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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Vol. 18 No. 48

Voyager Media Publications • www.shorewoodsentinel.com

WILL COUNTY

COMMUNITY

Union says letter violates labor law Representatives say Walsh’s ‘threatening’ letter violates state labor law By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

BY CLARE WALTERS | FOR THE SENTINEL Fuel Sports Performance Training opened a youth multisport training and development center earlier this month at an industrial complex at 400 E. Earl Road. Business owner John Bylina said the new facility was a logical expansion to the 4-year-old business that also operates a field house in Romeoville.

see GAME ON • Page 3

SHOREWOOD IS A FANTASTIC AREA FOR US. IT GIVES US GREAT ACCESS TO ADDITIONAL FAMILIES IN THE AREA. IT WAS TOO GREAT TO PASS UP.” -business owner John bylina

The union representing Will County employees on Oct. 29 filed charges against the county in response to a letter sent to county union members. Representatives of AFSCME Local 1028 say in the letter, Will County Executive Larry Walsh “threatened to fire workers who exercise their legal right to strike and to revoke their health insurance. Both threats are illegal under the Illinois Public Labor Relations Act.” In the letter signed by Walsh, union members are advised that if they strike, they are not eligible for unemployment compensation, cab be temporarily replaced with a new worker and “in some cases, you can lose your job forever if a permanent replacement is hired to do your job.” They also are advised striking workers are not eligible to remain on the county’s group health plan. They could, the letter continues, purchase COBRA coverage for $1,938.71 a month for family PPO coverage. Lastly, See UNION, page 2


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

UNION Continued from page 1 striking workers would not be able to accrue vacation, sick leave or any other benefits after missing one full pay period. Walsh also provided phone numbers if employees had questions, and advice if employees

who wanted to continue to work during the strike felt threatened trying to enter their workplace. Walsh’s letter was a “transparent attempt to scare and intimidate” workers “by threatening to illegally fire employees in retaliation for exercising their legal right to strike,” union president Dave Delrose wrote in an open response to Walsh.

News “The citizens ofWill County are illserved by your attempt to provoke a strike,” Delrose told Walsh.“Rather than intimidate AFSCME Local 1028 members ... [y]ou would be better advised to direct the county’s negotiators to return to the bargaining table to reach a fair and equitable settlement.” The union has asked the Illinois Labor Relations Board to hear the

charges and“order Walsh to rescind the threatening letter, post notices acknowledging his illegal threats in county worksites, and return to the bargaining table.” Bruce Tidwell, the county’s Human Resources Director, said recently they gave the union their “best and final offer after the county “moved significantly” since the beginning of negotiations, offering step increases, as well as some salary increases. And, he said, the county has lowered its offer on employee contributions to the health insurance plans, as well as allowing employees to phase in some of the increases. County officials have said they have to start asking employees to pay more toward insurance because of the increasing cost of health care. Until now, county employees had paid between 1 and 2 percent of their salaries, pre-tax, toward their chosen health care plan. The county now wants employees to pay a percentage of the premium based on a salary scale:Those earning under $30,000 would pay 4.7 percent toward their health insurance; $30,000 to $50,000 would pay 7.2 percent; and those earning over $50,000 would pay 13.2 percent toward

breaking down the

numbers the amount of employees AFSCME represents in the county court system

1,200

13.2

percentage the county wants employees earning over $50K to pay towards health insurance

percentage the county wants employees earning between $30K and $50K to pay towards health insurance

4.7

7.2

percentage the county wants employees earning under $30K to pay towards health insurance

their plan. The union said additional charges were filed over the county’s refusal to continue good-faith efforts to reach a settlement in long-running negotiations over a new union contract. AFSCME represents more than 1,200 employees in the county court system, health department, highway department, Sunny Hill Nursing Home, county jail, and in the offices of the sheriff, coroner, recorder, assessor, clerk, chief judge, executive and state’s attorney.


GAME ON Continued from page 1

Fuel Sports Performance Training opened a youth multisport training and development center earlier this month at an industrial complex at 400 E. Earl Road. Business owner John Bylina said the new facility was a logical expansion to the 4-yearold business that also operates a field house in Romeoville. “Shorewood is a fantastic area for us,” he said.“It gives us great access to additional families in the area. It was too great to pass up.” The 36,000-square-foot facility features 17 batting tunnels, four pitching mounds and 75 yards of training turf. The building is a former factory and required a lot of work to transform it into a pristine sports facility, Bylina said. “There was a lot of clean up and cleanout, and there were only two working lights when we moved in,” he said. In addition to the training

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013 spaces, the facility features a parents’ lounge designed to provide parents with a place to enjoy their time while waiting on their child. “It makes it a little more inviting for families,” he said. Bylina gives Fuel Sports’ trainers, which include former major league baseball player Sal Fasano and three-time NCAA softball champion Nancy Evans, credit for business’ success over the last few years. “They really give us an advantage over other facilities because they’ve played at the highest level,” he said, noting there are 15 instructors available for private lessons. While Fuel Sports has a niche with baseball and softball athletes, Bylina said the facility is not exclusive to those sports. “It’s about athletic development, not just sportspecific training,” he said. “There is no off-season for these athletes. They’re all multi-sport athletes.” Fuel Sports will work with children as young as 4, 5 or 6 through their high school years. “Our main goal is to get kids

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PHOTO by Clare Walters | for the sentinel

Fuel’s Training and Recruiting Center opened in October in a former industrial space at 400 E. Earl Road in Shorewood. The facility in Shorewood features 75 yards of training turf, 17 batting tunnels and four pitching mounds.

ready for high school,” Bylina said. “If they want to take their game to the next level, we will help them with recruiting, too.” Fuel Sports will host a grand opening at its Shorewood location on Nov. 9. The open house will feature free clinics and provide an opportunity for families to meet the coaches. For more information, visit www.fuelspt.com.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

News

will county

Soar into aviation careers at Lewis aviation conference Free conference is designed for anyone interested in career in aviation An exploration of career possibilities available in aviation will take place during the annual Aviation Career Conference at 9 a.m. Nov. 23 in the Harold White Aviation Center located on Lewis University’s main campus in Romeoville. This free conference is designed for

anyone interested in a career in aviation. Conference attendees will have the opportunity to witness an American Eagle RJ Regional Commercial Jet fly into the university and immediately talk with the crew led by American Eagle Captain Kyoko Kimura. Sun-

Aero Helicopter will be flying in one of their helicopters for a static display as well. Informational sessions include various careers of interest, such as airport management, FAA administration, U.S. Marshall, U.S. Customs border patrol, aviation mechanic, tower air traffic control, radar air traffic control, aviation dispatch, commercial airline pilot, corporate pilot, logistics and transportation.

