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Featuring North America始s Leading Travel Destinations

The Top 50 North American Group Tour Destinations


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PREVIEW By Steve Kirchner, Editor & Publisher

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For 2010, Branson is a close runner-up, followed by elcome to the latest issue of Byways magazine. This is a New York City, Pigeon Forge and Nashville. The strong showings of Pigeon Forge and Nashville, very exciting issue for us, as it represents the first time that Byways has become a full-size magazine. For the past 26 years, Byways was a halfsize digest, the only one in the group tour industry. Why did we change? As Byways transitions to an on-line magazine distributed electronically, we have much more flexibility in the size and content of each issue. If we can double the amount of editorial coverage with no increase in production costs, then we should do that. If we can give our advertisers twice the visibility for their advertising with no increase in advertising costs to them, that is something we should do. And if by increasing the size we can create a format Chicago is home to 15 miles of bathing that is easier to read through the internet, then that beaches along the shores of Lake Michigan. is something we should do. As you browse through this issue and enjoy features on such Top 50 tour destinations as Chicago, Seattle, Albuquerque and combined with the appearance of Memphis in the Top Annapolis, we think you will agree the new full-size 50, helped propel Tennessee to the Top Group Tour gives us an advantage with beautiful photography that is State. This is the second consecutive year Tennessee has taken first place. The next states in line are New simply not possible in a smaller size publication. York, Pennsylvania, Virginia It is fitting that and Maryland. the first full-size In the Natural Attractions issue features the category, Niagara Falls took the Top 50 Group Tour top honor, followed by Destinations of Yellowstone National Park and 2010. Traditionally, the Grand Canyon. this issue is one of The beautiful and historic our most popular, as Monuments in Washington, the destinations are DC took first place in the Manselected by the Made Attractions category, leading motorcoach with New York’s Statue of charter and tour Liberty second, followed by operators from Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry, throughout North Pennsylvania Dutch Country, America. The Seattle Skyline at dusk and Disney World in Orlando. Where will their In the Group Friendly Hotel groups be heading category, Hampton Inn again took top honors, followed in the new year? The answer begins on page 6 with the announcements by Holiday Inn/Holiday Inn Express, Best Western of the 2010 Top Group Tour and Motorcoach International, Comfort Inns and La Quinta. We hope you enjoy the first full-size issue of Byways. Destinations. It’s no surprise that the nation’s capital, If you have comments or suggestions, be sure to visit the Washington, DC, once again has gained sole possession Byways blog site at http://bywaysmagazine.wordpress.com/ of the top spot for the new year. Washington has shared and let us know what you think. the title for the past two years, with Branson in 2009 and And thanks for reading Byways. Pigeon Forge in 2008. 4 • Byways


Volume 26, Issue No. 4, 2009 On the Cover. Boats move in and out of the Bell Harbor Marina, with the Seattle skyline as a backdrop. Photo: Tim Thompson. Seattle is featured on page 18 as one of the Top 50 Group Tour Destinations in North America. Coverage of the complete listing of Top 50 Group Tour Destinations begins on page 6.

Features Washington, DC Selected Top Group Tour Destination, Tennessee Top State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Top 50 Group Tour Destinations of 2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Top 30 Group Tour States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Top 10 Group Friendly Hotels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Top 10 Group Friendly Restaurants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Top 5 Natural Attractions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Top 15 Man-Made Attractions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Chicago -- The Great American City!. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Seattle, Where It’s Happening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Albuquerque’s Authentic Southwestern Culture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Sail Away to America’s Sailing Capital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Bedford, Virginia’s Historic Treasures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Departments

Byways Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 What’s Happening Shenandoah Valley Delights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Advertisers Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Byways Subscription . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Coming in future issues of Byways… Upcoming coverage features Nebraska Tour Destinations; Traveling South, a look at the leading Southern travel destinations; and The Sesquicentennial: The 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, and more. The Omaha Skyline

Omaha, one of the Top 50 Group Tour Destinations in North America, and the State of Nebraska will be featured in the next issue of Byways.

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Washington, DC Selected as Top Group Tour Destination of 2010, Tennessee Retains Top State

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he Nation’s Capital in Washington, DC, claimed the undisputed top spot in the 2010 vote for the Top 50 Motorcoach Destinations of 2010. It’s the first time in three years that Washington has held the top spot on its own. Last year it shared first place with Branson, MO, and in 2008 it shared the top spot with Pigeon Forge, TN. For 2010 Washington edged out Branson, followed by New York City, Pigeon Forge and Nashville, rounding out the five top spots in the survey of motorcoach charter and tour operators from throughout North America. The annual survey of professional tour operators conducted by Byways magazine is now in its 25th year. While it is not a random survey, it has consistently provided an insight into where group tour customers will be traveling during the coming year. For the second consecutive year, Tennessee was selected as the most popular group tour state, coming in ahead

The U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, DC

of New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Maryland. Maryland’s finish was its strongest in years, jumping five spots from the 2009 survey. So many states had strong showings in this year’s survey that the state listings were expanded to 30, up from the 20 selected during the past several years. The Branson Strip. Branson was edged out by Washington, DC in the 2010 voting.

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Central Park, New York City

Hampton Inns again was ranked number one as the most Group Friendly Hotel chain, followed closely by Holiday Inn/Holiday Inn Express, and Best Western International. Cracker Barrel and Golden Corral again pulled away from the rest of the field to take the top two spots in the Group Friendly Restaurant categoy. Cracker Barrel has finished first for the past five years, but Golden Corral continues to make a strong push. Niagara Falls and Yellowstone again finished one-two in the Top Natural Attractions category. Washington, DC’s Monuments, a key factor in Washington’s strong finish each year, again topped the Man-Made Attractions list. When you consider that these Monuments are unmatched anywhere in the country and usually offer free admission, it’s hard for any other destination to even come close to what the nation’s capital offers to group tour travelers. The Man-Made Attractions following DC’s Monuments are the Statue of Liberty, The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Pennsylvania Dutch Country and Disney World in Orlando. Thanks to all of the tour operators who participated in this year’s voting. We hope they will enjoy reading the results just as much as the rest of Byways readers.

