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January 2014

Jan. 28 - Feb. 1 smart dogs handy horses quality CATTLE Outstanding Trade Show

RED BLUFF HAS WHAT YOU NEED PAGE 20

1 California Cattleman January 2014

2 California Cattleman January 2014

We don’t do ordinary

SELLING 200 BULLS

THURSDAY FEB. 27, 2014

AT THE RANCH

YEARLING RED ANGUS BULLS STOUT 18 MONTH RED ANGUS BULLS RED & BLACK COMPOSITE BULLS Featuring: beckton epic • brown commitment beefmaker • conquest • packer • jericho lorenzen joshua • lorenzen penDleton • eXpectation

3 California Cattleman January 2014

Correspondence to Larry Lorenzen PH 541.276.6108 | FAX 541.276.9696 or Sam Lorenzen PH 541.215.2687 P.O. Box 1519, Pendleton, Oregon 97801 January 2014 California Cattleman 3 larrylorenzen@hughes.net | lorenzenranches.com

California Cattlemen’s Association

OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Tim Koopmann, Sunol

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Billy Flournoy, Likely

SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Fred Chamberlin, Los Olivos David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville Richard Ross, Lincoln

TREASURER

Jack Hanson, Susanville

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Stevie Ipsen

ASSOCIATE DIR. OF COMMUNICATIONS Malorie Bankhead

MEMBERSHIP & OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Kirk Wilbur

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen stevie@calcattlemen.org californiacattleman@gmail.com

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net BILLING SERVICES Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

WE ALL HAVE A STAKE IN THE BUSINESS by CCA President Tim Koopmann

Just back from the annual meeting of the California Beef Council (CBC), I continue to appreciate the great diversity of people, types of operations, business philosophies and limitations that impact all of the beef producers in California. Please note that I have referred to the attendees at the CBC meeting as beef producers, not just beef cattle producers. I thought long and hard about this reference to beef producers, as the majority of cattle owners at this CBC meeting were members of the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA). All of the attendees play a vital role in the business of beef. There is reliance by each segment of our business on each other in order to optimize profitability Cow-calf producers, stocker operators, seed stock producers, dairy and dairy calf raisers and cattle feeders should all work in unity to assure that local, state, national and international consumers have access to the most affordable, safest and most enjoyable dietary protein available – American beef. Some may argue that the responsibility of CCA is to isolate our daily work efforts to single segments of our business. In the editorial nature of this column, I disagree as I view the final product that I grow and market is beef. I believe that our business is not limited to the loads of weaned calves that I annually deliver, but that my family business is international in nature and includes a final product that includes an interest from conception to consumption.

The marketing of American beef has evolved into many channels, including conventional grain finished, grass-fed, natural and organic. There is a market for all production methods and each segment of our business should embrace the flexibility that is available to us as calf producers or stocker operators. There should be no disparagement between segments, with un-founded claims of superiority; we should all be focused on the ultimate goal of increasing consumption and thus the potential for increased profitability in our own family businesses. Throughout the CBC meeting, I participated in many side conversations that included references to the sustainability of the business of beef. Academics, environmentalists, urban consumers and politicians have introduced the concept of the three legged stool as a measure of sustainability. The three required legs include: 1) Benefits to Society; 2) Environmental Benefits; and 3) Economic Benefits. I contend that economic benefits should be the primary focus and in the absence of profitability nothing is sustainable. Just like the stool referenced above, the beef business must stand on legs that includes all segments of production. We can only maintain the business of beef by working together, with all of our “legs” remaining solid.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlemen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomer, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100.

4 California Cattleman January 2014

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814.

JANUARY 2014 Volume 97, Issue 1

ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN from your CCA President

BUNKHOUSE

from CCA’s Executive Vice President

4 9

CATTLEMEN’S UPDATE CCA continues work on truck regulations

10

VET VIEWS featuring animal handling expert Lynn Locatelli, DVM

14

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER 18 What can GeneMax™ do for you? CHIMES CattleWomen to welcome ladies from throughout the west

45

FUTURE FOCUS Meet the future of the beef industry

46

SPECIAL FEATURES

73rd Annual Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale

20

Through the years: how the California Cattleman magazine has evolved

30

Rancher and lawmaker looks to year ahead

35

A look at the weather ahead

36

CCA awards over $25,000 in scholarships

50

READER SERVICES

Bull Buyers’ Guide New Arrivals Obituaries Advertisers’ Index

5 California Cattleman January 2014

38 52 52 58

THE COVER

This month’s cover photo, taken by Amy Anderson of Red Bluff, displays some of the attractions ranching enthusiasts can find at the 2014 Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale which runs Jan. 28-Feb. 1. The longest-running livestock event west of the Rocky Mountains, the Red Bluff Bull and Gelding Sale features all the things that any successful ranch need — bulls, ranch horses, stock dogs and much more! As a non-profit organization that donates all proceeds back to the agriculture and livestock communities, the sale committee extends a special invitation to all to come see for yourself all that this prestigious event has to offer. Again this year, Western Video Market will hold its annual feeder calf sale in conjunction with the Red Bluff Replacement Female Sale, broadcast on WVMcattle.com on Thurs., Jan. 30, at 12:30 p.m. Event organizers would like to express appreciation to all the generous sponsors who make this event possible. As you make your way to the various Red Bluff events this year, be sure to make time for the one-of-a-kind western trade show, which opens daily at 9, beginning on Jan. 29. For a full schedule of all that the 2014 event offers, see page 18 or visit www. redbluffbullsale.com.

Ward Ranches

PERFORMANCE GENETICS

UNIVERSITY

8th Annual Production Sale

50% SALE R S / 50% AN G U S His sons sell February 16th!

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014 1 p.m. at the Ranch Gardnerville, Nevada

Ward Ranches Optimizers “Balanced Business” Salers and Angus are both proven to be compatible for calving ease and marbling quality. Both breeds offer maternal and carcass qualities that are valued in the industry today. We have been blending the best of the two breeds to develop the ideal Optimizer bull. An Optimizer can be from 25% to less than 75% Salers. This has resulted in a superior individual with the qualities that increase profitability for you, our customer.

71% Salers / 25% Angus University son sold in our 2013 sale

70 FALL 2012 RANCH-READY BULLS SELL FEBRUARY 16 Angus • Salers • Salers/Angus Composites • Performance test and ultrasound results • Bulls fertility tested & unconditionally guaranteed • All bulls tested BVD–PI negative • Free delivery to central locations within 500 miles

The focus at Ward Ranches is to produce a quality product, year after year. We know that the Angus breed is known as the “Business Breed” and that the Salers breed is known as the “Balanced Breed.” Experience has taught us, and research has proven, that these two breeds complement each other well. “Balanced Business,” as we call it. Be sure to attend the Nevada Cattlemen All-Breed’s Bull Sale at Fallon on Saturday, and especially plan to join us

Sunday, February 16th, for the 8th Annual Ward Ranches Production Sale at Gardnerville! We are a 1.5 hour drive southwest of Fallon. 6 California Cattleman January 2014

Purebred Angus son of DPL Daybreak K82 sold in our 2013 sale

Guest Consignor: Hunsaker Livestock

Buhl, Idaho

Not on our catalog mailing list? E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com

/

Ward Ranches “Y OUR

GARY WARD & FAMILY

(775) 790-6148 P. O. Box 1404, Gardnerville, NV 89410 E-mail: wardranches24@gmail.com Ranch: 1155 Foothill Rd., Gardnerville

Western GENETIC SO URCE”

WESTERN GENETIC

BULL EVENT

TWO BIG DAYS

MARCH 3 & 4, 2014 BAKER CITY, OREGON

Powerful, PROVEN genetics 350 BULLS     

VOLUME SELECTION Oregon’s largest Hereford and Angus Seedstock Programs INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP Reputation family owned programs PREDICTABLE GENETICS Sons of Hereford and Angus Sire Summary Leaders MATERNAL POWER Two of the Northwest’s great cowherds NORTHWEST PREMIUM GENETICS PARTNERSHIP The value-added marketing option

Horse Preview Sunday, March 2

HARRELL SIRE H5 YANKEE 9131

CONNEALY CONFIDENCE 0100

Powerful Hi-Maternal, Multi-Trait, Performance and Carcass Grid Leader! Selling sons of breed leaders H5 9027 Advance 161, H5 Solution 064, HH Advance 0011X, CL1 Domino 994W, HH Advance 9075W.

Sons of this power sire sell along with sons of A A R Ten X 7008 S A, Connealy Consensus 7229, EXAR Upshot 0562B, S Chisum 6175, and S A V Final Answer 0035.

The performance brand of quality Angus Rob Thomas (541) 403-0562

Lori Thomas (541) 403-0561

Rob & Lori Thomas • (541) 523-7958 • 42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Office: (541) 524-9322 • Fax: (541) 523-4271 Email: thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com • www.thomasangusranch.com

MORE BULLS, GENETIC POWER & HETEROSIS...MORE MARKET VALUE!

Become a Northwest Premium Genetic Partner – Invest in Harrell Hereford and Thomas Angus bulls!

TY YORK RANCHES

Sat., march 15, 1 p.m. Bulls

20 open yearling registered heifers

Sons and Grandsons of These Breed Leaders Sell ...

S a V FiNaL aNSwer 0035

we will again be offering special discounts california cattlemen’s association members.

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

-1.0

+61

+103

+25

+1.37

+.52

RE

CoNNeaLy right aNSwer 746

SAV Final Answer 0035 x Hyline Right Time 338

Sitz Traveler 8180 x Bon View Bando 598

$B

BW

+.47 +49.88

-.3

WW

YW

+67

+121

MILK +38

SC

MARB

+1.11

+.47

RE +.03

$B $64.06

can’t make it to this year’s sale? watch and bid live

LCC New StaNDarD

BV New Design 1407 x War Venture 8030 6008 BW -.5

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

+56

+108

+38

+.41

+.61

RE +.63

KeSSLerS FroNtMaN r001 Connealy Front Page 0228 x TC Rancher 056

$B

BW

WW

YW

MILK

SC

MARB

$73.19

+0

+50

+86

+40

+.62

+.04

York ranches

$B $48.26

Matt Macfarlane Marketing

P.O. Box 18, Alturas California 96101

Terry & TOdd yOrk, OwnerS • ruSS dAviS, MAnAger THD ©

RE +.88

(530) 633-4184 • (916) 803-3113

(530) 233-4538 office • (530) 708-0487 cell download a Sale Book at www.yorkranch.com

mmacfarlane@wildblue.net • www.m3cattlemarketing.com

.

BUNKHOUSE NEW YEAR BRINGS RENEWED ENTHUSIASM by CCA Executive Vice President Billy Gatlin With the holidays behind us, many of us are anxious to close the book on 2013 and begin preparing and planning for 2014. That’s one of my favorite things about January: the new year always brings with it an extra sense of optimism. We are all eager to reflect on the year that has passed and excited for the fresh start the new year brings. It’s the time of year we all re-commit ourselves to making the year ahead of us better (and hopefully wetter) than the year behind us. I can tell you that no one is more excited for the new year than your CCA staff. We are dreaming big and have high expectations for 2014. Although 2013 was a great year for CCA, we believe 2014 is going to be even better and that CCA will continue to grow and become a stronger organization better positioned to serve and represent our members. One of the biggest changes that you may have already noticed is that our magazine has been redesigned to better serve our members and advertisers. Beginning with this January 2014 edition, the CCA magazine will be designed and edited in-house by CCA Communications Director Stevie Ipsen. While the California Cattleman magazine has always been a leader amongst industry publications, we believe this change provides an excellent opportunity to add a fresh new look to the magazine and add new columns and features that will enhance your experience with our magazine. In addition to the improved content of the magazine, members and advertisers will have a team of full-time staff behind the magazine who will be working to meet your needs and ensure that content is engaging, timely and useful. With Stevie taking on a larger role in the magazine, it has opened up an opportunity for CCA to add an excellent beef advocate to our communications team. Malorie Bankhead is a young and ambitious agriculture communications graduate from California Polytechnic State University with whom many of CCA’s members are already familiar. With Malorie on board, you are going to notice an increased presence in social media and a more proactive role in traditional media outlets to get information about our industry out to the general public. This will include working with media outlets to get increased coverage of the work we are doing in the State Legislature and in the U.S. Congress. The 2014 legislative and congressional sessions promise to be exciting with several critical issues being decided both statewide and nationally. With Congress’

9 California Cattleman January 2014

inaction on a Farm Bill in 2013, passing a Farm Bill early in 2014 is a top priority. We must also work with Congress to find a solution to mandatory Country of Origin Labeling regulations that threaten our trade status with the two largest importers of U.S. beef: Canada and Mexico. The Grey Wolf and its impact on the cattle industry will also be a major priority for CCA in 2014. Nationally, we will also be working to support the delisting of the wolf from the federal endangered species list. In California, we will be working to ensure that the California Department of Fish and Wildlife does not list the Grey Wolf on the California endangered species list. CCA will also be working on legislation to further deter cattle theft and reforming transportation regulations that restrict our ability to freely move cattle both in state and interstate. We will also be weeding through the over 2,000 pieces of legislation that will be introduced this year to identify bills that will have a negative impact on ranching in California and will work to defeat them. 2014 promises to be a very exciting and important year for California’s ranchers. I am proud and honored to be able to work for you and on your behalf. I speak for all of us in the CCA office when I say we have the greatest membership of any organization in California and we are all very grateful for the opportunity to serve you. If you ever need anything do not hesitate to contact any of us. If you call and I am not here, I am outside doing a rain dance, so leave a message and I’ll call you back when it starts to rain! I wish you a happy and prosperous 2014!

WHAT HAVE WE DONE FOR YOU LATELY? CCA Continues To Work For You In Regulatory Arena Most CCA members are now aware that most heavy duty diesel trucks that haul freight, goods and even cattle will have to be retrofitted with a Particulate Matter (PM) filter or be replaced with a 2007 or newer truck by Jan. 1, 2014. What has become an imminent economic crisis for some actually began in 2008 when the rule was first passed by the California Air Resources Board (ARB). Your CCA officers and staff worked diligently in 2007 and 2008 to reduce the harmful impacts this rule would have on California’s livestock industry. Unfortunately, regulators tend to dismiss the problems that will come with compliance given the long time between when the rule was passed and when it fully incorporates small fleets and owner-operators with one or two trucks. This reflects the situation today and is consistent with the heightened public awareness of this rule that remains highly controversial. ARB held a recent hearing to discuss what efforts might be taken to reduce what is expected to be the severe economic consequences on small fleets and owner-operators. While these helpful “provisions” will not be officially debated and voted on until April, they will become operational on Jan. 1. These provisions include: · Reopening the agricultural provisions by allowing eligible trucks purchased after Jan. 1, 2009 to be added as low mileage (10,000 miles/year or below) truck to delay all retrofit and replacement requirements until Jan. 1, 2023. · Those still needing to comply with the PM retrofit requirement Jan. 1, 2017 will be deemed compliant if documentation can be provided that the truck is awaiting the installation of a previously purchased filter by the manufacturer or installer, the delivery of a 2007 or newer compliant truck, loans or grants to help pay for the cost of the filter or a financial institution has denied a loan or credit to purchase a filter. · All trucks operating less than 5,000 miles/ year (an increase from 1,000 miles/year) will be exempt from all retrofit or replacement requirements until Jan. 1, 2023. In addition, CCA is also working proactively to explore new provisions that would delay compliance costs for livestock trucks driving higher annual mileage for the board’s consideration in April. These provisions would be in addition to the low and limited mileage agricultural provisions that CCA worked diligently to see adopted in 2008 when the rule was passed to provide the most comprehensive relief for any industry under the rule. In order to provide a defensible compliance alternative for livestock trucks, detailed fleet information will be necessary. If you have a livestock truck that will be affected on Jan. 1, 2014, please call Justin Oldfield in the CCA office to determine what alternatives may be helpful to ensure your truck keeps running in the New Year. CCA will remain on the front lines for you regarding all transportation issues impacting the livestock industry and your bottom line.

