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COMO VO L .7 / C O L U M B I A L I F E S T Y L E A N D C U LT U R E

+ O C T/N OV

2016

LI V ING

DECEMBER/JANUARY

CULTURE O C M HOMES O FASHION HOLIDAY ISSUE


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noon - DE Cat 2Closed E MB E R - on 2016Christmas Eve, December 24th


“Of course I’m a water

expert. Every time our team at Moresource helps another client save time and/or money, we toast with a glass of Culligan. And let me tell you... that’s a lot of Culligan water!” Kat Cunningham, Water Expert Founder & President of Moresource

Have Culligan of Columbia test your water for impurities like deposits, iron, even lead. If your results show reason for concern, Culligan will help with 50% off the installation fee of a Culligan drinking water system. For details, visit www.CulliganMidMissouri.com Limited time offer. Dealer participation may vary, some restrictions apply.

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Busenbark is an integral member of our project team.

We rely on their expertise to accomplish the project goals while being mindful of the budget. Traci has worked with us on multiple projects. We appreciate her vision, attention to detail and efforts to maintain the project budget.” -Joe Greaves, Central Development Group

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We Believe Women Empower One Another … Especially when they share a passion for collaboration and hold one another to the highest standards We are skilled at helping our clients understand the “language” and context of their portfolios. All five of us truly want to make our clients as financially savvy as possible. By forming strong emotional connections and understanding their struggles, goals and values, we create an environment of trust and assurance. As financial advisors, we are both analytical and intuitive, which helps develop relationships that withstand the test of time and unpredictable markets.

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1000 W. Nifong Bldg. 3, Suite 210 Columbia 573-442-9590

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AAMS ™

1905 Cherry Hill Dr. Suite 100, Columbia 573-234-1700

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4240 Philips Farm Rd. Suite 107, Columbia 573-442-0504

Investments & Services We Provide • Retirement & College Savings • Stocks, Bonds & Mutual Funds • Life & Long Term Care Insurance

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• Trust & Estate Considerations • Annuities

Ann Echelmeier 1729 W. Broadway Suite 3, Columbia 573-446-2770 EdwardJones.com Member SIPC


A BUSINESS TIMES COMPANY PUBLICATION

EDITORIAL Deb Valvo, Publisher Deb@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Brenna McDermott, Editor Brenna@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Matt Patston, Managing Editor Matt@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Libby Wall, Editorial Assistant Libby@BusinessTimesCompany.com

DESIGN Keith Borgmeyer, Art Director Keith@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Cassidy Shearrer, Editorial Designer Cassidy@BusinessTimesCompany.com

C R E AT I V E S E R V I C E S Kate Morrow, Graphic Designer Kate@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Jordan Watts, Editorial Designer Jordan@BusinessTimesCompany.com

MARKETING R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S Deb Valvo, Marketing Consultant Deb@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Cassi Cody, Marketing Consultant Cassi@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Heather McGee, Marketing Consultant Heather@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Tami Turner, Marketing Consultant Tami@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Janelle Wilbers Haley, Marketing Consultant Janelle@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Jamie Patterson, Digital Services Director Jamie@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Crystal Richardson, Digital Marketing Manager Crystal@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Emily Brehe, Digital Account Manager Emily@BusinessTimesCompany.com

J.J. Carlson, Web Designer JJ@BusinessTimesCompany.com

MANAGEMENT Erica Pefferman, President Erica@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Renea Sapp, Vice President ReneaS@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Amy Ferrari, Operations Manager Amy@BusinessTimesCompany.com

Fran Patrick, Account Manager Fran@BusinessTimesCompany.com

LE T TER from THE PU B LISHER

THIS IS THE YEAR Hard to believe we’re wrapping up our first full year as the rebranded COMO Living. And what a year it’s been! I so hope you’ve enjoyed watching our new brand continue to develop, expand, and gain momentum. More importantly, I hope you’ve enjoyed the stories we’ve told and feel that you’ve gained new insights. We’re very lucky to have this platform and will continue to do everything we can to keep it relevant and a valuable resource to our community and our readers. As 2017 looms on the horizon, I tend to begin considering goals and resolutions. And then I get tense. And perhaps a touch cranky (or perhaps a LOT cranky, depending upon the source). I’m not good at this resolution stuff. The pressure and certain failure cause gritting of the teeth. And yet, this issue’s “Bucket List for the New Year” story on page 70 starts to lure me down that slippery slope once again. Is this the year? Can I actually identify a goal or two and execute with success? If others can make it happen, surely I can as well. I find the suggested categories and options listed in this article fairly helpful. And who doesn’t like a good list? And the chance to actually check some things off your list (except for No. 10 on family-oriented list … no more of those for now)? If you’re one of those who crafts a careful list of resolutions and successfully sees it to fruition, I salute you. And I’m slightly in awe of you. But admit it. If it weren’t for some of the slackers like myself, you wouldn’t feel nearly as good about yourself, would you? Here’s to a new year of good lists, good friends, and good magazines. “You can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will.” Stephen King

Deb Valvo Publisher deb@businesstimescompany.com COMO L I V I N G

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COM O LIVING Business Times Company 2001 Corporate Place, Suite 100 Columbia, MO 65202

P: 573-499-1830 Website: comolivingmag.com Twitter: @COMOLivingMag Facebook: facebook.com/ COMOLivingMagazine Instagram: @comolivingmag —

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Keith Borgmeyer, Anthony Jinson, Catherine Rhodes

LE T TE R from TH E E D I T O R

HOLIDAY HEALTH

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Christy Asper, Anna Comfort, Sarah Everett, Nicole Flood, Josie Mickey, Jill Orr, Carolyn Paris, Monica Pitts, Tia Wood

It’s typical for me to stress about my weight during the holidays. The booze, the desserts, the glorious, seemingly endless heaps of mashed potatoes. No one ever plans to lose weight November to January: We all hope for maintenance at best, right? The problem? This year, the temptations of Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s stand between me and my February wedding. I’ll be getting fitted for my dress one week and tempted with sweet potato biscuits the next. And I’m the kind of person who gains a second set of hips just from looking at a piece of pie the wrong way. What was I thinking? Who, come January 2, feels confident about their body? All I usually feel confident in is that I won’t be consuming any alcohol for a solid month. It’s safe to say this will be the least indulgent holiday season I’ve ever suffered through. Yes, I plan to resent every person who eats a piece of pumpkin pie in my presence. Do not even let the smell of stuffing waft in my general direction. In all seriousness, I hope to make good choices over the holidays but try not to stress when I indulge in a few good beverages. The only health strategy that has ever worked for me is moderation. So I plan to enjoy a piece of pie — but maybe just the one, instead of sampling every flavor. These kinds of thoughts and experiences are what led us to ramp up the health section of COMO Living. No matter who you are or what you do, you’re probably interested in improving your health. So we’ll be bringing in local fitness experts to teach you an easyto-do, on-the-go move to get you up and moving each day. We’ll also start tackling some tougher health subjects. Not taking any supplements and not sure where to start? We’ve got great advice from local people to help get you started. We hope this content will inspire you to better health. Enjoy your holidays — pie and all — and think of me with each delicious bite.

THE BUSINESS TIMES CO. INTERNS Sarah Everett, Madelyne Maag, Grace Vance, Bobbi Watts

COMO LIVING BOARD Muriel Browder, Jenny Bouatay, Adonica Coleman, Becky Erdel, Krista Kippenberger, Ann Merrifield, Jill Orr, Carolyn Paris —

SUBSCRIP TIONS S U B S C R I B E O NL I NE

www.comolivingmag.com PH O NE O R DE R I NG

573-499-1830 SUBSCRIBERS

$5.95 per issue, or six issue subscription for $29.95. Call Amy Ferrari at 573-4991830 ext. 1003 to place an order or to inform us of a change of address.

Brenna McDermott Editor brenna@businesstimescompany.com COMO L I V I N G

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CON TE N TS FEATURES / DEPARTMENTS

110

59

16 17 20 23 24 27

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Letter from the Publisher Letter from the Editor COMO Living Advisory Board Shelf Life: Prep Your Book List Libations: Holiday Cocktails Day in the Life: Pam Ingram, Granny’s House Home Tour: Holiday Mantels

Missouri Symphony Society Home Tour

44

Fashion: Boots

49 50 59 70 77

79 81

83

85

2017 Wedding Planner Gourmet: Holiday Side Dishes Holiday Tablescapes Build Your Bucket List Wellness: Supplements You Should Know Move of the Month: Dead Bug Mom in the Middle:

Where Are You from? Confessions of a Working Mom: Holiday Life Hacks Life Coaching: Vulnerability

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87 Unleashed: Boarding Pets 89 Engagements 92 Midwest Wedding Crashers:

Little Piney

94 Wedding Confidential: Trends 104 December/January Datebook 106 Being Seen 110 Strong Woman: Jessie Kwatamdia 114 Couple You Should Know:

Mary Kroening and Mike Tompkins


ABOUT THE BOARD

SHARING HOLIDAY MEMORIES

The COMO Living Advisory Board got their holiday decorations out early to share their favorite holiday item and why it’s so important to them. Ann Merrifield My dad was a high school band director, but his second passion was woodworking. I have many beautiful pieces of furniture in my house that he refinished, and I also have many things that he built or designed from scratch, like my favorite Christmas ornament, this nativity scene puzzle. He made this for my family when the kids were little, and they spent many hours putting the puzzle together and setting it up to represent the nativity scene. Dad would always play the trick of sticking the last piece of the puzzle in his pocket so he’d be the one to finish it. My dad died three years ago. When I pulled this puzzle out the first Christmas after he was gone, I noticed there was a piece missing. I like to think he took it with him — perhaps it’s still in his pocket!

Adonica Coleman My most treasured Christmas decorations are my four little holiday bears. I purchased these bears in my first year married, after we moved into our first house. I was so excited to get to decorate for Christmas that I went to the dollar store and bought up everything they had. In the 15 years since, with moves to 3 different states, I have long since replaced all my dollar-store decorations with other things, with the exception of my four little bears. They come out every year and are placed in different places around the house. Each one has come to represent to one of the four daughters that we now have, and they’re a great reminder of humble beginnings!

Krista Kippenberger I love this painted tin because it has so many good memories attached to it. When my husband was going to chiropractic school in St. Louis, his mother and I would go to craft shows and shop for Christmas items on the weekend. I remember going to this one craft show and seeing this painted tin, and I bought one each for me, my mother, and my sister. We all still have them, so it’s like we all have the same item up for Christmas. I love getting it out and putting it by my fireplace, and I love that it’s an old item and that it's painted by a local crafter.   I also love that memory of going to craft shows each weekend and the time I spent with my mother-in-law and my mother, just one-on-one time. My mother-in-law had a stroke this year and is not the same person. I will love looking at this tin and remembering the years she was healthy and able to go with me to these shows and shop! COMO L I V I N G

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ABOUT THE BOARD

Carolyn Paris This is the one holiday decoration I’m tempted to leave out all year long. I enjoy the interplay of the angelic musicians. I enjoy placing them in different positions to imagine a different story. They seem so celebratory to me. It’s easy to imagine the beautiful melodies they create. I also enjoy that there are three angels. I am the middle sister of three girls, and our oldest sister passed away last year. To me, this decoration symbolizes the joy, love, and frivolity of our spirits as sisters. With a grandson now, I can see him playing and arranging these musicians to mirror his story, too. His imagination is free to run wild, creating even more joyful sounds and stories. I wonder if the artist who designed this trio had the same kind of joy and satisfaction with her work as I do?

Becky Erdel

Jill Orr

Mr. Frog is my favorite Christmas ornament. When I first had grandchildren, I wanted to find a pickle ornament to introduce my family to the tradition of the Christmas Pickle, where the first child to find the pickle on the tree gets to open an extra present. I found no pickle, but I did find Mr. Frog and started our own tradition: when you find the frog, you get to open a present without waiting until Christmas morning. The kids love it! They run to the tree as soon as they come through the door. We now have five grandchildren, so to make everyone happy I have to hide him five times every year. I make him a little more difficult to find for the older kids.

This brass menorah has been in my family for over 35 years. It was purchased in Tel Aviv during a trip my extended family took for  my cousin’s bar mitzvah in 1981. To me, the arms look like olive branches, though I’m not sure if that’s what the designer intended.  I love this menorah. It is graceful and elegant, and when we light one candle on it (from right to left) on each of the eight nights of Hanukkah, it’s a beautiful symbol of light and love and, perhaps most importantly, the hope for peace. 

Jenny Bouatay On Christmas Eve, we make our big family dinner. I come from a huge family, and I don’t get to see everyone very often, so the holidays are a time where I can enjoy their company and indulge in all my favorite foods. Growing up, food was always a big deal. My parents are amazing chefs and are very passionate about food and bringing everyone together. Every year, I help my parents prep and cook authentic Thai and Lao meals for our friends and family. It’s an all-day event, but I enjoy spending time with my parents and appreciate all the love that was made in prepping the big family dinner. It makes me look forward to going home for the holidays every year!  COMO L I V I N G

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SHELF LIFE

PREP YOUR TO-BE-READ PILE

Resources to build your book list for 2017. by B R E N N A M C D E R M O T T

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onsider me one of those stereotypical New Year’s resolution people. I love to set three or four major goals for myself and see if I’m up to the challenge of accomplishing each feat. This will be my fourth straight year setting my favorite resolution: read more. I’ve held myself accountable by remembering the wise words of one of my favorite authors, Stephen King: “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” Since I kinda write for a living, I think it’s important to read anything I can get my hands on: not just magazines, but great fiction, nonfiction, blogs, articles, anything. It’s essential to my growth as a writer and as an editor — after all, if I don’t know what good writing looks like, how can I bring it out in our writers? Beyond that, though, reading has

brought me joy on so many levels throughout my life. It’s good for the brain, it’s good for the imagination, it’s good to know how to entertain oneself and get lost in another world, and it’s good to get away from the TV. But sometimes we need a push, and setting a goal is good pressure to pick up a book. My 2017 goal? Read 40 books. It helps to have some resources to plan out what books I’m going to read so that I always have a pile to pick from. Here are some of my favorite online resources for staying up-to-date on my hunt for good books. Bustle.com – A great resource for finding articles about book genres or topics. You’ll find lists of great unknown mysteries, best books set in certain time periods, etc. They’ve also got book news so you can stay fresh on the next best book. Book of the Month Club – This is the most anticipated gift on my Christmas

list this year. You subscribe to BOTM, and each month you can choose one of five books selected by rotating judges. It’s $15 a month and shipping is free — most of these books seem to be hardback, so it’s kind of a deal. Don’t like one of the five books offered? You can skip a month. There are also great reviews and book articles on the website. NPR’s Book Concierge – Each year, National Public Radio compiles a few hundred books that NPR staff and critics loved. This is a really user-friendly service, as you can search by genre (mysteries, family stories, music, etc.) but also by other great categories, like book club ideas, eye-opening reads, tales from around the world, and more. 2016’s list should be out soon, but they also host all their picks going back to 2008. It’s a great way to catch up on the best fiction you missed over the last few years.

STAFF PICKS THE COMO LIVING TEAM ALSO SUGGESTED THEIR FAVORITE BOOKS TO INSPIRE YOUR NEW YEAR. Megan Whitehead’s Must-Read: “Almost Famous Women” by Megan Mayhew Bergman

Matt Patston’s Must-Read: “Two Hours: The Quest to Run the Impossible Marathon” by Ed Caesar

This book, while not outwardly appearing to be an inspirational one, gave me a much needed kick in the pants. These stories of women who were on the cusp of fame or reaching their dreams helped push me to follow my own dreams.

I’m not a runner, but I am a big fan of British journalist Ed Caesar. He’s written an outstanding book about distance running, East Africa, and pushing yourself to try the impossible. 

J.J. Carlson’s Must-Reads: “Awaken the Giant Within” by Tony Robbins

Brenna McDermott’s Must-Read: “I Am Malala” by Malala Yousafzai

Tony’s way of using the power of words to motivate has been immensely successful for me. My immediate response to some of his core concepts is: “Yes! I can get behind that and take action because of it.”