The Mill, Pigeon Forge, Tennessee

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The Top 50 Group Tour - Mo 1. Washington, DC

22. Asheville, NC

2. Branson, MO

23. Santa Fe, NM

3. New York City, NY

24. New Orleans, LA

4. Pigeon Forge, TN

25. Atlanta, GA

5. Nashville, TN

26. San Antonio, TX

6. Williamsburg, VA

27. Virginia Beach, VA

7. Niagara Falls, NY

28. St. Louis, MO

8. Mackinaw Island, MI

29. Baltimore, MD

9. Atlantic City, NJ

30. Boston, MA

10. Gettysburg, PA

31. Louisville, KY

11. Chicago, IL

32. Salt Lake City, UT

12. Philadelphia, PA

33. Mississippi Beach, MS

13. Charleston, SC

34. Oklahoma City, OK

14. Albuquerque, NM

35. San Diego, CA

15. Hershey, PA

36. Colorado Springs, CO

16. Cape Cod, MA

37. Los Angeles, CA

17. Myrtle Beach, SC 18. Dallas-Ft. Worth, TX 19. San Francisco, CA 20. Las Vegas, NV 21. Orlando, FL

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Atlantic City


torcoach Destinations of 2010 otorcoach Mackinaw Island, Michigan

Honorable Mention Alexandria, VA Anchorage, AK Boise, ID Cleveland, OH

38. Richmond, VA 39. Seattle, WA 40. Tucson, AZ 41. Memphis, TN 42. Portland, OR 43. Annapolis, MD 44. Little Rock, AR 45. Montreal, QB 46. Indianapolis, IN 47. Phoenix, AZ 48. Omaha, NE

Detroit, MI Houston, TX Knoxville, TN Las Cruces, NM Mobile, AL Ocean City, MD Quebec City, QB Tampa, FL Valley Forge, PA Wheeling, WV Virginia Beach

49. Reno-Tahoe, NV 50. Pittsburgh, PA (Tie) Denver, CO Toronto, ON Kansas City, MO Byways • 9


The Top 30 Group Tour States 1. Tennessee 2. New York 3. Pennsylvania 4. Virginia 5. Maryland 6. Missouri 7. South Carolina 8. Florida 9. Georgia 10. North Carolina 11. Michigan 12. New Jersey 13. Texas 14. Ohio 15. Massachusetts Maryland State House in Annapolis

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16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

Illinois California Kentucky West Virginia Mississippi Louisiana Arkansas Arizona South Dakota New Mexico Nevada Vermont Montana Nebraska Wyoming


8. Hard Rock Cafe 9. Olive Garden 10. Western Sizzlin’ Top 10 Group Tour Friendly Hotels 1. Hampton Inns 2. Holiday Inns/ Holiday Inn Express 3. Best Western International 4. Comfort Inns 5. La Quinta 6. Hilton 7. Marriott 8. Sheraton 9. Drury Inns 10. Days Inns Top 10 Group Friendly Restaurants 1. Cracker Barrel 2. Golden Corral 3. Bob Evans Restaurants 4. Piccalilli 5. Shoney's 6. Applebees 7. Landry’s Seafood Restaurants

Top 5 Natural Attractions 1. Niagara Falls 2. Yellowstone 3. Grand Canyon 4. Cape Cod 5. Black Hills of South Dakota Top 15 Man-Made Attractions 1. DC Monuments 2. Statue of Liberty 3. Grand Ole Opry 4. Pennsylvania Dutch Country 5. Disney World 6. Dollywood 7. Mount Rushmore 8. Six Flags Theme Parks 9. Universal Studios 10. New York’s Broadway 11. Elvis Presley’s Graceland 12. Silver Dollar City 13. Radio City Music Hall 14. Mount Vernon 15. Skyline Drive Byways • 11


CHICAGO -- THE GRE Photo credits: Chicago Convention & Visitors Bureau

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EAT AMERICAN CITY!

The Chicago skyline and the Chicago River

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The Chicago Water Tower (left) is one of the only buildings in the city to have survived the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

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C

hicago is a city of world-class status and unsurpassed beauty, drawing visitors from around the nation and the world. Located on the shores of Lake Michigan in the heart of the Midwest, Chicago, with a population of more than 2.7 million people, is home to world-championship sports teams, an internationally acclaimed symphony orchestra, renowned architecture, award-winning theater, and much more. Visitors to Chicago experience a virtual explosion of cultural activity, civic pride and multicultural expression. From stunning architecture and world-famous museums to lakefront parks and vibrant ethnic neighborhoods, Chicago offers a range of attractions, which keep visitors coming back again and again. The Chicago Cultural Center, 77 E. Randolph Street, an architectural showplace for the lively and visual arts, is a great place to begin a visit to Chicago. In addition to housing one of the city’s official Visitor Information Centers, the Chicago Cultural Center offers more than 600 free art programs annually. It serves as a cultural crossroads where visitors can meet and learn about Chicago and its residents. Chicago History The first resident of Chicago was Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, a fur trader from Santo Domingo of FrenchAfrican descent. DuSable built the first settlement in 1779 at the mouth of the Chicago River.

In 1830, lots were sold to finance construction of what would become the Illinois and Michigan Canal, connecting Chicago with the Mississippi River. Three years later, with a booming population of 350, the Town of Chicago was incorporated. In 1837, the town was incorporated as a city with a population of 4,170. Chicago cemented its role as a transportation hub in 1848 when the 100-mile Illinois and Michigan Canal was completed, and the first locomotive arrived from the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad. The city’s population tripled in the following three years. Access to transportation played a key role in the development of the Chicago Union stockyards, which served the nation between 1865 and 1971. On Sunday, October 8, 1871, a fire began on the West Side. By Tuesday morning, the Great Chicago Fire had claimed 300 lives, left 90,000 Chicagoans without homes and destroyed $200 million worth of property. This disaster turned into an opportunity to plan and rebuild the entire city. In 1893, Chicago hosted the World’s Columbian Exposition that attracted nearly 26 million visitors during its six- month run. In order to provide transportation to the fair, the Chicago Transit Authority introduced the first elevated trains to Chicago. Today the system’s “L” train encircles the city's central business district, The Wrigley Field marquee is an iconic Chicago image.