10 California Cattleman January 2014

A Tip of the Hat CCA wishes to recognize and congratulate Steve Lambert, of Lambert Ranch, Oroville, who was elected to serve as the 2014 president of the American Hereford Association (AHA), based in Kansas City, Mo. Lambert is a second-generation Hereford breeder, who was active showing cattle as a youth on the state and national levels. “It is an exciting time to serve as AHA president,” Lambert said in an AHA press release. “We have a great board of directors that represents a solid cross section of the industry and the country. The breed is heading back toward larger market share and desirability. Having grown up STEVE LAMBERT in a Hereford family, it is important to me to see the Hereford breed return to and maintain its rightful place in the beef industry.” Lambert’s family owned and operated Creekside Ranch, which was once one of the largest Hereford cattle operations in California. Today, Lambert Ranch is a diversified enterprise, growing highquality grain, hay and Hereford and Angus cattle. A Gold TPR (Total Performance Records) breeder, Lambert Ranch has bred several Dams of Distinction. “This coming year I will strive to make Hereford a brand that is synonymous for high quality and the rancher’s choice for added profit,” Lambert adds. “This will be achieved by a strong marketing campaign, dedicated staff and product placement. The breed continues to improve through genomic research and our members’ will to drive the demand for Hereford seedstock. I truly believe we are poised to be the great genetic resource we once were. We need to keep our eye on the prize so our future will be golden.” Lambert has served as a director of the California/Nevada Polled Hereford Association since 2002. In addition, he has been very active in local government and other community organizations, including serving as mayor of Paradise and as a Butte County Supervisor. He has three children: Nathan, Clayton and Meghan.

12 California Cattleman January 2014

VET VIEWS LOW-STRESS LIVESTOCK HANDLING: WHAT, WHY & HOW by Whit Hibbard, Ph.D., Stockmanship Journal, Adel, Mont.; Lynn Locatelli, DVM, CattleExpressions, Watrous, N.M.; and Anita Varga, DVM, MS, DACVIM, University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine Interest in low-stress livestock handling (LSLH) has increased over the past several years. There are many advantages of using LSLH in your herd. If you have not applied the principles of LSLH on your ranch, we hope to motivate you to do so. Our goal is to leave you with an accurate idea of what LSLH is, why you should utlize it and how you can go about implementing it. The term “low-stress livestock handling” was coined circa 1990 by Allan Nation, publisher and editor of The Stockman Grass Farmer to describe the unique livestock handling methods developed by legendary animal handling expert Bud Williams. Other people have adopted similar terms, but handling techniques vary between individuals. LSLH is a livestock-centered, behaviorally-correct, psychologicallyoriented, ethical and humane method of working livestock, which is based on mutual communication and understanding. LSLH is distinguished from “conventional livestock handling” (CLH), which refers to human-centered, behaviorallyincorrect, physically-oriented methods of handling livestock that are based on coercion, and consequently, high stress. See Table 1. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF USING LSLH ON YOUR CATTLE OPERATION? Scientific research and practical experience of the authors have demonstrated that TABLE 1

LSLH accrues benefits over CLH in several categories, including grass production and rangeland health, animal performance (as measured by weight gain, conception rates, milk yield, immune function and carcass quality), efficiency, safety, animal welfare and quality of life (i.e., enjoyment of the agricultural lifestyle and crew and family relations). A very important point is that all these benefits require no additional inputs and are not associated with any additional expense. Using LSLH appropriately on your ranch will actually decrease labor and, therefore, decreases direct and indirect costs. All it requires is a change in thinking and behavior of the stockman. HOW DO YOU APPLY THE PRINCIPLES OF LSLH ON YOUR RANCH? The practice of LSLH, as formulated by Williams, is based on five operating principles: 1. Cattle want to move in the direction they are headed. 2. They want to follow other animals. 3. They want to see what’s pressuring them. 4. They want to see where you want them to go. 5. They want to go around you. These principles are the basis for several specific techniques that clearly communicate what we want to our animals in such a way that they want to

CONVENTIONAL LIVESTOCK HANDLING

LOW-STRESS LIVESTOCK HANDLING

Human-centered

Livestock-centered

Behaviorally-incorrect

Behaviorally-correct

Physically-oriented

Psychologically-oriented

Can be unethical and inhumane

Ethical and humane

Often involves coersion

Involves communication and understanding

14 California Cattleman January 2014

do what we want. First, it is essential to understand, as Williams used to say, “The way we move, how we move, and where we move to are important to communicate with animals. If you move properly the animal will respond properly. Your position is everything.” So, the purpose of the techniques of LSLH is to put us in the proper position. As Williams insisted, “Proper position on your part is all the pressure you ever need to move animals, and if you’re in the proper position, animals will want to move in the direction you want.” SOME OF THE BASIC TECHNIQUES OF LSLH INCLUDE: 1. Zigzagging. To drive animals ahead, move in straight lines back and forth behind them–just as a Border Collie–moving closer with each pass. 2. The “T”. To get animals to go in a particular direction, zigzag behind them at a 90-degree angle to the direction you want to go. In other words, a “T” to your target. 3. Reverse-parallel. To speed animals up, go against their direction of travel (front to rear or head to tail) within their pressure zone. 4. Forward-parallel. To slow animals down, go with their direction of travel (rear to front or tail to head) within their pressure zone. 5. Backing up. Backing up a step or two is a great way to relieve pressure and to slow or stop an animal (e.g., when one tries to turn back in an alley or for sorting). 6. Rocking. To turn animals that are looking at you, to stop animals that are coming at you or to move animals ahead (especially in a confined area, not a pasture) rock back and forth.

Cattle are extremely cooperative until they are made otherwise by methods of improper cattle handling. Without proper cattle handling techniques, cattle become quite resistant and difficult to work. Many of the principles of proper livestock handling are counter-intuitive and require discipline to execute properly and consistently. Many livestock handlers fail to be successful because they default to their traditional way of

Temple Grandin to Speak at Producer Seminar Jan. 11 Well-known advocate of low stress livestock handling, Temple Grandin, Ph.D., will be the keynote speaker at the 3rd Annual Beef Improvement and Low-Stress Cattle Handling Seminar at the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine on Jan. 11. Grandin will speak about cattle behavior and how to improve facilities for stress-reduced processing of cattle, as well as how she sets up and implements auditing programs for beef cattle. Low-stress livestock handling techniques have been the basis for Grandin’s career in the agriculture industry over the past few decades. Grandin is world-renowned for her expertise in cattle handling and for her work designing facilities for cattle and the development of auditing programs. The seminar is hosted by the UC Davis Livestock Medicine and Surgery Service in conjunction with the UC Davis veterinary studentbased Food Animal Reproduction and Medicine (FARM) Club. Attendees of the seminar may receive Beef Quality Assurance Certification through the CCA office at no additional charge. For program information and registration, please visit www. vetmed.ucdavis.edu/CE/livestock/ beef_cattle_handling.cfm or contact Anita Varga by e-mail at avarga@ ucdavis.edu or call Roxy Rose in the cooperative extension office at (530) 754-9223. Registration after December 30, or at the door, is $40. 15 California Cattleman January 2014

working. Defaulting to tradition or “gut instinct” will often result in confusion and resistance from the cattle. When production events don’t go smoothly, often times the handlers experience frustration, get mad and create stress in the herd. When there are basic handling principles and techniques to follow, it is much easier to stay focused on handling cattle instead of being frustrated. When handlers have technique to follow, they

can redirect their focus from frustration to refining technique or applying different techniques, which facilitates “thinking your way to success,” instead of becoming aggravated and forceful. Understanding proper cattle handling techniques and possessing the discipline to implement them will create a working environment pleasant for the cattle, enjoyable for the handlers and an economic benefit.

Performance Camas Prairie

+

Plus

Crouthamel

Thursday, February 13, 2014 • 12:00 NooN (PsT) Lewiston Livestock Market • Lewiston, Id

Camas Prairie Hoover Dam 2114 9/3/12

Hoover Dam x Basin Expedition 768J

Camas Prairie Hoover Dam 2122 9/15/12

Hoover Dam x Basin Expedition 768J

Camas Prairie Hoover Dam 2131 9/3/12

Hoover Dam x Basin Expedition 768J

CED BW WW CED BW WW CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B YW MK MA RE $W $B YW MK MA RE $W $B 7 0.5 50 91 28 .68 .80 34.67 88.35 7 1.0 51 96 28 .64 .90 33.16 92.14 7 1.3 47 89 28 .75 .83 33.75 88.12

Camas Prairie BrillianCe 2148

Camas Prairie Hoover Dam 2126 9/7/12

9/20/12

SAV Brilliance 8077 x BR Midland

Hoover Dam x Basin Expedition 768J

Camas Prairie Final value 2050 5/24/12

Sitz Final Vaue 660X x S A F Focus of E R

CED BW WW CED BW WW CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B YW MK MA RE $W $B YW MK MA RE $W $B 0 -0.2 48 90 25 .32 .29 32.27 71.33 7 1.6 48 89 28 .71 .70 31.82 80.43 6 1.7 47 84 24 .44 .10 30.81 63.62

CroutHamel merritt 3022

CCC Merritt 030 x BT Crossover 758N

Connealy Final Product x Sitz Traveler 423M

CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B 4 3.2 63 112 34 .66 .60 35.97 91.10 4 1.5 55 99 36 .37 .50 39.56 .78

Also Selling: 16 California Cattleman January 2014

CroutHamel merritt 3047

CroutHamel Final ProDuCt 3516 1/27/13

1/10/13

CCC Merritt 030 x Sitz Traveler 6802

1/13/13

CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B -2 4.9 58 102 27 .47 .07 28.98 66.71

85 Open Angus Heifers from John Dixon, Pomeroy, WA

Sired by SAV Brilliance 8077, Hoover Dam, and PERFORMANCE PLUS BULLS

Performance Plus

+ Bull sale

Thursday, February 13, 2014 12:00 NooN (PsT) Lewiston Livestock Market Lewiston, Id CroutHamel BrillianCe 3030

1/10/13

SAV Brilliance 8077 x Sitz Tradition RLS 8702

CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B 12 -0.5 46 84 25 .28 .53 33.09 67.37

selling 225 angus Bulls 110 Fall Born Yearlings 115 Powerful Spring Yearlings

CroutHamel WarDen 3041

CCC Warden 036 x Mytty Alliance S247

1/13/13

CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B -2 4.9 52 92 30 .46 .18 25.59 79.57

call for a sale book today! Camas Prairie angus ranCh Bob & Ruby Rylaarsdam 647 Fairview Road • Grangeville, ID 83530 Home 208-983-2644 • Cell 208-983-6552 E-mail: cpar@mtida.net

CroutHamel WarDen 3054

Crouthamel Cattle Co. Cory & Shannon Crouthamel P.O. Box 255 • Touchet, WA 99360 509-948-6304 E-mail: cory.crouthamel@genusplc.com

1/16/13

CCC Warden 036 x Leachman Right Time

CED BW WW YW MK MA RE $W $B 0 4.1 57 98 29 .46 .21 30.17 77.53

Watch and Bid online at:

Marketing:

John dickinson (916) 806-1919 Jake Parnell (916) 662-1298

PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER Genomics test strategies explored:

GeneMax™ Demonstrates Benefits from Producer to Packer From Certified Angus Beef, Wooster, Ohio Every day, bulls and breeding stock are selected with the help of genomic tools. Whether producers know it or not, DNA testing affects most cowherds by way of their seedstock suppliers. But those who are more intentional about it are reaping the benefits. “I am still a big believer in making visual appraisal on phenotype, but the main thing that you’re doing there is for soundness,” says Sam Hands of Triangle H, near Garden City, Kan. His family operates a cowherd and feedlot where they have retained ownership of calves for 40 years. They use all the data for culling the herd, so when Hands got DNA results back on some of his mature females he says he was shocked. They used GeneMax™ (GMX) to evaluate their potential for gain and grade, which is ranked on a scale from 1 to 99. “As we went through this herd, I was happy we had 60 percent to 70 percent of them, but it was a good 10 percent that I’m embarrassed to say, snuck by me,” Hands says, noting their scores ran the whole gamut from 1 to 99. “The younger ones in the herd were mostly at the upper end, so at least that told me that my genetic source was doing a good job,” he says, yet it still bothered him to see those low scores. “They were counterfeits.” Hands says this could help producers sort cattle from home first, generating a pool that they can select from. In his case, Hands is looking for the ones that will make the most money in the feedlot.

18 California Cattleman January 2014

“Pounds pay the bills, but if we want to get more for those pounds they need to be high quality,” he says. Joe Mayer, of Guymon, Okla., follows that reasoning as he rebuilds his herd after a forced sale of mature cows a multi-year drought. He bought 500 heifers from different ranches after trying to research their backgrounds. Still, Mayer admits, “We were kind of like a guy in a cave because all we really knew about the cattle was the write up in the catalog and a vague idea of the genetics behind them. “We were looking for anything that would help us decide which of those cattle we wanted to keep in our herd and multiply and which ones we wanted to feed or do something else with,” he says. That’s when Mayer, too, found GMX and tested 10 percent of each group of females. He set the threshold high—a score of 80 or higher—for those heifers he’d retain after checking the rest of those in the top two groups. “We don’t know how this is going to work, but we had that flashlight in that dark cave,” Mayer says. “GeneMax gave us a little bit to see where we might be headed.” When it comes to replacement heifers, Ashland, Kan., veterinarian Randall Spare is on the other end of the equation. “Several years ago there was an opportunity to buy some heifers, breed them and resell them,” he says. “Our goal was to add value and then sell the known quality of genetics.” That worked, so his “Profit

Proven” group kept buying from the same ranchers for the past seven to eight years, DNA testing them for the first time this year. “Now there are cattle that are better, but at least we can tell people, ‘This is what they are,’ with an average GMX score of 75,” Spare says. They’ve always given buyers information like sires and health programs, but Spare says, “Today, I don’t think that is good enough. We want to give the people who buy from us a known quality, not just from a health standpoint, but also from a genetics standpoint.” To show how much difference that can make, he cited one client who earned a $181-per-head premium for fed cull heifers. They were 100 percent Choice, including 40 percent Prime. Profit provides obvious incentives. Mayer plans to use the GMX Sire Match feature on calves to help evaluate bulls used in multiple-sire pastures. “We are always trying to prove up our bulls and decide if this bull is siring some great calves or not,” he says. As a feeder, Hands knows most customer cattle so well that he has no plans to test calves coming into the yard, but he says many feedlots could benefit from such data. And a few customers can help themselves with the technology. One who has never had an identification program and thus no way to correlate carcass data to the herd recently started DNA testing. “He realizes what he’s been missing, but at the same time he can quickly catch up by using the GeneMax program,” Hands says.

A Little Angus • Bar R Angus • Dal Porto Livestock • Colburn Cattle Co. • Coy Angus • Emily Piland GMA Angus/Shane Avila • HAVE Angus • LAX Cattle Co. • Pheasant Trek • Schmidt Cattle Co. Silveira Bros. • Westwind Ranch Angus • Wisecarver Family Rockin S Ranch (3 Lots) • 7451 Cattle Company • Julia Dayton • Bishop Ranches • Andrew Nunez TLC Angus • Thomas Kinder • Emma Garcia • Katlyn Boyd • Macy Perry • Abigail Colburn Robert Kimura • Silveira Bros. • Cori Fagundes (2 Lots) • Scott Avila • Landon Viani Megan Silveira • Mary Tomera • Noelle Fagundes • Tule Vista Farms Cole Huie • Megan Rafferty • Egret Hill Land • HAVE Angus

THD ©

Longtime Angus breeder Mel Hansen (second from right) was inducted in the California Angus Association Hall of Fame during the California Angus Association (CAA) Annual Meeting held during California Angus Days in Turlock. Hansen’s son, CAA President Darrell Hansen (far right), made the presentation. Also pictured is CAA Immediate Past President John Dickinson (far left) and California Angus Hall of Famer and HAVE Partner Jim Vietheer. 19 California Cattleman January 2014

RED BLUFF

The Best in the West for 73 Years Jan. 28-Feb. 1, 2014

Tehama District FairGrounds, Red Bluff, CA TUESDAY, JANUARY 28

7:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m.