Malala’s story is nothing short of miraculous. Persecuted by the Taliban for refusing to quit school, Malala is now a world leader in the efforts to provide education for every woman around the world. COMO L I V I N G

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L I B AT I O N S

HOLIDAY COCKTAILS AROUND TOWN

The perfect drinks for every holiday occasion. by B RYA N A R R I | ph o to s by K E I T H B O R G M E Y E R

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y name is Bryan Arri, and I’m the lead bartender at Sycamore restaurant. We make delicious craft cocktails, and we release special drink menus that reflect the flavors of the season. I know that hand-crafting a drink looks really fancy when a bartender does it, but it’s as simple as knowing which ingredients to put together. With the holidays upon us, you’re going to want to know what to drink while you’re at home, while you’re out on the town, and while you’re hosting a party. Here are three recipes to carry with you through the season:

In our version of a hot toddy, we’ve got a spice-infused honey syrup, great for boosting the immune system and warming the body. We take Irish whiskey and spiced honey syrup and then add hot water to top. We’re garnishing with a beautiful lemon peel and serving it hot to you.

You’ll need: 2 ounces cranberry gin Tonic water Ice  Lime wedges

While I’m Out: Around the holidays, I love to go out shopping for presents. Unfortunately, the weather usually chills me to the bone. So, when I’m out, I swing into my bar for a delicious hot toddy.

While I’m in: Nothing stirs Christmas up in me like seeing cranberries decorating everything during the winter. The little fruit can also easily be infused into spirits to add a slight bitterness and refreshing quality. So, I present a cranberry gin and tonic for your time inside. To begin, take a bottle of fairly approachable gin, like Hendrick’s or New Amsterdam. Buy a bag of fresh cranberries and wash them. Empty the gin into an airtight glass container. Now, take a few cups of those cranberries and stab them with toothpicks. This will help release more flavor into the gin. Let the gin infuse for a week to two weeks, strain the cranberries out, and rebottle your newly infused gin. Taste every few days while you’re drawing flavor out of the cranberries to make sure the cranberries aren’t overpowering the gin.  Take two ounces of your newly infused cranberry gin and pour into a rocks glass (what you’d normally drink out of if you ordered a G&T). Add ice, top with tonic water, and garnish with a lime wedge. It’s so easy! Have a couple and enjoy your evening in. COMO L I V I N G

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You’ll need: 2 ounces Irish whiskey 1 ounce spiced honey syrup Hot water Lemon peel


L I B AT I O N S

While I’m hosting: As a bartender, I love crafting each drink by hand for my guests. It’s a way to tell them that they’re valued and to make them feel accepted at the bar. But when I’m at home, hosting a party, I’m usually not up to the task of mixing every drink individually — I want to party too! Here enters the beautiful world of punches. Punches are comprised of more than cheap handles of alcohol and fizzy syrups (oh, college). Here’s a classic recipe for Charles Dickens’ punch, adapted from the book “Punch,” by David Wondrich. In the basin of an enameled cast iron pot or heat-proof bowl, add sugar and the peels of three lemons. Rub the lemon peels and sugar together to release citrus oils. For a better infusion, let the peels sit in the sugar for 30 minutes.

Add the rum and cognac to the sugar and citrus.  Light a match, and, using a heatproof spoon, pick up a spoonful of the spirit mix. Carefully ignite the mix in the spoon. Bring the lit spoon to the spirits in the bowl, igniting them. Let the spirits burn for about three minutes, melting the sugar and extracting the oil from the lemon peels. Extinguish the bowl by covering it with a heatproof pan or tray. Remove the lemon peels, as they can add too much bitterness if left in any longer. Squeeze in the juice of the three peeled lemons, and then add hot tea or water. If serving the punch hot, skip to the next step. If serving cold, cool punch in the refrigerator and, when chilled, add ice. Garnish with citrus wheels and grated nutmeg, and serve with a ladle into small glasses. COMO L I V I N G

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You’ll need: 3/4 cup sugar (preferably Demerara) 3 lemons 2 cups rum (preferably Smith & Cross) 1 1/4 cups cognac (preferably Courvoisier VSOP) 5 cups black tea (or hot water) A heat-proof bowl or enameled cast iron pot

B RYA N A R R I Bryan Arri is a rising hospitalian with a thirst to craft curated cocktails. Presently, he's bartender at Sycamore, where he's in charge of the mixology program.


CHIROPRACTIC CAN ...help with headaches, migraines, sinus headaches, tension headaches. •••

“Not only has my daughter’s scoliosis stopped progressing, it is getting better! That’s just the beginning… She no longer has migraines. It’s wonderful to see my 12 year old little girl pain free again!” -Diane B.

As a local business, we are grateful to have many loyal customers. We are proud of the services we provide and are happy to help those in need. We are committed to providing the gift of a clean home to women undergoing treatment for cancer through the Cleaning For A Reason Foundation.

Our staff would like to wish you a very Merry Christmas and a blessed New Year! Does your home need a Personal Touch? Office: 573.256.1920 www.personaltouchcleaningservicellc.com

Dr. Amanda Signaigo-Owens, DC tigerfamilychiropractic.com 573.443.1414

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D AY I N T H E L I F E

PAM INGRAM The founder of Granny’s House wakes up strong. by M A D E LY N E M A AG

T

here are two things Pam Ingram looks forward to every day: her quiet time in the early morning and the arrival of kids for the after-school program at Granny’s House. Pam has two main rules that she follows during her quiet time: No meetings are held, and no technology is allowed — unless it’s her iPad. Her iPad is a huge factor during quiet time, as Pam likes to enjoy music while reading. And when she isn’t reading, Pam prays. “Praying starts my day,” she says. It’s a way for her to meditate and focus on any tasks she has to complete. Often, she prays for the children enrolled in Granny’s House.

“I ask, ‘How can I help them? What can I do today?’ and God gives me an answer,” Pam says. In short, she’s asking for a way to reach each child. The majority of kids enrolled in Granny’s House live in poverty, much like Pam did while growing up in Kansas City. It humbled her as she grew up and eventually led her to open up Granny’s House in Columbia. “We wanted to provide a safe place for a kid to be a kid,” Pam says. “It’s a place to teach them life lessons, respect, and how to love.” On the day she opened Granny’s House, Pam says it felt like the next step in her dream come true. She was anxious and equally overcome with joy. Since that day, From providing

Top right: Pam's husband, Dr. Ellis Ingram, and Pam circa 1976 and today. Bottom right: Pam taking a group of Granny's House kids to see the film "Queen of Katwe." Bottom left: Pam with middle schooler Dina Mugeni, this semester's Academic Motivation Program Grand Prize winner.

YEARS AT GRANNY'S HOUSE

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DAY I N T H E L I F E

snacks to making sure all the kids are occupied, Granny Pam does it all. She has pieced together every detail. She has made the place thrive through the love she delivers to her staff and to the children who are enrolled. Working here, Pam says that she feels like a plate spinner, tending to everything needed to make great things happen. Her goal with Granny’s House is to help as many children succeed in life as she can. Whether it’s through teaching life lessons, creating a space to be a kid, or helping complete homework in a relaxed environment, Pam finds a way to provide. “By seeing these kids for who they are at Granny’s House, I can learn how to help them grow,” Pam says. “I truly believe that by changing one kid’s life, we have the powerful potential to change societies.” With over 16 years of experience at Granny’s House, Pam loves nothing more than leading her volunteers and being with the kids. In the next few years, she hopes to step back and pass the baton of leadership to someone who can spin the plates of Granny’s House just as well as she can.

A T Y P I C A L DAY 7:00-10:00 a.m. — ­ Good Morning, Pam! After getting up and eating breakfast, Pam takes this time for herself. She reads, she prays, she meditates.

the afternoon. Pam makes sure to be there and greet the kids and volunteers as they arrive. 3:00-6:00 p.m. — Granny Pam is the roaming eyes and ears of Granny’s House. She makes sure that the kids are entertained, completing their homework, getting along, and eating their daily snack.

10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. ­— Time

to get down to business. Pam focuses on answering emails, organizing meetings, and handling the logistics of Granny’s House.

6:00 p.m. — Pam gathers the

kids of Granny’s House to help her clean up the rooms and yards before they go home for the day. “It’s a lesson that teaches these kids to take care of the things and places they enjoy,” she says.

1:00-2:00 p.m. — Pam drives

to work, but first she makes a few stops to pick up snacks and other items needed at Granny’s House. 2:00 p.m. — Pam organizes

7:00-7:30 p.m. — After the

her volunteer meetings. She prepares her volunteers for what to expect that day.

children are picked up, Pam makes sure that everything at Granny’s House looks good. She picks up the house or yard and then takes home any of the kids who need a ride.

2:45-3:00 p.m. — Ding!

School is out and kids start signing into Granny’s House for

photos by Keith Borgmeyer

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SELLING YOUR HOME IN WINTER: FOUR MYTHS DEBUNKED BY NICCI GARMON Find more at: www.columbiarealestate.com/nicci-garmon.php

dollars lower than yours. In addition, continued low interest rates often allow buyers to extend their buying budget.

MYTH #3: YOU WON’T BE ABLE TO HAVE FAMILY OVER FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Showings during the holidays can happen relatively easy if you have an agent who understands your schedule and accessibility. Let them know when your home is off limits, and perhaps request more notice before showings. Chances are your home is already cleaned and decorated for family gatherings, so your property should show nicely. Just remember to not go overboard with holiday decorations and keep them tasteful.

Spring may be the most popular time to put your home on the market, but that’s not always possible for every homeowner. The good news is that listing in the winter has several advantages as well.

winter, but the quality of these buyers is strong. Fewer window-shoppers, but more serious buyers. In addition, some people purposefully choose to buy a home before January to get a tax write off or to become eligible for tax credits.

MYTH #1: NO ONE BUYS IN THE WINTER.

MYTH #2: YOU WILL GET LESS FOR YOUR HOME IN WINTER.

Mid-Missouri has a healthy real estate market year round due to multiple large employers like MU, MU Health Care, Boone Hospital Center, the City of Columbia, Veterans United Home Loans, Shelter Insurance, MBS Textbooks, and State Farm Insurance. That means motivated buyers are coming into our city at all times of the year. You may have a smaller quantity of buyers in

When demand is still present and supply is low, you get better sale prices. The season with the lowest supply is usually winter. With a fewer amount of properties on the market, sellers have less competitive pricing from other sellers. That way, you don’t suffer from having neighbors pricing their homes a few thousand

NICCI GARMON Nicci Garmon is a member of the dynamic team at Columbia Real Estate. She uses her experience in the real estate market and love for our community, to help families buy, stage or sell their homes. You’ll also hear Nicci on 96.7 KCMQ and as a voice talent in a variety of radio and television commercials through her production company, Rock Chick Productions. A proud Alum of the Missouri School of Journalism, Nicci and her family have lived in Columbia for over 35 years.

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MYTH #4: HOUSES DON’T SHOW AS WELL IN WINTER. It’s true that several aspects of your home will photograph better in spring or summer, but winter can provide other opportunities to showcase your property. Play up the cozy factor with lit fireplaces, rich hardwood floors, the smell of baking cookies, and warm lighting. If you have a finished basement, winter is a great time to point out its usefulness as an indoor play area for kids. Depending on your home and when you need to sell, it’s possible that listing in winter is actually a better option than listing in the spring. Less inventory gives your home more attention. Also, many companies tend to hire or relocate at the start of the year, which makes finding a new home during winter urgent for those employees — helping you get closer to your asking price. One more plus: Real estate agents aren’t as busy in winter, so they can focus more of their time and attention on marketing your home. I’m happy to help: Email me at NicciGarmonRealtor@ gmail.com or stop by my office at Columbia Real Estate, 2100 W. Broadway.


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SPONSORED CONTENT

WHY NOW IS THE TIME TO REMODEL BY CALE KLIETHERMES Find more at: www.kliethermes.com

People tend to shy away from remodeling projects during the winter season. The below-freezing temps are quite demotivating, and limited daylight keeps us stuck in our daily routines. Fortunately, Kliethermes Homes and Remodelers has a reputation for serving your construction needs year-round. Despite common concerns of the past, the timing has never been better. Here’s why you should start that remodel:

IT’S GOOD WORKING WEATHER A lot of people avoid scheduling winter projects because they assume construction workers dislike the cold temperatures. This mostly applies to outdoor remodeling projects; however, everyday tasks like cutting wood or moving supplies are typically done outdoors. Turns out, physical labor can be a lot more discomforting on a blazing 90-degree day than it is on a brisk 30-degree day in mid-winter. We don’t mind working in the cold, and some actually prefer it to the heat! Additionally, frozen ground and dry air are actually better for digging foundations and pouring concrete footers than muddy ground and humidity.

CLEANUP IS NO LONGER AN ISSUE Many homeowners share outdated concerns regarding fumes, dust, and allocating areas for staging work during colder months. However, current technologies and cleaning methods can fully control these problems. Fans with features like negative pressure and zip doors

keep dust and debris contained to the work area and help keep your home neat and clean throughout the process.

ADDED VALUE Are you looking to move out next season? Are you on a tight schedule? Remodeling your home not only adds value, but it also yields a better financial return. Getting work done now allows for more time to enjoy your space come springtime.

VACATION TIME Are you dreading a disruption to your daily activities? Are your kids on a never-ending winter break? This brief siesta is a great time to start the routine-altering remodel you’ve been putting off.

CALE KLIETHERMES Cale Kliethermes has learned the construction business from the ground up, working with his father to uphold the 40-year legacy that is Kliethermes Homes & Remodeling. Having been immersed in the industry since his teenage years, Cale possesses decades’ worth of expert knowledge and experience regarding new construction and remodels. Cale studied business administration and finance at Regis University, in Denver, Colorado, and earned his CGR (Certified Graduate Remodeler) designation from the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). He also served in Iraq with the U.S. Marine Corps, where he built secure housing and observation posts. Cale specializes in leading homeowners through the creative process of designing their ideal home, and he is skilled in determining unique solutions that result in life-changing differences. 

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It’s a two-birds-one-stone mentality, and you’ll be thanking yourself later. Better yet? If you’re planning to escape to warmer climates this winter, it may be an optimal time to get a remodeling project started!

BEAT THE WINTER BLUES With shorter days, longer nights, and frigid temperatures, it’s hard to find the motivation to take on home-altering tasks. Don’t stay cooped up at home this season, planning for the busy months to ahead; get that remodel started now! You’ll be patting yourself on the back as winter speeds by and your home is ready to entertain before most homeowners even get started. Though not all home improvements will provide the best results during the winter — such as painting the exterior of your home or building a new swimming pool — many are unaffected by frigid and snowy weather. Popular projects include basement finishing and remodeling, bathroom remodeling, additions, garage improvements, kitchen renovations and upgrades, and more!


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5 BIGGEST MATTRESS BUYING MISTAKES TO AVOID BY DENNIS SMITH Find more at: DowntownAppliance.com

For some, buying a new mattress can prove to be a frustrating experience. There are so many choices and too many misinformed mattress sales people on the prowl. Make this process a little easier by avoiding these costly mistakes.

#1 TRYING TOO MANY BEDS. Trying every bed available will not only NOT help you make the right choice, but you will become overwhelmed and frustrated. Avoid the beds that are not in your “comfort profile” and once you’ve eliminated a bed, do not revisit it.

#2 NOT TESTING IT OUT BEFORE YOU BUY It’s hard to imagine but there are some who will not lay on a mattress in the store. You should spend a minimum of 15 minutes laying on your selected mattress in the store before you buy. Since you’ll spend one third of your life sleeping, a small investment of time here is crucial.

#3 BUYING BASED ON PRICE ALONE It’s not necessarily true that the lowest priced mattress is the best deal, or that the highest priced mattress is the best quality. What matters is that you find the right bed for you. Of course, you have a budget to consider but buying the mattress that is best for your sleeping needs will prove to be beneficial to both your budget and your health.

SINCE YOU’LL SPEND ONE THIRD OF YOUR LIFE SLEEPING, A SMALL INVESTMENT OF TIME HERE IS CRUCIAL. #4 BUY BASED ON A FRIEND’S RECOMMENDATION Each mattress feels different for each person so this is a highly personal choice. Body types, sleep positions and even medical histories all play a part in determining your best options. Unless you’ll be sharing your new mattress with the

DENNIS SMITH Downtown Appliance Home Center has been in business since 1961, specializing in creating your dream kitchen as well as finding the perfect mattress. Dennis Smith has been on board since March 2011 and specializes in finding a mattress to best suit your needs as well as helping you create your perfect kitchen. Inside Downtown Appliance, you will find the Sleep Shop, where you can experience all that Serta Mattress has to offer. Customers are encouraged to come in and experience the Downtown difference. 573-874-3333

DowntownAppliance.com

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person making a recommendation, leave them out of this decision!

#5 BUYING A MATTRESS THAT IS TOO FIRM Choosing a bed that is too firm is a common mistake. Since most wait until their current mattress is worn out, many over compensate by choosing a bed that is too hard. A good core is key, regardless of the level of firmness but softer mattresses can be an excellent choice, as well. Most of us only buy a new mattress about once every 10 years so it stands to reason that options have changed since you last shopped for your new bed.