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The annual Taste of Chicago Festival features cuisine from more than 70 Chicago restaurants, plus entertainment and activities.

referred to as “the Loop”. Chicago’s cultural interests can be traced to this era, when its orchestra, library, and major museums were established. The Columbian Exposition’s Palace of Fine Arts is now home to the Museum of Science and Industry, visited by more than one million people each year. In 1909, the newly formed Chicago Plan Commission published Daniel Burnham’s comprehensive plan. The city’s unobstructed lakefront, its citywide system of parks and its green belt of forest preserves were all part of this unique plan, the first ever presented to an American city. Chicago hosted the 1933 World’s Fair, dubbed “A Century of Progress,” to show the technological accomplishments of civilization since the city was incorporated. The fair attracted 39 million visitors in a two-year period. Richard J. Daley was elected Mayor of Chicago for the first of six times in 1955. For 21 years, Daley served “the city that works.” During his time in office, O’Hare International Airport (which became the world’s busiest) began operations, the Sears Tower (one of the world’s tallest buildings) was erected and McCormick Place Convention Center (the largest in North America) opened. In 1976, Mayor Daley died in office. Since then, Chicago elected its first female mayor (Jane Byrne in 16 • Byways

1979) and its first African American mayor (Harold Washington in 1983). In 1989, Mayor Richard M. Daley, son of Richard J. Daley, was elected Mayor and still holds the position. Chicago has increased its exposure as a world-class city by hosting the World Cup Soccer Tournament in 1994, the Democratic National Convention in 1996, the International Pow Wow in 1998, an International Millennium Celebration in 1999/2000, and Gay Games VII in 2006. Chicago’s multicultural heritage is reflected in its neighborhoods, which now attract thousands of visitors each year. Chicago is home to nearly three million people from all over the world. As each new group has come to Chicago, their unique community spirit, typified by Chicago’s motto “I will,” has enabled them to build a new community, a new life, and a new future. This spirit is responsible for a city that has never stopped dreaming, building, rebuilding, growing, and making major contributions to the world. Architecture Chicago is the birthplace of the modern building. From historic landmark buildings to contemporary technological masterpieces, Chicago is home to unique and innovative designs that have shaped American architecture. Chicago is a living museum of


architecture, thanks to the genius of architects such as Daniel Burnham, Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Helmut Jahn, Frank Gehry and hundreds of others. Museums Chicago is world-renowned for its diverse collection of museums, which explore a variety of subjects, including Chicago history, modern art, African American culture, astronomy, natural history and much more. Some museums offer free admission and many others have weekly free days. Tours By foot, bus, bike, boat, or plane--on the land, lake, river, or in the sky--you can tour all of Chicago, from its famous landmarks to its world-renowned cultural institutions and attractions. Taste Chicago has thousands of restaurants serving a medley of culinary delights to suit every taste, every budget and every mood. Reserve your table at one of Chicago’s award-winning restaurants, from Charlie Trotter’s signature dishes to Rick Tramonto and Gale Gand’s exceptional menu at Tru. Shopping Shopping in Chicago began on State Street, the center of the Loop. The original and flagship Marshall Field’s (now Macy’s) department store opened in 1852 on State Street. The famed “Magnificent Mile” that

Soldier Field, home of the Bears

runs along Michigan Avenue from the Chicago River to Oak Street offers hundreds of designer retail stores, shops and boutiques presenting top-of-the-line goods from around the world. Be sure to stroll down Oak Street, where designs from Paris, Milan and Manhattan are mixed with Chicago’s Gold Coast atmosphere, and visit neighborhoods such as Division Street and the Southport Corridor where specialty shops carry the work of independent and Chicago-based designers. Visitor Information Visitors can receive Chicago brochures, reserve hotel accommodations and receive trip-planning assistance by calling toll-free 1.877.CHICAGO (1.877.244.2246), or visiting www.explorechicago.org.

Millennium Park’s Jay Pritzker Pavilion during a performance

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Seattle, Where It’s Happening

Seattle’s lively and dynamic waterfront offers sightseeing, dining and shopping galore. Mount Rainier is in the background. Photo credit: Seattle Convention and Visitors Bureau

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Seattle’s famous Space Needle was built for the 1962 World’s Fair.

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f you look closely, you just might discover that in Seattle there are amazing things happening all around you. Seattle is anything but ordinary. It’s a place where bike messengers share elevators with worldrenowned researchers. Where fishermen have lunch alongside top surgeons. It’s a city where the extraordinary is commonplace and commonplace is anything but. Read on and discover some of the reasons why Seattle jumped from the Honorable Mention list in the Top 50 Group Tour Destinations in the 2009 poll, all the way up to the number 39 spot in this year’s voting. What you can’t miss from the coverage of Seattle is its beauty. Surrounded by water on all sides and framed by the spectacular Mount Rainier, Seattle is one of the most beautiful cities in North America. You can’t go to Paris without stopping by the Eiffel Tower. And you can’t visit Seattle without checking out the view from the world-famous Space Needle. Here’s a handy “must do” list for first-time visitors and those who want to be sure they’ve done everything. The Space Needle Seattle Center, 400 Broad St.; 206.905.2100 www.spaceneedle.com A 41-second elevator ride takes you up 520 feet to the observation deck of the Space Needle, built for the 1962 World’s Fair. Enjoy a meal at SkyCity, the restaurant at the top that revolves 360° while you dine.

Pike Place Market Between First Ave. and Western, from Pike to Virginia streets. www.pikeplacemarket.org Started in 1907, Seattle’s Pike Place Market is the granddaddy of farmers’ markets. Today, it’s a major tourist attraction with 200 businesses operating yearround, 190 craftspeople and 120 farmers booths, plus street performers and musicians. Flowers by the bucketful, flying fish, fresh pastries and fruit, handmade cheeses, local honey, wine, an assortment of restaurants, import goods, antiques, collectibles and lots of surprises are around every corner. Washington State Ferries www.wsdot.wa.gov/ferries Traveling by ferry is a state of mind as much as a means of transportation to some of the Puget Sound’s most historic and scenic sites. Views of the Olympic and Cascade mountains, the Seattle cityscape and the green shorelines will draw you out onto the deck to feel the salt breeze on your face. The state ferry system takes passengers and their vehicles from Seattle and nearby departure points to Vashon Island, the Kitsap Peninsula, the San Juan Islands and Canada.