Lewis University,American Airlines, Delta Airlines, United Airlines,American Eagle Airline, Boeing International, Chicago Dept. of Aviation, Federal Aviation Administration, Chicago Air Traffic Control, Federal Express Airlines and Southwest Airlines are hosting this unique opportunity to learn first-hand from “real world” aviation professionals. Register online at http:// www.lewisu.edu/ and complete the online

registration form by Nov. 19. Lewis University provides aviation career opportunities in flight management, administration, maintenance, security and air traffic control. Lewis is one of 31 institutions in the country certified by the FAA to offer the Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative Program. For additional information, contact Frank DuBois at (815) 836-5936 or duboisfr@lewisu. edu.


News will county

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

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IDOT to release Illiana RFQ, hosts outreach event Interested firms or project teams will be asked for a Statement of Qualifications that will be used to determine their eligibility The Illinois Department of Transportation will issue a Request for Qualifications on Friday, Nov. 8, seeking submission of qualifications by private industry partners to design, build, finance, maintain and operate the Illinois portion of the Illiana Corridor utilizing an Availability Payment structure. Interested firms or project teams will be asked for a Statement of Qualifications that will be used to determine their eligibility in the upcoming Public Private Partnership (P3) process. The Indiana portion of the project will be developed later under a separate P3 project with procurement by the Indiana

Finance Authority and the Indiana Department of Transportation. “We’re eager to begin the procurement process on the Illiana, which will bring jobs, promote business growth and boost the economy in Illinois,” said Gov. Pat Quinn in a press release. Private sector participation is being sought to spur innovation that will lead to delivery of the Illiana Corridor more quickly and efficiently, and at less cost, officials say. To ensure coordination of the multi-state Illiana Corridor Project, IDOT and INDOT are working together to coordinate technical requirements, tolling policy, the

federal environmental approval process, and construction schedules. Following the release of the RFQ, IDOT will host an Outreach Event for Illinois Disadvantaged Business Enterprises and other industry firms interested in bidding on work for the project. The event will be held Dec. 4, 2013, at the Holiday Inn Hotel and Conference Center in Joliet. “The Illiana project is a wonderful opportunity for minority, disadvantaged and women-owned businesses in Illinois, which represent the backbone of our economy,” said Quinn.“The forum is an important step toward connecting our

We’re really proud to be offering this opportunity to small businesses in Illinois, and we’re excited to be using creative financing sources to get it done.” - Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider

small businesses, laborers, and engineers as they work together on improving our transportation system and fueling our state’s economy.” The federally mandated DBE Program provides contracting opportunities to small businesses owned and managed by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals. “We’re really proud to be offering this opportunity to small businesses in Illinois, and we’re excited to be using creative

financing sources to get it done,” said Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider. “More work for Illinois businesses and employees, and less burden on Illinois taxpayers.” For more information about the project and Outreach Event and how to register, visit www. IllianaCorridor.org/P3. The RFQ and submission requirements will be posted to the official procurement site at www.dot.il.gov/desenv/ transprocbulletin.html.


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

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The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Joliet Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Joliet 1

Sheila L. Madison, 57, 401 N. Bluff, was arrested at 3:29 a.m. Oct. 25 at 401 N. Bluff for Theft of Services.

2

Danny R. Thomas, 32, 807 Vine, was arrested at 7:34 p.m. Oct. 25 at 4th and Sherman for Possession of Cannabis.

3

Marquis R.Holman,25,1022 Magnolia, was arrested at 7:40 p.m. Oct. 25 at Eastern and Van Buren for Possession of Cannabis.

4

Johnny Bailey Jr., 31, 329 Oak, Lockport, was arrested at 8:39 p.m. Oct. 25 at 119th Fairmont for Obstructing a P.O. and on a Will County Warrant.

5

Justin A. Kowalski, 28, 1010 N. Valley Ave., and James P. MacMillen, 26, 101 Baker Ave., were arrested at 4:21 p.m. Oct. 25 at 606 Henry for Mob Action, Aggravated Assault and Aggravated Unlawful Use of Weapon.

6

Joseph R. Mondrella, 18, 15238 S. Fieldview Court, Lockport, was arrested at 1:57 p.m. Oct. 25 at Jefferson and Joliet for Possession of Cannabis.

7

Jeremiah W. Johnson, 19, 311 N. Ottawa, was arrested at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 25 at 150 W. Washington for twice Impersonating a P.O.

8

Jerry L. Holmes, 54, 1322 Cutter Ave., was arrested at 3:17 p.m. Oct. 25 in the 1400 block of Cutter for Possession of Burglary Tools.

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A 13-year-old was arrested at 12:18 p.m. Oct. 25 at 402 Richards for Disorderly Conduct. R. Evans, 31, 602 10 Daniel Silver Creek Drive, and Steven M. Schellhorn, 21, 21232 W. Covington Drive, Plainfield, were arrested at 7:15 p.m. Oct. 25 at 3150 Tonti for Forgery, Money Laundering, Deceptive Practices and Fraud. Timothy M. Brzezniak, 27, 14531 S. 136th Ave., Lockport, was arrested at 9:44 p.m. Oct. 26 in the 1800 block of Jefferson for Possession of Cannabis.

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Edward D. Weather, 44, 1122 Richards, was

arrested at 5:29 p.m. Oct. 25 at 350 Washington for Disorderly Conduct.

for Domestic Battery, Aggravated Assault, No FOID and Unlawful Use of a Weapon for by Felon.

was arrested at 7:23 p.m. Oct. 27 at 777 Hollywood for Criminal Trespass.

Krystal A. Gurley, 28, 1014 Meadowsedge Lane, was arrested at 3 a.m. Oct. 25 at 4200 W. Jefferson for Domestic Battery.

Omar S. Noah, 27, 218 Notre Dame Ave., was arrested at 1:11 a.m. Oct. 26 at 2701 Plainfield for Domestic Battery.

Trabian M. Landing, 18, 525 S. State St., Chicago, was arrested at 11:42 a.m. Oct. 27 at 1401 Route 59 for nine counts of Retail Theft.

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20

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D. Velasco, 17, 316 14 Jasmine Water, was arrested at 1:58 a.m. Oct. 25 at 333 N. Madison for Aggravated DUI.