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PERKS OF PICKING A LANDSCAPE PROFESSIONAL BY JAKE FRINK Find more at: rostlandscaping.com

Creating an outdoor living space is beneficial in a variety of ways. By increasing the visual appeal and usability of your property, you are increasing the value of your home and your lifestyle. It’s easy to be a ‘do-it-yourselfer’ these days, however the outdoor spaces people dream of are often results of a professional. Here are four reasons to choose a reputable, experienced design/build firm.

PROS KNOW PROS Reputable design firms hire quality contractors and subcontractors. After years of experience, businesses have established relationships with companies of all different trades (concrete, masonry, plumbing, electrical, pools) and work together to make your outdoor living dreams a reality. Coordination with subcontractors is essential to staying on track with budgets and timelines. The greatest design and perfectly executed project can go south very quickly with the selection of poor contractors or subcontractors.

USE OF SPACE It takes experience to know how people use their outdoor spaces, and sometimes looking at the site objectively is truly an advantage. For me, it is easy to visualize how to best utilize a space for your wants and needs. Second guessing creativity, logistics of building, budgets, etc. can instantly hinder the important first impression of a project’s potential. Layout, size, material selection, etc. should all center around how the space

Legacy Springs, Rost Inc 2016

will be used. An outdoor living space is an investment and a long-term commitment, so utilizing the space to its highest potential is key. Seasonal usage is another major factor. What can be included in the design that will increase the usability of the space? A pool? A fireplace? Lighting? Taking all of this in to account will allow you to spend your money wisely and truly enjoy your space all year long.

COMPLEXITY AND COHESIVENESS The most appealing outdoor spaces are typically not a simple, flat patio with some shrubs. Grade changes, material selections, and a variety of elements such as patios, walls, steps, pergolas, etc. all add to the overall look and feel of the outdoor space. It requires a professional with a creative eye to plan out and build interesting

JAKE FRINK Jake Frink is a Columbia native who enjoys working and playing in outdoor spaces. He has a degree in plant science and landscape design from MU. With Rost Landscaping for nearly 18 years, Jake is the Design Manager. His natural talent for creating beautiful outdoor spaces gives him a huge sense of satisfaction. Jake considers himself to be a very lucky husband as well as a lucky dad of three great kids. 573-445-4465

rostlandscaping.com

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yet cohesive spaces. This often means turning what may at first appear as a project challenge into an important design element, gaining the most visual appeal and the most usability. The complexity of a site may drive people to take the easy way out or limit the potential of a project.

BANG FOR YOUR BUCK Quality products and workmanship are not cheap and for good reason. Material selections, in particular, can make or break your project, as well as your budget. Creating a thoughtful outdoor space requires a great deal of coordination with a variety of elements. Experts know what is worth spending money on and where your money would be poorly spent. Often people need reminding that there is always a cheaper way to get something done, but that it will only cost more in the long run if not done properly the first time. Professionals will be mindful of the point of diminishing return on your money invested in the project. But, when it’s said and done, it’s important to keep in mind that you get what you pay for. For an extensive and specialized project, you don’t want to have any regrets.


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SPONSORED CONTENT

MAKE IT ONE-OF-A-KIND 6 TIPS FOR ACING CUSTOM UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE BY CRYSTAL RICHARDSON Find more at: lifestylescomo.com

How many times have you seen a piece of furniture that was the perfect style but the color or pattern was all wrong? Custom furniture upholstery is the easiest way to achieve the exact look you want for your home. With so many options for color, style and look, choosing the perfect piece of furniture and having it custom upholstered can be a lot of fun. Before you get started, consider these important factors to ensure you enjoy your custom piece for years to come.

DEFINE YOUR EXPECTATIONS. Time and use play a big role in choosing the right piece of furniture and the best type of fabric. Start by evaluating how you will use the furniture, and how long you want it to last. Are you considering a sofa that will get daily use by the entire family? Or a decorative occasional chair for the hallway that you’ll use a few times a year? How many years do you want the furniture to last before replacing it? Thinking through these questions will help you pick your furniture frame, cushions and fabric.

PICK A FRAME THAT WILL LAST. It’s easy to focus just on the outward look of a piece of furniture. But to make sure you’re buying a quality piece, you have to look deeper – starting with the frame. The frame is like the bones of a piece of furniture. The stronger the bones, the longer the furniture will last. Frames made of solid wood will help your piece stand the test of time. Engineered plywood

is even stronger and is a great choice for high-use furniture. Don’t be afraid to ask for the furniture’s specifications to be sure of what you’re buying.

NOT ALL CUSHIONS ARE CREATED EQUAL. If you’ve ever encountered a sofa that sags or a rock-hard arm chair, you know that plump cushions are important for comfort. Go ahead, unzip the cushions on the showroom floor and take a peek. Quality seat cushions will have a high density foam core. A foam density between 1.8-2.5 pounds per cubic inch will last you about seven years with daily use. Note that back cushions generally take less abuse than seat cushions and sometimes have a thinner foam core. Don’t forget about the springs. The seat cushions should sit on well-spaced springs. Pull the cushions up and feel for springs that are close together to prevent your cushions from sagging with time.

BUY DOMESTIC, IN PERSON. Perusing the latest styles online can be great for inspiration, but buying online leaves you vulnerable to unwanted surprises. You wouldn’t buy a car without test driving it first, right? Until you see and feel the furniture for yourself, you can’t be sure that you’re getting the quality and style you want. Buying domestically made furniture also means your piece will be free of things like formaldehyde and cancer-causing glues, which are prohibited in U.S. furniture manufacturing but are common in imports.

J E R O M E R AC K E R S Jerome Rackers is from Columbia, Missouri and has been at Lifestyles Furniture for 25 years. He began his career at Lifestyles Furniture as the assistant manager and within three months became manager. After three years as manager, Jerome and his wife, Cheryl, purchased Lifestyles Furniture in July 1995. Jerome specializes in interior design and helping customers finding solutions to their home-furnishing needs. As owner and operator of Lifestyles Furniture, Jerome manages the staff, selects all floor stock, does the bookkeeping, plans and executes advertising and handles day-to-day operations.

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IT’S FABRIC TIME. Ok, so you’ve picked quality furniture in a style you love. Now it’s time to make it one-of-akind with custom upholstery. Like test driving your furniture before buying it, picking out fabric is a process best done in-store where you can touch and see the color, style and quality. Go back to your list of expectations (daily use and longevity) and look for fabric that will do more than just look pretty. A high-use piece of furniture should be upholstered with fabric that has at a rub count of at least 20,000 – that’s how many times the fabric endures contact before it needs replacing. If you’re anticipating food spills, pet hair and climbing kids, you might consider Revolution fabric. This new polyester blend can be cleaned safely with bleach, regardless of color, and is still soft and comfortable. Finally, don’t be afraid to go with a pop of color. Choosing custom upholstery gives you the chance to be unique. Avoid the temptation to go with a safe choice like beige or gray. Instead, make the piece truly yours with a funky pattern or bold color.

DON’T GO IT ALONE. Feeling overwhelmed by choices? Not sure if the furniture or fabric you picked will look great with your favorite rug? Another advantage of buying your furniture and fabric in-store is that you can rely on the help of experts. The staff at Lifestyles Furniture is well-versed on everything from frames and cushions to upholstery. They have the really cool job of helping you find and customize the furniture of your dreams. Plus, Lifestyles Furniture has great relationships with domestic manufacturers to ensure you get the highest quality available. Picking furniture and upholstery is a fun process with many details. Attention to those details will guarantee you end up with a distinctive, high quality piece. Don’t forget to take your time, have fun and be adventurous!


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HOW MUCH WILL A CLEAN HOME COST YOU? BY TIM ZAKREWSKI Find more at: www.tigermaids.net

Think a house cleaner is a luxury you can’t afford? Here are the going rates for professional house cleaning services. Keeping your house clean can be a monumental task, especially if you work full time, have young children or pets or all of the above. As a result, many busy homeowners are choosing to hire a professional house cleaner to help lower their stress and make their lives easier. But how much should they cost? Professional house cleaners and individual cleaners typically set house cleaning prices one of two ways: By the hour, or by square foot or a combination of both. Square footage is often used to determine time allocation and subsequent pricing.

INDIVIDUAL CLEANERS VERSUS CLEANING COMPANIES. Cleaning companies offer vetted and trained employees, most are covered with workers compensation and liability insurances and many offer their employees vacation and holiday pay, thus charging more for their services. Most companies work in teams of 2-3 cleaners, the nice thing about this is they are in an out quickly. They generally offer a satisfaction guarantee which means that if a cleaning job isn’t done to your satisfaction, you can take the issue up with the company. Many individuals run their own cleaning businesses but may not be licensed and typically do not carry the necessary insurances to protect your home and often want to be paid in cash or by personal check, so as to not

pay taxes. Their rates are typically lower and there is little recourse for a homeowner if a job isn’t done completely to your satisfaction, especially if the cleaner chooses to shut down his or her operation. There’s also a concern if an individual cleaner gets ill or has a personal emergency. Maid services typically have backups available and offer a greater degree of dependability. On average, hourly costs range from $25-$45 per maid hour for a professional organization and $15-$25 for an individual. With the average single family home spending $100-180 for bi-weekly service. First time cleanings are generally more expensive, as cleaners need to bring the home up to a maintenance level and need to determine if there are any rooms which require extra work. Industry standards indicate that a team of two properly trained speed cleaning professionals can service roughly 1400 sq ft per hour for bi-weekly clients. Variables that may affect this cleaning rate, time allocation and pricing are lifestyle, cleaning frequency, bathrooms in use, floor types, occupants, pets and drive time.

TIM ZAKREWSKI Tiger Maids was founded in 1996 by Robin Zakrewski, who has more than 25 years of experience in the residential cleaning industry and currently functions as the office and customer service manager. Her husband, Tim, joined the company full time in 2007. He brings more than 20 years in operations and sales management to the table and currently functions as the general and sales manager. Tiger Maids currently services more than 260 residential homes and performs hundreds of move-out services each year for their property management and realtor partners. Additionally, they provide post-construction clean-up services for six luxury home builders. Tim can be reached at tim@tigermaids.net or 573-999-5850.

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Pricing may also be affected by what is included or excluded from their services. Most professional house cleaners bring tools (vacuum, mop, dusters) and cleaning products with them, meaning you do not have to worry about picking up cleaning supplies, others ask homeowners to provide the cleaning supplies. This may make the hourly rate more attractive but can be a hassle. Many companies charge extra for windows, blinds, baseboards, or oven and refrigerator cleaning so be sure to see what is included. Here are a few pricing examples of common cleaning tasks and a few extras: • Biweekly service for a 2500 sq ft home -$105-120 per visit • Biweekly 3500 sq ft home (2500 main & upper, 100 lower) with the lower every other visit $250 –275 per month • Spring deep cleaning 2500 sq ft home$250- $300 • Move out service for a 2000 sq ft home$250-$300 House cleaning services no longer a luxury and in many cases they are a necessity, the good news is they are affordable. Call Tiger Maids we can fit a cleaning plan into any budget.


HOME TOUR

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HOME TOUR

An Elegant Touch Holiday mantels to set the season’s tone. by

BRENNA MCDERMOTT

photos by

KEITH BORGMEYER

Anne Tuckley’s holiday mantel.

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hen it comes to interior decorating, Anne Tuckley makes her own rules. And she’s created a living room that combines drama and whimsy in a way that is all her own. “In my own [home], because I’m an artist first, before a decorator, this is all just play,” Anne says. “It’s my freedom, it’s my outlet. Everything else that I do has to be for somebody else and normally a little bit more traditional.” This was originally a beige and gray room, and last November she intended to paint just one stairwell blue. Instead, after a “wild

hair,” she painted the entire living room. When she’s decorating, Anne doesn’t always have the final look in mind. Rather, she uses inspiration boards and her own artistic talents to drive the vision as she goes. To create her holiday mantel look, Anne hung ornaments from the ceiling with push pins and wire, and she attached ornaments to the mirror with Velcro. Next, she used lighted birch trees available in her store, Alley 108, to pull in the winter feel. To create her main ornament piece, she hand-wired together the ornaments (a process which took about three hours) used a hot

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glue gun to attach ornaments to a box to maintain shape, and held the piece up on the mantle with weights. Anne’s modern style mixed with lighthearted touches makes her vision one of a kind, and clients go to Anne Tuckley Interior Design for a one-of-a-kind look. “I ended up putting somebody’s tea set in their Christmas tree once,” Anne says. “It just made it so whimsical, so personal. I’ve put family photos, treasures, jewelry — things that you would never imagine putting in a Christmas tree, I’ve put in trees before.”


HOME TOUR

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HOME TOUR

Opposites Attract When Beverly Reid, owner of S. Stewart Home, called her friend of six years Judy Nistendirk with an invitation to decorate her mantel, Judy didn’t hesitate. “Awesome,” Judy said. “Let’s get started.” Judy’s home style is transitional to modern, so when planning to set the mantel, Bev says she went with a “less is more” approach when brainstorming. Bev and Judy didn’t want the decorations to overpower the bold mantel, nor the piece of art that hangs above it. They wanted to utilize elements already in Judy’s home to make the holiday décor an extension of Judy’s home style. They chose to mix greenery with mixed metals. “I love the more unique use of greenery,” Bev says. “I didn’t want the whole thing to be about floral. I still wanted to incorporate it in a different way than what you typically see.” Judy had purchased the votives and several vases from S. Stewart Home previously for everyday use, and they were able to incorporate several of those pieces into the décor, saving them from purchasing an entire new set of holiday items. Other than the silver trees on the mantel, everything was purchased from Bev’s store. Judy has worked there part time for several years. Bev constructed the main greenery piece herself, by combining strands of garland, greenery, and ornaments and attaching it with wire. The style of a low hanging element is popular because many people mount TVs above the mantel, Bev says. “I like that it has a combination of something new yet elegant, without being overpowering,” Judy says.

Judy Nistendirk’s holiday mantel, designed with Beverly Reid.

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HOME TOUR

HOMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS The Missouri Symphony Society gets Columbia in the holiday spirit. by A N N A C O M F O R T

T

hose looking for holiday inspiration can see some of Columbia’s most beautiful homes, with halls fully decked, on the Holiday Home Tour. The event is organized by the Women’s Symphony League, an auxiliary of the Missouri Symphony Society, and will take place December 2 through 4. Now in its 33rd year, the Holiday Home Tour raises funds to support the symphony society’s conservatory program for young musicians, as well as its Hot Summer Nights music festival. The tour is self-paced and features different homes every year. Visitors start at whichever

location they choose and are invited to enjoy each host’s take on seasonal décor. Volunteer docents stationed in every main room will point out decorations as well as furniture and architectural design features and share stories about the home’s history. This year’s tour presents a little variety for home viewers. “We have two young professional families on the tour this year,” says Nancy Griggs, Women’s Symphony League treasurer, “and both families have young children, bringing a theme of playful decoration to the tour.” One of the young couples, Melissa and COMO L I V I N G

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Josh Holyoak, describe life with their four children as “joyful chaos,” and they decorate their home each Christmas with homemade ornaments and an electric train set. The other couple, Megan and Daniel Hoyt, along with their son and daughter, adorn their bannisters with green garlands and decorate several themed Christmas trees throughout the house. The other two residential stops on the tour this year are Providence Point, also known as the University of Missouri President’s Residence, and the MU Chancellor’s Residence. Both are currently unoccupied, making it easier to open them to the public.


HOME TOUR

Providence Point has a traditional Christmas tree trimmed with bulb ornaments in black, red, green, blue, gold, and white, representing the school colors of each of the four UM System campuses. The Chancellor’s Residence is filled each year with elaborate Christmas decorations that complement the home’s Victorian décor. Nancy says that the Holiday Home Tour “kicks off [the chancellor’s home’s] 150th year.” The residence was built in 1867. Usually included in the tour is one nonresidential building; this year’s commercial stop is the Brouder Science Center, on the campus of Columbia College. The nurse’s lab will be open during the tour, and visitors will get to see Simon the Simulator, a robot that simulates medical symptoms. At points in the weekend, tour stops will feature live entertainment from the Missouri Symphony Conservatory and the Jane Froman Singers. “It’s a time to find ideas for your own home, or to get into the Christmas spirit if you don’t decorate,” says Nancy. “And it’s a wonderful opportunity to spend time with friends during the cold winter months.” Tickets are on sale for $15 at mosymphonysociety.org as well as D&H Drugstore, all Columbia Hy-Vee locations, McAdams Ltd., Songbird Station, and the Missouri Theatre, or at the door for $20.

