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Sentinel The Shorewood

ONLINE More news at shorewoodsentinel.com

Hold the salt Wednesday, Januar y 23, 2013

Vol. 18 No. 7

Voyager Media Publications • www.shorewoodsentinel.com

First tier completed in Illiana Corridor By Nick Reiher Managing editor

Another mild winter could come with a cost this spring

spokesman. Other programs such as “Warm Up to Snowshoeing” and “Twilight Tubing” obviously had to be canceled, he said. And other snow-based programs planned through February could be either canceled or altered, he said.

The announcement was no surprise, but it provides a benchmark for the next step in what Gov. Pat Quinn calls “a priority for my administration.” Transportation officials in Indiana and Illinois announced Jan. 18 the completion of the first tier of the Illiana Corridor project, and with it, the selection of the 50mile B3 route, which would link Interstate 55 near Wilmington to Interstate 65 in Indiana. The Illinois Department of Transportation, the Indiana Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration were involved in the final section following a handful of meetings with officials throughout Will County, as well as those who would be affected by construction of the path, anticipated to cost $1.25 billion in 2018 dollars. Officials have said they would consider private financing, and it is likely the Illiana will be a tollway. Corridor officials say the project is the first in the nation to use a combined federal and

See SNOW NO, page 2

See ILLIANA, page 27

By Laura Katauskas and Nick Reiher Enterprise Publications

Whether or not you like the white, fluffy stuff coating the streets, the lack of snow and unseasonable temperatures are a mixed blessing for most, with the ramifications of a mild winter lurking to a possible problematic spring. Even the prospect of a couple hundred golfers able to play on its courses in January isn’t enough to offset the concerns Joliet Park District officials have about the lack of snow on top of a drought this past summer. The lack of moisture and a hard freeze means the likelihood of more insects eating up Joliet Park District courses when the weather turns warmer, said Dominic Egizio, executive director. Manpower hours saved now translates to more hours necessary for manual watering and aeration, as well as applying insecticides, added Ted Brodeur, the park district’s superintendent of Revenue Facilities. With more golfers right now, they said, the district’s three golf clubhouses are doing well. But the lack of snow doesn’t do much

Bugle File Photo

Scenes like these from the cleanup of the February 2011 blizzard that paralysed the Midwest have become a distant memory in the wake of unseasonably warm temperatures the past two years.

good for the local Nordic Ski Club, which was supposed to have its annual meet the weekend of Jan. 19 at Woodruff Golf Course. Likewise, the Forest Preserve District of Will County has had to adapt its winter offerings due to the lack of snow, including its annual “Musher Mania” event Jan. 12. The sled dogs this year had to pull wheeled sleds instead, said Bruce Hodgdon, the district’s


Sentinel The Shorewood

ONLINE More news at shorewoodsentinel.com

Hold the salt Wednesday, Januar y 23, 2013

Vol. 18 No. 7

Voyager Media Publications • www.shorewoodsentinel.com

First tier completed in Illiana Corridor By Nick Reiher Managing editor

Another mild winter could come with a cost this spring

spokesman. Other programs such as “Warm Up to Snowshoeing” and “Twilight Tubing” obviously had to be canceled, he said. And other snow-based programs planned through February could be either canceled or altered, he said.

The announcement was no surprise, but it provides a benchmark for the next step in what Gov. Pat Quinn calls “a priority for my administration.” Transportation officials in Indiana and Illinois announced Jan. 18 the completion of the first tier of the Illiana Corridor project, and with it, the selection of the 50mile B3 route, which would link Interstate 55 near Wilmington to Interstate 65 in Indiana. The Illinois Department of Transportation, the Indiana Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration were involved in the final section following a handful of meetings with officials throughout Will County, as well as those who would be affected by construction of the path, anticipated to cost $1.25 billion in 2018 dollars. Officials have said they would consider private financing, and it is likely the Illiana will be a tollway. Corridor officials say the project is the first in the nation to use a combined federal and