Residents and tourists enjoy a sunny Seattle day on Seattle’s bustling waterfront. A Washington State Ferry unloads and loads passengers at the Colman Dock. Photo credit: Tim Thompson

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Seattle’s Pike Place Market is world famous for its fresh seafood, produce and its lively arts and crafts. Photo credit : Tim Thompson

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Seattle Aquarium Pier 59; 206.386.4300 www.seattleaquarium.org Meet Alki, the sea otter pup born at the Aquarium. Walk under the water in a glass dome as bluntnose sixgill sharks and other Elliott Bay creatures swim all around you. Touch a sea anemone. Learn about the lives of salmon at the world’s first aquariumbased salmon ladder. Marvel at the impossibly bright-colored coral reef fish. And don’t forget to wave to the giant Pacific octopus. The Seattle Waterfront Piers 52 to 70 on Alaskan Way ci.seattle.wa.us/tour/water.htm A bustling collection of attractions, restaurants and shopping, as well as starting points for ferries, cruise ships, the Victoria Clipper and Argosy boat tours are located here. Feed the seagulls at the statue of Ivar Haglund in front of Ivar’s Acres of Clams, stroll by the fountains on the wooden piers of Waterfront Park, admire the view or shop for souvenirs. Woodland Park Zoo South Gate: 750 N. 50th St.; 206.684.4800 www.zoo.org See more than 1,000 animals of 300 different species, from elephants and gorillas to piranhas and penguins, in

A Mariners game at SAFECO Field

naturalistic exhibits at the Woodland Park Zoo. Seattle’s Wondrous Gardens www.seattle.gov/seattle/parks/parkspaces/gardens Seattle Park and Recreation’s special gardens are some of the city’s most beautiful and inspiring places.They display diverse and unique collections of plants, landscape features and cultural heritages. They are the sparkling jewels within the Seattle Parks system.

Parasailing on Puget Sound, with SAFECO Field and the Qwest Field in the background. Photo credit: Tim Thompson

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Mount Rainier is an active volcano in Pierce County, Washington, located 54 miles southeast of Seattle. It towers over the Cascade Range as the most prominent mountain in the contiguous United States, at 14,411 feet.

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Seattle Gateway to Gold 319 Second Ave. South; 206.220.4240 www.nps.gov/klgo The Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park preserves the story of the 1897-98 stampede to the Yukon gold fields and Seattle’s role in this event. Interactive exhibits offer a glimpse at the stories of adventure and hardship of the gold rush. Touch screen computers allow visitors to experience the gold rush through the journals and personal accounts of actual stampeders.

Westlake Center features over 70 boutiques and eateries. Photo: Tim Thompson

Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour 608 First Ave.; 206.682.4646 www.undergroundtour.com After the Great Seattle Fire of 1889, the city was rebuilt over the top of the ruins. This guided tour takes visitors through the hidden subterranean passages that once were the main roadways and storefronts of old downtown Seattle and tells stories of the frontier people who lived and worked there. Tillicum Village Blake Island; 206.933.8600 www.tillicumvillage.com A short, narrated cruise takes you to an island village, where you’ll feast on salmon cooked in the authentic Native American way. A stage show of traditional dances and stories entertains and teaches you about the people who lived in the Northwest first. Myth and magic come to life in the spellbinding performance featuring dances in the spirit of coastal tribes. Ride the Ducks of Seattle 516 Broad St.; 206.441.DUCK (3825) www.ridetheducksofseattle.com Tour Seattle by land and water on a WWII amphibious landing craft. This 90-minute adventure tour will have you “quacking up” through the streets of Seattle. You’ll see the major sights of the Emerald City on land before you head out to the funky Fremont neighborhood where you’ll splash into Lake Union. 26 • Byways


Cruising from Seattle 2010 will be the cruise industry’s 12th summer season in Seattle. The Port of Seattle is expecting more than 200 premium ship embarkations, carrying more than 400,000 passengers, including repositionings. Celebrity, Holland America, Norwegian Cruise Line, Princess Cruises and Royal Caribbean are expected to homeport a total of eleven ships in Seattle, offering 7day roundtrip cruises to Alaska every weekend during the peak season, 14-day roundtrip cruises to Alaska

departing on Thursdays beginning May 14, and 1-4 day Pacific Northwest cruises at the beginning and end of the Seattle season. Repositioning cruises provide some additional itinerary options. In addition to the large cruise lines, Seattle also benefits from small-ship cruises to the San Juan Islands, British Columbia, Northwest rivers, and early and late season Seattle/Alaska and reverse itineraries. The niche lines include American Safari Cruises, Cruise West, and Fantasy Cruises.

The Norwegian Sun set to sail from Seattle

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Clear blue skies, calm winds and mild temperatures are the norm in Albuquerque, encouraging yearround hot air ballooning and enabling more than 300 resident balloonists (more than any other state) to fly hot air balloons frequently and for long periods of time. Photo credit: Ron Behrmann.