Homes featured on the 2015 home tour COMO L I V I N G

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Fringe

Benefits Boots to spice up your winter wardrobe. by B O B B I WAT T S photos by K E I T H B O R G M E Y E R

'Tis the season for fringe! This winter, discover some of the bold and daring trends of the season, including the forever-timeless statement of fringe — this time with a twist. Break the habit of boring and try out some invigorating and chic styles of casual, dressy, and cowboy boots. There’s a little something for everyone this season.

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Keep It Casual Clockwise from left: Dromedaris Krissy Dryer’s Shoes Steve Madden Aces booties  Dillard’s Dansko Michelle milled nubuck Dryer’s Shoes Earthies Zurich by Earth American Shoe

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Dress It Up Clockwise from left: Vince Camuto Rora peep-toe booties  Dillard’s Vince Camuto Fermel tassel boots  Dillard’s Vince Camuto Winiveer fringe sandals  Dillard’s Free People Seven Wonders American Shoe

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FA S H I O N

Look at Them Boots Clockwise from right: Abilene Boots teal leather upper Larry’s Boots Very Volatile Los Angeles Lookout  Dillard’s Durango Crush boots  Dryer’s Shoes Corral Women’s cowboy boots  Larry’s Boots

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2017 Wedding Planner Directory Your go-to guide to the experts

Bakeries

Catering

Gift Registry

Travel Specialists

Range Free range-free.com 573.777.9980

Fresh Ideas freshideasfood.com 573.445.4321

Tallulahs Store tallulahsstore.com 573.442.9550

Adelman Global Travel Solutions adelmantravel.com 573.442.2200

Schnucks schnucks.com 573.446.2800

Room 38 room-38.com 573.449.3838

Upper Crust theuppercrust.biz 573.874.4044

Schnucks schnucks.com 573.446.2800

Jewelers

Venues

Betz Jewelers betzjewelers.com 573.449.1070

Big Cedar Lodge bigcedar.com 417.335.2777

— Beauty & Wellness Columbia Allergy & Asthma breatheeasyandlivefree.com 573.777.4700 Keen Dental Care columbiamodentist.com 573.875.5336 Pela Cura Anti-Aging & Wellness pelacura.com 573.256.7772 Regeneration Salon & Spa salon-spa-regeneration.com 573.234.1560

— Wedding Dresses & Alterations

University Club uclub.missouri.edu 573.882.2188/573.882.9048

Upper Crust theuppercrust.biz 573.874.4044

Photographers

Rebecca Allen Photography rebeccaallenphotography.com 573.268.7700

Event Specialists

Scott Patrick Myers Photography scottpatrickmyers.com 573.239.8162

Annabelle Events annabelleevents.com 573.815.9136

Central Missouri Bridal Association centralmissouribridalassociation.com

573.636.4094

Specialty Services

Complete Weddings & Events weddingdjcolumbia.com 573.814.9151

Too Rooster Artistry toorooster.com 573.356.3401

Blue Bell Farm bluebellfarm.org 314.220.7120 Columbia Country Club columbiacc.net 573.449.4115 Serenity Valley Winery serenitywinerymo.com 573.642.6958 Stoney Creek Inn stoneycreekhotels.com 573.442.6400 The Broadway Hotel thebroadwaycolumbia.com 573.875.7000 The Club at Old Hawthorne oldhawthorne.com 573.442.5280 Ugly Mugg facebook.com/uglymuggcomo 573.673.5757

Ana Marie’s Bridal anamariesbridal.com 573.636.1060

Floral

Transportation

University Club uclub.missouri.edu 573.882.2188/573.882.9048

French Laundry frenchlaundrybocomo.com 573.449.4152

Schnucks schnucks.com 573.446.2800

Celebration Limousines & Buses celebrationlimousines.biz 573.489.9070

Upper Crust theuppercrust.biz 573.874.4044

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Side by Side

Your favorite local chefs share their go-to holiday side dishes. Recipes on page 54

Creamy Country Green Bean Casserole

by Chef Benjamin Hamrah Peachtree Catering & Banquet Center

ph otos by K E I T H B O R G M E Y E R COMO L I V I N G

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Deviled Duck Eggs with Goat Cheese, Prosciutto, & Fresh Chives By Chef James Nevins Broadway Brewery

Brandy Pear Cake

by Chef Keil Herman 44 Stone

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Pear, Sweet Potato, and Parsnip Salad By Chef Daniel Pliska University Club and University Catering

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Chocolate-Covered Caramel Toffee Cheesecake

By Chef Chris McDonnell Chris McD’s

Parmesan Au Gratin Potatoes By Chef Ben Randolph ElevenEleven

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Creamy Country Deviled Duck Eggs Green Bean Casserole with Goat Cheese, Prosciutto, & Fresh Chives Ingredients: By Chef Benjamin Hamrah Peachtree Catering & Banquet Center

• • • • • • • • • • •

7 ounces country bacon 3½ ounces red onions, sliced thin 2 tablespoons butter 2 tablespoons flour 2 cups heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped 1/2 teaspoon Lawry’s Seasoned Salt 3 cups fresh green beans

For Crispy Onion Garnish • • • •

6½ ounces red onion, sliced thin 1 cup flour 1 teaspoon Lawry’s Seasoned Salt Vegetable oil

1. Heat a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium–low heat. 2. Add bacon, stirring frequently. Cook bacon until crispy. Remove to a paper towel-lined bowl. Reserve bacon grease for another day. 3. Add butter and first batch of onion to skillet and brown. Sprinkle flour onto butter– onion mixture and stir to incorporate. Allow to cook slowly for 10 minutes. 4. Slowly stir in cream and add spices. Stir gently and frequently, bringing the mixture to a low simmer. As cream thickens, add green beans and stir to cover completely. 5. Place in a 350-degree oven for 20 minutes. 6. While green beans are in the oven, heat some vegetable oil in a high-sided pan on medium–high heat. Toss second batch of onions in the flour with seasoning salt, and use a mesh strainer to shake off any excess flour. 7. Gently fry the onions in the oil until deep golden brown. Remove to a paper towel-lined plate and reserve. 8. Remove the beans from the oven. Garnish with the crispy bacon and crispy onions.

By Chef James Nevins Broadway Brewery

8 duck eggs (or 12 chicken eggs) 1/3 cup mayonnaise 1/3 cup goat cheese 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 2 dashes Sriracha hot sauce 1 teaspoon minced shallot 3 tablespoons fresh chives 2 ounces prosciutto, sliced into 1-inch pieces Kosher salt to taste

1. Boil duck eggs for 13 minutes (nine minutes for chicken eggs.) 2. Cool in ice bath and peel. 3. Slice eggs in half. Remove yolks and place in a mixing bowl. 4. Mash up yolks with a fork, then add mayonnaise, goat cheese, minced shallot, Dijon mustard, and chives. Whisk until the yolk is broken up and the mixture is smooth. 5. Use a piping bag to fill eggs with mixture. 6. Top with a thinly sliced (1-inch) piece of prosciutto ham with additional chives for garnish.

Brandy Pear Cake By Chef Keil Herman 44 Stone

Ingredients: • 8 pears • ½ cup light brown sugar, packed • 3-plus cups Anjou or Bartlett pears, peeled or not, cored, and diced medium • 2 tablespoons brandy cake -

• 1/4 cup butter • 1 tablespoon hot water (more if needed) • 1½ cups powdered sugar

Cake 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Coat a 9-inch deep pie pan with cooking spray. 2. Place a round portion of parchment paper onto the bottom of the pan. 3. Warm the butter and brown sugar in a skillet over medium heat. Add the pears and sauté just until tender (five minutes or less). Remove the skillet from the heat, stir in the brandy, return the skillet to the heat and cook, stirring, for another minute (be careful — it may flame up). 4. Pour pear mixture into prepared pie pan. 5. Using a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, cornmeal, baking powder, and salt. Scatter the butter over the top of flour and pulse until crumbly like uncooked oatmeal. Transfer to a bowl. 6. Combine milk, egg, and brandy. Mix into flour mixture just until blended. Spread over the pears in the pie pan. 7. Bake until risen, light golden, and able to have a wooden skewer come out of the center cleanly (about 30 minutes). Cool for 10 minutes, then invert onto a serving platter. Cool completely. Drizzle with brown butter glaze

Brown Butter Glaze

Cake

COMO L I V I N G

1 cup all purpose flour 1/3 cup granulated sugar 1/4 cup cornmeal 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, diced small and chilled • 1 cup whole milk • 1 large egg, room temperature and fork beaten • 1 tablespoon brandy

Brown Butter Glaze

Ingredients: • • • • • • • • •

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1. Melt 1/4 cup butter in a small sauce pan; continue to cook the butter, swirling the pan occasionally, until the butter turns nutty and golden brown. 2. Remove from the heat and whisk in 1½ cups powdered sugar and 1 tablespoon hot


water. Add a little more if needed to achieve a drizzling consistency. This glaze can also easily be made in the food processor. 1. Place your powdered sugar in the food processor bowl. Have your hot water ready next to your food processor. 2. Cook the butter until it has reached the level of brown that you are after. 3. Moving swiftly, turn on the food processor, slowly drizzle in the hot brown butter, making sure to scrape all the browned butter from the pan. 4. Slowly add hot water to the food processor until your glaze has reached the desired level of consistency.

Pear, Sweet Potato, and Parsnip Salad By Chef Daniel Pliska University Club and University Catering

Makes 18 servings (approximately 12 cups)

Ingredients: Salad • 1 quart sweet potatoes, roasted and diced 3/4 by 3/4 inch • 2 cups parsnips, roasted and diced (3/4 by 3/4) • 2 cups pears, poached, cored, peeled, and diced (3/4 by 3/4) • 2 cups celery, diced (1/2 by 1/2) • 1 cup golden raisins

Dressing • • • • • • •

1/2 cup honey 1/2 cup white balsamic 1/2 cup parsley 1½ cup vegetable oil 1/4 cup tarragon 1½ teaspoons cumin powder Salt and pepper to taste

1. Prepare the dressing by whisking the honey and white balsamic vinegar with the herbs and cumin.

2. Whisk in the oil in a slow stream to make a vinaigrette. 3. Toss with the vegetables, pears, and raisins. Chill and serve.

Chocolate-Covered Caramel Toffee Cheesecake By Chef Chris McDonnell Chris McD’s

Ingredients: Crust • 2 cups graham cracker crumbs • 1/2 cup sugar • 1/2 cup melted butter (adjust to proper consistency)

Cheesecake • • • • • • • •

3 pounds cream cheese, room temperature 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup sugar 2½ tablespoons flour 5 eggs 1/2 cup heavy cream 5 Heath bars or toffee, crushed 1/2 cup melted caramel (can make from scratch or melt store-bought Werther’s chewy caramels)

Ganache • 1½ cups dark chocolate • 3/4 cup heavy cream Melt together in a double boiler until melted. Add cream until desired consistency.

Toppings • 3/4 to 1 cup melted caramel • 1 Heath bar, cut into shards 1. Heat oven to 300 degrees. 2. Mix graham cracker crumbs, sugar, and butter, and then press it into the bottom of the greased springform pan. Set aside. 3. In a mixer with paddle attachment, mix cream cheese, cream, flour, sugar, and vanilla extract until smooth. COMO L I V I N G

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4. Add eggs one by one, only adding the next one after the first is completely mixed. 5. Add Heath bars and warm caramel. 6. Pour the cheesecake batter over the top of pressed crust. 7. Bake 2 to 2 ½ hours, rotating halfway through. 8. Cool the cheesecake until cool to the touch before pouring the ganache. It doesn’t have to be completely cooled, since you’ll refrigerate after the ganache is on, but make sure it does remain in the fridge overnight (or for around 8 hours) to ensure that it’s cold all the way through before serving. Be sure to wait to cut it until the ganache has fully set. It’s best to allow for chilling overnight to ensure that everything is cold and set.

Parmesan Au Gratin Potatoes By Chef Ben Randolph ElevenEleven

Ingredients: • • • • • • • •

1 tablespoon butter 2 cups heavy cream 1/4 cup flour 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 cup onions, minced 1 cup parmesan cheese, grated 3 russet potatoes, peeled and sliced 1/8-inch thick

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Butter a 13-by-9-inch baking dish. 3. Combine cream, flour, garlic powder, and kosher salt. 4. Toss onion, parmesan cheese, and potato slices in cream mixture. 5. Shingle potato slices in baking dish in layers. 6. Pour remaining cream mixture over potatoes. 7. Cover potatoes with foil and bake for 45 minutes. 8. Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes.


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Top Tables Local experts show you some creative ways to set your table for the holiday season. ph otos by K E I T H B O R G M E Y E R


, Rockin

Around the Clock

New Year’s Eve Table by Michele Towns

Logan Arnett COMO L I V I N G

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From Everyday to Holiday

Twist of Tradition Christmas by McAdams’ Ltd. COMO L I V I N G

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Building the Collection

Traditional Holiday Figures by Tallulahs COMO L I V I N G

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Rockin, Around the Clock From Everyday to Holiday Building the Collection New Year’s Eve Table by Michele Towns

Twist of Tradition Christmas by McAdams’ Ltd.

Traditional Holiday Figures by Tallulahs

When we pitched the idea of a setting a holiday themed table for COMO Living, Michele Towns immediately snatched up the New Year’s Eve theme. Why? She loves decorating in black, white, and gold. Michele connected the old and the new with her modern color scheme and tied it in with the classic clock and mask themes. Her approach to this table consisted of repurposing and DIY-ing some things, and many of her items were reused: tablecloths from Jana, at Studio J, used for her daughter’s wedding; antique plates found at estate sales; and embroidered napkins made by her sister, which Michele says she’s seeing from all the design bloggers she follows. “It’s fun to make things with what you have,” Michele says.

The McAdams’ team’s table is based on a combination of classic place settings and whimsical details, like the salad plates illustrated with winter scenes. They included Juliska, Reed and Barton, and Mariposa brands at the table, all of which can be found in the store. The centerpiece bowl full of ornaments is a fun play on the traditional ornament display, and it can be thrown together with just a few minutes’ notice. It makes sense that the McAdams’ table is a mix of traditional and trendy — it reflects the eclectic style of the store. And it shows that any regular table settings can be made to reflect the holidays with a few simple additions.

The popular holiday lines at Tallulahs recall memories of childhood Christmas mornings — the traditional snowmen and Santas found on Vietri’s Old St. Nick collection; the Vagabond House’s wooden cheese plate and salt and pepper shakers; and Belleza holiday plates bring a touch of fanciful fun to the Christmas season. Tallulahs owners Mary Stauffer and Melissa Alabach say Vietri is one of their most popular brands (their products are hand painted), and they start stocking Vietri in August. It’s a brand that families can add to as they grow — they release a new signature piece of the collection each year.

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BUCKET LISTS for the New Year COMO L I V I N G

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THIS YEAR, DITCH YOUR RESOLUTIONS FOR SOMETHING BIGGER.

Y

by N I C O L E F L O O D

Some lists grow us personally. Some lists grow us professionally. And some lists grow us in our relationships with others. The important thing is creating a bucket list that works for you.

ou’ve done the whole New Year’s resolutions thing. New year, new you, right? The thing with these resolutions is that people often abandon them by mid-March. We’ve all seen the gyms fill up in January, only to empty back to normal as early spring sets in. So what makes change stick, and what makes someone see their goals through? Resolutions tend to fail because you’re looking at something you want to change about yourself. A bucket list, on the other hand, is something you want to do. Bucket lists are aspirational. They inspire you to strive towards an accomplishment and lead a purposeful life. Setting long-term goals with various timelines helps us create a driving force in our life that takes us out of our comfort zones and the day-to-day grind that can bog us down. COMO L I V I N G

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Find the Driving Force

As life coach Carolyn Paris spends time with her clients, goals naturally come up. “Guiding people through the practice of interrupting the negative cycles that keep them in the same patterns in order to experience a fun, satisfying, powerful life is the cool part of consulting,” she says. Carolyn doesn’t necessarily ask clients to make a bucket list, but she does ask what seems impossible but, if it were possible, would make a significant difference in their life. Once clients answer that question, she then focuses on the “why.” -

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Often in the “why,” one will find the driving force behind what they want to obtain. The first step is determining the why, then declaring it, writing it down, reviewing it, and taking consistent action towards what you are seeking. Once you’ve done that, you share it with others. “By nature, we want to grow and improve our situation or experience on Earth, so just by our very nature we’re always wanting to stretch,” Carolyn says. “I think the benefit of having a bucket list is really about selfexamination. Rather than being on autopilot, maybe fulfilling someone else’s dreams or purpose, when you make your bucket list you have to do self-examination and say, ‘What do I want? What will give me joy? What will give me satisfaction?’” Part of this is deciding what, exactly, will challenge you and how long it might take to accomplish your goals. Once you begin working towards the goal, it’s also important to take time to reassess and examine your progress. The whole idea of a bucket list, of course, comes from the euphemism “kick the bucket.” Looking at the idea from that standpoint, bucket lists are about setting up things you want to experience, getting the most out of life so you can look back knowing you’ve lived to the fullest. “My coach always says, ‘Our goals and our commitments give us our future and our actions,’ and I think that is such a strong statement,” Carolyn says.