See SNOW NO, page 2

See ILLIANA, page 27

By Laura Katauskas and Nick Reiher Enterprise Publications

Whether or not you like the white, fluffy stuff coating the streets, the lack of snow and unseasonable temperatures are a mixed blessing for most, with the ramifications of a mild winter lurking to a possible problematic spring. Even the prospect of a couple hundred golfers able to play on its courses in January isn’t enough to offset the concerns Joliet Park District officials have about the lack of snow on top of a drought this past summer. The lack of moisture and a hard freeze means the likelihood of more insects eating up Joliet Park District courses when the weather turns warmer, said Dominic Egizio, executive director. Manpower hours saved now translates to more hours necessary for manual watering and aeration, as well as applying insecticides, added Ted Brodeur, the park district’s superintendent of Revenue Facilities. With more golfers right now, they said, the district’s three golf clubhouses are doing well. But the lack of snow doesn’t do much

Bugle File Photo

Scenes like these from the cleanup of the February 2011 blizzard that paralysed the Midwest have become a distant memory in the wake of unseasonably warm temperatures the past two years.

good for the local Nordic Ski Club, which was supposed to have its annual meet the weekend of Jan. 19 at Woodruff Golf Course. Likewise, the Forest Preserve District of Will County has had to adapt its winter offerings due to the lack of snow, including its annual “Musher Mania” event Jan. 12. The sled dogs this year had to pull wheeled sleds instead, said Bruce Hodgdon, the district’s


2

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

SNOW NO Continued from page 1 Hoping to hit the snow hill or partake in the average winter activities, some are officially bummed about the lack of snow like Romeoville resident and mom Erika Teo. “I actually had bought new sleds in November with the hope of snow,” Teo said. “I also left my outside (Christmas) lights out and lit longer than usual with the hope of snow— I love the sparkle. Oh yeah, and let’s not forget the taste of hot chocolate after coming in from building a snowman. Making me sad now just thinking about it.” The lack of snow also is a concern for the Forest Preserve District’s various plants, said Glen Buckner, the district’s wildlife ecologist. “Most of the native plants and animals in the area have adapted to heavy winter snowfalls,”he said. “Those adaptations vary greatly, but any time you throw changes into these complex systems, you are likely creating impacts to the native species.” Snow melt also is preferable than hard rains because the former provides a sustained trickle effect, he said, so that more water is absorbed into soils for use by overwintering plants, as opposed to creating erosion or running off into ditches. Snow also protects the dormant plants, animals and soils from

extreme temperatures, Buckner added. As they were all last year, farmers still are concerned about the lack of moisture. Mark Schneidewind, Will County Farm Bureau manager, said this area was nowhere near as bad as other areas in the state. “Basically, we used up all of the soil moisture from last year as it was needed,” he said.“The current soil profile needs moisture to be added, and while it is difficult to make up being 10 inches of rainfall behind what we normally get, what most farmers are hoping for is normal winter moisture for February and March. Then we won’t fall any further behind, and then we need good spring rains in that 3-4 inch category over the month of April.” The other concern for farmers, Schneidewind said, is the slowing of barge traffic up and down the river, or not being able to have barges totally full due to low river levels. And then, of course, low water levels in private wells are a problem, too, he said. Jan. 14 marked the end of the first half of meteorological winter, according to the National Weather Service, and for the second year in a row, the first half of winter has started out abnormally warm with much below-average snowfall. Without any meaningful cold or snow so far this winter, it’s not just unusual, but record-breaking. The first day of the 2012-13 winter with a sub-freezing high was Jan. 1, which ties the record for the

News latest first sub-freezing high on record in Chicago. The Chicago area also set a new record for the most number of consecutive days without a sub-freezing high temperature at 310 days, though that streak ended Dec. 31. The NWS reports that by looking at the number of consecutive days without a snow depth measured of at least 1 inch, can tell the story of just how unusual it is for Chicago to go this long without the ground being covered.Through Jan. 17, it has been 326 days since Chicago has officially had an inch of snow on the ground, making this the longest stretch of its kind on record in Chicago. The previous streak of 313 days without an inch of snow was set in 1940. JimAllsopp,meteorologist at the Romeoville NWS office, confirms that such a mild winter can lead to drought-like conditions come spring. “Last year, we had a drought in the summer; water levels are already low in Lake Michigan and the lack of snowfall isn’t helping,” said Allsopp. “We need some precipitation. And actually, snow is a bit better for the ground. Snow soaks into the ground, melting at a slower rate than say a rainfall that can run off. We don’t realize it that much in the winter, but we need the snow to replenish for the summer.” Allsopp said the area is well below the normal average, about 14 to 15 inches of snow, and despite a possible dusting predicted for Jan. 24 and 25,