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Albuquerque’s Authentic Southwestern Culture

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ecognized as one of the most culturally diverse cities in the country, Albuquerque’s ethnic tapestry is reflected in its architecture, artwork, cultural centers and cuisine. Countless customs and traditions passed down over generations are a vibrant part of daily life in the city, and make Albuquerque a center of authentic Southwestern culture. Albuquerque has consistently ranked in the top half of the annual survey to the Top 50 Group Tour Destinations, placing number 14 in 2010. Here you will discover the rich art and culture, rooted in centuries of history, expressed through pottery and 30 • Byways

jewelry and Southwestern paintings. The influence of Native American, Spanish and Western heritage is clear. It’s in the Pueblo and Spanish-inspired architecture. It’s in the world famous cuisine, the music and the art. But most of all, it’s in the people -- evident in the tremendous Southwestern hospitality. Albuquerque, New Mexico’s largest city, was named to honor a Spanish Duke, the 10th Duke of Albuquerque, Spain. Colonial Governor Don Francisco Cuervo y Valdez selected the name, but over the centuries, the first “r” has been dropped. In 1706, Albuquerque was founded by a group of


Historic Route 66 (Central Avenue) runs through the heart of Albuquerque. Photo credit: MarbleStreetStudio.com

colonists who had been granted permission by King Philip of Spain to establish a new villa (city) on the banks of the Rio Grande (which means big or great river). The colonists chose a place along the river where it made a wide curve providing good irrigation for crops and a source of wood from the bosque (cottonwoods, willows and olive trees) and nearby mountains. The site also provided protection and trade with the Indians from the pueblos in the area. The early Spanish settlers were religious people, and the first building erected was a small adobe chapel, San Felipe de Neri. Its plaza was surrounded by small adobe

homes clustered close together for mutual protection against any threats posed by hostile forces in this vast and dangerous country. In 1792, the church collapsed under heavy rains and was rebuilt the following year. Since then, the building has undergone additional renovations. It has been enlarged several times and remodeled, but its original thick adobe walls are still intact. The church is the hub of historic Old Town, the sentimental heart of Albuquerque, with activity revolving around shopping and dining. To this day, special holidays and feast days are still commemorated as part of the year-round attractions of this “original” Albuquerque. The growth of Albuquerque can be traced to two changes in the early development of the area. First, the Rio Grande changed course moving a little farther to the west, causing a slight shift in the population. Second, the railroad came to Albuquerque in 1880, and a “New Town” grew along the tracks two miles east of Old Town. Population increases can also be attributed to Albuquerque becoming an important stop on the Camino Real -- the trail from Chihuahua to Santa Fe -and the city’s proximity to the Santa Fe Trail, the Southwest’s first “superhighway” during the westward expansion. Between 1850 and 1875, many forts were established in the Southwest to protect the westward migration. Albuquerque was a major supply center to these forts. During this same period, merchandising companies that had first shipped goods by covered wagon, and then by rail, established warehouses and stores in Albuquerque. Manufactured goods from the east were brought in and hides, pelts, livestock, lumber and minerals were shipped out. Albuquerque never went through the lawless days of the frontier like other western towns. When those times came (the last quarter of the 19th century), Albuquerque already had an established culture of a century-and-a-half old. Much of Albuquerque’s appeal today can be attributed to the subtle blending of the many cultures that comprise its fabric: American Indian, Spanish, Anglo, African and Asian. Each has left its mark in food, music, religion, art, customs, architecture and traditions. Historic Route 66 weaves through Albuquerque connecting the past, present and future. Albuquerque grew up along Route 66, and it continues to measure the pulse of the city, connecting popular attractions on what is now Central Avenue. Beginning with Petroglyph National Monument on the city’s far west side, modern day adventurers will pass through the Rio Grande Botanic Garden and the Albuquerque Aquarium, historic Old Town, the Albuquerque Museum and the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science. Walking or driving through the downtown area, visitors enjoy the majesty of the KiMo Theatre and the ambiance of diners and restaurants along a revitalized Route 66. Route 66 passes by the University of New Mexico, farther east, Byways • 31


Winter View of Sandia Peak Aerial Tramway Photo credit: Jay Blackwood

the trendy Nob Hill area, home to many of the city’s best restaurants and many eclectic shops and boutiques. The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta®, the world’s largest hot air balloon festival, takes place each October, when you’ll see more than 700 balloons in the sky at a time. This magical hot air balloon festival is considered to be the most photographed event in the world, drawing a huge international crowd of balloonists and

spectators. You can visit the Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum, the world’s premier facility dedicated to the art, culture, science, history, sport and spectacle of hot air ballooning. It features one of the world’s finest collections of hot air ballooning equipment and memorabilia. With dependably sunny days, crisp mountain air and stunning vistas everywhere, Albuquerque provides

Sandia Mountain/Rio Grande Birds in flight over the Rio Grande in winter Photo credit: www.morimotophotography.com

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attractive high-desert conditions for athletes of all stripes. It’s little wonder that Albuquerque was named “Fittest City” by Men’s Fitness magazine in 2007. Outdoor activities in Albuquerque, New Mexico range from biking to skiing, depending on time of year and location in the city. Albuquerque is a major destination for bicycling enthusiasts and has some of the best mountain bike trails in New Mexico. The high desert is the perfect place to play tennis or golf year-round, and Albuquerque provides plenty of courts and courses both public and private. During the winter months you can ski, snowboard and snowshoe at Sandia Peak; in the summer, whitewater rafting trips depart from north of Albuquerque, alternately coasting and whooshing down the Rio Grande. Albuquerque stands with one foot in the past, one foot in the present and both eyes on the future. Home to some of the nation’s finest high-tech research facilities including Sandia National Laboratory, Phillips Laboratory and the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque is leading the way in technology transfer.

Outdoor nightlife in Nob Hill at Kelly's Brew Pub Photo credit: newmexicostock.com

Companies including Intel, Eclipse Aviation, and Advent Solar call Albuquerque home. Civilian application of military technology has provided the spark for many an entrepreneur and led to a technological boom. Albuquerque continues to set the pace for success throughout the Southwest as a visitor destination and a great place to live.

Sandia Peak Ski Area looks down upon Albuquerque below. Photo credit: Jay Blackwood

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Ski, Taste and Exp Thrilling visitors from around the world, Shenandoah Caverns is the only cavern in Virginia with elevator service. Explorers of every age and ability will discover an underground world of wonder. With level walkways and no stairs, only our sights are breathtaking!