John R. Graham, 17, 1116 Burns, Minooka, was arrested at 10:05 p.m. Oct. 26 at 2003 Glenridge for Burglary from M.V.

Bryant M. Espino, 19, 1810 Arbor Gate Drive, Plainfield, was arrested at 9:17 p.m. Oct. 26 at that address for Battery and Illegal Consumption of Alcohol by Minor.

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Jane M. Molek, 34, 3400 Forestview Drive, was arrested at 1:05 a.m. Oct. 26 at that address for Loud/ Unnecessary Noise. Sherry L. Holmes, 46, 1019

Shorewood

Raymond J.Daniels,20,1312 Luther Ave., was arrested at 1:15 p.m. Oct. 26 at that address for Domestic Battery.

Schoolgate Road, New Lenox, was arrested at 3:55 a.m. Oct. 27 at 1119 N. Center for DUI – Alcohol.

David A. Miller, 24, 3107 September Drive, Joliet, was arrested at 7:45 p.m. Oct. 23 at Black Road and Route 59 for Possession of Cannabis, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and Failure to Reduce Speed to Avoid an Accident.

James E. Fox Jr., 20, 713 E. Jackson and Jonathan A. Liceaga, 23, 413 Catalpa St., were arrested at 3:44 p.m. Oct. 26 at 3340 Mall Loop Drive for Theft.

Miguel Cruz, 20, 102 Margaret, was arrested at 3:48 a.m. Oct. 27 at 5507 Hickory Grove Court, for Criminal Trespass to Residence.

Bardo Perez-Mendoza, 33, 523 Henderson, was arrested at 11:24 a.m. Oct. 26 at 3340 Mall Loop Drive for Theft.

John E. Jarnigin, 50, 3520 S. State, Lockport, was arrested at 4:23 p.m. Oct. 27 at 652 N. Collins for Criminal Trespass to Real Property.

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Amos D. Morgan, 53, 1019 Summit, was arrested at 4:15 p.m. Oct. 26 at that address

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Michael R. Zivic, 28, 2830 Sun Valley Drive, Plainfield,

For more Joliet blotter, go to www. buglenewspapers.com

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Kerrisa C. Harris, 29, 2437 Burbank, Joliet, was arrested at 6:48 p.m. Oct. 24 in the 19700 NE Frontage Road on a Will County warrant for Family Offense.

29

Prezont T. Wiggins, 21, 855 Summit Creek, Shorewood, was arrested at 10:10 a.m. Oct. 11 at the Shorewood Police Department, 903 W. Jefferson St., on a Williamson County warrant for Forgery.

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ForuM

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

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Column

It Takes a lot of meatballs to make magic By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

If they haven’t already, many people soon will be getting ready to host family gatherings for Thanksgiving. Could be as few as two; could be 40 or 50 or more. By now, those of you who’re doing this have a system. So many weeks out, this needs to be done, that needs to be ordered and so on until you cull the oohs and ahhs for your golden brown turkey (except for brother-inlaw Paul who prefers meatloaf over turkey) on the Big Day. Always the same worries: Did I prepare enough food? Will everyone show up? Do we need to repaint the bathroom? Will someone bring some uninvited guests like Thelma Lou did that one year? Will these new decorations make Aunt Myrna itch? And so on. Oh, I have helped plan smaller events.Tammy and I are a pretty good team when it comes to hosting events in the old days

like the kids’ post-baptism/ confirmation parties, birthday parties, etc. We’ve never had a huge crowd for Thanksgiving. But “Meatloaf Paul” and his family from Minnesota will be joining us this year. We still have some work to do. Tammy and I have our Thanksgiving system: I take care of the turkey; she takes care of the “compromise” dressing, i.e., one that uses giblet broth instead of the actual, icky entrails. (I guess you can probably figure out how the compromise came about). Tammy makes the pies, and I eat them. Good system. Good times. But I recently hosted a much larger event that made me glad Dr. Peter used that heavy-duty PVC pipe fixing my scorched intestine a few years ago. As past president of the Exchange Club of Joliet, I was in charge of our largest fundraiser this year: the vaunted Spaghetti and Meatball Dinner on Oct. 30. We get about 2,000 people

each year for this event, so the pressure was on to make sure we could bring in and feed those hungry diners, and be able to distribute a good amount of funds to Joliet-area groups helping to fight child abuse and other great community causes. First of all, you need a great team.I had one on my committee, and most importantly, I had one in the kitchen, a group of fellow members, several of whom have cooked spaghetti and fashioned a couple hundred pounds of frozen orbs into what I like to call “Magic Meatballs.” I’m not kidding. My friend Lynne Lichtenauer from JTHS and WJOL’s “Lynne, Mary and Natalie” Show came up to me afterward and said they really were “Magic Meatballs.” Many others said similar things. They made a movie about “Mystic Pizza,” we make money for the community on “Magic Meatballs.” Not many people know this, but it takes dough to make meatballs.Not the pizza kind,the

not many people knoW this, but it takes dough to make meatballs. not the piZZa kind, the green kind.

green kind. And we had many, many generous supporters – some of whom have been with us for dozens of years – making sure we had enough of those “Magic Meatballs.” On behalf of the Exchange Club, mille grazie per tutti. The same with the volunteers. We had dozens of them flying around that Elk’s Club before, during and after our event. Thank you, thank you, thank you. And of course, like any host who puts on a party for an unspecific number of friends, I wondered, “If we cook it, will they come … and eat?” Really. Did you see the weather on Oct. 30? But

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

Illustrated Opinions General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor Nick Reiher nreiher@buglenewspapers.com 815-436-2431 ext. 117 Assistant Managing Editor Jonathan Samples jsamples@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sue Baker Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

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hundreds of people braved the fog and pre-Halloween ickiness to join us for lunch, and, even more astounding, many hundreds more swam through a deluge that evening to have dinner with us, including a couple good friends who drove down from Wheaton. And to those of you from our fellow community groups who supported us, we’ll be there for your events as well. A community pulls together in good times and bad for that type of support. Again, I want to thank everyone involved in helping make our Spaghetti Dinner a success. There was magic in more than the meatballs that day.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