chances for a big snow are minimal. “All season, we have just missed large snowfalls like they’ve seen in Madison (Wis.) and downstate,” said Allsopp.“The overall weather pattern has seen a Pacific flow, from West to East, keeping a wind pattern that has been milder to the area and to the central U.S. We have not seen a persistent pattern of cold air as they have in Alaska, and the real cold that other parts of the world like Asia are experiencing.” But the lack of snow has an upswing, right? Most would think so, said Dan Bromberek, Romeoville PublicWorks Engineer, but not necessarily true. Bromberek said while the village may save on overtime costs for plowing, it’s not much because the lack of snow which usually insulates the ground leaves room for more water main breaks. “So, it basically becomes a wash,” said Bromberek. In addition,most villages buy salt through the state procurement program that doesn’t allow for a return, thus just adding this year’s salt to a growing stockpile. The village buys salt based on a 10-year average, better to be prepared than without, Bromberek said, leaving little cost savings for a year with little snow. And for the Valley View School District, the lack of snow is presenting some interesting dynamics, said Michael M. Lopez, Director of Facility Operations. “On the one hand, we are

saving on snow plowing for the district in terms of budget- at least for now,” said Lopez. “However, we have a large surplus of salt, both in storage and with our state contract procurement. If we continue to experience a mild winter, we will need to look at options to store any salt we don’t use. It’s not unusual for us to store extra salt after winter, but this year’s amount may be fairly large, and storage space may be limited. And the lack of moisture regionally can have negative effects on the turf and landscaping come spring. All in all, the weather has been a mixed blessing for us.” But winter is only half over, and Bolingbrook Public Works Director Mike Drey said you can never tell what may happen. “I do not want to speculate any savings until the season is over,” said Drey. “But in general, savings will be (on) overtime and salt if winter stays away.And less winter does less road damage.” The park district has been taking advantage of a snowless season, completing tasks that normally could not be accomplished with snow on the ground such as pruning shrubs, clearing of woody weeds in their natural areas and fence repair, said Dan Leahy, marketing and communications manager. And for those who are happy not to shovel the snow, Bolingbrook resident Judie Nash has a message: “Every day without snow, is a day closer to spring.”


News THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

ILLIANA

Statement on July 31 and Aug. 1.

Continued from page 1

Although corridor officials noted that public opinion favored Corridor B3, it was far from unanimous. Much of the land in the path belongs to farmers who now must be concerned if and how their acreage will be divided by the road. Also in the path are several dozen homes in Wilmington and in Beecher. State officials say they will work with all landowners to make the process as easy for them as possible. One major concern throughout the process has been the use of “quick take” to acquire the land necessary for the Illiana. Officials from both states said they will not make any official offers to buy land for the interstate until they have the money to do so. They don’t expect to be making any of those offers until the second phase is complete, sometime in 2014. But if landowners in the path are interested in selling before that time, he said, they will listen. But the states must show a need for the property before the land acquisition process can begin, officials said. Once they have determined a need, the state will get an independent appraisal of the property and then make an offer to the property owner based on that appraisal. If the property owner declines the state’s offer, the matter will be decided by a judge and jury. How long that process takes is up to the court’s schedule.

environmental clearance process using the latest federal highway authorization bill, also known as Map-21. Both states have accelerated the work to gain this approval to expedite economic development and job creation. This process also enables prompt decision making to inform potentially affected stakeholders more quickly. “This decision represents an important step forward for the Illiana Corridor, which is a priority for my administration,” said Gov. Pat Quinn. “The Illiana will create a new, much needed east-west link at the Crossroads of America, improving travel and commerce across the region. Building this expressway will create thousands of new jobs and pave the way for more long-term economic development in Illinois.”

Roads mean jobs “Roads mean jobs,and the Illiana Expressway will boost economic growth in northwest Indiana and across our state,” said Indiana Governor Mike Pence. “We are pleased that Indiana has been able to partner with Illinois to take this significant step forward.” Supporters say the expressway will reduce the strain of truck traffic on local roads, improving safety, cutting commuting times, reducing congestion, and improving accessibility to jobs. Environmentally, it will help by reducing the number of travel hours and fuel wasted due to cars and trucks caught in congestion. IDOT and INDOT estimate the project will create or retain more than 9,000 construction jobs immediately, and more than 25,000 long-term jobs. “This is a significant milestone in the development of the Illiana Corridor,” said Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider. “The selection of Corridor B3 could not have been made without the input from residents, communities, local officials, agencies, and other stakeholders who greatly assisted IDOT and INDOT every step of the way.” The Corridor B3 recommendation reflects comments and input received after the release of the Tier One Draft Environmental Impact Statement on July 13, 2012, and throughout the study. Formal comments also were received in response to the public hearings held for the Tier One Draft Environmental Impact