Snow Tubing at Bryce

Resort

Indoor Pool at Hampton Inn

Thrilling visitors from around the world, Shenandoah Caverns is the only cavern in Virginia with elevator service! Explorers of every age and ability will discover an underground world of wonder. With level walkways and no stairs to climb, only the sights are breathtaking. The Family of Attractions includes amazing parade floats and presidential inaugural props at American Celebration on Parade. Delightful antique animated department store window displays on Main Street of Yesteryear. Experience the live indoor beehive and model trains in motion at the Yellow Barn. Fourattractions - one low price! www.shenandoahcaverns.com 34 • Byways


plore Shenandoah The views are breathtaking from the slopes of Bryce Resort, the Mid-Atlantic’s Premier Learn to Ski/Board Resort. Skiing, Snowboarding, Snow Tubing and more await you at this winter paradise. Learn to ski or snowboard packages available. Learn about the Bryce ResortHampton Inn overnight ski packages from just $99.00 per person. www.bryceresort.com

New Hampton Inn/W oodstock

sort The slopes at Bryce Re

With an indoor heated pool, 92 rooms (including 30 luxurious suites), wireless Internet, and 32” flat screen TVs, the Hampton Inn/Woodstock is the newest, most exclusive hotel in the Shenandoah Valley. It is located in the quaint, historic town of Woodstock, and central to many of the Valley’s breathtaking and unique attractions, including Skyline Drive, Shenandoah National Park, Shenandoah Caverns and many Civil War battlefield sites. Located just 15 miles from Bryce Resort, check out the new overnight Bryce Ski Packages from just $99.00 per person, double occupancy. www.hamptoninnwoodstock.com

Skiers at Bryce wineries Visit the five doah n a n e of the Sh Trail. e in W ty Coun

Skiing, Snowboarding, Wine Tasting, Caverns, Attractions, Old Valley Pike, and Civil War Battlefields in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia 90 minutes from the Washington Beltway Shenandoah County Tourism 888-367-3965 • www.shenandoahtravel.org Byways • 35


Sail Away to America’s Sailing Capital Photo credits: Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Conference and Visitors Bureau

Sailboats docked at Ergo Alley in Annapolis, Maryland

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Sailboats arrive at the U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis.

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f sailing is your sport, make America’s Sailing Capital your destination this summer. Located in the heart of the Chesapeake Bay at 38 degrees, 58 minutes, 35 seconds north and 76 degrees, 28 minutes, and 46 seconds west, Annapolis, Maryland is a sailor’s delight. Perhaps that’s why National Geographic Adventure Magazine recently named it one of the top waterfront destinations in the country. If you’re coming by car or motorcoach, that’s fine, too. You’ll enjoy all the action related to the sailing events, and there is plenty to see and do as part of your Annapolis tour. The fact that Annapolis is also the home of the United States Naval Academy and the capital city of Maryland offers more to experience there. In fact, that may be part of the attraction that resulted in Annapolis moving into the Top 50 Group Tour Destinations for 2010. A bustling port town during the 18th-century, Annapolis is home to the U.S. Naval Academy, site of the November 2007 Middle East Peace Talks. A photo I.D. gets you inside the gate for a stroll of The Yard and a glimpse of the 4,000 strong Brigade of Midshipmen. If you prefer, guided tours of the beautiful National Historic Landmark campus depart daily from the Academy’s Armel-Leftwich Visitors Center. The National Trust for Historic Preservation has dubbed Annapolis one of a Dozen Distinctive Destinations in America. Founded as Anne Arundel Town in 1649, Annapolis became the capital of Maryland in 1695 and was the nation’s first peacetime capital in 1783. Today, Annapolis boasts more 18th-

century buildings than anywhere else in the nation. The Maryland State House is the oldest in continuous legislative use in the country. It was here that General George Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and the Treaty of Paris was ratified. The homes of all four of Maryland’s signers of the Declaration of Independence are located in Annapolis, and three of them are open to the public. Signer William Paca’s home features the only two-acre 18th-century pleasure garden of its kind in Maryland. Around the corner is the Hammond-Harwood House. Designed by 18th-century architect William Buckland, it boasts the Most Beautiful Doorway in America. Because historic sites in Annapolis are so close to one another and to the waterfront, boaters find it easy to spend the day exploring the “Museum Without Walls” that is Annapolis. No visit is complete without a trolley or walking tour of the city. Colonial tour guides depart the Visitors Center at 26 West Street daily, filling visitors in on the gossip of the centuries as they wind their way along the brick-lined streets of the Historic District. Food lovers can also get their fix at Westfield Annapolis’ McCormick & Schmick’s and Noodles & Company. The restaurants are part of a $150 million, 240,000 square foot expansion that added more than 60 new stores and restaurants to Westfield Annapolis. Between Westfield Annapolis and Arundel Mills Mall, one of the top three shopping attractions in the nation, people who like to shop ‘til they drop will have plenty to keep them busy.

Maryland is famous for its crabs and crabcakes.

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A motorcoach group tour is dropped off at the wharf with the Maryland State Capitol in background.

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As the gateway to North America’s largest estuary, it’s only fitting that Annapolis is home to the National Sailing Hall of Fame and Museum. Organizers are expected to begin construction of a permanent home for the museum at City Dock in 2010. In the meantime, Annapolis is internationally known for the U.S. Sailboat and U.S. Powerboat Shows that happen back to back at City Dock every October. Located at the site of the former McNasby Oyster Company in Eastport, the Annapolis Maritime Museum commemorates the maritime heritage of Annapolis and the neighboring waters of the Chesapeake Bay. The Maritime Museum officially reopened to the public in December 2008 following a $1.2 million renovation. The museum’s main permanent exhibit on the history and ecological properties of oysters will be installed in 2010. Get to know the maritime heritage of the Annapolis area from a waterside campus on the shores of Back Creek. Learn about the life of watermen and the seafood industry of yesteryear in the Bay Experience Center that is housed within the area’s last remaining oyster packing plant, McNasby’s. Board a boat and take a 1.5 mile trip out to the Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse. Tour the last remaining screw-pile

lighthouse in its original location on the Chesapeake Bay at 723 Second Street, Eastport, Annapolis. www.annapolismaritimemuseum.org Part of the appeal of Annapolis to boaters is the fact that it is located where the mouth of the Severn meets the powerful sailing winds of the Chesapeake Bay. Many boaters choose to keep their boats in Annapolis so they can head down after work on a Friday night. If you are among them, you could find yourself spending the evening dining and exploring the Historic District. The next day, it’s off for a day sail or for a weekend getaway to St. Michaels on the Eastern Shore. Solomons, Baltimore, Rock Hall, Havre de Grace, Chesapeake Beach, and Herrington Harbor are all popular places within easy reach of Annapolis. By Sunday, don’t be surprised to find yourself back in Annapolis enjoying a rollup-your-sleeves, steamed crab feast. Annapolis Carriage has expanded its carriage service to provide romantic carriage rides in Eastport on Friday and Saturday evenings. The carriages board at Severn and Third Streets in Eastport. Let a horse do the walking while you relax in style in a vintage carriage. Your coachmen will point out some of the 300 years of Annapolis history, letting you feel the times when