Schools

Joliet West students provide loans to people in need Each class provided $100 in loans to the group or individuals they wished to fund through website In just one day, Joliet West High School students in Meghan Culp, Shannon Hubbart, and Danielle Schmidt’s World Affairs classes provided loans to over 30 people in need around the world. The project was funded through a JTHS Foundation Grant, and students also collected and recycled electronics to raise funds. The loans were issued through the Kiva organization, which uses a unique website system to ensure that funds are transferred properly and used responsibly. “Kiva is a non-profit organization that posts online profiles and requests of people throughout the world who are in need of a small loan,”

said Culp. “In many countries, financial borrowing is not available to those in remote areas. These small loans make a huge difference to those in need, while teaching our students about the culture and living conditions of other countries.” Each class provided $100 in loans to the group or individuals they wished to fund through the Kiva website. With Kiva, loans can be as little as $25 and are typically used for things like buying farm land and equipment, restoring a damaged home, purchasing food and clothing to stock new businesses, or raw materials to create finished products for sale. Since Kiva does not take any percentage of the loan,

students also opted to donate a small sum to the organization so it can continue its operations. Joliet West freshman, Lisa Hicks, championed to fund a portion of a loan to a woman named Teopista who resides in Uganda. The loan will provide the funds necessary to fix the doors and windows of her house. She will also own the home once the work is complete. “I chose Teopista because she is a single mom with four children,” said Hicks. “She also has four other dependents that live with her, so she is the provider for 8 people and she is just 35 years old. The loan will help her a lot and will allow her to own her home and not pay rent.”

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Madi Dobbs and Raymadier Jackson were among Joliet West students helping provide loans throughout the world through the Kiva Organization.

Students, Madi Dobbs and Raymadier Jackson, campaigned to fund a group of women in Senegal who will use the loan to buy vegetables to sell for a profit in their store. “The profits will also be used to provide an

education for their children,” said Dobbs. “This project has really made me appreciate the opportunities that we have in our country. Giving back to those in need is so important.” Each class voted on who they believed were most deserving of the loan. Hicks, Dobbs, and Jackson were among several students who had their people funded. The loans provided to the women will be paid back between six and 11 months. “Historically, 99 percent of Kiva loans are repaid in full. Students will make no profit off of these loans, however when the loans are repaid, students will continue to provide new loans to other deserving people,” said Hubbart. “This is a gift that just keeps on giving. Once the school year comes to an end, each class is able to bequeath their Kiva balances to the students coming into Joliet West the following year to continue the project.” Using Kiva, the students will be able to track the progress of the individuals and groups they selected to finance. This project gives students the opportunity to experience the World Affairs’ curriculum first hand and provides students practical experience in math, accounting and business. “Ultimately, students will feel empowered themselves that they have the ability to truly change someone’s life and will learn the importance of serving a larger community,” said Hubbart. “It feels good to help people in need,” said Hicks. “One person really can make a difference.”


taKe 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Singer Bryant 6 Tooted in a Revolutionary band 11 Jacques, e.g. 14 Common java hr. 15 “__ of Two Cities” 16 Be in the red 17 Michael Jackson memorabilia 19 Coal container 20 Met display 21 Met supporter: Abbr. 22 Completely drained 24 Cold War concerns 27 Web address ending 28 Line-drawing tool 33 Fruity 36 Aristotelian pair? 37 Cauliflower __: boxing injury 38 “Exodus” author 39 Heavy curtain 41 Head of a

Down family? 42 Channel for film buffs 43 Jalape-o rating characteristic 44 Nemo creator Verne 45 Conversational skill 49 Info source, with “the” 50 Like early life forms 54 Shakespearean actor Kenneth 58 SALT subject 59 Worker who handles returns, briefly 60 Tune 61 Uno ancestor, and, in a way, what are hidden in 17-, 28- and 45-Across 64 Prune 65 New worker 66 Pick of the litter 67 Sot’s symptoms 68 Readied, as the presses 69 Deep sleep

1 Engaged in armed conflict 2 Beatles jacket style 3 Contract change approvals: Abbr. 4 Tit for __ 5 Motel Wi-Fi, for one 6 Singer-dancer Lola 7 Jurist Lance 8 Top choice, slangily 9 Type of sch. with low grades? 10 Iron-fisted rulers 11 “Don’t sweat it” 12 Baby’s boo-boo 13 Convalesce 18 First in a car, say 23 Uno e due 25 Retired fliers 26 Straddle 29 Spark plug measurement 30 Color 31 Look openmouthed 32 Valentine’s Day deity 33 Target of a joke 34 St. Louis symbol 35 Sci-fi travel

conveniences 39 Dict. feature 40 Dirty one in a memorable Cagney line 41 Sugar shape 43 Terrace cooker 44 Night-night clothes? 46 DDE, in WWII 47 Worn at the edges 48 Sarcastic remark 51 TV monitoring device 52 Most likely will, after “is” 53 Surgery beam 54 Not in need of a barber 55 Mob action 56 It may run from cheek to cheek 57 Carol opening 62 Zip code start? 63 Day-__: pigment brand

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

Horoscopes Drive and determination can carry you far. Getting organized and being efficient in the week ahead will get you even further. Make it your priority to complete assignments and meet deadlines.

Bake a cake. In the week ahead, you might be preoccupied by business and material matters. It might be a good idea to set aside some quality time to reconnect with your domestic, emotional side.

What seems feasible today could prove impossible by the end of the week; not all the facts are in and conditions may not be ripe. Use business know-how to handle finances with finesse.

In the week to come, stick to routines that have served you well in the past. If you cross all your “T’s” and dot all your “I’s” no one will need to take a red pencil to your work. Hold off making major purchases.

Put a lid on it. Turn down the heat and don’t let frustrations boil over in the week ahead. Family commitments may take up a great deal of your time or interfere with your ability to make career progress.

Take pride in careful analysis. To be successful in the week ahead, examine the facts and abide by the rules. Remember to handle your money as though it was all you were going to get.

Sometimes more is less. In the week ahead, friends may urge you to dive right into a new project or accept a proposal that could prove costly. You’d be wise to take more time to look at all the angles.

Put down an anchor and remain close to shore. This is not a good week to set sail on a new journey or begin anything new. Your best bet is to ride out any pressing urge to make investments or life changes.

Get what you need and need what you get. In the upcoming week, you should be cautious about spending and conscientious about paying bills on time. Daydreaming could be counterproductive.

Control freaks put on a show. In the upcoming week, you might find it difficult to make headway with your goals because someone else wants to run the show or inject much more than their two cents.

Set the alarm and don’t oversleep this week. Too much work and not enough play might make Jack a dull boy, but too much play can interfere with work. The boss might not overlook a black mark.