Kick-Off Breakfast & Beef Forum, Merck Animal Health, Don Smith Pavilion. Sifting & Grading of all RANGE READY CALVING EASE AND RANGE READY BULLS, Don Smith Pavilion.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29

8 a.m. Sifting & Grading of all HALTER CALVING EASE AND HALTER BULLS, Don Smith Pavilion. 12 p.m. Trade Show and Art Show open. Close at 7:00PM. 1 p.m. Working Stock Dogs - All dogs work OUTSIDE. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Cow Horse Clinic: Pauline Davis Pavilion 6 p.m. Buyer & Consignor Dinner - $15/person. Fairgrounds Cafeteria. Cocktails 6:00PM. Dinner at 7:00PM Youth Activity Fund Raffle at 7:30 p.m. followed by auction of Red Bluff’s Buckin’ Best Bull Riders.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30

7 a.m. GELDINGS & MULES - Shown at halter, in age order, youngest to oldest. Pauline Davis Pavilion. 9 a.m. Trade Show and Art Show Open. Closes at 7 p.m. 11 a.m. Novartis Animal Health Seminar, Don Smith Pavilion. 12:30 p.m. WVM INTERNET FEEDER/REPLACEMENT FEMALE S ALE, Presented by Novartis, Don Smith Pavilion. 1 p.m. GELDING & MULES - Dry, Trail and Cattle Works, Pauline Davis Pavilion. 5-8 p.m. Art Show Wine & Cheese Tasting, Hosted by Raley’s, Gem Building. 6:00-7:15 p.m. Cow Horse Clinic: Pauline Davis Pavilion. 7:30 p.m. GELDING Conformation Horse Selection followed by inside work of STOCK DOGS, Pauline Davis Pavilion.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 2014

8 a.m. GELDINGS & MULES shown in Roping, Cutting, Snaffle Bit/Hackamore & Stock Horse Contests. Plus the selection of the Craig Owens Ideal Ranch Horse, Pauline Davis Pavilion. 9 a.m. Trade Show and Art Show Open. Art Show closes at 7 p.m., Trade Show closes at 9 p.m. 11 a.m. Zoetis Seminar. Don Smith Pavilion. 12 p.m. WORKING OF STOCK DOGS - Final Round Outside. 2:30 p.m. SALE OF STOCK DOGS, Don Smith Pavilion. 3:30 p.m. DOORS OPEN FOR GELDING & MULE SALE, Pauline Davis Pavilion. 3-7 p.m. Ag Social Sponsored by Chico State College of Agriculture, Fairgrounds Cafeteria. Information: Sarah DeForest (530) 898-3737 / Shelley Macdonald (530) 527-1941. 4 p.m. Vic Woolery’s Famous Tri-Tip BBQ before & during the Gelding Sale. $10.00/person. Pauline Davis Pavilion. 5:30 p.m. SALE OF QUARTER HORSE, PAINT GELDINGS & SADDLE MULES, Presented by Rolling Hills Casino. Pauline Davis Pavilion. Animals sold in computer drawn order. Admission is $10.00/person. Tickets available at door, or call office.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2014

9 a.m. Trade Show and Art Show open. Art can be removed at 2 p.m., Trade Show closes at 7 p.m.. 9:30 a.m. SALE OF ALL BULLS, Presented by Zoetis, Don Smith Pavilion. 7 p.m. RED BLUFF’S BUCKIN’ BEST BULL RIDING Party & Dance immediately following. Pre-Sale General admission: $20/person, $25 at door, Arena Floor Seating Pre-Sale $30/person, $35 at door: V.I.P. Premier Seating, Parking, Reception, Appetizers: Pre-Sale $75, $80 at door.

For the most up-to-date Show and Sale Information, visit us online at www.redbluffbullsale.com 20 California Cattleman January 2014

2014 Gelding, Mule & Stock Dog Consignors Geldings

CONSIGNOR(S), CITY, STATE................... LOT NO(S)

ALLAN, RANDY & CHEYENNE. MABTON, WA................. 37 ALVES, MAYNARD & JACOLYN, REDMOND, OR............. 63 AUMAN, JEREMY, ONALASKA, WA................................... 62 AUMAN, JOSH, ONALASKA, WA....................................... 36 AURORA PACIFIC CATTLE CO, HERMISTON, OR........... 38 BAR 4 RANCH, SAN MATEO, CA ...................................... 77 BAR X RANCH, ASOTIN, WA........................................ 51-54 BARTON, JIM, CAREY, ID.................................................. 23 BATCHELDER, VAN, VINTON, CA..................................... 35 BRIDGES, CATHY, OAKLEY, CA........................................ 75 BROOKS, RANDY, REDDING, CA ..................................... 76 BUCKINGHAM, TOM & CARMEN, BRUNEAU, ID. 41, 42, 43 BUSHEY, LINDA, NAPA, CA.............................................. 28 CHATHAM, TALON, ANDERSON, CA................................ 34 CHILD, RUSTY, REDMOND, OR ....................................... 47 COBIAN QUARTER HORSES, LAKEVIEW, OR ............... 13 CRAZY LADY RANCH, ANDERSON, CA.......................... 33 DAVIS, PEGGY, KLAMATH FALLS, OR ....................... 69, 70 DITMARS, NICOLE, VALLEY SPRINGS, CA ..................... 27 EDSALL, CLAYTON, OAKDALE, CA ................................. 79 FAULKNER, ROBERT & GAIL, FERNDALE, CA ............... 12 FLEISSNER, ROBIN, WHITE CITY, OR ............................ 21 GREEN, JAY, TERREBONNE, OR........................................ 3 GRIDER, MIKE & LEIGH, ORLAND, CA ...................... 49, 50 GRIMES, KARLA, KLAMATH FALLS, OR .................... 25, 26 GRIMSMAN, KATE, ORLAND, CA..................................... 67 HANSEN, ROSS, TENINO, WA.......................................... 68 HEWARD, HARLEY, BURLEY, ID....................................... 39 HICKEN, ROGER & DORRIS, MALTA, ID.......................... 40 HICKS, ALLYSON, PENN VALLEY, CA................................. 7 JACOBS, BRIAN, RANCHO MURIETA......................... 19, 20 JOHNSON, BONNIE, TENINO, WA................................... 32 KOONTZ, DOUG OR KERRY, BUHL, ID.............................. 2 KOONTZ, SAVANNA, BUHL, ID............................................ 1 MARTINEZ, TYLER, RED BLUFF, CA............................... 44 MASON, DEBBIE, LEBANON, OR..................................... 48 MASTAGNI, MICHAEL & KATHARINE, BEATTY, OR... 29, 30 MONTICELLI, LISA, REDDING, CA ................................... 64 MORRIS, GENE & MICHELLE, FLORENCE, MT .............. 31 NEILSON, BOBBIE, MOSSYROCK, WA ........................... 57 NISSEN, DENNIS, ACAMPO, CA ........................................ 4 OSBORN, AUDREY ANN, RICHLAND, WA ....................... 56 PIRAS COW & HORSES USA, GRASS VALLEY, CA .......... 8 PIVETTA, MIKE, HOLLISTER, CA ..................................... 24 PRITCHETT, SMOKY, RED BLUFF, CA ............................. 78 RICHESON, IVAN, MILBURN, OK ....................................... 6 ROARING SPRINGS RANCH, FRENCH GLEN, OR ......... 82 ROBINSON, RAEDAWN, ASOTIN, WA ............................. 81 ROWSE, SARA, PRINEVILLE, OR .............................. 15, 16 SELVEY, DEAN, OAKDALE, CA......................................... 65 SELZLER, DAVID, EUGENE, OR........................................11 SLEEMAN, JAELYNN, ROY, WA............................. 60, 61, 66

21 California Cattleman January 2014

SLEEMAN, JEFF & BECKY, ROY, WA .......................................58, 59 SMITH, PARD, PRINEVILLE, OR...............................................17, 18 SNOW, GARY, FALLON, NV.............................................................14 STUREMAN, LOUANN, SAN MARTIN, CA......................................45 SWENSON, CLINT, PALO CEDRO, CA........................................9, 10 TINGEY, NANCY, FRESNO, CA........................................................80 TORRES, KATHY, SAN JOSE, CA....................................................55 UMSTED, JERRY, MILLVILLE, CA......................................................5 WARD, B & THORNBURGH, T, CHILOQUIN, OR............................46 WESTBROOK, DANA, OAKLAND, OR.............................................22 WRIGHT, RICHARD, COTTONWOOD, CA................................ 71-74

Mules

CONSIGNOR(S), CITY, STATE............................... LOT NO(S)

3M LIVESTOCK, BEATTY, OR........................................................502 CLARK, TJ & LANDRUSS, AMY, RALSTON, WY...........................504 POULSEN, LELA, MALTA, ID.........................................................501 RALPH, MIKE & PAM, GRANTS PASS, OR...................................505 ROWSE, SARA, PRINEVILLE, OR.................................................503

Stock Dogs

CONSIGNOR(S), CITY, STATE........................ .......LOT NO(S)

BRIAN JACOBS, HERALD, CA...........................................................1 SARA ROWSE, PRINEVILLE, OR......................................................2 DUSTIN WOOD, SANTA MARGARITA, CA........................................3 PAM SCHWENKFELDER, CAMBRIDGE, ID......................................4 DEAN THOMPSON, HARTLINE, WA..................................................5 MASON WINEBARGER, PRINEVILLE, OR........................................6 JEREMY SUTTON, MIDVALE, ID.......................................................7 MERLE NEWTON, RED BLUFF, CA...................................................8 TROY SPOON, MILPITAS, CA............................................................9 ROCKY BROWN, MESA, ID.............................................................10 MARTIN SANCHEZ, FORT KLAMATH, OR......................................11 JAIME GONZALEZ, FORT KLAMATH, OR.......................................12 ERIC WANMAN, BUHL, ID...............................................................13 DANNY OILAR, MILLVILLE, CA........................................................14 CHAD KALMA, LAMAR, CO.............................................................15 CRAIG EDDINS, MENAN, ID............................................................16 MIKE RALPH, GRANTS PASS, OR..................................................17 CARLOS SILVA, STEVINSON, CA...................................................18 ROBIN (NUFFER) BROWN, MESA, ID.............................................19 JOHN ROSE, MENAN, ID................................................................ 20

Geldings and Mules and Stock Dog Sale Books:

www.redbluffbullsale.com

RED BLUFF

The Best in the West for 73 Years 2014 All-Breed Bull Sale Consignors Angus CONSIGNOR, CITY, STATE 3M Livestock, Beatty, OR A Little Angus, Wilton, CA Avila Cattle Company, Cottonwood, CA Bar KD Ranch, Culver, OR Black Bear Ranch, Montague, CA Cardey Ranches, Turlock, CA CB Ranch, Gerber, CA CB Westside Cattle Co., Gustine, CA Charron Ranch, Paicines, CA Cooper Cattle, Oakdale, CA CUHSD Rodgers Ranch, Corning, CA D Bar D Ranch, Mariposa, CA England Ranch , Powell Butte, OR Flint Hill Angus, Copperolis, CA HAVE Angus, Wilton, CA Hogan Ranch, Gerber, CA Honey Run Ranch, Tehama. CA K Bar D, Redmond, OR Lax Cattle Company, Arbuckle, CA Levin Ranch, Farmington, CA Little Shasta Ranch, Montagu, CA Medeiros Angus Farm, Paso Robles, CA Newton & Black Bear Angus, Montague, CA Oak Ridge Angus, Calistoga, CA Owings Cattle, Powell Butte, OR P&M Waltz Ranches, Wheatland, CA Red River Farms, Blythe, CA Rocking PH Ranch, American Canyon, CA Sammis Ranch, Dorris, CA Silviera, Denair, CA Spencer Cattle Co., Rancho Murieta, CA StarDust Farms, Oak Run, CA Sunbright Angus Ranch, Red Bluff, CA Tara Farms, Orland, CA Teixeira Cattle Co., Pismo Beach, CA The Bull Mart, Burns, OR Whitcomb Cattle Co., Marysville, CA Wild West Angus, Dairy, OR Winter Creek Ranch, Arbuckle, CA Wulff Bros. Livestock, Woodland, CA

BAlancer

3M Livestock, Beatty, OR Cardey Ranches, Turlock, CA The Bull Mart/LCS, Burns, OR

BRANGUS

Brocco Show Cattle, Sonoma, CA Macfarlane Cattle Co, McArthur, CA

PoLLED HEREFORD

Macfarlane Cattle Co., McArthur, CA

Alto Herefords, Arcata, CA Barry Ranch, Gresham, OR Bianchi Ranches, Gilroy, CA Dewar Farms, Bakersfield, CA England Ranch, Prineville, OR Genoa Livestock, LLC, Minden, NV Haight Livestock, Sheridan, OR Hannan Family Farm, Molalla, OR High Desert Cattle Co., Canyon City, OR Lambert Ranch, Oroville, CA Larry Imbach & Downing Family, Burns, OR Macfarlane Livestock, Cottonwood, CA Morrell Ranches, Willows, CA Perrin Ranch, Penryn, CA Santos Hereford Ranch, Hilmar, CA Sierra Ranches, Modesto, CA Turkey Crick Ranch, Roseburg, OR Weimer Cattle Co., Susanville, CA

Gelbveigh

RED ANgus

Deer Creek Cattle Co., Los Molinos, CA StarDust Farms, Oak Run, CA Wyman Creek Cattle Co., Palermo, CA

Charolais

Amos Ranch, Castle Rock, WA Avila Cattle Company, Cottonwood, CA Bianchi Ranches, Gilroy, CA Broken Box Ranch, Williams, CA Cardey Ranches, Turlock, CA Cardey Ranches, Turlock, CA Rafter DN, Powell Butte, OR

Chiangus

Ledgerwood Gelbvieh, Clarkston, WA

Hereford

Alto Herefords, Arcata, CA Barry Ranch, Gresham, ,OR Chandler Herefords, Inc., Baker City, OR East Wind Cattle, Troutdale, OR England Ranch, Powell Butte, OR England Ranch, Prineville, OR Genoa Livestock, LLC, Minden, NV High Desert Cattle Co., Canyon City, OR Kudlac Herefords, Grants Pass, OR Larry Imbach & Downing Family, Burns, OR Macfarlane Livestock, Cottonwood, CA Madsen Herefords & Angus, Livermore, CA Morrell Ranches, Willows, CA Oak Knoll Herefords, Flournoy, CA Potter Ranch Herefords, Winton, CA Rocking Cane Farm, Alfalfa, OR Santos Hereford Ranch, Hilmar, CA Sierra Ranches, Modesto, CA Sonoma Mountain Herefords, Santa Rosa, CA Y Cross Herefords, Bonanza, OR

Limousin

Haugen Limousin, Los Molinos, CA Whitcomb Cattle Co., Marysville, CA

22 California Cattleman January 2014

MAINE-ANJOU

6R Ranch LLC, Redmond, OR Bianchi Ranches, Gilroy, CA CB Ranch, Gerber, CA England Ranch, Powell Butte, OR High Summit Cattle Co., John Day, OR JR Cattle Co., Hilmar, CA Lazy J Red Angus, Prineville, OR Oak Ridge Angus, Calistoga, CA Owings Cattle, Powell Butte, OR

ShorthorN Barry Ranch, Gresham, OR Cardey Ranches, Turlock, CA Cardey Ranches, Turlock, CA Cardey Ranches, Turlock, CA

SIMANGUS

Eberhardt Livestock, Wheatland, CA HAVE Angus - Elizabeth Vietheer, Wilton, CA Little Shasta Ranch, Montague, CA Macfarlane Livestock, Cottonwood, CA Teixeira Cattle Co., Pismo Beach, CA Rocking Cane Farm, Alfalfa, OR

SImmental

Hinton Ranch Simmentals, Montague, CA

23 California Cattleman January 2014

11 sons from these top Herdsires sell Feb.1!