Morning formation at the U.S. Naval Academy

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The renovated Gallery of Ships Museum

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and many of our nation’s founders roamed these same streets. www.annapoliscarriage.com A new attraction of great interest to group tour operators are the Duffy Electric Boats operating from City Dock and the Chart House Restaurant in Eastport, Annapolis. Maryland’s capital has many hidden coves

The U.S. Naval Academy

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The renovated U.S. Naval Academy Chapel


and creeks that make the Chesapeake Bay a place to remember. These boats provide a relaxing, comfortable and quiet cruise on the local waterways. Two major projects have been completed at the U.S. Naval Academy. The U.S. Naval Academy Museum has reopened following renovations to the 1939 structure. The museum’s Gallery of Ships has been moved into a large, bright second floor gallery. The 1908 chapel is undergoing a two-phase $2.3 million renovation. During the year-long project, wooden floors and pews were restored; plaster trim was repaired; and the interior returned to its original color scheme. The lifestyle in Annapolis is laid-back with a taste of big-city excitement, combining smalltown accessibility with a cosmopolitan flair. Annapolis has a vibe of its own, as water defines its boundaries and personality, meaning a relaxed environment. Come Sail Away to better time. www.visitannapolis.org

New electric boat rentals

Downtown Annapolis

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The National D-Day Memorial in Bedford, Virginia “Historians believe that Bedford suffered the highest per capita loss on D-Day of any single community in the United States.” 44 • Byways


Bedford, Virginia’s Historic Treasures

T

Upon President Thomas Jefferson’s retirement he wo Bedford, Virginia area landmarks have celebrated anniversaries that commemorate impor- retreated to Poplar Forest. The small, secluded plantatant events in U. S history. For over 200 years, tion represented Jefferson’s own Pursuit of Happiness -Bedford has been home to American heroes. While president, Thomas Jefferson chose Bedford as the place to build his personal retreat, Poplar Forest, a remarkable architectural gem that he designed and built. The following century, The Bedford Boys would achieve immortality at D-Day when Bedford suffered the largest per capita losses of any community in the United States. Their sacrifices and those of the thousands of other soldiers is eloquently memorialized at The National D-Day Memorial. In 2009 the Memorial has celebrated the 65th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, officially known by millions as D-Day. The Thomas Jefferson Wine Festival at Poplar Forest Why are they in Bedford, in rural Virginia? Located in the western part of the Piedmont Plain, about 7 miles from the Peaks of Otter, between a private sanctuary, far from public scrutiny, and well the rolling foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and removed from the demands of his day. Almost lost to the ravages of time, Poplar Forest was panoramic Smith Mountain Lake, lies Bedford County. Rising out of the Blue Ridge Mountains, three promi- rescued almost two centuries later by a group of connent peaks stand against the sky giving Bedford one of cerned private citizens. Their efforts have resulted in the most beautiful backdrops in Virginia. These “Peaks the public’s ability to see Poplar Forest as it looked upon of Otter” known as Sharp Top, Flat Top and Harkening Jefferson’s last visit in 1823, at the age of 81. Poplar Forest now offers a unique experience, allowing Hill, were home to Native Americans who lived and visitors to see the restoration of the home’s interior and hunted there as early as 10,000 B.C.

Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest retreat Byways • 45


The flags of the Allied nations welcome visitors to the National D-Day Memorial. At right is the memorial of Dwight David Eisenhower, the Supreme Allied Commander. Top right, a veteran reads the indvidual plaques of units which stormed the beaches on D-Day. wings as well as archaeology in progress. Experience Jefferson’s sophisticated, newly-restored kitchen, the massive stone hearth, cook’s room, and cold storage areas. Visitors can also for the first time walk out on the wings of the unique roof, a multi-layered engineering marvel that Jefferson used to stroll in the evenings. 46 • Byways

Visit www.poplarforest.org/calendar for event and programming information. Moving forward to 1944, the National D-Day Memorial was built in Bedford in recognition of the unprecedented role the community played and suffered during this pivotal time in World War II.


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The impressive Bedford Welcome Center is an ideal first stop for visitors, motorcoach groups and RV travelers. At right is a 1929 Seagrave Pumper, Bedford’s first mechanized fire engine.

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The Memorial and gift shop are open from 10:00am5:00pm daily (some inclement weather closings possible). Guided tours and school programs available. Additional information available at www.dday.org. More than a million people have visited the D-Day Memorial, and Bedford offers one of the finest welcome centers in the country. A joint project with Bedford City and County, the Bedford Welcome Center opened in 2004, and sits directly across from the D-Day Memorial. The 10,700 square-foot facility features views of the Memorial and the Peaks of Otter. The Welcome Center has a gift shop featuring locally-produced items, displays highlighting area attractions and businesses, a picnic area, internet station and WI-FI, and full service camper hookups and sanitary stations.

Of the 26 young men from Bedford who landed on Normandy on June 6, 1944, within 15 minutes 19 were killed outright, and two more died in action later that same day. With its stylized English Garden, haunting invasion tableau, and striking Victory Plaza, the Memorial stands as a powerful permanent tribute to the valor, fidelity, and sacrifice of D-Day participants, and was dedicated by the President on June 6, 2001. Located on an 88-acre site, the Memorial reminds visitors of the heavy price that was paid on D-Day, with 4,500 Allied servicemen killed. Their names are inscribed on the bronze necrology tablets that surround the Elmon T. Gray Plaza, which also contains a sculptural tableau of Allied soldiers landing on the beaches and scaling the cliffs.