You can ride high on a bubble of inspiration in the week ahead, but don’t neglect mundane tasks. People will be less forgiving than usual if you make mistakes or don’t hold up your end of a bargain.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2013

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • VIRUS • EXTOL • GROTTO • MISUSE

Answer:

What the class considered the aerobics instructor’s tireless energy -- TIRESOME

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

News

Child Care Resource, Referral Wine & Chocolate Tasting Child Care Resource and Referral will hold a Wine & Chocolate Tasting fundraiser from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Joliet Renaissance Center, 214 N. Ottawa St., Joliet. There will be a sampling of wine and chocolate. Tickets are on sale for $30 per person. The event will feature a flight of five wines, exquisite selection of chocolate desserts and heavy appetizers.

The event will also feature a small raffle and diamond draw courtesy of David Nelson Jewelry. Enter for your chance to win a 1/4 carat diamond or $100 gift card to David Nelson Jewelry. Must be 21 to attend. All proceeds will fund CCR&R’s 2013-2014 Teen Parent program. For more information or registration, call 815-741-1163, ext. 224.


INSIDE: Local boys and girls cross country runners will be represented at the state meet this week in

www.buglenewspapers.com

Peoria, page 15

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL NOVEMBER 6, 2013

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Hilltoppers to host Kaneland By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

The southern bracket of the IHSA Class 5A football playoffs has been dubbed as one of, if not them toughest of any class in the state. Well, after most teams had a first-round cake walk, the fun is about to begin. No. 4 seed Joliet Catholic Academy (9-1) is coming off a 63-12 win over Urban PrepEnglewood in the opening round and will host No. 5 Kaneland (91) at 7 p.m. Saturday. The Knights defeated Hampshire 35-0 in its opener. Kaneland is paced by quarterback Drew David, who completed 17-of-24 passes for 240 yards, two touchdowns and two interceptions. Brandon Bishop caught 7 passes for 92 yards before leaving on a stretcher, while John Pruett caught five balls for 91 yards. Isaac Swithers had 17 carries for 67 yards. For JCA in the win, the Hilltoppers did not risk injury, playing their starters sparingly. Junior Mike Gruben opened the scoring as he took the opening kickoff 73 yards for the score. For Gruben, a blocker on the return team, it was the first time all season the kickoff came his way. The Hilltoppers saw action from both quarterbacks, as Nick Morrison returned from injury. He had one touchdown pass, while sophomore Cade Earl had a pair of TDs on only four pass attempts. Mike Ivlow saw limited action in the game, but still had an impact, gaining 109 yards on See HOST, page13

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Mike Ivlow averaged more than 25 yards per carry in the Hilltoppers’ first round win.


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Sports

Minooka falls in sectional final By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Giacomo Raimondi and the Indians lost in the sectional final.

After winning the Joliet Central Regional Title on penalty kicks last week, Minooka did not want to have to go to PKs again in the Joliet West Sectional opener with Moline. “It was very important to win in overtime,” said senior Giacomo Raimondi. “You never want to take a game to PKs, even though we are a good PK team, but you always want to get it done soon.” “We have been solid in PKs and I was confident if we had to go there, but we told them right before overtime to trust their teammates and trust themselves and go out there and win the

game,” said Minooka coach Chris Brolley. With the match tied at 1-1, the teams went into overtime. With the new OT rules, there is one, 20 minute overtime period, broken into two halves, followed by PKs if still tied. With the match still knotted at 1-1 in the second half of OT, the Indians broke the tie around the five minute mark and held on for the 2-1 win and advancement to the sectional final. Minooka refused to allow the Maroons to clear the ball as a scrum broke out near the goal. As the Moline goalie thought the ball was cleared, freshman Kyle Sparks found the ball and found the back of the net. “It was a great moment. This

is a great team and a great year,” Sparks said. “I just looked up and saw the goalie in the center of the net. I just ripped it. The ball came off Josh Sutton and I had a one-time volley into the left side of the net.” It was Sparks’ sixth goal of the season. Without the golden goal in effect, the Indians had to play defense for five minutes to clinch the win. “We scored and we knew we had to play defense and not give them chances to score,” Raimondi said.“Once we scored, we never gave them a chance.” Minooka jumped out to a first-half lead on Joe McCabe’s seventh goal of the season. While the Indians held the lead into the intermission, it was short lived as Moline scored less than two minutes into the half. The Maroons had a few more chances in the second half, as chances at winning in regulation either just missed the net or hit the cross bar. This postseason has been one of making the most of their opportunities and taking advantage of the opposition’s missed chances. “We made some mistakes and we have learned from our mistakes and we have taken their mistakes and took advantage of them,” Raimondi said. “All through the playoffs (our opponents) have had chances and chances in the end and we have made our chances count.” See FINAL, page 13


Sports HOST Continued from page 11 four carries and scoring a pair of touchdowns. The second round contest appears to be destined to be a game of which defense can step up. Through the first game in the post season, the Hilltoppers are averaging 41.8 points per game, while Kaneland is at 39.2. Defensively, the teams are equally as close as JCA allows 15.1 points per contest and the Knights only 10.1. With the return of Morrison to the lineup, JCA only has one player remaining on the sidelines from the rash of ankle injuries players suffered in the win over Marist Sept. 27. That player, senior lineman J.B. Butler, has his cast off and could make a return for the game against Kaneland. mark@buglenewspapers.com

FINAL Continued from page 12 “We dodged a couple of bullets today,” Brolley said. “They had a couple of good rips and hit a couple of posts, but we survived and move on. This is fun to watch. That is what the playoffs are, they are all one goal games. You have to dodge some and if your keeper makes a few good saves then hopefully you get one to sneak in the back of the net.” The Indians, however, fell 4-0 in the sectional final to Edwardsville. mark@buglenewspapers.com

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Sports

Volleyball seasons close By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Joliet Central fell to Bolingbrook in the regional opener.