Offering 16 High-Powered Herefords at the 73rd Annual Red Bluff Bull Sale, Feb. 1!

ID 323 322 317 314 312 308 311 315 309 321 318 316 313 319 320 310

SIRE Dakota 10K26 OHR Advance 612 Dunrite 8016 ET OHR Advance 612 Dunrite 8016 ET Dunrite 8016 ET Dunrite 8016 ET Dunrite 8016 ET Dunrite 8016 ET Advance 612 Dunrite 8016 ET Advance 612 Advance 612 Dunrite 8016 ET Harland 09K30 Dunrite 8016 ET

BW +1.3 +3.1 +1.9 +3.1 +.5 +2.9 +3.5 -.6 +2.8 +3.0 +1.9 +4.6 +2.3 +1.8 +2.4 +.9

WW +57 +50 +60 +67 +49 +56 +54 +45 +55 +61 +40 +56 +50 +46 +53 +42

YW +93 +85 +87 +108 +68 +82 +84 +63 +78 +101 +58 +94 +76 +62 +94 +57

MILK MARB RE +27 +.23 +.29 +26 +.10 +.25 +22 -.04 -.64 +34 +.18 +.39 +22 -.04 +.58 +22 +.00 +.60 +14 -.10 +.53 +21 +.00 +.64 +17 -.06 +.48 +30 +.12 +.38 +20 -.09 +.50 +31 +.18 +.33 +26 +.06 +.28 +16 -.05 +.49 +24 +.15 +.28 +19 +.03 +.46

Selling the same kind of high-caliber bulls Red Bluff buyers have counted on year after year!

KUDLAC Herefords Phil Kudlac

Call today for pricing on bulls in the offering!

24 California Cattleman January 2014

3290 Lower River Rd. Grants Pass, OR 97526

(541) 761-3696

Broken Box Ranch 6 sons of Winn Mans Lanza Sell in Red Bluff Saturday, Feb. 1!

Red Bluff is your chance to get a quality bull out of this yearling weight trait leader that you can also use on your 1st calf heifers! How he compares to other Charolais bulls: Top 5% for WW Top 3% for YW Top 1% for SC Top 8% for HCW Top 5% for Fat

WINN MANS LANZA CANADIAN #: MC307395 • US #: M780143 CE BW WW YW MILK MTNL CWT REA FAT MB 96 0.2 51 129 24 50 26 38 1.00 .17 9.1 -4.0 20 29 17 27 8 .01 .015 .19

FOR DETAILS ON THE COMPLETE OFFERING, VISIT WWW.BROKENBOXRANCH.COM

AND HIS EPDS IMPROVE WITH EACH CALF CROP! Jerry & Sherry Maltby Office: (530) 473-2830 Cell: (530) 681-5046 P.O. Box 760, Williams, CA 95987 E-mail: bbr@citlink.net

Selling Stout, High-Growth Bulls Our Buyers Can Trust!

ID Sire Polled Herefords

383 Bailout 14U ET

Hereford

382 341 333 337 334 332 335 339 336 338 340

Golden Oak Outcross 18U Advance 8203U ET Golden Oak Outcross 18U Advance 8203U ET Harland 408 Golden Oak Outcross 18U Bailout 144U ET Domino 552 Shock & Awe 158W ET Harland 408 Shock & Awe 158W ET

BW WW YW MILK MARB RE +4.3 +52

+84 +20

-.02

+4.9 +5.2 +5.3 +5.1 +2.2 +5.3 +3.5 +1.4 +5.3 +2.2 +5.3

+99 +74 +109 +81 +86 +109 +89 +63 +92 +86 +92

+.05 +.60 +.18 +.02 +.19 +.68 +.17 +.15 +.19 +.17 +.19 +.68 -.07 +.35 -.01 +.31 -.10 +.39 +.18 +.17 -.10 +.39

+58 +48 +63 +55 +51 +63 +54 +40 +54 +51 +54

+23 +17 +22 +23 +33 +22 +26 +22 +25 +33 +25

+.40

Barry, Carrie & Bailey Morrell • (530) 934-2047 morrellranches@aol.com • 5640 County Road 65 • Willows, California 95988 25 California Cattleman January 2014

HINTON RANCH

The Source for Outstanding Simmentals

The program that brought the champion Simmental to Red Bluff in 2013 is delivering Quality Genetics to Red Bluff again in 2014! 2014 HINTON RANCH BULLS FOR SALE IN RED BLUFF ID 445 446 447 448 449 450 451

2013 Champion Simmental Bull

SIRE BW JAC W9776 B +1.2 JAC W9776 B +2.7 Dikemans Double Down 26W +2.6 CNS Dream On L 186 +1.3 Ebonys Grandmaster +2.3 Dikeman’s Sure Bet +2.6 SVP In Dew Time +1.1

WW +55 +65 +66 +62 +60 +56 +59

YW +78 +90 +93 +86 +87 +84 +83

MILK +23 +22 +23 +20 +22 +25 +17

MARB +.05 +.09 +.43 -.18 +.23 +.17 +.31

RE +1.02 +.84 +.91 +.77 +.94 +.97 +.61

HINTON RANCH

Proven Performance Cattle

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE BULLS IN OUR 2014 RED BLUFF BULL SALE OFFERING, CONTACT: John & Shauna Hinton, Montague, CA: (530) 459-3928 or Lester & Paula Hinton, Klamath Falls, OR: (541) 882-1218

Put Profit in Your Cowherd with a Baldy! Tim Coleman & Family Owner/General Manager (209) 968-7232 tim@sierraranches.net

Kevin McKinzie

Manager/Purebred Cattle Division (209) 505-5416 kevin@sierraranches.net PO Box 577980 Modesto, CA 95357 Office: (209) 526-BEEF Fax: (209) 238-3004

www.sierraranches.net 26 California Cattleman January 2014

WYARNO 9500

BAILOUT 144U

Don’t miss the chance to bring home a bull from these outstanding sires! ID NAME Polled Hereford 388 GO H Bailout 2351 ET 390 GO H Bailout 2349 ET 389 H W4 Wyarno 2350 ET 386 H WR Advance 2366 ET 391 T WR Thor 2333 ET 387 H GO LCC Outcross 2149 ET Hereford 347 H GO LCC Outcross 2130 348 H WR Advance 2314 ET

BW WW YW MILK MARB RE +4.2 +4.2 +3.9 +4.4 +2.4 +2.9

+52 +52 +54 +50 +48 +54

+90 +90 +84 +79 +79 +85

+24 +24 +27 +30 +17 +25

-.01 -.01 +.15 +.09 +.21 +.04

+.29 +.30 +.44 +.44 +.47 +.35

+4.7 +66 +109 +26 +.12 +.75 +2.2 +56 +80 +24 -.06 +.36

27 California Cattleman January 2014

UC SEEKING COOPERATIVE EXTENSION ADVISOR FOR MODOC COUNTY Across California, the University of California’s Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) is an engine for problem solving. Serving as the network that links local issues and the power of UC research, more than 300 campus-based specialists and county-based advisors work as teams to bring practical, unbiased, science-based answers to Californians. UC is currently seeking an advisor headquartered in Modoc County who can conduct an extension, education and applied research program that will focus on livestock production including nutrition, herd health and management, forage production, invasive species and grazing management. The advisor will address water quality, soil quality, wildlife habitat and management, as well as forage production and grazing strategies that support ecosystem services through collaborations among campus based academics, Cooperative Extension advisors, specialists and community stakeholders. UC seeks an advisor who is: •

An innovative researcher, who can develop an applied research program and demonstrate projects that evaluate livestock, pasture and range management practices and strategies that maximize production efficiency while enhancing rangeland resources, wildlife habitat and water quality. An educator committed to delivering extension education programs using traditional and innovative delivery techniques to meet the needs of a diverse clientele. A collaborator, who can develop partnerships and leverage resources to deliver innovative approaches that will develop, strengthen and expand the local delivery of statewide programs; one who can collaborate with UC ANR program teams, specialists, advisors and others within the research/extension network. A visionary, who can complement UC ANR’s Strategic Vision, optimizing opportunities for conducting outstanding research and extension programs that meet the needs of Californians.

For information about UC ANR, the rich breadth of program scope and delivery, candidates are invited to visit the UC website: ucanr.edu. This position is an academic career track appointment; a minimum of a Master’s Degree is required, though advanced degrees are encouraged, in disciplines of animal science, rangeland management or other closely related fields. Ideally the applicant will demonstrate relevant course work, training and practical experience in both animal science and range management and have the minimum course work to be a Certified Rangeland Manager within five years of date of hire. For a full position vacancy announcement, application procedures and more about what makes UC ANR a great place to work, please visit http:// ucanr.edu/jobs or contact Pam Tise at pdtise@ ucanr.edu, (530) 750-1281 and refer to position listing AP#13-27. To assure full consideration, application packets should be submitted to anracademicsearch@ucop.edu by Feb. 24. 28 California Cattleman January 2014

BAR KD RANCH We’ve Got Your Cows Covered! Elite Angus Bulls Available At: Red Bluff Bull Sale ~ January 28th – February 1st, 2014 Klamath Bull Sale ~ February 6th-8th, 2014 PABCO Bull Sale ~ February 8th, 2014 Private Treaty at our Ranch Progeny of Leading AI Sires Herd Sire Prospects ~ Calving Ease ~ Growth ~ Carcass Complete Performance & Ultrasound Data Kenny & Dianne Read Nicole Jorgensen 1485 SW King Lane, Culver, OR 97734 541.546.2547 Ranch ~ 541.480.9340 Cell www.barkdranch.com

Please be with us for our

2014 Bull Sales 520 Angus Sell! 320 Bulls & 200 Registered Females

Thomas Angus Ranch at LGW Sale February 14, 2014 • Hamley’s Steakhouse, Pendleton Oregon

Selling 120 Fall long Yearling bulls sired by: Hoover Dam, Coleman Regis 904, Connealy Thunder, Summitcrest Complete 1P55, CRA Bextor 872 5205 608

Thomas Angus Ranch at the Western Genetic Event

Thomas Angus Spring Bull Sale March 4, 2014 • Baker City, Oregon

100 spring Yearling bulls sired by: AAR Ten X 7008 SA, Connealy Confidence 0100, Connealy Consensus 7229, EXAR Upshot 0562B, S Chisum 6175 and SAV Final Answer 0035

100 Fall long Yearling bulls sired by: Connealy Confidence 0100, Summitcrest Complete 1P55, Connealy Impression, Werner War Party 2417

200 bred FeMales sired by: Connealy Confidence 0100, Summitcrest Complete 1P55, Connealy Impression, Werner War Party 2417, Hoover Dam, Coleman Regis 904, Connealy Thunder and CRA Bextor 872 5205 608 and BRED to: AAR Ten X 7008 SA, Connealy Confidence 0100, GAR Prophet and EF Authentic 0829

Also Note: March 3, 2014 • Baker City, Oregon Harrell Hereford Ranch Bull Sale at the Western Genetic Event SALE MANAGED BY:

517-546-6374 www.cotton-associates.com

Thomas Angus Ranch • 42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561

www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

29 California Cattleman January 2014

A New Era

CA’s official publication continues working for you by Stevie Ipsen, CCA Director of Communications

As the official publication of the

not even recorded. Shorthorn

California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA),

cattle were still very popular, but

the California Cattleman magazine has been

Hereford was definitely king.

sent monthly to members of CCA as well

Common topics among producers

as ranchers throughout the Western U.S.

were tuberculosis testing, bangs

for nearly 80 years. Since the beginning,

vaccinations, eradicating brucellosis

this publication has served its purpose well

and alternative feedstuffs.

– educating and informing beef producers

JULY 1919

A decade later, in 1945, though

about issues impacting their way of life.

Angus cattle were making their way

Originally published in 1919, the

to the scene, Hereford was still top

magazine lasted only a couple of years

dog. Infact, the Red Bluff Bull Sale DECEMBER 1935

before ceasing operation during the majority was known in those days as the Red of the Great Depression. The publication

Bluff Hereford Sale. At that time,

gained new life in 1935, and since that time

Kern County’s LeRoy Rankin served

CCA has been fortunate to have publishers,

as CCA President.

both inside and outside of the office, who

As printing prices were growing,

were dedicated not just to a quality product,

advertisements were becoming

but also to the cause of CCA.

a bigger part of the publication

During a time which CCA producer

business, a necessity to keep the

dues were only $2.50, a one-year magazine

magazine running. Among the

subscription went for $1, or 10 cents per

topics of concern to California

issue in 1935. The magazine was printed by

ranchers at that time, highway truck

I.E. Broad out of San Francisco, where the

permits and forest grazing fees were

CCA office was also based at the time.

discussed often in the magazine.

In those days, the CCA magazine

Such facts illustrate that though

primarily featured Shorthorn cattle. It also

ranching hurdles continue to evolve,

included a fashion column entitled “Mrs.

some of the challenges ranchers face

Cattleman.”

have been present for decades.

In 1935, the magazine stated that

By 1955, CCA had over 2,500

beef was the most consumed protein in

members. The executive secretary, J.

the state, followed by pork, lamb and veal.

Edgar Dick, was also the editor of the

Interestingly, chicken consumption was

California Cattleman. In that year, CCA passed resolutions at the annual convention to: help

30 California Cattleman January 2014

JANUARY 1945

JANUARY 1955

As one of the best auctioneers of that era, Parnell’s contacts in the industry, as well as his dedication to the western way of life, made him and his team a great asset to CCA. As a marketing professional, Parnell was able to offer advertisers additional benefits like sale and ringside assistance. Today Parnell and his family play influential roles in the livestock industry. In 1973, one of Parnell’s business associates, Phil Raynard, Auburn, took over the publishing duties of the magazine. For 16 years, Raynard worked with the CCA office to communicate important issues to California beef producers. During that time, Bill Staiger, CCA’s executive secretary, served as the magazine’s editor. In that year the subscription rate for the magazine was $6/year and – to illustrate how times have changed – the beef checkoff program collected 10 cents for every head marketed in the state. In 1985, John Lacey, Paso Robles, was the president of CCA. That year, the CCA office was moved to its current location on H Street. A magazine subscription at that time was $12/year. In that same year, CCA’s top recruiter in the CCA Membership Contest was awarded a trip to Hawaii, courtesy of Andreini and Company. In 1987, the Sacramento-based firm James A. Danekas and Associates (JDA) was contracted to publish the California Cattleman. With this change, CCA was able to continue to offer ring service to magazine advertisers. JDA published the magazine for the next decade, implementing

increased ad sales as well as more color printing into the magazine. During that time, the subscription rate was raised to its current price of $20. As beef producers themselves, today the Danekas family continues to be advocates for the beef industry, not just as producers, but also as owners and publishers of both Western Cowman and the Angus Icon. In 1998, Cornerpost Publications, then operated by Kelli Toledo and Rick Cozzitorto was awarded the printing and publishing contract for the California Cattleman. Toledo and Cozzitorto, both with seedstock and commercial cattle backgrounds, were young and energetic and brought many strengths to the magazine. After Cozzitorto moved on to pursue other career goals, Matt Macfarlane partnered with Toledo to fill the need for ad sales and ring service. Over the past 16 years, Cornerpost Publications has provided outstanding service to CCA and its membership. The California Cattleman is known throughout the country as one of the best state association publications. In addition to the service to CCA members, Cornerpost Publications has been dedicated to countless causes, like the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association, California Rangeland Trust, local cattlemen’s association, junior livestock groups and has been a donor in CCA’s scholarship program for many years. In 2009, Toledo was recognized by the Beef Improvement Federation with their prestigious Ambassador Award for her dedication to promoting agriculture, especially within the beef industry.