Make the Most of Your Bucket List

For Michele Spry, who owns Midway Electric with her husband, Brandon, her bucket list started in 2013 with the desire to write a children’s book, run more, and travel to all 50 states with her high school sweetheart. “This year, Brandon and I both turned 40, so I created several bucket list items that I really wanted to accomplish by the year we turned 40,” says Michele. “As I hit 40, I realized I’m not getting younger, and I want to live life to the fullest. I don’t want to live and not enjoy everything I’ve done.” After a trip to Maine, New Hampshire, and Rhode Island in October, Michele has


From left: Michele Spry and her husband, Brandon; Dwain Gardner and Mary Stanford on a dive trip.

now been to all 50 states with her husband. “I really wanted to travel, and, for me, I really wanted to see the United States,” Michele says. “I don’t really care about seeing the world — this is the place we love, and I really wanted to see what all it had to offer.” Their travels included a trip to Alaska, on Anchorage’s 100th birthday. “Seeing the sunset in Alaska at 11 p.m. was amazing,” Michele says. “And we’ve seen the sunrise in Maui, Hawaii at around 3 a.m. It was incredible. Getting to experience what each state has to offer I think has been the best part — and that we get to do it together.” Michele released her second children’s book on July 4, a month before she turned 40. When she released her first book, “Tom T’s Hat Rack,” in January 2013, she was nervous about what people might say. “Writing the book was a scary moment for me, but it was something I had set out to do, and from that point forward I wanted to create my own bucket list and push myself to live life to the fullest,” she says. For her running, Michele started with a goal to do 13 5Ks in 2013. Suffice it to say she conquered that challenge, completing 62. Since then, she’s been making decisions to be healthier and get her steps in through running and walking challenges at both in-person and virtual races.

“Anytime that we can create something or have an idea and execute it, we become more empowered. ” — Rachael Sparks

This year, she wanted to do 40 5Ks to celebrate her 40th birthday. She is well on her way to crossing that off her bucket list as well, having already completed 31 virtual 5Ks and 2 live races so far this year. Michele says that bucket lists help you lead a purposeful and positive life. List items can even be small creative things that are inexpensive, such as sitting on a historic park bench in a train station. “No matter if you’re talking about travel or you’re talking COMO L I V I N G

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about races or daily life, it forces you to find something good in everything,” Michele says. “That’s the great thing about bucket lists: they force you out of your comfort zone and encourage you to try things and do things you wouldn’t normally do.”

Empower Dreams

Rachael Sparks, an empowerment coach, works with her clients to help them live an authentic life. “It’s more [about] identifying their values and knowing what they want to do with their life so that they can specifically start working towards that, rather than the direction society keeps pulling them.” Rachael likes to have clients make a bucket list because it gives people motivation and something to work towards, taking the blinders off the 9-to-5 grind many of us are in. “I really think the main idea behind a bucket list is having direction and purpose and clarity,” Rachael says. “It kind of is validating to who we are to know that our life does have purpose and things to look forward to.” When clients come in for coaching, she asks them what five things are on their bucket list. These types of conversations help create a snowballing momentum. “Anytime that we can create something or have an idea and execute it, we become more


empowered,” Rachael says. “And so the more empowered we are in our everyday life, the more we live the life we deserve and we know that we want. It’s just one more tool for living an empowered life.” One difference she uses to distinguish between a goal and a bucket list item is that goals can provide motivation and a sense of satisfaction and fulfillment, like bucket lists, but bucket lists take you outside of your normal life and give you a taste of something completely different — they stretch you in a way that enhances your worldview and your perspectives. With bucket lists, it’s also important to have a sense of accountability. “If you just have a friend, a spouse, a family member, a co-worker, a colleague, a life coach — that person can help you to really get out of your own head and get your stuff down on paper and hold you accountable to reaching those goals in your life and ticking those things off your bucket list,” Rachael says.

Diving into the Unknown

Mary Stanford and her husband, Dwain, own and manage Captain Nemo’s Dive Shop in Columbia, where they teach scuba diving, sell equipment, and run a diving travel program. “We have quite a bit of experience with customers expressing their desire to scuba dive because it is on their bucket list,” Mary says. “The ocean is a healing, calming, and profound life force that calls to many of us.” Unlike other common bucket list items, Mary says, scuba diving is accessible to most people. Mary says it’s fulfilling for them to see people achieve this bucket list goal and experience the positive change it has in their life. Bucket lists can offer a new perspective on the goal setting and resolution building that comes with the new year. Mary, working firsthand with so many bucket-listers, gets to see this work in action. “Accomplishing something you have as a goal is powerful, satisfying, and, in some cases, lifetransforming,” she says. “Without goals, time passes and nothing gets done. We have lots of people that say, ‘I wish I had done this years ago.’”


Kick-starting Your Own Bucket List

Whether you love jumping off of things or hunkering down with a good book, you can start your bucket list today. We offer up a few different lists — find the one that inspires you and go to work!

Adventurous

Career

Single Life

Familyoriented

Out of Your Comfort Zone

Budgetconscious

• • • • • • • • • •

Go on a safari Take a random day or weekend trip Go sky-diving Visit a national park  Raft the Grand Canyon Visit the Sistine Chapel See the Northern Lights Bike across the state  Learn a different language Create a travel blog

• Volunteer together  • Cook dinner together — have each person cook something special • Get family portraits taken   • Plant a garden • Visit the library once a week • Teach grandma how to text • Have your kids plan a family weekend  • Turn your living room into a “home theater”: order pizza, pop some popcorn, and have an old school movie night. • Camp out in the backyard  • Buy a family pet

• • • • • • • • • •

Get published Start your own business Invest in a new business venture Mentor someone Learn a new skill Start a volunteer program  Use all your vacation time  Obtain your next degree Start a work book club Apply for your dream job

• Try a new local restaurant  • Take a Dancing, painting, or wine tasting class • Attend a poetry slam  • Write a book  • Befriend a stranger  • Take an acting class  • Volunteer for a cause • Participate in an open mic night  • Take up photography • Host a party  • Go to lunch by yourself COMO L I V I N G

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• • • • • • • • • •

Plan a girls’ weekend Run a marathon  Try a new hair style  Travel to a new country  Take a cooking class Go to a festival  Redesign or organize your home Revamp your wardrobe Throw a dinner party Adopt a pet 

• Read every book written by your favorite author • Create your own recipe  • Attend the opening of an art gallery  • Build a house with Habitat for Humanity  • Do a charity walk  • Make a time capsule • Take a CPR class • Attend a free concert  • Research your family tree • Write and send handwritten letters


At Golden LivingCenter, our passion is to provide advanced clinical care to meet your personal care needs. Through our patient-centered care planning approach, we establish goals that will allow you to regain your strength and independence so you can return to the activities that you enjoy.

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WELLNESS

SUPPLEMENT YOUR HEALTH Ma k i ng s u re you r b ody h a s w hat it n eeds to th rive. by A N N A C O M F O R T

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n a perfect world, we’d all have the time, energy, and resources to make sure that we receive all the nutrients our bodies need through a balanced and wholesome diet. But, because of processing and additives, our food isn’t always as nutritious as we want it to be. Add to that the rise in health issues requiring dietary restrictions and it becomes nearly impossible to get all the proper nutrients through food alone. We talked to local nutrition and supplement experts to find out which supplements can help you fill in the gaps and maintain a healthful diet. Here are their top suggestions.

Soft-Capsule Multivitamin Multivitamins are a bit of a given, right? But the hard-pressed tablets most of us take don’t get digested properly, according to Justin Lackey, manager at Complete Nutrition. “They go in one end and right out the other,” he says. “So I tell people to get a good capsule multivitamin — a cellulose or gelatin capsule will break down as soon as it hits your digestive tract. Or, a powder mixed with water will be immediately absorbed by the body.” Phillip Stewart, owner of Columbia’s two Supplement Superstore locations, agrees. “A soft-capsule multivitamin will get you better absorption of nutrients.”

regularity.” Justin, at Complete Nutrition, adds that improved digestion through probiotic use can even help with weight loss.

Protein Protein is important for building muscle, but our bodies also use protein to manufacture hormones and other necessary chemicals. Phillip, at Supplement Superstore, says there are protein supplements to fit anyone’s lifestyle. “We have a lot of people that use it in the morning, in a shake,” he says. “It breaks down like you’re eating whole food. Protein bars are good, too. They’ll give you some higher fiber, which is lacking a lot in people’s diets.” Caroline Cheong, regional nutritional health coach for Natural Grocers, says a good way to estimate your daily protein needs is to divide your weight by 2.2. For example, a woman weighing 150 pounds should shoot for about 68 grams of protein per day.

Fish oil Omega 3 fatty acids are essential for heart health and also improve your body’s inflammatory response, which can reduce joint pain and asthma symptoms. Phillip

recommends a supplement high in EPA and DHA fatty acids, which are used more easily by your body than the ALA acids found in plant sources like chia and flaxseed. Caroline, at Natural Grocers, says vegans and vegetarians should look for algae-based supplements made from the same algae that fish get their omega 3s from.

Vitamin D Women know how important calcium is for healthy bones, but without vitamin D, our bodies can’t properly absorb calcium. Beyond bone health, vitamin D also boosts the immune system. Caroline stresses, “Especially during this time of year, during fall and winter, you really want to build up your immune support.” Other vitamin D benefits include improved brain function, healthy inflammatory response, and healthy blood sugar balance. Not all supplements are created equal. Make sure to check that your supplement actually contains what the label advertises by checking with independent organizations. Always consult your doctor about which supplements are best for you.

Not all supplements are created equal.

Probiotics Another important part of making sure your body properly absorbs nutrients is by encouraging healthy gut bacteria. Laura Gresham, team leader and supplement buyer at Clover’s Natural Foods, says, “We take a lot of antibiotics, and the animals that we consume are fed a diet that is heavy in antibiotics, so we end up with a depleted gut flora.” This depletion, Laura says, also makes us susceptible to infections. “Taking a probiotic can boost your immune system as well as improve COMO L I V I N G

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SPONSORED CONTENT

The trend for hair and makeup is strobing!

Strobing is a concept we’ve been using in makeup and now, Matrix has created some great techniques for your hair. Essentially, strobing is highlighting areas that you want to accentuate deliberately. Hair color, face shape and skin tone all play a part in the placement of these highlights.

Makeup Strobing Strobing has become even more popular in makeup and is simply contouring and illuminating without darkness and shadows. We use beautiful highlighters for eyes and cheeks in a variety of tones to warm

the skin. This the perfect make-up technique to brighten dull skin and help post-summer skin look amazing.

Hair Strobing As in the above, hair strobing adds a glow to the areas of your face where light would naturally touch. We use lighter tones around the eyes, the check area or around the jaw. It can be a singular area or a combination of all three. You can select from warm tones, cool tones or fun pops of colors like blue, pink or coral. Some opt for a more subtle look while others are all about the drama. Either way, you get to complement your best features.

Here are a few of the looks that I’ve recently created. The brunette’s hair is a cheek strobe while the red head is a subtle all over strobe with makeup to complement.

Marcie Olivas salon/spa owner

Passionate about the art of cosmetology, Marcie is also highly respected for her expertise as a Matrix artistic designer and as a master colorist. She’s consulted Miss USA delegates, directed photo shoots and bridal fashion shows, and consulted on various magazines. She has earned her CIDESCO Diplomate certification and has extensive knowledge in skin care. COMO L I V I N G

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FITNESS

DO THE DEAD BUG

How to wo r k out wh i l e l yi n g dow n . by J E F F C A R R

Move: Dead bug with supine breathing.

Purpose: To achieve diaphragmatic breathing with good rib, spine, and pelvis position. Also, to improve core control and maintain neutral spine with limb movement.

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Target area: Core — works the core while keeping back in safe neutral alignment

How to do it: Step 1: Lie in supine position with arms up and knees bent. Make sure back is flat, ribs are down, and chin is tucked.

Step 2: Without arching the back, slowly

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extend an arm, keeping other limbs in place. Maintaining the good rib position, take a deep breath in through the nose and into the belly.

Step 3: Forcefully exhale air through the mouth and force ribs down (inhale for three or four seconds and take six to eight seconds to exhale).

Step 4: Return to original position, then repeat for desired reps or time.

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Jeff says to try this move two times a day every other day for up to 20 reps or as many as 60 seconds. JEFF CARR Jeff Carr is the co-owner of The Fitness Company. He has a B.S. in health science and a master of health education from MU. He believes working out should be fun.

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MOM IN THE MIDDLE

BEYOND ICON

WHERE ARE YOU FROM? A po e m a bo u t t h e h om e I re m ember. by J I L L O R R

So much of how we parent comes from looking backward. Our minds continually flash back to the way things were when we were kids. We mine our childhoods for what worked, what didn’t, and what we vow never to repeat. For instance, I will never make my kids eat everything on their plate — because my father used to save the leftover cereal (in milk) that I didn’t finish at breakfast for me to eat after school. He thought this would teach me not to pour such a big bowl. As it turned out, it only taught me not to do this to my own children. When my son was in sixth grade, he was given a poetry assignment based on the famous poem “Where I’m From,” by George Ella Lyons. This poem is used as a teaching tool in schools and writing workshops all the time because it has a very definite structure: a collection of details from the memories that make up the writer’s identity. The framework of the poem is always the same, but each poem written within that framework is vastly different. My son struggled with it. Still, when I saw him working, I wanted to give it a try. I’m weird that way. Plus, I thought, if past is prologue, then where we come from will certainly influence the direction our children go. Surely that’s something worth examining . . . even if it means writing a poem. JILL ORR Jill is a stay-at-home mom of two and an MU grad with a degree in journalism and master's in social work, with an emphasis on children and family studies.

I A m From  by Jill Orr I am from orange shag carpeting and dark wood floors, neon sculptures, stained-glass windows, and harvest gold refrigerators. From wide suburban streets, lined with tall old trees and faded chalk four-square courts. I am from radiators and asbestos in the basement, from the first house on the block to get a microwave. I am from watery eyes and serial sneezes, from bug-bites and itchy grass. From grape Benadryl and asthma attacks and freckles and sunburns. I am from staying inside whenever possible. I am from air conditioning. I am from family vacations in woodpaneled station wagons and silent laughter in the way-back. From my Mom, who always knew the latest, best thing, and my father, who told me the truth whether I wanted to hear it or not. I am from my sister, who understands this all without me having to explain. I am from one family split slowly, painfully, into two. I am from spending every other weekend in the city, playing long games of gin rummy with my dad. From watching my mother rebuild her career, from vicious fights with my sister, from seeking refuge in my friends. I am from closing my door and writing it all down. I am from “You can do anything you set your mind to” and “Don’t take

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yourself too seriously.” From I love yous unspoken, but never doubted. From the security of “I’ll always be here if you need me.” I am from those Jewish enough not to eat ham on white bread, but not enough to stay away from bacon or attend synagogue; from Darwinism and the Golden Rule and Karma and Always Try Your Best. I am from pop culture, song lyrics, and fortune cookie wisdom. I am from the glass half full. I am from hot dogs with pickles but never ketchup and deep-dish pizza. From cheese tacos and peanut butter and jelly in a bowl, from buttered noodles, fried matzo, and the Joy of Cooking. I am from one tragic fat-free Thanksgiving where my mom made us go around the table and introduce ourselves to each other. I am from the time my parents told me I had chicken pox by bock-bockbocking at me through my bedroom wall, and from the way it still makes them laugh. From needlepointed baby books, PTA presidents, homemade Halloween costumes, Kodak slide shows, and learning to drive a stick shift in the East Bank Club parking lot. I am from carnival birthday parties on the front lawn and trick-or-treating after dark. I am from knowing there would always be someone there when I got home.