Lockport’s season came to a close Oct. 31 against Benet, the Class 4A two-time defending state champ, 25-18, 25-16 in the Plainfield East Regional final. The Porters were right in the match with the Redwings (325) early in both sets, but Benet finished both sets on 14-5 runs. The Porters (22-14) defeated No. 9 Naperville Central in the regional semifinal, 25-15, 25-15. Naperville Central defeated both Benet and Lockport in the Asics Challenge a few weeks ago. “We knew we didn’t play well against them the first time and we wanted a second chance,” Lange said. “Everyone came in and executed well and did their jobs. We were well prepared.” “I felt like today everything was meshing,” Pfeiffer said. “Our offense was on, which is normally our weaker point. If we See CLOSE, page 16


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Locals will be well represented at state By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

EDWARDSVILLE – Despite making a three-plus hour drive to Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville for the Class 3A Edwardsville Sectional, the Minooka girls cross country team didn’t show any fatigue, winning the sectional championship with 39 points. O’Fallon was second with 66 points Nov. 2. The Indians were led by a pair of freshmen as Ashley Tutt finished second with a time of 18:54, while Mackenzie Callahan was sixth with a time of 19:04. O’Fallon’s Sydney Neal won in

18:43. “My team did really good,”Tutt said. “I never thought this could happen a year ago. I just keep working hard and the seniors have really helped out. It was windy and had a little bit of an effect going up the hills. I felt really good today.” “We were hoping to beat O’Fallon and we did,” Callahan said.“The key was to stay strong and pass as many people as you can, especially O’Fallon people. On the hills you couldn’t give up. I’m very happy with my performance, especially as a freshman.” The freshmen benefited from the practice the previous day at

the course. “We ran here yesterday to see what it was going to be like,” Tutt said. “I’ve never been here before that. It helped because we ran the hills a little bit and coach gave us tips on how to run them.” “It helped me see the course more because if I didn’t practice here yesterday, I would have no idea where I was going,”Callahan added.“I might get lost.” Caleigh Beverly (19:05, 7th), Morgan Crouch (19:16, 9th) and Kaitlyn Chetney (19:41, 15th) scored for the Indians, who are headed to state as a team. The top five teams and seven See STATE, page 17

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Joliet West’s Dan Treasure is headed to the state meet.


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Sports

Big Hurt to speak at Brown & Gold night Frank Thomas, two-time American League Most Valuable Player as a member of the Chicago White Sox, will be the featured speaker at University of St. Francis’ 37th Annual Brown & Gold Night to be held Monday, November 18, at the Pat Sullivan Center in Joliet. | Registration Thomas is one of only four players in MLB history who retired with a career batting average of at least .300, and had 1,500 or more RBIs, 1,600 or more walks, 1,400 or more runs, and 500 or more home runs. The other three were Hall of Famers Mel Ott, Babe Ruth and Ted Williams. Thomas is the only right-handed hitter among that group. Thomas accepted a scholarship to play football at Auburn University, where he also played for the Tigers’ baseball team. He went on to earn All-America honors as a freshman and junior on the diamond, and during his three years with the Tigers he hit a school-record 49 home runs. The Chicago White Sox selected Thomas in the first round of the 1989 Major League Baseball Draft. He spent his first 16 years with the White Sox and became one of only twelve players in MLB history to win back-to-back Most Valuable Player awards as he was named American League MVP in 1993 and 1994. Thomas is also just one of two players in major league history to have seven consecutive seasons (1991-97) with a .300 or better batting average together with at least 100 walks, 100 runs scored, 100 runs batted in and 20 home runs. The only other player to

CLOSE Continued from page 14 keep that up on Thursday, I think we have a good shot.” The Porters built an early 9-3 lead in the first set and were never seriously threatened. However, Naperville central held the lead for much of the first half of the second set until eight straight points by the Porters broke open a 14-14 game. “That’s a good team,”Lange said of Naperville Central. “We knew it wasn’t going to be an easy game. It is a stacked sectional.”

accomplish that feat is Albert Pujols. Thomas’ accomplishment is even more remarkable considering that he played only 113 games in the 1994 strikeshortened season. Thomas joins an impressive list of Chicago professional sports greats to have served as the featured speaker at the Brown & Gold event. That list includes Chicago Bears’ Super Bowl XX quarterback Jim McMahon (2012), Chicago Blackhawks’ Denis Savard (2011), Chicago Cubs’ Fergie Jenkins (2008), and Chicago Bears’ Mike Ditka (1982, 2007) and Dick Butkus (1980). Other notable speakers at past Brown & Gold events were longtime Marquette University basketball coach and network television analyst Al McGuire (1977, 1987), basketball coaching legend John Wooden (1978), twotime Super Bowl MVP Bart Starr (1994), former DePaul coaching legend Ray Meyer (1979), college baseball’s all-time winningest coach and USF’s own Gordie Gillespie (1996), and Olympic wrestler and coach Dan Gable (2002). The annual fundraiser begins with a cash bar at 5:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 7 p.m. and the program at 8p.m. The event will also include a silent auction. Tickets priced at $50 per person and reserved tables for $500 can be purchased by contacting the USF athletics department at 815-740-3464 or visiting the USF athletics website at gofightingsaints.com.Corporate sponsorship opportunities are also available.

JOLIET CENTRAL Joliet Central lost the opening game of the IHSA Class 4A Bolingbrook Regional Bolingbrook 25-18, 25-14 to the host Raiders. “I thought we were going to have a different game and they started to pull away early,” said Central coach Suzie Bambule. “The season wasn’t really what we had hoped for. “I had four seniors and I will miss them. They are great girls, great athletes, students, people. We have to work toward the summer conditioning and try and get more kids to play club.” Mark Gregory contributed


Sports STATE Continued from page 15 individuals not on those teams qualified for state, which takes place Nov. 9 at Detweiller Park in Peoria. “It means a lot,”Tutt said of the team going to state. “I’m really happy we’re going to state as a team. The team is really close as a whole. We hope as a team we can get at least in the top 10 and hopefully get a state trophy.” “For me, I want to get under 18,” Callahan said of her state goals.“As a team, I want us to get top 10. We ran there once this year.The course is pretty flat for the most part, so it will be ok.” Joliet West missed out on the state meet, placing seventh with 196 points.However,sophomore Charlotte Youell qualified as an individual, taking 16th place with a time of 19:52. BOYS Joliet Central is headed to the state meet after placing fifth at Edwardsville with 159 points. O’Fallon won with 33. Senior Salvador Lazaro led the Steelmen with a time of 16:13, good for sixth place. “It was pretty great,” Lazaro said. “I think I really improved from last year. I can safely say I put in the work. I knew this sectional wasn’t the easiest. It is a pretty tough course.” Lazaro has shown major improvements in just his second year in the sport. “Last year I was getting used to the sport,” said Lazaro, who spent his first two high school

campaigns playing soccer.“I was running in soccer shoes. Now I’m really getting into the sport and am looking in the future to compete in college.” While he was happy with his personal success, his main goal was to see the team advance to state. “It means a lot more than just qualifying individually,” Lazaro said.“I am extremely excited for the team to go to state for the first time in Joliet history.” Minooka just missed the state cut, placing sixth with 187 points. Junior Gabe Ceballos qualified individually, placing 17th with a time of 16:33. Joliet West finished eighth with 237 points. Dan Treasure is headed to state after placing 7th with a time of 16:13. “I really can’t explain how I feel,” Treasure said. “I was working hard all week. Last week I went out a little slower to keep the pace down and it didn’t work. I tried something different this week and it really helped. I was really disappointed last year because I missed state by two spots. It feels great.”