CCA members have been fortunate to have had access to this great publication for so many years. CCA leadership and staff are grateful for the assistance they have had in providing CCA members with news and information that benefits their operation and bottom line. As you have likely noticed from this month’s edition, the CCA magazine has a new look and feel. As digital design and graphic arts have become more accessible to today’s communications world, CCA’s leadership made the decision to print and publish the magazine in-house, meaning that all editorial, advertising, layout and design will be done from the CCA office. As one of the best livestock marketers in the West, Macfarlane will continue to sell advertising and provide ring service for CCA so advertisers can expect the same quality of service they have enjoyed in the past. CCA officers and staff are excited about what the future holds as well as optimistic that members will also be pleased with the product they receive from their association each month. Should you have any requests about the publication or wish to see any particular topics, you have a full-time staff working to provide you with what you need. For questions about editorial content or advertising billing, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. To learn more about advertising or to place your ad today, contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113 or mmacfarlane@wildblue.net.

FEBRUARY 1965

MAY 1968 MARCH 2007 JULY/AUGUST 1998 JANUARY 1975

31 California Cattleman January 2014

JANUARY 1985

leaders and animal physicians, more than 1,800 designated FFA chapters received more than $1.1 million this year to support their chapter activities. Supporting agricultural leaders today helps ensure the future of the industry, said Rob Kelly, vice president, Students involved in agriculture rely on support from their teachers, U.S. Cattle and Equine Operations, mentors and the industry. For the Zoetis. fifth year, Zoetis has partnered with “Many at Zoetis, along with our veterinarians, animal health suppliers veterinarian and animal health supplier, and dealer customers to support youth dealer and distributor partners, were through its Industry Support Program. involved in these organizations, so The 2013 spring program has raised we know firsthand the importance of $1,231,243 to benefit students through support,” Kelly said. “We recognize the Future Farmers of American (FFA), this is our opportunity to give back and the American Association of Bovine directly impact these students now and Practitioners (AABP) Foundation and in the future.” the American Association of Equine Support of FFA, the AABP Practitioners (AAEP) Foundation. Foundation and the AAEP Foundation Between Jan. 1 and March 31, is a component of Commitment to 2013, a portion of funds from eligible Veterinarians™, a Zoetis initiative purchases of Zoetis cattle and equine supporting veterinarians through products was directed to local FFA training and education, research and chapters and/or veterinary student development, and investing in the scholarships through the AABP and future of the veterinary profession. AAEP foundations. Since its inception For more information on how to in 2008, the program has raised more enroll in the Industry Support Program, than $5.9 million. call (866) 611-2626, contact your local In addition to the scholarships Zoetis representative or visit zoetisUS. Zoetis has provided to future industry com/industrysupport.

Zoetis Gives to FFA, AABP, AAEP Programs

BULL SALE February 17, 2014 1:00 p.m.

ww Watch w.b ulls Bull V ofth ide ebi os a gsk t y.c om

Our sale will feature one of the largest selections of Black and Red Simmental and SimAngus bulls in the US, the largest offering of Red SimGenetics in Montana, and a special selection of Angus bulls—all from six Big Sky area breeders.

www.bullsofthebigsky.com

32 California Cattleman January 2014

Billings Livestock Commission Billings, Montana 220+ YEARLINGS & OVER 35 FALL YEARLING BULLS REQUEST A CATALOG AT: www.bullsofthebigsky.com or Contact Maureen Mai at 208-267-2668

snyder’s buLLs For The 21sT CenTury Consignors: anguS

amador angus bar Lr angus Cardey ranches Cooper Cattle diablo valley angus Fox angus adventure gomez angus ranch gudel Cattle Company hone ranch pozzi ranch roman Cattle schafer ranch smoky’s angus ranch steve smith angus and gelbvieh Westwind ranch angus Wild West angus

charolais

Jorgensen ranch

gelbvieh/balancer

Cardey ranches steve smith angus and gelbvieh

hereford

bell ranch shamrock herefords

Lim-Flex

easterly romanov ranch

red angus

mcphee red angus moore Creek red angus phillips red angus Trotter red angus

Shorthorn

Cardey ranches

you’LL Find onLy The besT

aT The ToughesT damn buLL TesT... period

Snyder

buLL teSt and SaLe Sunday, March 9

only the best of the 180 bulls from california, utah, nevada and oregon sell march 9, having completed one of the toughest bull tests in the west ... • • • • • •

Weaning perFormanCe FerTiLiTy - dam and individuaL gain on TesT ConFormaTion and musCLing Feed eFFiCienCy uLTrasound CarCass CharaCTisTiCs

Bull Buyer’s Seminar & Social sat., march 8, 4 p.m., pioneer crossing convention center, yerington, nevada FeaTuring a paneL disCussion abouT CLimaTe Change WiTh nCba’s darren WiLLiams serving as moderaTor. paneLisTs inCLude uC davis’ Frank miTLoehner, ph.d., James TayLor and oTher indusTry experTs.

Snyder LiveStock company, inc. Lucy Rechel/Eddie Snyder • Office (775) 463-2677 Lucy’s Cell: (775) 790-0801 • www.slcnv.com Funded in part by grants from the City of yerington and Lyon County Tax boards.

33 California Cattleman January 2014

THD ©

Shaw Cattle Co. Production Sale Production Sale

February 12 p.m. p.m. (MST) (MST) February 19, 19, 2014 2014 -- 12

400 Angus Bulls Bulls 400 Hereford, Hereford, Angus & Red Angus

SITZDIMENSION DIMENSION8607 8607 SITZ 52Sons SonsSell Sell 52

CONNEALY FINAL PRODUCT CONNEALY 68 Sons Sons Sell Sell 68

Other AI AI sires sires include include TEN TEN X, Other X, Rito Rito Revenue, Impression, Impression, Brilliance Brilliance & Revenue, & Right Answer. Right Answer.

FirstSeason SeasonBreeding BreedingGuarantee Guarantee • • First Allcattle cattlePIPItested testednegative negativefor forBVD BVD • • All Ultrasound and RFI/Feed Efficiency • • Ultrasound and RFI/Feed Efficiency dataavailable available data Allbulls bullsare areborn bornand andraised raisedon on our our • • All ranch. No Cooperators ranch. No Cooperators SIGHTUNSEEN UNSEENPURCHASES PURCHASESFULLY FULLY • • SIGHT GUARANTEED GUARANTEED Family Owned and Operated for • • Family Owned and Operated for over 65 years over 65 years

Shaw Cattle Cattle Co. Co. Shaw 22993 Howe Rd. Caldwell, ID 83607

SCHU-LAR SCHU-LAR RED REDBULL BULL18X 18X 16 16 Sons SonsSell Sell

Other Other Hereford HerefordAI AIsires siresinclude includeRedeem, Redeem, Peerless, Peerless, 8502, 8502,175 175&&Efficient. Efficient.

THR THR THOR THOR4029 4029 18 Sons Sell 18 Sons Sell

S

22993 Howe Rd. Caldwell, ID 83607 www.shawcattle.com www.shawcattle.com greg@shawcattle.com greg@shawcattle.com he Bull Business TThe Bull Business

Angus Angus Hereford Hereford Red RedAngus Angus

B Brand rand

Greg: (208) 459-3029 Greg: (208) 459-3029 Sam: (208) 453-9790 Sam: (208) 453-9790 Tucker: (208) 455-1678 Tucker: (208) 455-1678 Ron Shurtz: (208) 431-3311 Ron Shurtz: (208) 431-3311

Giving Rural California A Voice Representing ranching values at the state capitol by Assemblymember Frank Bigelow (R-O’Neals)

It seems like only yesterday I was sworn in as a State Assemblymember, yet it has almost been one year since I first headed to Sacramento to represent fellow ranchers and all of rural California in the State Legislature. While I was at home among friends as a local official, I stood out when I first arrived in Sacramento. It’s not every day that a cattleman is elected to our State Assembly. Though a cowboy hat and boots are nontraditional attire for the State Capitol, standing out has actually helped me reach urban lawmakers and educate them about the problems facing rural California. Even though I am serving in just my first term, I was fortunate to have been selected by my colleagues as the new chair of the Legislative Rural Caucus. The caucus is comprised of 50 bipartisan members of the State Assembly and Senate and works to ensure a strong voice for rural communities at the State Capitol. It is one of the few places where Republicans and Democrats work closely together to advance shared interests. We are united by a desire to get things done rather than partisan politics, which I find refreshing. One result of our efforts was the passage of my livestock theft legislation – Assembly Bill 924 – that has become law thanks to Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature earlier this year. Given that the legislative and executive branches are dominated by a party different from mine, enacting Assembly Bill 924 was no small feat. As you know, there has been a rise in livestock theft resulting in significant costs to California’s ranchers. My bill was intended to discourage criminals from committing these crimes. It will ensure that prosecutors have the tools they need to hold criminals accountable. The law will establish a fine of up to $5,000 for anyone convicted of livestock theft and allow local officials to accurately track statistics on how many people have been convicted of stealing livestock. Assembly Bill 924 is a win for rural California and

35 California Cattleman January 2014

our state’s agricultural industry. It shows that rural California has a voice and that we can make real changes in our laws. The key is building trust with legislative colleagues so that your “yes” means “yes” and your “no” means “no.” Building and relying on that trust will be essential as 2014 approaches, when I look forward to presenting more solutions that can be supported by my colleagues. My top priorities include repealing the unfair fire tax on rural residents, ensuring an adequate water supply for the future, rolling back burdensome regulations and improving rural education opportunities for our young people. I still believe our best days are ahead of us if we can all work together toward moving our state forward. We may not get our way with every issue, but at least we can make our voices heard. That is why groups such as the California Cattlemen’s Association are invaluable in shaping good public policy. With a year of Assembly experience now under my belt, I look forward to working with you to make further progress in 2014 to preserve our state’s rich ranching heritage. Assemblyman Frank Bigelow, R-O’Neals, a businessman, rancher and CCA member is the chair of the California Legislative Rural Caucus and represents the 5th Assembly District in the California Legislature.

Dry Weather Ahead

Short-Term Forecast Not Looking Promising For California Ranchers By Brian Bledsoe, meteorologist, Colorado Springs, Colo. We had a pretty active first half of December with a massive arctic outbreak and plenty of rain and snow for SOME locations. This has many folks saying that the rest of the winter will be the same. I’ve been telling my readers and viewers that while we would have periods of wintry weather, the most active winter weather pattern would end up in the eastern half of the United States. This is where the coldest air would end up along with the most moisture. Let’s see if that will continue. PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK THROUGH JAN. 29: Blue/Purple = Wetter Than Normal Green/Red = Drier Than Normal

The eastern two-thirds of the country are generally normal to slightly wetter than normal with the wettest locations generally across central Texas, but not excessively so. The driest locations exist from Western Colorado to the Pacific Coast. All of California is dry, with the driest signal running from central California to Western Arizona. Overall, it looks like those that desperately need moisture really won’t get it. With Canada being so cold, it also won’t take much to get another blast of Arctic air. But as of right now, it looks like most of it will stay well to the east. TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK THROUGH JAN. 29

Orange/Red = Warmer Than Normal Blue/Green = Colder Than Normal

As mild as we look to finish December for most of the country, it looks like most of January will be slightly cooler than normal. However, the bulk of the coldest air (darker blue/green) will end up in the Midwest and Great Lakes region. EDITOR’S NOTE:

In addition to delivering the weather forecast to the greater Colorado Springs area, the author is also a private weather consultant whose goal is to help agriculture producers make their business more successful by using accurate weather forecasts, both short- and long-term. His strong background in agriculture is important, as he recognizes the need for good common sense weather forecasting that can readily be used by farmers and ranchers.

THIS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: 36 California Cattleman January 2014

“Thank You”

We appreciate your business and look forward to working with you in 2014!

Contact a Silveus Agent today to see what we can do for you...

Aaron Tattersall 303.854.7016

aaron.tattersall@cropins.net Lic #0H15694

Jim Vann 530.218.3379

jimv@wsrins.com Lic #0B48084

Matt Griffith 530.570.3333

matthewdgriffith@hotmail.com Lic #0124869

Dan VanVuren 209.484.5578

danv@garibaldiins.com Lic #0E44519

Tait Berlier 303.859.0777

tait.berlier@cropins.net Lic #0H16532

When it comes to PRF (Pasture, Rangeland, Forage), there’s no one better!

37 California Cattleman January 2014

38 California Cattleman January 2014

39 California Cattleman January 2014

Bulls and females available private treaty at the ranch!

40 California Cattleman January 2014

41 California Cattleman January 2014

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

for these

2014 CCA EVENTS CCA meetings like the midyear meeting and convention are your opportunity to voice your concerns on the issues that impact your way of life. In addition to policy meetings, CCA also features several events in which members can help assist CCA in its lobbying and fundraising efforts. Below is a list of CCA events you should mark on your calendar for 2014. CA/AZ Feeder Council Meeting Coronado Marriot, Coronado May 23-23

AUTHORIZED DEALER! 10391 E. STOCKTON BLVD in ELK GROVE

Intersted in advertising in our buyers’ guide? Contact Matt Macfarlane at (916) 803-3113 to reserve your space TODAY! 42 California Cattleman January 2014

CCA Legislative Steak & Eggs Breakfast Sutter Club Downtown Sacramento June 11 CCA/CCW Midyear Meeting Sacramento Doubletree, Sacramento June 12-13 98th Annual CCA/CCW Convention John Ascuaga’s Nugget, Sparks, Nev. Nov. 20-22

Event Aims to Keep Rangelands Viable With California rangelands returning as little as $1-per acre per year, ranchers and grazing are being replaced not only by ranchettes and shopping malls but by tree crops, vineyards and other types of agriculture. This conversion is particularly evident in the San Joaquin Valley. The Fogarty family has been in the cattle ranching business in Stanislaus County since the 1870s. In recent years, they’ve seen rangeland around them converted to housing and orchards. “With the conversion around us, we are affected with a declining water table and increased traffic,” said Bill Fogarty. Ranchers, researchers, managers, agency representatives and conservationists will gather in January to discuss challenges and opportunities in maintaining rangelands. Keeping rangelands and ranches viable for wildlife, wetlands and water will be discussed at the 9th annual California Rangeland Conservation Coalition Summit set for Jan. 21-22, at the Gene Bianchi Community Center in Oakdale, 16 miles northeast of Modesto. The summit is sponsored by the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition and the University of California Cooperative Extension. “This event is a time for ranchers to showcase their positive role in stewarding California’s wide open spaces and their contributions to the state’s economy,” said Tim Koopmann, president of the California Cattlemen’s Association. “Ranchers who attend the annual event learn valuable information on the latest research outcomes about best management practices for their land that simultaneously improve the natural resources and economic profitability.” At risk is the future of California’s ranching industry and the ecosystem services that ranches provide: diverse wildlife, unique wetlands and healthy watersheds. At the rangeland summit, ranchers, researchers, land managers, agency representatives and conservationists will focus on rangeland science, land management, land-use policy and livestock 43 California Cattleman January 2014

production. The event will feature presentations on the challenges ranchers face, impacts of rangeland conversion to natural resources and opportunities to support working ranches and rancher stewardship. Ranchers from Colorado and Montana will share new opportunities they are finding to keep ranching viable through conservation efforts. The first day of the two-day summit will feature presentations and a ranch tour on the second day. “University of California Cooperative Extension is pleased to be a partner in bringing together a diverse group of people interested in rangelands to discuss the opportunities and challenges for keeping California’s ranches working to support communities and habitat,” said Theresa Becchetti, University of California Cooperative Extension advisor in San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties. “We are particularly fortunate to be able to hold this meeting and engage in a constructive dialogue with stakeholders in Oakdale, where rangelands and associated resources are at risk.” In addition to research that will be shared with attendees, speakers will also address how ranching in California is a complex, multifaceted challenge that ranchers embrace each day. Stewardship and respect for the land is central to the ethic of California producers. One speaker, Dave Daley, Ph.D., Oroville will address how simplistic solutions offered by non-producers may not recognize the complexity of the global market, the regulatory challenges for producers, the vagaries of nature (weather) and the long-term implications to both financial and environmental sustainability of the ranching community. A photo contest will be held providing a chance to win cash prizes for photos taken in California highlighting rangelands, including livestock, people, wildlife and plants. Don’t miss your chance to become famous and promote the beauty and diversity of rangelands and the people that manage them. Details for how to enter are available on the website: http://www.carangeland.org. Ranchers are encouraged to attend the event, to be part of solutions discussed and be a

soundboard for what solutions would be practical and appropriate. To encourage rancher participation, there is a “Rancher Special.” Ranchers are encouraged to bring a friend along for free when they register. There is no discount for coming by yourself, so make sure you bring your spouse, kids or neighbor along to take advantage of the special. For more information, visit http://www.carangeland.org/ calendarevents/2014summit.html or call Pelayo Alvarez at (916) 313-5800, ext. 107. The California Rangeland Conservation Coalition is a group of over 125 agricultural groups, nonprofit organizations, researchers and government agencies representing a broad cross-section of California’s ranching and environmental communities. The disparate groups are united by their recognition of the importance of California’s working rangelands for natural resources, plant and wildlife species, cultural values and economics. The Rangeland Coalition began in 2005 with a small group of organizations committed to protecting rangelands within California’s Central Valley and Interior Coast ranges. This event is sponsored by:

University of California ANR, Environmental Defense, Audubon California, California Association of Resource Conservation Districts, California Beef Council, California Cattlemen’s Association, California Native Plant Society, California Rangeland Trust, Santa Clara County Open Space Authority, Center for Natural Lands Management, Defenders of Wildlife, Cal-Pac Chapter Society for Range Management, East Bay Regional Park District, Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative - California, Natural Resources Conservation Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife – Partners Program, MidPeninsula Open Space District, Point Blue Conservation, Sierra Business Council, Sierra Nevada Conservancy, Sustainable Conservation, InterWest Insurance Services, Inc., The Nature Conservancy, Koopmann Rangeland Consulting, Westervelt Ecological Services and San Joaquin-Stanislaus Cattlemen. In addition, Oakdale Cowboy Museum and numerous private ranchers are sponsors, hosts and speakers.

BUCHANAN ANGUS RANCH A TRUE Performance Program, where performance doesn’t START at the feedbunk.

For more than 50 Years, the ALGOMA ANGUS CATTLE have been defining performance with Practical Efficiency.

PICTURES THAT ARE WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS

H

Sound, Fertile, Moderate Framed, Easy Fleshing Females that work hard and wean heavy calves every year!

Moderate Birth Weight, Rapid Growth … The best bulls in the breed are represented in the pedigrees of these “Genetic Packages” through generations of A.I.

Great Udders that will hold up for the lifetime of the cow.

Natural Muscling, Carcass Quality, Maternal Traits … All in one Eye Appealing Package

H

Our Bulls always sell with Performance and Ultrasound data. In addition, they are also tested PI-negative for BVD, DNA tested, and are fully vaccinated and semen tested.

Sound Feet and Legs. At weaning the bulls are conditioned on a steep juniper covered hillside. These are NOT OVERFED bulls. They will be ready for the 2014 breeding season!

Lot 50: Algoma Copyright 598B Reg.#17577646

SELLING SONS OF:

Connealy Right Answer Connealy Imprint Connealy Consensus 7229 TC Aberdeen Connealy Confidence TC Franklin Sitz Wisdom Upshot and others.

a 3/4/13 son of “Connealy Right Answer” who weaned off his “Connealy Front Page” dam on 10/17/13 at 860 lbs. LOT 26: Algoma Impression 546B

LOT 3:

Reg. # 17581704

A “Connealy Consensus 7229” son who weaned off his “004” dam at 990 lbs.

Reg. # 175776621

A “Connealy Imprint” son who weaned off his dam at 890 lbs.

THESE BIG STOUT GROWTH BULLS AND MANY CALVING-EASE BULLS WILL SELL AT THE …

Traynham Ranches Loop Ranch Santos Angus Country Inn Cattle Co and DDP Angus

ANNUAL BULL SALE NOON SUNDAY, Buchanan B February 23, 2014 Angus on

at the

KLAMATH COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

Call Today for your Sale Book or more 44 California Cattleman January 2014 Also Broadcast Live at: information.

A

with Guest Consignors:

Cattle Business, Our ONLY Business

ROBERT, KATHLEEN BUCHANAN & FAMILY 13490 Algoma Rd., Klamath Falls, OR 97601

541-883-8471 b u c h a n a n a n g u s @ h u g h e s . n e t • w w w. b u c h a n a n a n g u s . c o m

CHIMES CALLING ALL CATTLEWOMEN: A Golden Opportunity Awaits in Lake Tahoe by California CattleWomen, Inc., Vice President Sheila Bowen For more than 60 years, the California CattleWomen, Inc., (CCW) has been on the cutting edge of beef promotion and education to the public. Our organization has always had a mission to educate consumers, students, teachers, ag groups, public officials and the general public about the benefits of beef and the cattle industry. In 2012 alone, the 29 county units that make up CCW made direct contact or used media outreach opportunities that had combined audiences of more than 6.7 million people. Our California CattleWomen are truly a proven force for good in the cattle industry. With all that the California CattleWomen accomplish, we hope that our members will take advantage of an opportunity to participate in an upcoming conference that is geared toward CattleWomen. The California CattleWomen have been selected to host the Region VI American National CattleWomen (ANCW) Meeting. CattleWomen from Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah, as well as guests from other regions will be joining us in Lake Tahoe April 30 through May 2. This three-day event will consist of learning, networking, discussing issues and exchanging ideas on how to reach even more people for the beef industry. We are excited about

45 California Cattleman January 2014

this opportunity to further impact our industry and want to put our best foot forward. To this end we have already scheduled top notch speakers, including: Karen Ross, the California Secretary of Agriculture; Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D., a UC Davis Associate Professor and highly respected air quality specialist; and Dave Daley, Ph.D., associate dean of the College of Agriculture at California State University, Chico, and administrator for the university farm and a California Cattlemen’s Association Vice President. In addition to our speakers, there will be a workshop geared toward the ANCW toolkits, what they offer and how to utilize them. One evening we will take a dinner cruise on Lake Tahoe aboard the Tahoe Paradise. On the final day of the conference we will tour the Bentley Agrodynamics’ ranch in Minden, Nev., where general manager Matt McKinney will highlight the history of this historic ranch, share current management practices and discuss innovative opportunities. We encourage interested CCW members to join us in Lake Tahoe for this meeting. One does not have to be a member of ANCW to attend. The conference will be held at the Lake Tahoe Resort Hotel. Room reservations can be secured by calling

1-800-988-9894. Use group code: CCW. To register for the conference go to www.ancw.org, print out the registration form for Region VI and send it to the address on the form. For more information on attending the conference or to find out about sponsorship opportunities please contact me at sbowen1958@ earthlink.net or call (661) 536-8652 or (661) 201-5572.  California CattleWomen

would like to thank those who have helped to make this conference a success:

PLATINUM SPONSOR Farm Credit Alliance GOLD SPONSORS

Valley Republic Bank Adele Bartholomew/Bissett Ranch Amanda Jenson Martin Siskiyou Angus and Herefords Kern County Cattlemen’s Association Tehama County Cattlemen’s Association Kern County CattleWomen Plumas Sierra CattleWomen San Benito County CattleWomen

OTHER SPONSORS

Jean Barton El Rancho Espanol de Cuyama Carver Bowen Ranch Cockrell Ranches & Lodging Napa Solano Cattlemen’s Association Siskiyou County CattleWomen Humboldt County CattleWomen Alameda County CattleWomen

FUTURE FOCUS Combining Wisdom of the Past with Vision for the Future from the California Cattlemen’s Association’s Young Cattlemen’s Committee In 2014, the California Young Cattlemen’s Committee (YCC) is excited about the opportunities and endless possibilities that lie ahead. This year’s officer team was selected at the 97th annual CCA/CCW Convention in November. The 2014 officer team is: Katie Stroud, chair, California State University, Chico (Chico State); Trevor Airola, vice chair, Chico State; Kellie Mancino, secretary, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly); and Erica Bianchi, publicity chair, California State University Fresno (Fresno State). Katie Stroud was raised on a fourth generation cow-calf operation in Modoc County. Currently a junior studying Animal Science at Chico State, Stroud is a member of the Chico State Livestock Judging Team as well as a past National Beef Ambassador. As a beef ambassador, she was able to share her passion for beef and the ranching way of life with consumers across the country. Stroud plans to pursue a masters degree in Rangeland Management. She would also like to work for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Public KATIE STROUD Lands Council or a state cattlemen’s association before returning home to take over the family ranch. Her goals as a YCC officer are to increase membership throughout the state as well as club involvement. Knowing that the cattle industry’s future is in the hands of today’s youth, Stroud hopes to fuel members’ passion by “Combining the Wisdom of the Past with the Vision of the Future,” a theme she has set for YCC in 2014. She hopes to inspire fellow YCC members to proactively educate the public of the safe, wholesome and nutritious product that beef is. Trevor Airola grew up in Calaveras County on his family’s cow-calf ranch. An Agriculture Science and Education major at Chico State, Airola has had a strong passion for beef cattle his whole life, and spent many hours helping fellow local cattlemen during slow times on his family’s ranch as a kid. Although he sold his own cattle when he moved to Chico to begin his college career, Airola plans to return to his hometown in Angels Camp after graduation to pursue a career as a high school animal science and agriculture mechanics instructor while also continuing his ranching responsibilities. TREVOR AIROLA His goal for this next year as a YCC officer is to inspire more active membership, as well as help members learn how to more effectively communicate with beef consumers to promote the industry. Kellie Mancino was born and raised on her family ranch in San Benito County. Mancino is a second year Agriculture Science student at Cal Poly with the goal of becoming a high school agriculture teacher and FFA 46 California Cattleman January 2014

advisor with hopes of eliminating agriculture illiteracy and promoting the beef industry. Mancino is very involved in the Cal Poly beef department as well as promoting agriculture as a member of Agriculture Communicators of Tomorrow. Her goals as an YCC state officer are to increase the involvement of all members on the state level as well as increase interaction between the different campuses. An agriculture-related field has KELLIE MANCINO always been the first choice of future goals and aspirations for Erica Bianchi. Bianchi grew up on a cattle ranch in the foothills of Gilroy. Ever since she could walk she has been helping out at the ranch and leading cattle into the show ring. Some of her best childhood memories come from the family cattle branding or from cattle shows throughout California. Bianchi hopes to continue her involvement in the beef industry by working as a beef industry advocate for a cattlemen’s association or farm bureau office, a breed association in the west or in livestock pharmaceutical sales. ERICA BIANCHI Currently a senior at Fresno State, Bianchi will soon obtain a bachelor’s degree in Agricultural Business. She is honored and excited to serve as this year’s state YCC publicity chair. One of her major goals is to help the YCC grow in numbers. She is striving to boost club membership along with membership from new clubs and groups.

To reach out to these young beef enthusiasts, contact them at: Chair Katie Stroud kstroud1@mail.csuchico.edu Vice Chair Trevor Airola trevorairola_@hotmail.com Secretary Kellie Mancino kelliemancino@yahoo.com v

Slow Cooker Pot Roast Soup Total recipe time: high setting: 6 hours and 15 minutes; low setting: 9 hours and 15 minutes. Makes 6 servings

We Believe... ...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

INGREDIENTS 1 boneless beef shoulder roast (2 1/2 pounds) 2 cups chopped onions 1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes with green peppers and onions, undrained 1 cup frozen hash brown potatoes (cubes) 1 cup beef broth 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 2 cups broccoli slaw 1/2 cup frozen peas INSTRUCTIONS 1. Cut beef roast into 12 equal pieces. Place in 4 1/2 to 5 1/2-quart slow cooker. Add onions, tomatoes, potatoes, broth, garlic, thyme, salt and pepper. Cover and cook on HIGH 5 to 6 hours, or on LOW 8 to 9 hours, or until beef is fork-tender. (No stirring is necessary during cooking.) 2. Stir in broccoli slaw; continue cooking, covered, 30 minutes or until broccoli slaw is crisp-tender. Turn off slow cooker. Stir in peas; let stand, covered, 5 minutes.

Calving ease. Carcass. Cows. 1-800-278-8254 www.selectsiresbeef.com contact@allwestselectsires.com AvAilABle through theSe fine loCAtionS:

Ranch Calls

Conlin Supply oakdale, CA (209)847-8977 Merced, CA (209)725-1100 evAnS feed & liveStoCk Supply Madera, CA (559)673-9420 porterville, CA (559)781-8685 Chowchilla, CA (559)665-7891 hAweS rAnCh & fArM Supply red Bluff, CA (530)527-4151

toll-free 1-800-657-0900

let a powder river representative, along with your local dealer, assist you at your ranch in designing a cattle working system to fit your needs. if you want to get a look at some powder river equipment, there is a good chance you don’t need to go further than your nearest pasture. the fact is, powder river has been making livestock handling equipment since 1938, longer than anyone else out there. today we are still the brand of choice by livestock producers around the world. from the strongest gates in the industry, to the latest in squeeze chute innovations powder river is committed to quality, value, and efficient livestock equipment.

Call for free catalog 800-453-5318 or visit www.powderriver.com

47 California Cattleman January 2014

Anderson, CA (530)365-2332 higBy’S Country feed, inC. dixon, CA (727)678-9007 jiM’S Supply CoMpAny Bakersfield, CA 1-800-423-8016 live wire produCtS Marysville, CA (530)743-9045

toll-free 1-800-272-9045

MendoCino County fArM Supply ukiah, CA (707)462-1492 MArtin rAnCh Supply rohnert park, CA (707)585-1313 powder Creek rAnCh Supply lincoln, CA (916)645-8161

Extended-Release Injectable Parasiticide 5% Sterile Solution NADA 141-327, Approved by FDA for subcutaneous injection For the Treatment and Control of Internal and External Parasites of Cattle on Pasture with Persistent Effectiveness CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. INDICATIONS FOR USE LONGRANGE, when administered at the recommended dose volume of 1 mL per 110 lb (50 kg) body weight, is effective in the treatment and control of 20 species and stages of internal and external parasites of cattle: Gastrointestinal Roundworms Cooperia oncophora – Adults and L4

Lungworms Dictyocaulus viviparus – Adults

Cooperia punctata – Adults and L4 Cooperia surnabada – Adults and L4 Haemonchus placei – Adults

Grubs Hypoderma bovis

Oesophagostomum radiatum – Adults Ostertagia lyrata – Adults Ostertagia ostertagi – Adults, L4, and inhibited L4

Mites Sarcoptes scabiei var. bovis

Trichostrongylus axei – Adults and L4 Trichostrongylus colubriformis – Adults Parasites

Durations of Persistent Effectiveness

Gastrointestinal Roundworms

Sale Management Marketing Order Buying Photography/Video (916) 803-3113 (530) 633-4184 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net www.m3cattlemarketing.com 48 California Cattleman January 2014