The Welcome Center has some fascinating exhibits, including a beautifully restored 1927 Seagrave Pumper Fire engine, the first motorized firefighting vehicle purchased by the city of Bedford. A trip to Bedford is not complete without a visit to the Bedford Wine Trail tasting rooms. Bedford is home to five wineries, which have blossomed along the slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains and along the shores of Smith Creek Lake. Mild winter temperatures and warm summers, fertile soil and the protection of the Blue Ridge make this area an exceptional location for excellent grape and fruit harvests used in the production of quality wines. Byways • 49


View of the Thomas Jefferson Wine Festival from inside Jefferson’s Poplar Forest.

The Thomas Jefferson Wine Festival is held each Bedford is a treasure trove of experiences, from a harNovember at Jefferson’s Poplar Forest. It’s a great oppor- vest festival, the world-famous National D-Day tunity to sample the local wines and tour this historic Memorial, fine wines, glorious apples, rugged trails and estate. www.bedfordwinetrail.com. breathtaking overlooks. Visit www.visitbedford.com. 50 • Byways


ide Click for Travel Gu

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VISIT PAWNEE CITY, NEBRASKA!

A Complete Tour Package Pawnee City’s downtown district is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Home of SchillingBridge Winery & Microbrewery.

Pawnee City Historical Society Museum Civil War Reenactments.

Pawnee City Historical Society Museum 25,000 reasons to visit including the Dan Whitney Barn. The Pedal Clinic Over 500 Tractor/Car Pedal Toys. Agricultural Tourism Experiences.

www.pawneecity.org Byways • 61


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Shenandoah Valley Delights

ort ryce Res B t a g in Tu b and Snow g in d r a nowbo S k ii n g , S

g n i n e p p a H s ’ t a h W

The Shenandoah Valley is world renowned for its scenic beauty and history. Now, several tourism entities have teamed up to promote Shenandoah County, Virginia’s many travel attractions, resulting in more exciting and available opportunities to travel and vacation in the legendary Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Shenandoah County is located in the northern Valley where I-66 meets I-81. Bryce Resort has joined with the new Hampton Inn in Woodstock to promote new winter overnight ski packAfter a day on the slopes, enjoy a dip in the pool and spa at the new Hampton Inn ages for motorcoach groups and individual travelers from in Woodstock. just $99.00 per person, double occupancy. Bryce Resort is the Mid-Atlantic’s premier “learn to ski” resort, and its location close to the Nation’s Capital, convenient destination for travelers from the area or just 90 minutes from the Capital Beltway, makes it a motorcoaches traveling to Washington, DC. Bryce’s Learn to Ski packages for groups are some of the most attractive in the industry. For more information, visit www.bryceresort.com. When you’re done after a day on the slopes, a swim in the new Hampton Inns indoor pool will be refreshing, along with a dip in the spa. Visit www. hamptoninnwoodstock.com. Many motorcoach tour operators are already familiar with Shenandoah County, which has some of the most recognized attractions in the Valley. In addition to Bryce Resort, Shenandoah County is home to the Shenandoah Caverns Family of Attractions, featuring the famous Shenandoah Caverns, the American Celebration on Parade at Shenandoah one-of-a-kind American Celebration on Caverns Family of Attractions Parade and the new Yellow Barn. Byways • 63


A tour group views amazing parade floats and presidential inaugural props at American Celebration on Parade.

These attractions are well-known to motorcoach tour operators, and host more than 500 motorcoach visits each year. www.shenandoahcaverns.com Also close by are the new Route 11 Potato Chip plant, which offers tours for individuals and groups, and the New Market Battlefield, commemorating one of the most well-known and unique battles of the Civil War. Here, annual reenactments draw thousands of visitors from throughout the country. To learn more visit www2.vmi.edu/museum/nm/. Shenandoah County is one of Virginia’s largest agricultural producing counties, and the emerging wine industry has brought a new and exciting venue to the county. The Valley’s low rainfall and deep, rocky soils make this an ideal location for growing the highest quality grapes and to make wine. The Shenandoah County Wine Trail features five wineries located throughout the county, several of which are within minutes of Bryce Resort and the new Hampton Inn in Woodstock. 64 • Byways

A trip to Shenandoah County will create many lasting memories. Whether it’s skiing, snowboarding, snow tubing, indoor pools, hot tubs, Caverns, battlefields or wine tasting, there’s something fun, adventurous or just relaxing, 90 minutes from Washington’s Beltway. Visit www.shenandoahtravel.org.

The lobby of the new Hampton inn in Woodstock


Cave Ridge Vineyard is one of five wineries on the Shenandoah County Wine Trail. All have tasting rooms and visitors are welcome.

Snowboarding and snow tubing are popular activities at Bryce Resort.

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Byways is published bi-monthly by Byways, Inc. and distributed electronically throughout North America to those who have an interest in U.S and Canadian travel destinations. Byways is emailed to more than 500,000 frequent travelers through the internet. Subscriptions are complimentary. Byways’ distribution also includes 4000+ motorcoach companies, tour operators, travel agents, bank travel managers, school band and athletic planners, and meeting planners. For advertising rates, editorial deadlines, or to place advertising insertions, contact: Byways Magazine, P.O. 1088, Mount Jackson, VA 22842. Telephone 540-4773202. Fax 540-477-3858. ©Copyright 2009 by Byways, Inc. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be duplicated in any form without express written permission of the publisher. Editor and Publisher Stephen M. Kirchner

Advertising Director 1.800.469.0062 540.477.3202 Fax 540.477.3858 Internet: www.motorcoach.com/byways Blog: http://bywaysmagazine.wordpress.com Email: byways@motorcoach.com

Advertisers Index motorcoach.com/National Reservation Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska, Who Knew? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . International Quilt Study Center & Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska’s Landmark Country: Scottsbluff and Gering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska Lewis & Clark Scenic Byway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fremont & Dodge County Convention & Visitors Bureau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loup Rivers Scenic Byway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandhills Journey Scenic Byway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska 385 Gold Rush Byway. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sidney/Cheyenne County Visitors Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kearney Visitors Bureau. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pawnee City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nebraska, Heritage Highway. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shenandoah County, Virginia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Byways Magazine Vol 26 Issue 4 2009