LOCKPORT The Lockport girls did not enter the Hinsdale Central Sectional as the favorite to win, but that did not deter the Porters from placing all five scoring runners in the top 26 and winning the sectional with 82 points. Lockport beat Downers Grove South, who was second with 95 points. Freshman Morgan Bollinger paced the Porters, placing

second overall in 17:28.07. “I was trying to break 18 (minutes). I broke my PR by 30 seconds and I am very happy with my race,” she said. “(As a team), we were ranked fourth, so we were really excited to come out here and win it.” Following Bollinger were Emmie Hahn (10th, 17:55.56), Karlee Stortz (12th, 18:02.86), Taylor Latta (16th, 18:09.71) and Haley Beaumont (26th, 18:28.57). Abby Elwood (28th, 18:32.60) and Alicia Ary (36th, 18:43.37) competed, but did not score. On the guys side, only one Porter advanced to the state meet as Will Giroux placed 10th overall in 15:00.68. “That was the ultimate goal this week was to get out. I just had to run hard and I did,” he said. “I wanted to get out and hit the first uphill hard and then use all the down hills to my advantage. I knew I couldn’t be up with one and two, but I knew if I was in that five through 10 I was fine and that was where I tried to stay. “This is probably the toughest sectional in the state and I have a lot of confidence going into next week.” As a team,Lockport placed 13th with Kristian Hernandez (49th, 15:49.90), Vincent Ceropski (78th, 16:19.52), Mark Diamond (81st, 16:20.82) and Chris Fojtik (97th, 16:45.76) adding to the scoring. Kyle Smietanski (98th, 16:46.26) and Robert Elwood (111th, 16:52.92) competed and did not score. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com

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Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Morgan Bollinger was fourth at the Hinsdale Central cross country Sectional Saturday.


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buglenewspapers.com/football

Styles set to clash in 8A second round By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

When Bolingbrook and Marist meet up in Friday night’s Class 8A Round 2 match-up, something has to give. The two teams could not be more opposite as the Redhawks rely on winning games by scoring at a video-game pace, averaging 42.3 points per game this season. The Raiders are more methodical on offense, as they average 32.9 points per game, they just usually take time to get there. “That is just the nature of our offense,” said Bolingbrook coach John Ivlow. “We see a different look each week and we get under center and feel them out and feel them out and then we make our adjustments and then we are usually pretty good.” Marist will allow Bolingbrook to put points on the board, as it has allowed on average of 30.4 points per game through week one of the postseason. The key to the game will be if the high-powered Marist offense can score on Bolingbrook’s stingy defense. Arguably the top defense in the state, the Raiders allow only 6.7 points per game. In their 48-12 win over Bloom Township in the playoff opener, the Trojans tallied both touchdowns against the Raider reserves, as the starters played only the first series after halftime. The third quarter Bloom TD was the first points Bolingbrook has allowed in the third quarter this season.

The Raider defense forced four fumbles, recovering two. Standout defensive back Parrker Westphal added an interception, all of which gave the offense great field position to score. “We make plays and the offense capitalizes on that,” said defensive back Julian Huff. Julian was the first of the three Huff brothers to make a big play in the game, as he opened the scoring in the first minute of the second quarter when he recovered a punt that hit the offensive lineman in the helmet and caromed to the five-yard line. Huff secured it at the three and ran in for the score. He would add two sacks and a forced fumble. Brother Jacob Huff would help end the Bolingbrook scoring against the Bloom kicking game, as he blocked a punt with 9:13 left to play in the third quarter that was recovered by Joshua Collins and returned five-yards for the score. It was Jacob’s second blocked kick of the year, tying Julian for team lead. In between those scores, oldest brother Jaden had a 27-yard TD run and a 17-yard TD catch from Quincy Woods. Woods added a pair of 1-yard QB sneaks for scores, while Dariel Greer found Mike Valentine for a 33-yard score on the final play of the second quarter. That TD pass capped off a 42-point second frame for Bolingbrook and put the running clock into effect for the second half. All involved know the road will

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Julian Huff forces a fumble in Bolingbrook’s win over Bloom in the first round of the playoffs.

be tougher against Marist. “That is a great team coming to town here. It will be a great game. I hope everyone comes out to watch it,” Ivlow said.“They are your typical 8A football team. They are big and solid, but we are used to playing against the physical teams. We are not very big, but we will go toe-to-toe with the big boys.” Marist is paced by Notre Damebound receiver Nic Weishar and fellow receiver Flynn Nagel. Quarterback Jack Donegan makes use of his receivers, while Peter Andreotti is the Redhawks’ leading rusher. “We are excited,” Julian Huff said. “We watched their game (Friday night). I like their running back (Andreotti). He is fast and

they are physical on the offensive line. Nagel and (Weishar) and good players. A lot of their top guys play defense too, but they are all going to big schools.” Huff said it will be another chance for the Bolingbrook defense to try and play an even better game. “We have read all the articles and we have seen the videos and everyone says how good we are, but it is crazy to say, but we can get so much better. People just don’t know how much better we can get,” he said. “We do what we do because we have known each other for a while. People talk about how defenses play well because they have played together for a long time, but we have lived together for a long

time. We have known each other for a while and that is what makes this defense run.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

35.6

The margin of difference between the 42.3 ppg Marist scores and the 6.7 ppg Bolingbrook allows


Business & Real Estate

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Effective managers deliver bad news with right words Q. I’ve been a manager for 15 years and am puzzled at how badly my employees take negative feedback. I attempt to diplomatically tell them when they are not team players or are rude or inappropriate, but they always end up offended. How do I deliver bad news without getting a bad reaction? A. You can deliver bad news without a bad reaction if you avoid triggering shame in your employees. People at work feel personally attacked and confused if you use vague labels like “inappropriate.” People feel motivated to listen and change when they know exactly what behavior you want. Without meaning to alienate others, we trigger shame when we use vague descriptions that imply a person is inadequate or bad. Shame is different from guilt.