Cooperia oncophora Cooperia punctata

100 days 100 days

Haemonchus placei Oesophagostomum radiatum Ostertagia lyrata

120 days 120 days 120 days

Ostertagia ostertagi Trichostrongylus axei Lungworms

120 days 100 days

Dictyocaulus viviparus

150 days

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) should be given only by subcutaneous injection in front of the shoulder at the recommended dosage level of 1 mg eprinomectin per kg body weight (1 mL per 110 lb body weight). WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS Withdrawal Periods and Residue Warnings Animals intended for human consumption must not be slaughtered within 48 days of the last treatment. This drug product is not approved for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, including dry dairy cows. Use in these cattle may cause drug residues in milk and/or in calves born to these cows. A withdrawal period has not been established for pre-ruminating calves. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Animal Safety Warnings and Precautions The product is likely to cause tissue damage at the site of injection, including possible granulomas and necrosis. These reactions have disappeared without treatment. Local tissue reaction may result in trim loss of edible tissue at slaughter. Observe cattle for injection site reactions. If injection site reactions are suspected, consult your veterinarian. This product is not for intravenous or intramuscular use. Protect product from light. LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin) has been developed specifically for use in cattle only. This product should not be used in other animal species. When to Treat Cattle with Grubs LONGRANGE effectively controls all stages of cattle grubs. However, proper timing of treatment is important. For the most effective results, cattle should be treated as soon as possible after the end of the heel fly (warble fly) season. Environmental Hazards Not for use in cattle managed in feedlots or under intensive rotational grazing because the environmental impact has not been evaluated for these scenarios. Other Warnings: Underdosing and/or subtherapeutic concentrations of extended-release anthelmintic products may encourage the development of parasite resistance. It is recommended that parasite resistance be monitored following the use of any anthelmintic with the use of a fecal egg count reduction test program. TARGET ANIMAL SAFETY Clinical studies have demonstrated the wide margin of safety of LONGRANGE® (eprinomectin). Overdosing at 3 to 5 times the recommended dose resulted in a statistically significant reduction in average weight gain when compared to the group tested at label dose. Treatment-related lesions observed in most cattle administered the product included swelling, hyperemia, or necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue of the skin. The administration of LONGRANGE at 3 times the recommended therapeutic dose had no adverse reproductive effects on beef cows at all stages of breeding or pregnancy or on their calves. Not for use in bulls, as reproductive safety testing has not been conducted in males intended for breeding or actively breeding. Not for use in calves less than 3 months of age because safety testing has not been conducted in calves less than 3 months of age. STORAGE Store at 77° F (25° C) with excursions between 59° and 86° F (15° and 30° C). Protect from light. Made in Canada. Manufactured for Merial Limited, Duluth, GA, USA. ®LONGRANGE and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks of Merial. ©2013 Merial. All rights reserved. 1050-2889-02, Rev. 05/2012

WITH SEASON-LONG CONTROL, YOUR CAT TLE

TH E N EIGHB ORS WI LL STA RE.

will look so good

Introducing new LONGRANGE with 100 to 150 days of parasite control in a single dose.1

Nothing else comes close to the control of LONGRANGE.2,5-7* DECTOMAX® (doramectin) Injectable

SMALL INTESTINAL WORM (C. oncophora) SMALL INTESTINAL WORM (C. punctata) STOMACH HAIRWORM

A pasture full of thicker, slicker cattle is a beautiful sight. Get the look with LONGRANGE. Its unique THERAPHASETM Technology gives you 100 to 150 days of parasite control in a single dose.2 Break the parasite life cycle and see the performance benefits all season.3,4 Ask your veterinarian for prescription LONGRANGE.

CYDECTIN® (moxidectin) Injectable

LONGRANGE Injectable

BARBER’S POLE WORM NODULAR WORM BROWN STOMACH WORM (O. ostertagi) BROWN STOMACH WORM (O. lyrata) LUNGWORM 0

30

60

90

120

DAYS *SAFE-GUARD® has no demonstrated persistent activity.

For more information, visit

150 Available in 500 mL, 250 mL and 50 mL bottles. Administer subcutaneously at 1 mL/110 lbs.

theLONGRANGElook.com

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: Do not treat within 48 days of slaughter. Not2014 for use in female dairy cattle 2049 months of age January California Cattleman or older, including dry dairy cows, or in veal calves. Post-injection site damage (e.g., granulomas, necrosis) can occur. These reactions have disappeared without treatment. 1

®LONGRANGE and the Cattle Head Logo are registered trademarks, and THERAPHASE is a trademark, of Merial. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. ©2013 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. RUMIELR1213-E (09/12)

Dependent upon parasite species, as referenced in FOI summary and LONGRANGE product label.

LONGRANGE product label. Morley FH, Donald AD. Farm management and systems of helminth control. Vet Parasitol. 1980;6:105-134. Brunsdon RV. Principles of helminth control. Vet Parasitol. 1980;6:185-215 5 CYDECTIN® Injectable product label. 6 DECTOMAX® Injectable product label. 7 SAFE-GUARD® product label. 2 3 4

In November 2013, at the CCA/CCW Convention in Sparks, Nev., representatives of several CCA affiliate groups had the honor of interviewing many CCA scholarship applicants, among which were some of the brightest and most ambitious individuals the future of the beef industry has to offer. The groups represented on the scholarship panel include: Allflex, USA; the CCA Allied Industry Council, the CCA Feeder Council; the California Beef Cattle Improvement Association (CBCIA), the Livestock Memorial Research Fund (LMRF); and representatives for the Gordon Van Vleck Memorial Scholarship and the inaugural Tom Grimmius Memorial Scholarship.

Tyler Stevenson

Veterinary School Student University of California, Davis $2,500 • LMRF

Jessica Sampson

Agricultural Economics Graduate Student Texas A&M University $2,000 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Ashtin Bechtold

Animal Science & Ag Communications Major Oklahoma State University $1,550 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council & Gordon Van Vleck Memorial Scholarship 50 California Cattleman January 2014

To qualify for a scholarship, students must be members of CCA and either graduated from a California high school or are currently attending a California college or university, majoring in an beef industry-related field. This year, not only was the candidate pool impressive, but it represented both in-state and out-of-state students ranging from the community college level to veterinary and graduate school students. In addition, this year, affiliate groups offered nearly $7,000 than in recent year’s past, allowing more students to benefit from the scholarship program. Recipients of the 2013 CCA scholarships are pictured here.

Joey Mancino

Animal Science Graduate Student California Polytechnic State University $2,500 • LMRF

Bryan Welly

Animal Science Graduate Student University of California, Davis $2,000 • CBCIA

Tracy Schohr

Horticulture & Agronomy Graduate Student University of California, Davis $1,500 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Sara Jo Avila

Agricultural Business Major California State University, Chico $2,200 • Tom Grimmius Memorial Scholarship

Alina Amaral

Veterinary School Student Western University of Health Sciences $1,550 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Erica Bianchi

Agricultural Business Major California State University, Fresno $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

the families of the late tom grimmius & gordon van vleck

Feeder Council

Peyton Imperiale

Kimberly Rounds

Agricultural Business major California State University, Chico $1,000 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Animal & Equine Sciences Major Colorado State University $1,000 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Grace Tobias

Animal Science Major University of California, Davis $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

LMRF

Suzanne Amaral

Animal Science & Ag Education Major California Polytechnic State University $1,000 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Madison Albiani

Animal Science Major California Polytechnic State University $750 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council 51 California Cattleman January 2014

Katie Roberti

Agriculture Communication California Polytechnic State University $1,000 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Kelsey Scheckla

Animal Science & Ag Business Major California State University, Fresno $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

Courtney Callaway

General Education Major Allan Hancock College $750 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

Marissa Fisher

Animal Science Major Texas Tech University $1,000 • Allied Industry Council

Emma Spivey

Animal Science Major California State University, Chico $750 • Allflex,USA/Feeder Council

In Memory FRANK EDWARD HAGATA 1926-2013 Lifelong California rancher Frank Edward Hagata passed away peacefully on November 22, 2013 at Renown Medical Center in Reno, Nev. Hagata was born on May 27, 1926, on the family ranch in Lassen County’s Willow Creek Valley to John and Anne Hagata. John and Anne emigrated from the Béarnaise region of France and homesteaded the ranch in 1904. Hagata attended grammar school in a one-room schoolhouse in Willow Creek Valley and then attended Lassen Union High School in Susanville. He spent his entire life on the family ranch developing an outstanding cow-calf operation and custom haying business. Frank was extremely proud that the ranch has been in the Hagata family for 109 years, passed down directly from father to son. Hagata was an active, dependable and knowledgeable leader in his community and the beef cattle industry. He served for many years as a member of the Lassen County Planning Commission, BLM Grazing Advisory Board, Production Credit Association Board and was the Exalted Ruler of the Susanville Elk’s Lodge. He was a long time member of the Lassen County Sheriff ’s Posse, the Lassen County Farm Bureau, Lassen County Cattlemen’s Association, California Cattlemen’s Association, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Los Rancheros Visitadores. He was honored as the Lassen County Cattleman of the Year in 1987 and his ranch was inducted into the California Agricultural Heritage Club in 2008. He designed and built the Lassen County Cowbelle “Red Barn.”

New Arrival Jillian Diana Oldfield was born on Dec. 17, 2014, to parents Justin and Julia Oldfield, Elk Grove. She weighed 8 pounds 9 ounces and was 20.5 inches long. Jillian was welcomed by big brother Jackson and Grandparents Joachim and June Daehling and Tom and Diana Oldfield, all of Elk Grove. Justin serves as CCA’s Vice President of Government Relations and Julia manages Big Oak Nursery in Elk Grove.

52 California Cattleman January 2014

In later years, Hagata developed a passion for travel. With his wife, Bernice, he visited FRANK & BERNICE HAGATA China, Great Britain, Europe, Australia and Canada. Their favorite domestic trips were ranch tours with many friends that were hosted by the Crow family and the Western Livestock Journal. Frank was an honest, progressive and highly-respected cattleman and businessman who demonstrated great love for the land, his animals, his friends and his family. He was extremely resourceful with an uncanny ability to find simple solutions to complex problems. Above all he loved his family, enjoyed his life and departed with no regrets. Hagata is survived by his loving wife of 62 years, Bernice, his sister Marie Simmons, daughters Darcy Hanson (Jack) of Willow Creek Valley and Teri Bertotti (Joe) of Janesville, California, son Daren Hagata (Patricia) of Willow Creek Valley, grandchildren Wyatt and Bradford Hanson, Andrew and Daniel Bertotti and Taylor (Tori) and Bailey Hagata and many friends and neighbors. He was preceded in death by his sisters Henrietta Alway and Josephine Haws and brother Marcel Hagata. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Donations may be made to the Lassen County CattleWomen Memorial Fund, P.O. Box 1469, Susanville, California 96130 or a charity of choice in Frank’s memory.

Committed to provide THE BEST For over 50 years

BULL SALE

The

Tues., Feb. 18, 2014

12:30 p.m.

At the ranch in Milton-Freewater, OR

Kesslers Frontman R001

Selling Sons of:

AAR TEN X 7008 SA

AAR TEN X 7008 S A Kesslers Frontman R001 TC Aberdeen 759 VDAR Really Windy 4097 BW +.1 WW+67 YW +137 MILK +29 CW +55 MARB +1.18 BW +0 WW+50 YW +85 MILK +37 CW +21 MARB +.20 RE+.71 Fat +.003 $B+112.69 RE+.60 Fat +.018 $B+55.15 Connealy Confidence Sire: Mytty In Focus -- SAV Adaptor 2213 Sire: Connealy Front Page 0228 -- MGS: TC Rancher 056 0100 The Randy Kessler Family 49839 Fruitvale Rd Kesslers Cowman 1586

Selling 125 Spring & Fall Bulls!

SAV Pioneer 7301

Milton-Freewater, OR 541-558-3821 509-520-3281 rek52@live.com

53 California Cattleman January 2014

Rangeland Decision-making Processes Influence Adoption of Conservation Programs

• social network connections, describing to what degree ranchers communicate and provide leadership and opinions in their communities; and • social values, including views on property rights, the government’s role in protecting private property and trust in government involvement in conservation. Ranchers with larger amounts of land, who look toward the future and who are opinion leaders with knowledge of conservation were found to be more likely to participate in conservation programs. Capitalizing on the decision strategies of ranchers by reaching out to wellconnected opinion leaders, honoring the desires of many ranchers to maintain the family and historical legacies of their land and establishing trust between ranchers and conservation organizations can help build collaborative conservation relationships.

Rangeland conservation programs are growing. The number of acres of land in the western United States enrolled in conservation easements has outpaced land development since 1997. Understanding why ranchers participate in conservation programs helps to create partnerships and strategies that can enhance rangeland sustainability and the ecosystem services they provide. In the current issue of Rangeland Ecology & Management, the article “Conservation Program Participation and Adaptive Rangeland Decision-Making” examines ranchers’ involvement in a social–ecological context. Conservation programs are Full text of the article “Conservation Program just one strategy ranchers might choose to manage their Participation and Adaptive Rangeland Decisionland in a manner that promotes productivity and health. Making” in this issue of Rangeland Ecology and More than 500 California ranchers returned mailed Management, Vol. 66, No. 6, November 2013, is surveys in this study. Ranchers were asked about their now available. awareness of, participation in and attitude toward various conservation programs using a range of behavioral responses. With this TRUCK SCALES • LIVESTOCK SCALES • WAREHOUSE SCALES • RENTAL SCALES information, a multinomial logit model MOBILE LIVESTOCK RENTALS AVAILABLE AT: was used to estimate the importance of Bullet Rental – Klamath Falls, OR • ACW Rentals – Burns, OR • Powell Scales – Scio, OR different variables on rancher involvement in conservation programs. This study examined four key variables: • operator and operation characteristics, s including whether the land is privately ental ! R owned or publicly leased, and the able l i a v A education and income of the operator; • time horizon, meaning the number of family generations who have managed the land and if an inheritance plan is in place;

Shasta College to Host A.I. Workshop On Feb. 14 through 16, Shasta College’s Agriculture and Natural Resources Program is offering a cattle artificial insemination school for students and non-student cattle producers. The first 16 paid students will receive classroom instruction. The $500 fee includes all the A.I. equipment and supplies needed, plus two and a half days of handson instruction. Classes are held at the Shasta College Farm, 11555 Old Oregon Trail in Redding. To register and for more information on the A.I. School, call B.J. Macfarlane at (530) 2427564, or email bmacfarlane@shastacollege. edu. The event is sponsored by the Shasta College Agriculture and Natural Resources Program, the Shasta College Foundation and Zoetis.

 54 California Cattleman January 2014 

CERTIFIABLE! ~ AFFORDABLE! PORTABLE TRUCK SCALES WITH STEEL RAMP OR MOBILE LIVESTOCK SCALES AVAILABLE

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SCALE SERVICE • SYSTEMS • PARTS • SALES & CONSTRUCTION Main Office Powell Scales NW, Inc. 39120 West Scio Rd. Scio, OR 97374 503.394.3660 Toll Free: 1.800.451.0187

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www.scalesnw.com • SteveOrr@scalesnw.com • Steve Orr 503.510.3540

THE QUALITY REVOLUTION BEGINS WITH YOU

Angus Means Business: Demand for Quality is Up

For decades, beef’s market share has eroded to pork and poultry. We think it’s time to say enough — and to embrace quality as the centerpiece for rebuilding demand. Today, the word “Angus” means quality — not just among ranchers, but with consumers — and for good reason. We’ve spent generations building quality beef and consumer demand.

The wholesale beef demand index was developed by Kansas State University to accurately estimate demand by accounting for changes in price, sales volume, inflation and population. Each year, it’s expressed as an index or percentage value relative to the base index value of 100.

Better and more reliable genetics have resulted in better beef, and that’s opened the door to valuebased marketing opportunities for producers who’ve embraced the quality revolution. For instance, demand for Certified Angus Beef ® has grown by nearly 80% since 2005, and a growing worldwide middle class will continue to drive demand for quality. That’s good news for producers who choose reliable, consistent and high-quality Angus cattle. Simply adding pounds isn’t enough anymore. The road map to quality, and a more profitable herd, is really pretty simple: turn out a registered Angus bull or invest in Angus replacement females.

3201 Frederick Ave. • St. Joseph, MO • 64506 www.ANGUS.org © 2012-2013 American Angus Association®

Angus means business.