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CONFESSIONS

HOLIDAY MOM HACKS Have a great look and save some time for yourself this season. by M O N I C A P I T T S

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olidays are filled with all kinds of excuses to get fancied up (like holiday parties!), but there are also tons of time-sensitive things that need to get done. I love to feel spiffy, but, as a mom of young kiddos, sometimes it’s tough to find all of the minutes needed to doll myself up for a special occasion.   In my world, the act of preparing to be beautiful is interrupted, rushed, and sometimes stressful. Luckily, I have a few fast hairstyling tricks to create compliment-worthy styles, and I have some holiday timesavers that give me enough time to prepare for fanciness.  

Hire a sitter so you can clean. When I’m trying to get my house together before guests arrive, my kids make messes faster than I can mitigate them. So I often hire a sitter to keep my kids safe and entertained while I clean with the franticness of the Tasmanian Devil.

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Track Christmas lists in Google Docs. Share your Google Doc Christmas lists with family and have them mark off the items they purchase for your kiddos. I usually include links to the products to clarify the list items.

Use Amazon to think up gift ideas.

Quick and Party-ready Hair I love styling hair. I even tried to be a beautician, but my dad made me go to college first, and, well, now I run a marketing agency. So I’m not a pro, but I am a hobbyist.   This style is one of my favorites — the double bun. For the complete tutorial, and to see my other holiday party hairstyles, head to comolivingmag.com. As any mom knows, the holidays hardly give us enough time to breathe, let alone worry about our hair. That’s why I’ve developed a few

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Double Bun Tutorial

Consider online shopping. other holiday life hacks to add a few available minutes to your holiday schedule.

Say “no” more often. It’s a super busy time of year. Other moms (or compassionate human beings) will not judge you for saying no to their request. Skip that birthday party and go to bed early!

MONICA PITTS

Order groceries for pick-up. Monica is the founder of MayeCreate Design. She spends her days brokering kids, a marriage, and helping businesses grow through website design and online marketing.

Consider using Amazon as a gift idea generator. Search “gifts for 2-year-old girl” or “gifts for mom” and you’ll have more ideas than you can handle!  

Make your meal plan in advance and create your shopping lists with Hy-Vee Aisles online when you have time. Then you can add the groceries you need and order for pick-up. And you can send your husband to pick them up from the store. COMO L I V I N G

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Crowded shopping on a time crunch is not my idea of a good time. I often shop online, even from local stores, for holiday gifts. I think of shipping costs as a trade-off for not spending hours running from store to store, wading through crowds or waiting in lines.

Give the gift of experiences instead of possessions. If you don’t have time to buy gifts for everyone, or if you have people on your list who have everything, gift an experience for Christmas. Take them to dinner in February, to the zoo or a show in the spring, when things have died down a bit. Experiences make memories instead of collecting dust.


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LIFE COACHING

BUILDING THE VULNERABILITY MUSCLE Tu r ni ng s o - c a l l e d b a d e m ot i on s into positive g row th . by C A R O LY N PA R I S

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riting articles for everyone to see throws me into a pool of vulnerability. As I have been known to say, “It’s like sticking needles in your eyes.” Typing this sentence, I can feel the tightness in my chest. Who am I? What if they find out I’m just me? I remember posting one of my first articles for COMO Living on Facebook. In the post, I shared that I was really afraid to write these columns, but I was glad I decided to say yes. I was surprised when I starting receiving supportive comments from people, thanking me and encouraging me. I didn’t expect it at all. I felt really supported and connected. By sharing what, to me, was a weakness, I experienced the benefits of being vulnerable: support, affirmation, and connectivity, to name a few. Brené Brown is a researcher and expert in the field of vulnerability (you can’t have a meaningful conversation about vulnerability without referring to Brene’ Brown), and she defines it as “uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure.” It doesn’t get much clearer and scarier than that. One might wonder — and rightfully so — why anyone would make vulnerability a goal. As children, we might have told our friends that our favorite ride at Six Flags was the teacups, only to be laughed at by some mean boy who considered that ride childish. Or perhaps we ran across the playground and kissed our true love, only to discover it wasn’t reciprocated. When we’re vulnerable, feelings of unworthiness, shame, and guilt arise, as does the armor of protection: trying not to be seen as we are but, rather, as we think others will accept and love us.

The challenge with wearing this thick armor is that it stifles our opportunity to have a satisfying, powerful life with deep relationships. I remember my coach once saying, “Enough with the army of one.” He

3 WAYS TO PRACTICE VULNERABILITY: • Share your opinion. It can be low risk. “I would like to go to Murry’s for dinner.” • When asked how your day is going, share something about your experience. It doesn’t have to be big or dramatic. Something real. “It seems like a long day. I’m tired. I woke up a lot during the night.” • Invite someone whom you’d like to know better to lunch.

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was referring to my notion that I had to go it alone and be perfect rather than actually share myself and even ask for help. For me, the notion was both alarming and exciting. I started talking with friends who had earned my trust and shared my tender spots of insecurity, and I asked for help or advice. Two unexpected things happened: My projects got easier, due to my friends’ advice, and I felt more relaxed and in deeper relationships with them. They had seen my underbelly and still wanted to hang out with me. Over the years, investigation and research have shown that vulnerability takes courage. It requires a willingness to be seen, to engage in those difficult conversations without knowing the outcome —quite risky situations! But, as Brené says, “Vulnerability is the birthplace of joy, love, and creativity.” Being vulnerable is like deciding to work out at the gym. The first time is pretty rough, but as you continue to work out, you become stronger. So it goes with the vulnerability “muscle.” The more you practice vulnerability, the more your joy, power, and connections to humanity increase. Ask yourself, “Where is a place I could practice vulnerability?” Start with something low-risk with people you trust and with whom you feel safe. This is a gift you can give yourself. A gift that keeps on giving. C A R O LY N PA R I S An executive consultant and coach, Carolyn works with high performers. She helps clients create balance, fun, and satisfaction so they attain sustainable success.


Pet owners trust us to provide a better experience for their cats and dogs ... Whether it’s grooming, boarding or both! Our experienced, conscientious staff is devoted to superior care for your pet. Come see for yourself.

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Call us to schedule a dentist appointment you’ll actually enjoy. From cosmetic to sedation, we’re dedicated to providing exceptional care. Conscious Sedation is taught as part of a post-graduate residence program approved by the America Dental Association. Dr. Willett and Dr. Patton have completed an American Dental Association approved program in which conscious sedation is taught. Cosmetic Dentistry and Implant Dentistry are specialty areas not recognized by the A.D.A. that require no specific educational training to advertise these services.

573.445.5300 | 1601 Chapel Hill Rd. | Columbia, MO | WillettandPattonDDS.com COMO L I V I N G

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UNLEASHED

MAKE PLANS FOR PETS by J O S I E M I C K E Y

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very year, it feels like December is so far off — and then, all at once, here we are. In my profession, December is crazy busy and typically stressful. The holidays are that way for everyone, really, so planning for your pets can be really helpful to you and to them. If you’re going on a vacation without your pet, I highly recommend advance scheduling, no matter what pet-watching service you’re using. Reservations are key this time of year, and spots will fill up fast. If you are using a pet boarding facility, please allow your pet some time to adjust to that environment. If you’ve never left them before, the holidays are a difficult time to start — everyone else is going out of town and leaving their pets for boarding too. It will be extremely busy, and this can add to your pet’s stress level, which will already be high because of leaving you for the first time. I recommend starting with at least one night’s stay as a trial, to show your pet that you will be back. If you make it fun for him or her, you’ll both undoubtedly benefit.

Schedule your pet’s grooming in advance as well. At The Pet Fair, we ultimately want all our clients to look great for the holidays, and we’ll work hard to get everyone in. Please be

flexible with us and we will do all we can to accommodate you. Holiday safety for your furry family member is also important. Treats from the table are a no-no; drinking from the Christmas tree water can cause upset tummies. Make sure the tree is anchored well, especially if you have cats who like to climb. Tinsel can cause obstructions if ingested, and no mistletoe or holly, as it’s poisonous to pets. It also helps to have a safe, quiet place for your pet to go where they can get away from all the holiday fun. If you can think ahead, you’ll have a wonderful, stress-free holiday season for you and your pet! JOSIE MICKEY I didn't expect to own a business grooming dogs. As the owner of The Pet Fair, I love perfecting my craft and building a trustworthy home away from home for our guests.

Cuddly Cuties

We asked you for your pet’s cutest holiday attire. You shared: This is Charlee, and he’s all ready for winter. By the priceless look on his face, you can tell he’s thrilled that cooler temperatures are on their way...but he’s prepared with his stylish brownplaid flannel hat and scarf! Charlee is a fullblooded miniature Dachshund and steals the hearts of everyone he meets. -Submitted by Renee' Cosner

This is Brooklyn Crawford in her snowman costume. She’s a 3-year-old Yorkshire terrier. What a bundle of cuteness! -Submitted by Tessa Crawford

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Member SIPC

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COMO L I V I N G

573-449-1070 | BetzJewelers.com 601 E. Broadway, Suite 303

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ENGAGEMENTS

ENGAGEMENTS by MADELYNE MAAG

ALESE FURNALD AND NATHAN THOMPSON

CORBY JONES AND KELLI SWAYDEN

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lind dates crafted by mutual friends can be scary. In the case of Alese Furnald and Nathan Thompson, however, it went wonderfully. “We worked in the catering business and also had mutual friends in it, as well,” Alese says. “They thought it would be great to set us up.” Their personalities matched perfectly, and, over time, the two continued to consistently support each other through everything from sports leagues to school to simple daily activities. “We love being there for each other,” Alese says. “Without question, he will help me all the time. It really shows that he really loves and cares for me and cares for our relationship.” After nine years of dating, Nathan decided to propose to Alese during a weekend trip to St. Louis. They went to a Cardinals game with friends before heading around town. Nathan says, “All day, I had been trying to figure out the perfect place to propose to Alese.” Eventually, Nathan decided on the St. Louis Botanical Gardens — a beautiful and less crowded tourist attraction in the city. After strolling through the gardens for a while, Nathan finally found a perfect spot, next to a koi pond, to propose. He pulled Alese into his arms by her elbow and shakily asked, “You love me, right?” Catching on to what was about to happen, Alese smiled, saying “Of course” as Nathan got down on one knee. Since fall is their favorite time of year, Alese and Nathan had their wedding on October 22, at White’s Mule Winery in Owensville, Missouri.

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elli Swayden was so focused on organizing and celebrating boyfriend Corby Jones’ 40th birthday that she couldn’t find her words when he pulled out a ring. Laughing from the surprise of the proposal, Kelli gathered herself to say yes to Corby. “I planned out the majority of his birthday and wanted to make sure that the day was all about him,” Kelli says. Corby had other plans. Kelli is from a small town in central Kansas, and Corby is from Dallas. Columbians best know Corby from his time as starting quarterback for the Missouri Tigers, leading the team to winning seasons in 1997 and 1998. The pair originally met in 2009, at an AntiValentine’s Day event being hosted by a friend in Kansas City. The two showed up early and struck up a conversation while sitting next to each other. They attempted to date but instead remained close friends as time went on. In the summer of 2010, tragedy struck Corby with the passing of his brother. “I didn’t want anyone else there but Kelli,” Corby says. “She was all I could think about.” That’s when the two finally decided on settling down with each other. They say they complement each other; they’re polar opposites who nonetheless share the same core values. Kelli and Corby are leaning toward a destination wedding with a large reception back in Kansas City for friends and family. Although the exact date and location are yet to be determined, they said an ideal date would be June 9, 2018, the day of Kelli’s grandparents’ wedding. COMO L I V I N G

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WEDDINGS

The Magic behind Little Piney

by C H R I S T Y A S P E R | ph o to s by C AT H E R I N E R H O D E S P H O T O G R A P H Y

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t used to be a tradition that the women of the church would gather together to put on a wedding. From the flowers to the food, everything came together with their help. I love this idea: people rallying behind a young couple and helping their big day become a reality. When we crashed Ben Lake and Rhiannon Galloway’s wedding, we were taken back to this tradition in a magical way. Rhiannon had prepared months in advance and chose some top-notch vendors to make her big day come together. Her venue was a beautiful estate tucked away in the outskirts of Hermann called Little Piney. She wanted her special moments captured by one of the best photographers in the mid-Missouri area, Catherine Rhodes. She hired an incredible wedding planner at BHive Events to coordinate her day. Rhiannon had the perfect centerpieces picked out and had planned to CHRISTY ASPER Christy Asper started The Ink Café, an invitation and stationery service in 2015. Since then, she received a Best of the Best award for wedding invitations from St. Louis’ Best Bridal.

arrive early the day before the wedding to set it all up. She had every detail planned out. But sometimes it’s the unexpected events in our life that help us realize we need a village of friends, family, and even vendors to make the sweet moments even sweeter. Rhiannon was unable to come early the day before her wedding, and she was behind schedule in getting all of her decorations and centerpieces together. So, after the wedding rehearsal dinner on Friday night, Rhiannon’s bridal party gathered around and started to work feverishly. The sweet couple who own Little Piney, John and Julie, also rallied behind the bride and helped her decorate. Around midnight, with much left to do, everyone encouraged the bride to get her sleep. They assured her they would take care of the rest the following morning. The bridal support team was back to work at sunrise. Little Piney had a closet full of decorations (in case of emergencies), where Rhiannon was able to find the perfect cupcake stands for her dessert table. Julie pulled out the dishes that her grandmother had given her on her wedding day. Amid all the wedding details, the forks for the cake had gone overlooked; John and Julie got busy raiding their kitchen and found 150 plastic forks to save the day. “Each one of our couples is special to us COMO L I V I N G

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because we work alongside them to start their marriage,” Julie says. “It’s really crazy isn’t it? That we get to be with them at the beginning of this commitment to forever. It’s kind of holy.” Rhiannon’s wedding planner was scheduled to arrive at 4:00 in the afternoon to help execute the timeline. When she heard that Rhiannon was running behind schedule, she drove down, six hours early, to help with set-up. As the wedding photographer and makeup artist arrived, everyone had to convince the bride to leave the décor behind. Trusting her friends,


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family, and vendors, Rhiannon began really focusing on her wedding day. Everything was ready to go in time for the ceremony. The pictures are a clear depiction of how beautiful it truly was. There is a lot to be said about traditions. Getting behind a bride to make sure her wedding day is full of love and laughter is one that ought not get lost in today’s times. But these days, when we don’t have a group full of church women to help pull it off, it’s amazing how choosing quality vendors and surrounding yourself with loving family and friends can make a world of difference. Congrats to Ben and Rhiannon! May you feel the love and support of those around you for years to come.

RESOURCES CAKE

MAKEUP

Velvet Cupcake velvetcupcakecafe.com 573-875-8888

Confident Beauti by Erica beautipage.com/spawith-erica 573-489-8055

C AT E R I N G A N D BARTENDING Trailside Bar and Grill trailsidebarandgrill.com 573-236-4411

PLANNER BHive Events bhiveevents.com 573-999-6347

DJ C&C All Around Sound candcallaroundsound.com 636-528-9696

PHOTOGRAPHER Catherine Rhodes Photography catherinerhodes photography.com 573-645-2222

DRESS Ana Marie’s Bridal anamariesbridal.com 573-636-1060

VENUE

FLOWERS

Little Piney littlepineylodge.com 636-561-8615

Grindstone Hy-Vee hy-vee.com 573-442-8595

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WEDDING TRENDS TO TRY (AND DITCH!) Two that need to stay and two that need to go. by A N N E C H U R C H I L L

W

elcome to what is going to be a super fun column all about the ins and outs of weddings. I’m Anne Churchill, Columbia’s seasoned and locally grown event and wedding planner. I’ve been planning meaningful moments and special days for 10 years, and now it’s time to spill the beans: the good, the bad, and the ugly of planning weddings. I’ll share tips and tricks, plus (I’m sure) some giggles as I pull from real-life stories. The first thing to tackle is wedding trends: what’s hot and what’s not. Here in the Midwest, we tend to be about three years behind what we see on the coasts. Some may see this as a negative — not I. There’s two great benefits to this. As long as you’re on top of it, you can be the first to do something in Columbia while still having dozens of

examples from the coast to refer to. And we only do the tested and proven trends — forget the trends that come and go in six months or, even worse, backfire. (Literally. Flames on your wedding day. Think the fire breathers under a tent were a good idea? No, they weren’t.) Here are the two trends that I think are tired, done, and over with . . . even for good ol’ CoMO: Doors (or some other entrance) to outdoor wedding ceremonies. Here’s the hard truth. You’ve chosen to get married on uneven ground with the elements of wind and rain. So the

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beautiful idea of doors swinging open upon your entrance isn’t so easy, and it’s something to avoid when you consider the hassle. Even if you get those babies perfect . . . you know your guests are going to see you walk (or ride an ATV) up to them, right? Boom. Surprise gone. Just embrace the land you’re getting married on!