When we feel shame we believe another person is making a judgment about our value as a human being. Guilt is remorse over something we have done and can do differently in the future. If your employees believe you think something is basically wrong with who they are, they will become hostile and demoralized. Next time you provide an employee with feedback, make it clear that you both face a problem and tell them what you need to help with the solution. Make it crystal clear with the words you chose that the employee is not “the problem.” For instance, if you need accurate reports on your budget, do not tell the employee that he needs to stop being sloppy or careless. You are just using a negative label that will trigger shame. Instead tell the employee you need his help making sure there are zero math errors on

the next budget. Even well meaning managers get frustrated and use negative labels. Instead of calling employees rude, stubborn or lazy, consider the problem you need solved and the behavior you want. Focus on treating your employee as an ally in resolving the problem and be specific about what you want them to do. You’ll be impressed at what magic specific requests will create. Very few employees get upset at being asked to arrive on time for a meeting. Every employee will be upset if instead you accuse them of being irresponsible, thoughtless and late. Using the right words at the right time with the right person can seem like wizardry when you see the different results you get. I’ve seen teams go from being demoralized and conflict-drenched to cooperative, harmonious environments just because everyone stopped using language that triggers shame. We take a job because we have to pay bills. But each of

We take a job because we have to pay bills. But each of us hopes to find a workplace where we feel valuable and competent. us hopes to find a workplace where we feel valuable and competent. Despite what you learned as a kid, the magic word isn’t just “please”; the magic words include, “Can you help me do this?” You won’t just transform your team if you change your language; you’ll encourage other managers to make similar changes. When they see the magic you are working within your department, everyone will want to know your new trick!

Last word(s) Q. I have a coworker who seems to get all the breaks. I know I’m jealous and feel petty about it, but I’d love to see her get fewer goodies. Is there anything wrong with spending time thinking about

how to show people she isn’t so great? A. No, there isn’t anything wrong with thinking about showing people she isn’t so great. However, you’ll get further spending time thinking and showing people why you are so great than undermining your coworker. (Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www.interpersonaledge. com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.


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WILL COUNTY

all quiet at County finance Committee, sheriff’s budget still an issue Will County Sheriff Paul Kaupas was asked his opinion on consolidating maintenance staff By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

Will County Sheriff Paul Kaupas came to the County Board Finance Committee meeting Oct. 29 expecting a showdown. Instead, he was asked his opinion on consolidating maintenance staff county-wide. That left Kaupas, and others in the County Board’s intimate committee room, shaking their heads. Many of those same people had seen the Finance Committee put Deputy Chief Nate Romeo’s feet to the coals at their Oct. 22 meeting. The issue then was a nearly $3.9 million discrepancy in the salary portion of the sheriff’s 2014 budget. Kaupas asked for $42 million; the county board is offering $39 million. If the committee continued to stick with the lower figure, Romeo said last week, that could result in taking as many as 50 deputies off the streets. But the Finance Committee on Oct. 29 had a kinder, gentler tone. Republicans on the committee, after caucusing Oct. 26, said they would support offering 2 percent raises to county employees. In return, said Board Member Chuck

Maher, R-Naperville, they would ask each department head doing that to find up to 5 percent to cut in their non-personnel budgets. County Board staff, working with Wilhelmi and the county’s Finance Department, also distributed a list of cuts that would offset a $1.6 million deficit that resulted when County Board Republicans at the Oct. 17 meeting refused to allow the county to recoup that much in property taxes through increases in assessments during the past year. Finance Committee Chairman Steve Wilhelmi, D-Joliet, also continued to push to see what the county might save by combining various maintenance tasks throughout county government under the Will County Executive’s Office. When asked, he said he hoped to cut out at least $100,000 from the county’s now $500 million annual budget. Asked by the committee to weigh in on the issue, Kaupas and several staff took their seats at the square committee table, maybe wondering if it were an ambush. Instead, Kaupas said contracting out many of the maintenance duties would be

more expensive. And he didn’t really care if someone took away the maintenance oversight from him, “So long as you don’t take away the extra money you never gave me.” When he was finished, Kaupas asked if there were any other issues, but the committee members had none. When asked after the meeting, Wilhelmi said the issue of the $3 million shortage still is very real. “But there is no reason to attack the sheriff during a committee meeting,” he said. “(County Board) leadership will work with the sheriff on his budget. If he can’t find the money elsewhere in his budget, he will have to lose some employees.” Kaupas said after the meeting he has lost 22 already through attrition. “I don’t have any more to cut,” he said. “Then they’ll be asking why I don’t have more deputies on the streets.” And as far as not wanting to get into a battle at the committee meeting, Kaupas added that he didn’t appreciate the committee putting it to Romeo at the last meeting. That’s why he showed up this week, he said, and why he brought much of his support staff to answer any questions on his budget. But there were none.

AAIM honors County prosecutor, deputy AAIM honors County prosecutor, Deputy Assistant State’s Attorney Frank Byers, a long-time prosecutor in the felony division, was recently honored by the Alliance Against Intoxicated Motorists for his skillful prosecution of a defendant in a fatal drunken driving case. Byers, honored at AAIM’s annual Fundraiser and Silent Auction

Sunday, Oct. 27, was one of many prosecutors, police officers, victim advocates and AAIM supporters from throughout Illinois to be recognized for their contributions in the fight against drunken driving. He was honored for the successful prosecution of Vincent Borgic, a drunken driver from Joliet who struck and killed a

pedestrian who was lying in the street on the evening of July 13, 2011. Although the victim, Scott Zolecki, also was intoxicated, Byers secured a conviction by presenting testimony from other sober motorists who swerved their vehicles to avoid hitting him. The victim was rushed to Silver Cross Hospital and was later transferred to Loyola Medical

Center, where he died on July 14, 2011. His death was determined to be related to head injuries he suffered when he was struck. Byers also presented evidence at trial that blood from Zolecki’s head was found on the underside of Borgic’s Dodge Challenger. Borgic, who admitted coming from a bar, refused field sobriety tests and a breathalyzer,but a blood

standard provided later at the hospital revealed a blood-alcohol level of .208. Byers secured a five year prison sentence for Borgic. In addition to Byers,Will County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Steve Kirsch also was honored by AAIM for making 111 DUI arrests in 2012. During its annual luncheon, AAIM honors officers who make more than 100 DUI arrests a year.


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Sentinel 11-06-13