 Bovine Elite, LLC....................................................................................... 43 Broken Arrow Angus................................................................................ 38 Broken Box Ranch...............................................................................23, 42 Buchanan Angus........................................................................................ 38 Byrd Cattle Co............................................................................................ 38 California Beef Cattle Improvement Association..................................26 California Custom..................................................................................... 42 California Rangeland Trust...................................................................... 27 California State University, Chico ���������������������������������������������������������� 41 California Wagyu Breeders, Inc. ������������������������������������������������������������� 42 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market ������������������������������������������������������������������� 2 Charron Ranch.......................................................................................... 38 Cherry Glen Beefmasters......................................................................... 40 Conlan Ranches California...................................................................... 42 Conlin Fence Company............................................................................ 42 Conlin Supply Company, Inc. ����������������������������������������������������������������� 16 Corsaid Angus Ranch............................................................................... 38 Dal Porto Livestock................................................................................... 39 Diamond Back Ranch............................................................................... 42 Donati Ranch............................................................................................. 38 Edwards Lien & Toso, Inc........................................................................ 42 Five Star Land Company.......................................................................... 42 Freitas Rangeland Improvements ����������������������������������������������������������� 29 Fresno State Agriculture Foundation �����������������������������������������������23, 41 Furtado Angus........................................................................................... 39 Furtado Livestock Enterprises ��������������������������������������������������������������� 43 Genoa Livestock........................................................................................ 40 Gonsalves Ranch....................................................................................... 39 HAVE Angus.............................................................................................. 39 Hogan Ranch............................................................................................. 40 Hone Ranch................................................................................................ 40 Hufford’s Herefords................................................................................... 41 J/V Angus................................................................................................... 39 Jorgensen Ranch........................................................................................ 23 Kerndt Livestock Products....................................................................... 43

46 California Cattleman April 2016

Lambert Ranch.......................................................................................... 40 Lander Veterinary Clinic.......................................................................... 43 Little Shasta Ranch.................................................................................... 41 M3 Marketing............................................................................................ 43 McPhee Red Angus................................................................................... 41 Nicholas Livestock Co.............................................................................. 23 Noah’s Angus Ranch................................................................................. 39 Norbrook Animal Health......................................................................... 17 Norbrook Animal Health...................................................................24, 25 O’Connell Ranches.................................................................................... 39 ORIgen......................................................................................................43 Orvis Cattle................................................................................................ 41 Pacific Trace Minerals.........................................................................13, 42 Pitchfork Cattle Co.................................................................................... 41 Ray-Mar Ranches...................................................................................... 39 Razzari Auto Centers................................................................................ 45 Romans Ranches....................................................................................... 23 Sammis Ranch........................................................................................... 39 San Juan Ranch.......................................................................................... 40 Schafer Ranch............................................................................................ 39 Schohr Ranches......................................................................................... 41 Sierra Ranches............................................................................................ 41 Silveira Bros................................................................................................ 40 Silveus Rangeland Insurance................................................................... 43 Skinner Livestock Transportaion ����������������������������������������������������������� 42 Sonoma Mountain Herefords ����������������������������������������������������������������� 41 Southwest Fenc & Supply Company, Inc. ���������������������������������������������� 42 Spanish Ranch............................................................................................ 40 Tehama Cattle Co...................................................................................... 40 Teixeira Cattle Co...................................................................................... 39 Tumbleweed Ranch................................................................................... 40 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard ��������������������������������������������������������������� 7 Universal Semen Sales.............................................................................. 43 Van Cleve Associates................................................................................. 29 Veterinary Service, Inc.............................................................................. 42 VF Red Angus............................................................................................ 41 Vintage Angus Ranch.........................................................................40, 48 Visalia-Templeton Livestock Market ����������������������������������������������������� 15 Western Fence & Construction, Inc. ����������������������������������������������������� 42 Western Charolais Breeders..................................................................... 23 Western Stockman’s Market..................................................................... 11 Western Video Market................................................................................ 3 Wulff Brothers Livestock.......................................................................... 39


2016 BULL BUYERS GUIDE

RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY! CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE

MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET • (916) 803-3113 DEADLINE: JUNE 5, 2016

April 2016 California Cattleman 47


VAR

EMPIRE

3037

V A R EMPIRE 3037 AAA REG. 17455111

SIRE: AAR TEN X 7008 SA MGS: RITO 1I2 OF 2536 RITO 6I6

EMPIRES ARE BUILT ONE STRAW AT A TIME • VAR Empire is a Ten X son with perfectly smooth shoulders, no front, no sheath, a square hip, good bone, tons of depth and a top 1% $Beef. • VAR Empire’s exceptional $Beef and moderate birth weight makes him an easy choice for all your Upshot, Upward and Onward bred females. • VAR Empire’s dam has been the high-selling female at Express Ranches and Vintage Angus. 4212 is also an outstanding producer of high quality cattle with 10 daughters selling at VAR for an average of $40,974 each. • In the 2014 bull sale at Vintage, 5 sons of 4212 sold for an average price of $20,800 each. In the 2015 bull sale at Vintage Angus, 14 maternal grandsons sold for $204,499 to average $14,607.

EPDS +7 +.8 +60 +114 +.32 +16 +23 +58 +.95 +.91 +57.19 +90.99 +47.87 +40.35 +193.20

TRAIT CED BW WW YW RADG Doc Milk CW Marb RE $W $F $G $QG $B

EPDs as of 3/18/2016

Semen: $30

BREED RANKINGS

10% 3%

3% 10% 5% 1% 3% 5% 5% 1%

Certificates: $30

OWNERS: VINTAGE ANGUS RANCH, CA GREEN VALLEY CATTLE, NE

FULL SISTER - VAR Blackcap 3084 pictured as a bred heifer.

2702 SCENIC BEND, MODESTO, CA 95355 (209) 521-0537 DAM - EXAR New Design 4212, a proven donor for Vintage Angus and Deer Valley Farms.

WWW.VINTAGEANGUSRANCH.COM VINTAGEANGUS@EARTHLINK.NET

California Cattleman April 2016 Online  
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