The super short wedding ceremony. I’m talking five minutes total. I think this comes from the stretched out ceremonies we grew up with. And trust me, I get it: I was raised Catholic. But just because you don’t want mass and communion doesn’t mean we need to make your ceremony shorter than a Hulu ad break (insert spinning loading wheel here). Really, why are we all coming together? For a wedding! So let’s have one! Readings, songs, and all. It all goes so fast — relish in the moment. I won’t ever leave you on a negative note, so


here are two newer trends I love for weddings. Fingers crossed they’re here to stay. The alternative dessert. I’m not just talking cupcake towers. Dessert is a great time to be nontraditional without making your grandmother gasp. Think small bites and a variety of tastes. It’s a great place to introduce the trend of food stations using a dessert spread, or even pies (if you’re considering pies, call the gals at Peggy Jean’s — they love weddings!). Take the opportunity to hit everyone’s taste buds and get funky with it. This is a fun time to play up the theme or season of your wedding. Live everything. Live painting, live cooking, live performances. Considering live options are great if the couple is looking to be less traditional or add in a spark. One of my favorite new vendors is TooRooster Artistry. Cindy Scott paints live, right there, and it’s amazing. Your wedding guests will crowd around her and the final product is a true piece of art, unique from any gift you’ll receive. Live catering stations or food trucks add energy to the meal. Let your guests pick exactly what they want to eat and enjoy the satisfaction of freshly prepared food. At the end of the day, here is my biggest piece of advice when it comes to tackling trends: learn from others. As you attend weddings, take note of what works, what you love, and what makes you say “oh no!” Consider what your guests might need when experimenting with a trend. For example, if you’re having food stations, create signage if your guests typically attend buffet dinners. Or, if all of your family weddings have been at the country club, go rogue and pitch a tent in a field. Make sure they get the vibe of your wedding from the invitation, so they’re ready for the fun night. Being trendy can be successful, as long as you give it thought. ANNE CHURCHILL Anne is the founder of AnnaBelle Events.. Her newest venture, Jubilee Planning Studio, opens in 2017 as Columbia's one-stop planning shop.

Formal Wear For All Occasions 573-896-5091 | 275 Karen Dr. Holts Summit, MO

CalenasFashions.com

Live Theatre in the Heart of Downtown Columbia 210 St James St, Columbia, MO 65201

Stud Ducks

December 2-4 and 9-11 Friday and Saturday performances at 7:30pm; Sunday performances at 2:00pm. Tickets are $13 for adults and $11 for seniors 65+ and students.

Our final production of the 2016 season is the hilarious comedy Stud Ducks, by former Columbia resident H. Russ Brown. This delightful play, set in Texas in 1978, will have you laughing at every turn. The head of this crazy household, Milton Day, fiercely loves his family, and he’ll do almost anything to make sure his daughter and grandson are taken care of. A wonderful story of family and the ties that bind.

The Sinatra Supper Club Saturday, January 14, 2017 6:30pm

Now a highly anticipated annual event, the theatre is turned into a New York supper club for a terrific evening of music and dining! The music is supplied by Talking Horse’s own artistic director, Ed Hanson. Songs from the Great American Songbook make this an evening to remember! Tickets are $75 per person, and include a sumptuous three-course dinner, catered by Bleu Events Catering. A cash bar will be available.

BUY TICKETS: Online at www.talkinghorseproductions.com Call 573-268-1381


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DOC TALK Columbia is fortunate to have access to some of the nation’s best health care professionals and most cutting edge technology. Learn more about some of the area’s top providers in this special section.


SPONSORED CONTENT

DOC TALK

DOC TALK

DOC TALK

DR. ANDREW MALOY

SHELLEY ANN LYLE D.D.S.

DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC

You never know when you are going to be sidelined!

Preventative

A recent incident with my dog found me with knee injuries and a broken leg bone. Thanks to amazing family and friends, a great orthopedic doctor and his team, and my supportive staff, I received excellent treatment allowing optimum rehabilitation and recovery.

Maintenance There is a wealth of information at our fingertips about how to live a healthy lifestyle and more than likely, you’ve seen it all. Even when we are doing things 100 percent

My approach is to look at the “big picture” by obtaining diagnostic images and taking thorough histories. With over three decades of experience and continuing education, I can recommend definitive treatment recommendations, as well as identify potential problems and evolving conditions. Patients then have a greater understanding and we can work together to set treatment recommendations.

right sometimes things happen, such as an injury or twist of fate. Whether it’s heart disease or back pain, a majority of us don’t see or feel them coming until the day you have to go to the hospital. But, the things that caused those problems didn’t just start happening that day.

This might mean a referral to a specialist while we address in-office treatment; prioritizing the more urgent treatment; relieving pain or correcting a significant esthetic problem such as a broken tooth; considering factors such as finances, time, esthetic desires, and dental anxiety. Also, don’t count on symptoms to be your guide; some catastrophic conditions may never present with discomfort.

There were many small events that slowly chipped away at your health without your knowledge until massive failure ensued. That is why it is so important to go to your doctors of medicine, chiropractic and dentistry before you notice something is wrong so that they can catch it early

Please do not be sidelined by a toothache or a non-treatable condition when prevention and treatment can mean long-term comfort, esthetics, chewing and speech efficiency, not to mention avoiding that bigger price tag for advanced treatment or the disappointment of an unhealthy mouth.

before it gets bad, or EXPENSIVE. Preventative medicine is always better than reactive medicine. Wellness care is always better than sick care.  

Focus On Health 4200 Merchant Street, Suite 105 Columbia, Missouri 65203 573-777-5900

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SPONSORED CONTENT

DOC TALK

JOHN JARSTAD, M.D.

MICHAEL COOPERSTOCK, M.D. MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF THE INFECTION CONTROL DEPARTMENT

DIRECTOR OF CATARACT AND LASIK SURGERY

December and January are peak months for influenza. The best way to stay healthy and prevent the disease is to receive an annual vaccination.

Our eyes change as we age, and many people can develop cloudy vision caused by cataracts. By age 80, more than half of all Americans will either have cataracts or will have undergone a surgery to have them removed. At University of Missouri Health Care, we offer patients the most advanced cataract removal technology available.

Influenza is a respiratory illness that can be life-threatening if it spreads through the upper respiratory tract and invades the lungs. Infants, children and the elderly have the highest rates of hospitalization from influenza.

As one of the first surgeons in the United States to master bladeless laser cataract surgery, I’ve performed the surgery more than 1,000 times. The procedure is painless and provides unmatched accuracy and precision. Bladeless laser cataract surgery is especially beneficial to patients with complex cataracts or those wishing to have premium lenses. In many cases, patients may no longer need to wear glasses or contacts to see clearly.

If you do get sick with the flu, it is important to stop its spread by staying home until you have gone at least 24 hours without a fever. When coughing or sneezing, do so into your shirt sleeve or the bend of your arm. This keeps the germs off your hands and reduces the chances of spreading them to the next thing you touch. Regular hand washing and the use of alcohol-containing hand gels also helps to prevent illness and the spread of germs to others. Additionally, avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth to keep germs that may be on your hands away from your face. These tips increase your chance of fighting off influenza.

We’re committed to restoring your vision and returning you to a life of sight. If you’d like to learn more about bladeless laser cataract surgery, I encourage you to visit www.MUHealth.org or call (573) 884-EYES to speak with a specialist today.

MU Health Care muhealth.org

MU Health Care muhealth.org

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SPONSORED CONTENT

DOC TALK

DOC TALK

DOC TALK

MEGHA GARG, M.D.

JAMES KEENEY, M.D. CHIEF OF ADULT HIP AND KNEE RECONSTRUCTION SERVICE

CHIEF OF BREAST IMAGING

Early detection is one of the best weapons against cancer. The development of the Women’s Imaging Center at University of Missouri Women’s and Children’s Hospital allows us to offer another convenient, onestop imaging service for our patients.

Partial and total joint replacement surgeries have relieved pain and improved function for millions of Americans with hip and knee arthritis. The Missouri Orthopaedic Institute’s adult reconstruction specialists are highly trained experts who provide both non-surgical and surgical care.

Women’s and Children’s Hospital worked with Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, a certified member of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Network®, to consolidate and expand imaging services. These services include both 2-D and 3-D screening mammography, diagnostic mammography, mammography- and needle-guided localization for minimally invasive biopsy, breast ultrasound, ultrasound-guided biopsy, and diagnostic bone densitometry. Additionally, an on-site radiologist increases the speed of acquiring results and decisions about other possible diagnostic care.

Arthritis-related joint pain is caused by deterioration of the cartilage that sits on the ends of the joint bones and acts as a shock absorber. Pain can be caused by the body’s reaction to cartilage particles that break down in the joint or from increased stresses placed on the joint bones as the cartilage wears down. At the Missouri Orthopaedic Institute, our teams help patients experience pain relief and improved function. Non-surgical treatments may include anti-inflammatory or non-narcotic medications, collaboration with rehabilitation specialists or injections of pain medications. For patients with advanced disease who no longer respond to non-surgical approaches, we can use joint preservation methods such as partial and total joint replacement surgery. Our team works with patients to develop a comprehensive approach that gives them the best chance for success to reach their joint improvement goals.

At MU Health Care we are committed to making a difference in people’s lives, and it is now easier for women to have potentially life-saving screenings. Additional locations within MU Health Care for women’s imaging services include Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, South Providence Medical Park and Ellis Fischel’s mobile mammography van.

MU Health Care muhealth.org

MU Health Care muhealth.org

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SPONSORED CONTENT

DOC TALK

RAGHAV GOVINDARAJAN, M.D.

CHRISTINE FRANZESE, M.D. ALLERGIST

NEUROLOGIST

It’s an unfortunate reality that millions of Americans live with movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia or Huntington’s disease. As you can imagine, frequent and involuntary movements and tremors can make everyday tasks a challenge. At University of Missouri Health Care, we have a team of dedicated neurologists who are specially trained to provide the latest treatments for movement disorders and their related neurological conditions.

Millions of Americans suffer from seasonal allergies — and when I say suffer, that’s not an exaggeration. Itchy eyes, a runny nose and respiratory reactions can keep us from the outdoor activities we love. At University of Missouri Health Care’s ENT and Allergy Center, we offer treatment options to keep allergies at bay. Traditional therapies such as allergy drops and shots are available, but you may not know that we also offer a new form of allergy treatment that can help you literally brush off your allergies. It can be easy to forget to take your allergy drops or shots, and if you’re a parent of a young child with allergies, these may not always be the easiest option. Using new customized toothpaste, your allergies can be treated without disrupting daily routines. The toothpaste — available in a variety of flavors — is mixed with allergens for your individual allergies. Our mouths are lined with cells that absorb the allergy medication, and brushing with the toothpaste can lessen the severity of your allergies over time or eventually even eliminate them.

One such treatment used to treat debilitating neurological symptoms such as tremors, stiffness and walking problems is deep-brain stimulation. It involves the use of specialized electrodes to help control brain activity that causes involuntary movements. The procedure doesn’t harm healthy brain tissue, but instead modulates electrical signals from specific parts of the brain. If medication hasn’t been able to adequately control your symptoms, you may be a candidate for deep-brain stimulation.

If you’d like to learn more about the toothpaste or other allergy treatments, please visit www.MUHealth.org/allergy or call (573) 817-3000.

If you’d like to learn more about treatments for a range of neurological conditions, please visit www.MUHealth.org or call (573) 882-1515.

MU Health Care muhealth.org

MU Health Care muhealth.org

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DOC TALK

DOC TALK

DOC TALK

ARUN KUMAR, M.D.

COURTNEY BARNES, M.D. CHAIR OF THE BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT TEAM AND MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF THE LOWINTERVENTION BIRTH PROGRAM

CARDIOLOGIST

November marked the one-year anniversary of the University of Missouri Women’s and Children’s Hospital lowintervention birth program. Women with low-risk pregnancies now have multiple options to delivering their babies the way they want — and it’s the only program of its kind in central Missouri.

For patients who could benefit from heart valve replacement caused by aortic stenosis, but are considered too high-risk for a traditional open heart surgery, University of Missouri Health Care offers a lessinvasive option: transcatheter aortic valve replacement, or TAVR.

In the first eight months of the program, more than 100 babies have been delivered using low-intervention methods. More than 70 other women currently are utilizing the program to meet their choice of birthing options.

Aortic stenosis is caused by the narrowing of the aortic valve, which prevents it from opening completely. This results in restricted blood flow to the aorta and the rest of the body. Aortic valve stenosis is most commonly caused by calcium buildup as one gets older. There is no medication that can delay or reverse calcium buildup on the aortic valve.

Women who meet low-risk pregnancy guidelines can choose between receiving prenatal and delivery care from one of two certified nurse midwives or one of 10 physicians specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Patients also are invited to bring their own doulas, or birth coaches, to be a part of the delivery team. Birthing choices range from a natural, un-medicated experience to a more traditional birth plan, or a combination of care that safely meets their expectations.

Our MU Heart and Vascular Center became the first in mid-Missouri to offer TAVR in December 2014. With this procedure, our cardiovascular team is able to replace valves using a transcatheter approach, which is a less invasive method that does not require openheart surgery. After TAVR, patients with aortic stenosis have had significant resolution of symptoms and improved quality of life.

This program also features birthing rooms designed to be more home-like, but that provide mother and child a safety net of medical experts who are easily and quickly accessible in the event of any unexpected complications during delivery.

To find out more about TAVR or other treatment options available for aortic stenosis, please visit the MU Heart and Valve Center at www.MUHealth.org/TAVR or call (573) 884-0296.

MU Health Care muhealth.org

MU Health Care muhealth.org

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THE FUTURE OF LEAD GENERATION IS HERE.

MOBILE

CONQUESTING Cutting-edge mobile advertising for your business.

BusinessTimesInteractive.com/mobile

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C A L E N DA R / DECE M BER 2016 DECEMBER 1 Moscow Ballet: The Great Russian Nutcracker, Missouri Theatre, $25 to $35, 573-882-3781

First annual Chocolate Festival, Parkade Center, 601 Business Loop 70 W., 12 p.m. to 4 p.m., tigerfamilychiropractic.com

First Chance Ugly Sweater Happy Hour Fundraiser, Room 38 restaurant, $5 donation to have your picture in event album, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., gilbertc@firstchanceforchildren.org

DECEMBER 5-6 Blind Boone Piano Concert Series, Sutu Forté and Jake Clayton in “A Country Holiday Concert,” Boone County Historical Society, 3801 Ponderosa St., 7 p.m., 573-443-8936

DECEMBER 2 First Fridays in the North Village Arts District, North Village Arts District, 6 to 9 p.m., northvillageartsdistrict.org

DECEMBER 6-8 A Dickens Victorian Christmas, Historic Senior Hall Parlors at Stephens College, 4 p.m. matinee on December 6, 7:30 on December 7 and 8, stephens.edu

Living Windows Festival, The District, free, 6 p.m., 573-442-6816 Sager Braudis Masters Exhibit opening, Sager Braudis Gallery, 1025 E. Walnut St., 6 to 9 p.m., sagerbraudisgallery.com

DECEMBER 7 Windham Hill: Barbara Higbie, Sean Harkness, and Liz Story, Missouri Theatre, $30 to $40, 7 p.m., 573-882-3781

DECEMBER 2-4; 9-11 Talking Horse Productions presents “Stud Ducks,” 210 St. James St., $11 to $13, talkinghorseproductions.com

DECEMBER 8-11, 15-18 Columbia Entertainment Company presents: “5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche,” CEC Theatre, 1800 Nelwood Dr., $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, students, and children, Sunday matinees at 2 p.m., all other shows at 7:30 p.m., cectheatre.org

DECEMBER 3 Boonville Farmers Market Holiday Market, 518 Vine St., Boonville, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., facebook.com/BoonvilleMOFarmersMarket Pancakes with Princesses fundraiser for Wonderland Camp, Columbia Country Club, 2210 N. Country Club Dr., $20 per person, 9 to 11 a.m., facebook.com/ColumbiaMOJaycees

DECEMBER 9 Mannheim Steamroller, Missouri Theatre, $45 to $55, 7:00 p.m., 573-882-3781

Kwanzaa celebration, Progressive Missionary Baptist Community Building, free, 2 to 5 p.m., 573-874-6379

DECEMBER 10 Arthritis Foundation Jingle Bell Run, John and Mary Silverthorne Arena at Stephens College, 8 a.m., dhenderson@arthritis.org, 314-447-4883