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Contact your local distributor or Allflex regional manager, Tom Polich 559.798.2969, Scott Holt 208.850.1329 or Annie Troutt Inks 208.860.5318

800.989.TAGS allflexusa.com

Angus and Hereford Bull Sale Monday, March 10th, 2014 1:00 PM at Spring Cove Ranch in Bliss, Idaho

Selling 150 Angus Bulls Yearlings & Falls

50 Hereford Bulls 3 Red Angus yr. Bulls Yearlings, Falls & 2’s

25 Angus yr. Heifers 13 Hereford yr. Heifers

Selling sons of CCA Emblazon 702 Reg 15980098 CED+16 BEPD-1.8 WEPD+60 YEPD+106 MEPD+22 SC+1.01 CW+30 MARB+.50 RE+.63 $W+51.22 $B+79.37

Selling sons & grandsons of SLL Overload T18 Reg 15843888 CED+7 BEPD+1.3 WEPD+60 YEPD+100 MEPD+18 SC+1.12 CW+50 MARB+.71 RE+.57 $B+107.78

Selling sons & daughters of KCF Bennett 9126J R294 Reg P42651401 CED+10.1 BW-1.5 WW+54 YW+96

Selling sons of Apex Windy 078 Reg 16237970 CED+1 BEPD+3.9 WEPD+72 YEPD+110 MEPD+40 SC+1.60 CW+41 MARB+.38 RE+.16 $W+51.02 $B+76.03

M+33 Milk & Growth +60 SC+1.4 RIB+.06 MARB+.58 CHB+$39

For Catalogs Call: 208-352-4332 www.springcoveranch.com

Cattlemen’s Report

CALIFORNIA ANGUS DAYS FEMALE SALE Dec. 7, Stanislaus Co. Fairgrounds, Turlock Col. Jake Parnell Sponsored by the California Angus Association 21 Lots.......................................................... $5,185

WESTERN NUGGET NATIONAL HEREFORD SALE Dec. 7, John Ascuaga’s Nugget Showroom, Sparks, Nev.

Col. Butch Booker

14 Lots.......................................................... $5,492 7 Embryos.................................................... $543 AHA Photo

In longstanding tradition, sale cattle at the annual Western Nugget National Hereford Show in Reno were exhibited to buyers and other sale attendees prior to kicking-off the nostalgic event. At the sale, a touching tribute was made to the legendary John Ascuaga for his many years of dedication to the sale and the Hereford breed.

58 California Cattleman January 2014

Index Allflex, USA.......................................................................................................56 Allwest/Select Sires...........................................................................................42 Amador Angus..................................................................................................38 American Hereford Association.....................................................................40 American Angus Association.........................................................................55 Andreini & Co. ................................................................................................48 Apache Polled Herefords ................................................................................40 Bar KD Ranch...................................................................................................28 Bar R Angus .....................................................................................................38 Bar Six Charolais & Angus “Cowman’s Kind” Sale......................................11 Bianchi Ranches...............................................................................................25 Bovine Elite, Inc. ..............................................................................................42 Broken Arrow Angus Ranch ..........................................................................38 Broken Box Ranch......................................................................................23, 40 Buchanan Angus.........................................................................................38, 44 Bulls of the Big Sky...........................................................................................32 BWM Angus .....................................................................................................38 Byrd Cattle Co. ...........................................................................................38, 62 California Angus Days.....................................................................................19 California Custom............................................................................................42 California Windmills.......................................................................................41 Cargill Regional Beef.......................................................................................37 Central Valley Dodge.......................................................................................53 Chandler Herefords..........................................................................................25 Charron Ranch.................................................................................................38 Cherry Glen Beefmasters................................................................................40 Colyer Herefords & Angus..............................................................................13 Conlan Ranches California.............................................................................41 Conlin Fence Supply........................................................................................41 Corsair Angus Ranch ................................................................................38, 61 Cow Camp Ranch............................................................................................37 Dal Porto Livestock .........................................................................................38 Diamond Back Ranch......................................................................................41 Donati Ranch....................................................................................................38 Double D Cattle Co..........................................................................................25 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc...............................................................................41 Fair Oaks Ranch...............................................................................................39 Five Star Land & Livestock..............................................................................39 Freitas Rangeland Improvements...................................................................58 Furtado Angus..................................................................................................39 Furtado Livestock Enterprises........................................................................42 Gonsalves Ranch..............................................................................................39 Harrell Hereford Ranch..................................................................................... 7 Haugen Limousin Cattle Ranch.....................................................................40 HAVE Angus...............................................................................................22, 39 High Sierra Cattle Co. .....................................................................................22 Hinton Ranch....................................................................................................24 Hoffmann Hereford Ranch.............................................................................12 JV Angus............................................................................................................39 Kennedy Nutrition Services............................................................................42 Kerndt Livestock Products..............................................................................41 Kessler Angus....................................................................................................52 Kudlac Herefords..............................................................................................23 Laurel Fowler Insurance..................................................................................41 Little Shasta Ranch...........................................................................................23 Lorenzen Ranches.............................................................................................. 3 Macfarlane Cattle Co.......................................................................................22 McPhee Red Angus..........................................................................................41 Merial...........................................................................................................48, 49 Morrell Ranches................................................................................................23 Noahs Angus Ranch...................................................................................32, 39 Novartis.............................................................................................................59 O’Connell Ranch..............................................................................................39 ORIgen Beef......................................................................................................42 Pacific Trace Minerals......................................................................................41 Performance Plus........................................................................................16, 17 Powell Scales.....................................................................................................54 Power River.......................................................................................................42 Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale........................................................ 1, 20, 21, 22 Riverbend Ranch..............................................................................................61 RayMar Ranches...............................................................................................39 Sammis Ranch..................................................................................................39 San Juan Ranch.................................................................................................40 Shafer Ranch.....................................................................................................39 Shaw Cattle Co. ................................................................................................34 Sierra Ranches...................................................................................................24 Silveira Bros. .....................................................................................................39 Silveus Insurance Agency................................................................................37 Skinner Livestock Transportation..................................................................42 Snyder Livestock Co.........................................................................................33 Spanish Ranch...................................................................................................40 Tehama Angus Ranch......................................................................................40 Teixeira Cattle Co.............................................................................................40 The Cattleman’s Connection Sale...................................................................57 Thomas Angus Ranch........................................................................................ 7 Thomas Angus Ranch/LGW...........................................................................29 Trinity Farms.....................................................................................................15 Tumbleweed Ranch..........................................................................................40 Universal Semen Sales, Inc..............................................................................42 Veterinary Services, Inc. .................................................................................41 Vintage Angus Ranch......................................................................................40 Ward Ranches..................................................................................................... 6 Western Fence & Construction, Inc. .............................................................41 Western Video Market....................................................................................... 2 Winnemucca Ranch Hand Rodeo Weekend................................................60 Wulff Brothers Livestock.................................................................................40 York Ranches....................................................................................................... 8

59 California Cattleman January 2014

MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION 1221 H Street Sacramento, CA 95814 916-444-0845 (Office) · 916-444-2194 (Fax) www.calcattlemen.org NAME(S):

RANCH/BUSINESS NAME:

ADDRESS: CITY:

STATE:

E-MAIL ADDRESS:

PRIMARY PHONE:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

DO YOU WANT TO RECEIVE OUR WEEKLY LEGISLATIVE E-MAIL BULLETIN?

Yes

ZIP:

Recruited By_________________________

No

Step 1: CCA Membership PRODUCER MEMBERSHIP

FOR CATTLE OWNERS AND THOSE SEEKING A VOTING MEMBERSHIP LEVEL

Cattle Numbers 2500 & Over 1600-2499 1000-1599 800-999 500-799 300-499 100-299 0-99

Dues $1,615 $1,165 $890 $665 $565 $420 $295 $220

Calves under 6 months of age are not counted. Stockers pay at ½ the total number of stockers owned each year or minimum dues, whichever is greater.

ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP

PRODUCTION BUT DO NOT OWN CATTLE NON-VOTING MEMBERSHIP LEVEL

Statewide Allied/Feeder Associate $220

REGULAR MEMBERSHIP Cattle Numbers 1501 & Over 1001-1500 501-1000 251-500 101-250 0-100

Dues $750 + Fair Share $550 + Fair Share $400 + Fair Share $300 $200 $100

FAIR SHARE: ______@ 25¢/cow calf unit ______@ 12.5¢/feeder or stocker ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP: $100 (ASSOCIATES CANNOT OWN CATTLE)

Statewide Stewards of the Land

$10.00 $10.00 $10.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00 $20.00 $25.00

Humboldt-Del Norte Inyo-Mono-Alpine Kern County Lake County Lassen County Madera County Mendocino County Merced-Mariposa

Young Cattlemen’s Committee

$150

CCA Supporting Member

$100

(Available to non-producers who support the industry.)

$ 25

Must own fewer than 100 head of cattle. Must be 25 years of age or younger or a full-time student Applicant’s Birth Date:_______________

(Available to non-producers that own land on which cattle could or are run.)

- OR -

if over 25 years of age Applicant’s expected date of Graduation:

Step 3: Total Payment

CALIFORNIA BEEF CATTLE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION

MEMBERSHIP CBCIA is an affiliate of CCA and is a producer driven organization that fosters beef cattle improvement and economical production based on information and education.

CCA

$

NCBA

$

CBCIA

$

Payment Options:

□ Check payable to CCA

Local (All) $ TOTAL

$

Regular Members: $35

Card #___________________________________

Associate Members: $35

Exp______/________

Young Cattlemen:

Name on Card ____________________________

$5

LOCAL ASSOCIATON MEMBERSHIP: (Circle up to four below) Amador-El Dorado-Sac Butte Calaveras Contra Costa -Alameda Fall River-Big Valley Fresno-Kings Glenn-Colusa High Desert

NON-VOTING MEMBERSHIP

(includes Feeder Council Associate, Allied Industry membership and second membership. Second membership does not include Allied Industry voting rights.)

Step 2: Other Optional Dues NATIONAL CATTLEMEN’S BEEF ASSOCIATION

YOUNG CATTLEMEN MEMBERSHIP

FOR THOSE WHO SUPPORT CALIFORNIA CATTLE

$15.00 $25.00 NA $20.00 $7.00 $25.00 $15.00 $20.00

Modoc County $25.00 Monterey County $10.00 Napa-Solano $5.00 Plumas-Sierra $10.00 San Benito $20.00 San Diego-Imperial $10.00 San Joaquin-Stanislaus $5.00 San Luis Obispo $20.00

Signature ________________________________ Santa Barbara Santa Clara Shasta County Siskiyou County Sonoma-Marin Tahoe Tehama County Tulare County

$10.00 NA $20.00 $10.00 $5.00 $15.00 $10.00 $5.00

Tuolumne County Ventura County Yolo County Yuba-Sutter

$10.00 $35.00 $25.00 $25.00

Corsair Angus Ranch Inaugural Bull & Heifer Sale Thursday, March 6, 2014 • 1 p.m.

Herdsires

Connealy Confidence 0100 War Party 2417 Coleman Regis 904 Sydgen CC&7 HA Program 5652 Steve & Jan Puntenney 66062 Hwy 74, Ione, OR 97843 (503) 784-8691 www.corsairangus.com Take Exit 147 off of I-84. Follow Highway 74 to Milepost 21½. From Heppner, OR, we’re 22 miles North on Highway 74.

61 California Cattleman January 2014

Selling 41 Yearling • 16 Two-Year-Old Angus Bulls for the 2014 Breeding Season 36 AI Bred Registered • 4 AI Bred Commercial Heifers Phenotypically Correct Fit for Function, not Fat These Bulls will get out there and cover your cows

JOIN US AT NOON FOR A BBQ LUNCH ON SALE DAY!

430 Angus Bulls Sell

11:00 am • Saturday • March 8, 2014 • Idaho Falls, ID Riverbend actively works to help our customers receive the highest price possible for their calves. Over the past three years we have purchased and fed over 40,000 head of predominantly Riverbend sired calves. In 2013, Riverbend invested over $7 million in puchasing our customer’s calves. Key points of Riverbend’s customer investment program include: • Use Riverbend genetics. • Tell us when and where tyour cattle will be selling. • Understand that the more Riverbend influence your cattle exhibit, the more we can bid relative to the market. • Have confidence that in addition to our bids, we work hard to educate other buyers about the value of the Riverbend genetics in your calf crop.

It’s in the numbers! Carefully maintained records including performance, breeding, carcass merit, and genomic profile provide genetic direction. Riverbend bulls sell with: • Complete Zoetis HD50K results and the most up to date EPD’s. • An unconditional guarantee unmatched anywhere in the industry. • Sight unseen purchases and free delivery options are available. Riverbend sired calves have consistently proven their ability to convert feed into pounds of beef, and they yield and grade far above industry averages. Simply put, Riverbend genetics will produce superior profits in the feedlot compared with the average Angus calf. This allows buyers to pay more for Riverbend genetics. Competition for Riverbend genetics at sale time is fierce. Leading feeders recognize the value of Riverbend sired calves, and such calves have consistently topped the market.

Riverbend’s commercial cow-calf herd, consisting of 4,000 mother cows, serves primarily as a testing ground for developing and proving cutting edge Angus genetics in tough, real-world conditions. Ranch locations in Idaho, Montana, and Utah allow us to evaluate how Riverbend genetics perform in diverse western ranch environments. We focus on the fact that the Angus mother cow is the model cow in terms of maternal characteristics, which makes all the difference in a cow-calf operation. Riverbend works diligently to balance all traits in a fashion that will insure that your cowherd excels in all the maternal traits, fertility and longevity you expect from the Angus breed.

Genetic Edge Bull Sale

430 Angus Bulls Sell including • 140 coming 2-Year Old Bulls • 90 Heifer Bulls • • 50 Registered Angus Heifers •

63 California Cattleman January 2014

Different

...for all the right reasons! Byrd Cattle Company is not your typical purebred breeder. We’re family owned and operated, and our only business is the purebred cattle business. We’re the owners, the managers, cowboys, fence builders and bookkeepers – just like many of you. We don’t have spare time or money – thus we concentrate on problem-free, low maintenance cattle that won’t cost you money – they’ll make it! We have only one goal – to make our customers more $$. That's why our program is built around you. We breed cost efficient, functional cattle, backed by elite genetics and dependable data, yet, we realize all the data in the world won’t make you profitable without stressing the convenience traits such as attitude, udder quality, sound feet and legs, mothering ability, and the ability of a cow to wean a calf and breed back in a harsh environment – every year. At BCC, these intangibles have a direct effect on the most important trait of all – THE PROFITABILITY OF OUR CUSTOMERS. To assist our customers in putting more net dollars in their pocket, we’ve worked tirelessly to cultivate relationships with procurement

managers for both traditional and grassbased finishing programs. These contacts have indicated a willingness to pay significantly more for our customers’ cattle, as there are “mountains” of data documenting the profitability of BCC genetics in every segment of the beef production chain. At Byrd Cattle Company, we’re continually moving forward with new technology. We see feed efficiency as an untapped “great frontier” in the beef business. With feed costs accounting for nearly 70% of the cost of raising cattle, we believe in offering our customers every opportunity to save money by purchasing tested, documented feed efficient genetics. Every bull in our sale sells with individual Residual Feed Intake (RFI) data, in addition to Zoetis 50K DNA percentile rankings. This adds a substantial cost on our end, yet the benefit to you, our customer, is priceless. If you're thinking about buying Angus bulls or females, let us show you how BCC genetics can make you more profitable. We sell affordable bulls and females bred with cow sense – but more importantly with common sense!

2002 CBCIA SeedStoCk ProduCer of the YeAr

BYrd CAttLe CoMPANY, LLC P.O. Box 713 • Red Bluff, CA 96080

Dan 530-736-8470 • Ty 530-200-4054 byrdcattleco@hotmail.com • www.byrdcattleco.com THD ©

The West’s #1 Source for Low Birth, High Growth Bulls with Marbling, Muscle and Feed Efficiency!


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