DECEMBER 3-4 Tryps Institute presents: “Elf: The Musical Jr.,” The Warehouse Theatre Company, 104 Willis Ave., $12 for adults, $7 for children 18 and under, trypskids.com

DECEMBER 11 We Always Swing Jazz Series, Tim Warfield’s All-Star Jazzy Christmas, Murry’s restaurant, $35 to $55, show one starts at 3:30 p.m., show two starts at 7 p.m., wealwaysswing.org

DECEMBER 4 We Always Swing Jazz Series President’s Concert, Missouri Theatre, $40 to $60, doors open at 6 p.m., show starts at 7 p.m., wealwaysswing.org COMO L I V I N G

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First annual Chocolate Festival, Parkade Center, 601 Business Loop 70 W., 12 p.m. to 4 p.m., tigerfamilychiropractic.com DE CE MBE R 1 1

We Always Swing Jazz Series, Tim Warfield’s All-Star Jazzy Christmas, Murry’s restaurant, $35 to $55, show one starts at 3:30 p.m., show two starts at 7 p.m., wealwaysswing.org


C A L E N DA R / JANUARY 201 7 JANUARY 15 Rocheport Roubaix Gravel Grinder, Rocheport General Store, 202 Central St., $30 to $40 for 30 mile race, $35 to $45 for 50 mile race, $40 to $50 for 67 mile race, 8 a.m. packet pick-up, ultramaxsports.com/races/Roubaix

DECEMBER 14 Ladies Night Out, Mid America Harley-Davidson, 5704 Freedom Dr., free, 6 to 8 p.m., midamericahd.com DECEMBER 14-23 Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre presents “A Christmas Carol,” Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre, Arrow Rock, $36, shows at 2 and 8 p.m. on the 14 through 18 and the 21 through 23, lyceumtheatre@lyceumtheatre.org

12/31-1/1 1/16

JANUARY 16 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Candlelight March and Memorial Celebration, departs from Douglass High School, free, 6:30 p.m., como.gov/ParksandRec JANUARY 19 Columbia Business Times’ 20 Under 40, Reynolds Alumni Center, tickets limited, columbiabusinesstimes.com

DECEMBER 16 Holiday Lights and Sights Tour, mini-bus departs from the ARC, $7.50 per person, 6:15 to 7:30 p.m. and 7:45 to 9 p.m., como.gov/ParksandRec

JANUARY 20 “Close to You: The Music of the Carpenters,” Missouri Theatre, $20 to $30, 7 p.m., 573-882-3781

DECEMBER 18 It’s a Wonderful Ride Holiday Lights Bicycle Tour, depart from Lucky’s Market, free, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., como.gov/ParksandRec

JANUARY 21 Community Gospel Choir concert to benefit Granny’s House, First Baptist Church, free, 7:00 p.m., choralartsallianceofmissouri.com

DECEMBER 31 New Year’s Rockin’ Eve 2016 at the Arrow Rock Lyceum, Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre, $175 per person or $225 for VIP seating, doors open at 7:30 p.m., 660-837-8388

JANUARY 23 We Always Swing Jazz Series, Regina Carter: “Simply Ella,” Kimball Ballroom at Stephens College, doors open at 6, wealwaysswing.org

Shake, Rattle and Roll in 2017, Holiday Inn Executive Center, $260 to $310 per couple, 6 p.m., holidaycolumbia.com

JANUARY 28 ROC 7K Trail Run, Rhett’s Run at Cosmo Park, $30 in advance or $35 on race day, como.gov/ParksandRec

DECADANCE, The Blue Note, $15, 7 p.m., must be 21 or older, thebluenote.com MAR K Y O U R CALE N D AR S I N J A NUA R Y DECEMBER 31 -JANUARY 1

DECADANCE, The Blue Note, $15, 7 p.m., must be 21 or older, thebluenote.com JANUARY 1 6

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Candlelight March and Memorial Celebration, departs from Douglass High School, free, 6:30 p.m., como.gov/ParksandRec

JANUARY 1 New Year’s Day Festival, Missouri United Methodist Church, free, 3 to 8 p.m., facebook.com/NewYearFestCoMo

If you know of an event that should be featured in an upcoming issue of COMO LIVING, please send all available info, including date, time, and location, to matt@ businesstimescompany.com.

JANUARY 7 Hot Cocoa Hustle 5K Run/Walk, YMCA of Callaway County, 1715 Wood St., Fulton, $8 to $35, 1 p.m. start time, hotcocoahustle.eventbrite.com COMO L I V I N G

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BEING SEEN

JOBPOINT COMPANY FEUD Job Pointed hosted Company Feud Monday, October 10th. Modeled after the game show “Family Feud,” local companies enjoyed appetizers and competed against each other for bragging rights and a traveling trophy. Job Point is Missouri’s premier employment center and community development corporation, specializing in preparing individuals to enter the workforce while meeting a critical need of the business community. Last year, Job Point served over 400 individuals.

JOHN AND NICOLE SAFLEY

TOM BRADLEY, NATALIE DIEMLER, WILL ENYARD, MATT SMILEY, OLIVIA AND NICK HOPKINS

SARA SHIEBANY, KRISTYN SNELL, SHANE MCCARLEY, NATHAN TODD, DEREK HARLEY

JON AND KRISTA ALBRECHT

RAND, KATHY, HANNAH AND ERIC RAW

KEVIN MILLER AND RENE ESLINGER

CENTRAL MISSOURI HUMANE SOCIETY WINE & WHISKERS The fifth annual Wine & Whiskers auction and gala benefitting the Central Missouri Humane Society took place Tuesday, October 25th. Guests gathered at the Reynolds Alumni Center, and the evening kicked off with a silent auction, hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and music by Michael Porter. The night continued with a live auction. Proceeds from the event benefitted the animals at Central Missouri Humane Society, providing them safe shelter and loving care.

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BEING SEEN

GREAT CIRCLE’S DIAMOND NIGHT The 11th annual Great Circle Diamond Night: A Storybook Gala was held on Friday, October 14th at the Holiday Inn Executive Center. The evening of elegance, fine dining, and celebration raised awareness and funds to ensure that mental health treatment and support services are accessible to those who need it in Columbia. Great Circle is a nonprofit organization that provides a unique spectrum of behavioral health services to children and families. With specialized programs and highly-trained professionals, they provide hope to those in difficult circumstances.

SHARON VILES, PRIYA BATCHU

ANNE TUCKLEY, ARPITA KUMAR, AUDREY SHARP, SHELLEY WAGNER, PATTY OERLY, BEVERLY SMITH, SHELLEY RAVIPUDI, NIKKI BURTON, KAY WHEELER, LIZ ATEN, SUSAN REEVES, BRANDI HUEBNER

JEAN SUNDET, PAUL SUNDET

BEN SNYDER, JOE SNYDER, MARK SNYDER, JUANITA SNYDER, GABBI SNYDER

LEROY NUNN, PAULA FLEMING, VINCE HILLYER, PHILLURY PLATTE, REBECCA NOWLIN

ALFREDO MARTIN, LAURIE KEMPKER, ANNE TUCKLEY, BEAU AERO

SEC BEER FEST The second annual South East Craft Beer Fest took place Saturday, October 15th on the grounds of N.H. Scheppers Distributing Co. Over 750 attendees gathered to sample beer from more than 70 breweries, including Columbia’s five craft brewers. Efforts and proceeds of the 2016 South East Craft Beer Festival benefitted the American Red Cross and Unchained Melodies Dog Rescue.

CODY SPARK

JOE TONNIES, CRAIG NIEDEN, KEVIN FICK, BRIAN FICK

JUSTIN ABBOTT, ZANE SMITH, MATT VEIT, CHARLIE HANFORD

CINDY KOESTNER, SARA SAMUELS, GRACE DEVENPORT

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BEING SEEN

CMCA AND JOE MACHENS’ WINE, WOMEN & SONG Central Missouri Community Action and Joe Machens hosted Wine, Women & Song on Thursday, October 13th. The evening was full of entertainment, friends, food, and music to benefit the Head Start program. During the entertainment portion of the event, sponsors took the stage and performed for the chance to be crowned the winner of the evening. Head Start is a comprehensive early childhood program serving families who meet the federal poverty guidelines. Head Start families receive support in nutrition, wellness, social services, and emotional support with the goal of ensuring all children entering kindergarten are ready to succeed in school.

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573-449-2858 Dr. Letrisha A. Thomas, DDS Dr. James W. Elliott, DDS One E. Broadway Ste A Columbia, MO 65203 www.letrishaathomasdds.com Like us on Facebook!


STRONG WOMAN

JESSIE KWATAMDIA Executive Director, Alzheimer’s Association Greater Missouri Chapter ph oto by A N T H O N Y J I N S O N

WHAT’S YOUR BACKGROUND? I’m a

native of Nigeria, and I have two daughters, 27 and 24. I hold a bachelor’s degree in horticultural therapy and a master’s in adult and continuing education. Both degrees are from Kansas State University. Most of my career has been in nonprofits. WHAT ARE THREE WORDS YOUR BEST FRIEND WOULD USE TO DESCRIBE YOU? Insightful, humorous, and dedicated. ON A TYPICAL WEEKNIGHT, WE COULD FIND YOU DOING WHAT? I enjoy

"I TRULY BELIEVE THAT TRIALS AND OBSTACLES ARE OPPORTUNITIES YOU HAVEN’T REALIZED YET." listening to classical music while I read. WHO OR WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST INSPIRATION? My biggest

inspirations are my parents. They instill in me the principle of doing unto others as you would like them to do unto you. They always asked what I thought on issues (even COMO L I V I N G

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as a kid) and infused in us the importance of helping others. WHAT GETS YOU OUT OF BED IN THE MORNING? Knowing that one day soon our

vision of a world without Alzheimer’s disease will be realized. I don’t want others to have to deal with this brutal disease like my father and other people and families around the world are currently doing. WHAT’S THE BIGGEST LESSON YOU’VE LEARNED? Les Brown once said, “When

life knocks you down, fall on your back,


STRONG WOMAN

because if you can look up, you can get up.” I truly believe that trials and obstacles are opportunities you haven’t realized yet. FROM WHAT DO YOU DRAW STRENGTH? I draw strength from regularly reading the Scriptures and from the support of my family. WHAT IS YOUR PASSION? I enjoy working

and helping older ones cope with aging. WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE A STRONG WOMAN? Allowing your vulnerability,

weakness, and emotions to show. Not always being in charge or showing you got it together while you’re falling apart inside. Embrace your feminine side and be true to yourself. W H AT A DV I C E WO U L D YO U G I V E A YO U N G E R V E R S I O N O F YO U ? Take that

trip around the world. Don’t be too hard on yourself. Enjoy life’s journey, play, and laugh more. WHAT WOULD WE BE SURPRISED TO LEARN ABOUT YOU? I was a regular on a

children’s television program, which led me to always wanting to be a news anchor like Bimbo Roberts, a famous Nigerian female anchor. I still do.

Top: From left, Jessie with her daughters Nabila, 24, and MaryAnn, 28. Left: Jessie, right, with her father, mother and brother in London. COMO L I V I N G

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PUBLICATIONS Columbia Business Times COMO Living Jefferson City

CUSTOM PUBLICATIONS Where content meets creativity

THE BUSINESS TIMES COMPANY WE’RE SOCIAL

E-NEWSLETTERS www.columbiabusinesstimes.com www.comolivingmag.com www.jeffersoncitymag.com

OUR EVENTS 20 Under 40 Top of the Town City’s Best (Jefferson City)

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ADVERTISER INDEX Betz Jewelers

88

Blanc Studio

8

Edible Arrangements

58

Edward Jones

11 & 88

Organize That Space

84

Personal Touch Cleaning Service

26

Boone Hospital

18 & 69

Focus on Health

Shelter Insurance Agents

96

Buchroeder's

56 & 57

Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland

67

Stange Law Firm

96

Golden Living Center

76

State Farm Insurance - Stephanie Wilmsmeyer 84

Great Circle

28

Studio Home

Hilltop Christmas Tree Farm

67

Superior Garden Center/Rost Landscape 5 & 82 Talking Horse Productions Theater

95

The Broadway Hotel

82

Burgers' Smokehouse Busch's Florist Busenbark Flooring and Granite

2 113 7

58 & 98

Calena's Fashions

95

Joe Machens Lincoln

80

Central Dairy and Ice Cream Company

92

Joe Machens Nissan

4 & 14

Columbia Real Estate

32

Johnston Paint & Decorating Direct

Commerce Bank-Springfield

3

90

10

The District

9 86

Kliethermes Homes and Remodeling 30 & 33

The Pet Fair

Culligan 6

Landmark Bank

115

Tiger Family Chiropractic & Wellness Center 26

Dave Griggs Flooring America

Les Bourgeios

116

Tiger Maids

Designer Kitchens & Baths

12 103

37

Lifestyles Furniture

36

Tiger Scholarship Fund

76

Manor Roofing & Restoration

96

University of Missouri Health Care

Downtown Appliance

34

Massage Envy

22

Willett and Patton Dentistry

Dr. Letrisha Thomas

109

Mid-City Lumber Co

29

Wilson's Fitness

13

Midwest Block & Brick

92

Winter-Dent & Company

112

Missouri Dept. of Conservation

15

Women's Network

84

DogMaster Distillery

Dr. Shelley Lyle Ecowater Systems

98 109

68 5 & 99-102

Busch’s is your one stop Christmas shop!

Jeff City | 620 Madison St. | 636-7113 Columbia | 443-3133

buschsflorist.com

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facebook.com/BuschsFlorist

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CYSK

COUPLE YOU SHOULD KNOW Mike Tompkins, Tompkins Construction, and Mary Kroening, Hidden Treasures Tours HOW DID YOU MEET? 

Mary: I bought my first home in Columbia while it was under construction by Tompkins Construction. I then worked with Mike to build our second custom home in the country. I later rented a home from Mike and gardened for Mike in his personal home. Mike: I built two houses for Mary.  

WHAT MAKES YOU MOST PROUD OF YOUR PARTNER?

Mary: Mike’s work ethic and drive, and his integrity and self-respect. Mike: Her ability to not get bogged down in the little stuff. She knows life can be hard

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST DATE?

Mary: We went for a bike ride from the McBaine trailhead to Rocheport to have dinner at the Rocheport General Store. We then biked back to our cars in the dark. It was awesome fun. Mike: Bicycle trip to Rocheport. WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO IN YOUR FREE TIME?

sometimes. She shrugs those times off and keeps moving forward. WHAT IS UNIQUE ABOUT YOUR RELATIONSHIP?

Mary: How similar our travel style is: incorporating our need for a strong daily physical workout with our love of travel. We both enjoy and value hiking abroad from small village to small village, staying in pubs, taverns, and B&Bs. Mike: We met later in life — just getting to the point where we can go have fun together. We don’t have to get caught up in raising families. We get to spend most of our time enjoying each other. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE RESTAURANT IN COLUMBIA?

Mary: Travel, hike, bike, trail run, golf, garden. Mike: Hike and bike.

Mary: Hoss’s Market. The menu always varies and I can enjoy a lighter fare. Mike: D. Rowe’s.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE PLACE YOU’VE TRAVELED TO TOGETHER?

WHAT IS ONE THING PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU?

Mary: Coast to coast hike in northern England. Mike: Wow — so many I can’t list only one. Italy, Spain, England, Iceland.

Mary: I did my master’s thesis researching an insect called the apple maggot. Mike: I am a simple person — I don’t need many materialistic things. I like to think of myself as humble.

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES?

Mary: Hiking, running, biking, golf. Mike: Backpacking and biking.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR RELATIONSHIP IN ONE WORD?

WHAT IS THE BEST QUALITY OF YOUR PARTNER?

Mary: Awesome. Mike: Exciting!

Mary: Mike is incredibly tender and considerate, and he has an amazing storytelling side, as well. He is very witty with his storytelling. Mike: She is strong, both emotionally and physically. 

WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR THE TWO OF YOU?

Mary: Lots of travel. Mike: Adventure travel all over the world. We have a lengthy bucket list. COMO L I V I N G

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O n e o f m i d-Mi ssouri ’s Prem iere Cult ural and Rec reat ional At t rac t i o n s

Turn Your Event into An Occasion The Blufftop Bistro will be offering expanded availability for private events on the main floor beginning in January. To inquire about hosting your engagement party, milestone birthday or family reunions, call our catering director at 573-698-3060.

MissouriWine.com | catering@missouriwine.com | 573-698-3060 | 14020 W. Hwy BB, Rocheport, MO 65279 COMO L I V I N G

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Como living december 2016 january 2017