Farmers concerned

Federal approval As a result of Tier One studies, IDOT and INDOT have secured federalapprovalforanapproximate 2,000-foot-wide planning corridor. Tier Two studies can now begin to identify a refined alignment and preferred 400-foot right-of-way for the Illiana project. Tier Two also will shift the focus from the original broad 952 square-mile study area to the communities, landowners and access needs along the preferred corridor. Some of the engineering work will include interchange locations and layout, drainage studies, and determining overpass or underpass opportunities. During this process, corridor officials say stakeholder outreach will again be a top priority with careful consideration of community needs, including farm operations, emergency services, school routes and local land use planning.Tier Two may take 12 to 24 months to complete. Further information regarding the study can be found at www. Illianacorridor.org.

27


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013


2

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

SNOW NO Continued from page 1 Hoping to hit the snow hill or partake in the average winter activities, some are officially bummed about the lack of snow like Romeoville resident and mom Erika Teo. “I actually had bought new sleds in November with the hope of snow,” Teo said. “I also left my outside (Christmas) lights out and lit longer than usual with the hope of snow— I love the sparkle. Oh yeah, and let’s not forget the taste of hot chocolate after coming in from building a snowman. Making me sad now just thinking about it.” The lack of snow also is a concern for the Forest Preserve District’s various plants, said Glen Buckner, the district’s wildlife ecologist. “Most of the native plants and animals in the area have adapted to heavy winter snowfalls,”he said. “Those adaptations vary greatly, but any time you throw changes into these complex systems, you are likely creating impacts to the native species.” Snow melt also is preferable than hard rains because the former provides a sustained trickle effect, he said, so that more water is absorbed into soils for use by overwintering plants, as opposed to creating erosion or running off into ditches. Snow also protects the dormant plants, animals and soils from

extreme temperatures, Buckner added. As they were all last year, farmers still are concerned about the lack of moisture. Mark Schneidewind, Will County Farm Bureau manager, said this area was nowhere near as bad as other areas in the state. “Basically, we used up all of the soil moisture from last year as it was needed,” he said.“The current soil profile needs moisture to be added, and while it is difficult to make up being 10 inches of rainfall behind what we normally get, what most farmers are hoping for is normal winter moisture for February and March. Then we won’t fall any further behind, and then we need good spring rains in that 3-4 inch category over the month of April.” The other concern for farmers, Schneidewind said, is the slowing of barge traffic up and down the river, or not being able to have barges totally full due to low river levels. And then, of course, low water levels in private wells are a problem, too, he said. Jan. 14 marked the end of the first half of meteorological winter, according to the National Weather Service, and for the second year in a row, the first half of winter has started out abnormally warm with much below-average snowfall. Without any meaningful cold or snow so far this winter, it’s not just unusual, but record-breaking. The first day of the 2012-13 winter with a sub-freezing high was Jan. 1, which ties the record for the

News latest first sub-freezing high on record in Chicago. The Chicago area also set a new record for the most number of consecutive days without a sub-freezing high temperature at 310 days, though that streak ended Dec. 31. The NWS reports that by looking at the number of consecutive days without a snow depth measured of at least 1 inch, can tell the story of just how unusual it is for Chicago to go this long without the ground being covered.Through Jan. 17, it has been 326 days since Chicago has officially had an inch of snow on the ground, making this the longest stretch of its kind on record in Chicago. The previous streak of 313 days without an inch of snow was set in 1940. JimAllsopp,meteorologist at the Romeoville NWS office, confirms that such a mild winter can lead to drought-like conditions come spring. “Last year, we had a drought in the summer; water levels are already low in Lake Michigan and the lack of snowfall isn’t helping,” said Allsopp. “We need some precipitation. And actually, snow is a bit better for the ground. Snow soaks into the ground, melting at a slower rate than say a rainfall that can run off. We don’t realize it that much in the winter, but we need the snow to replenish for the summer.” Allsopp said the area is well below the normal average, about 14 to 15 inches of snow, and despite a possible dusting predicted for Jan. 24 and 25,

chances for a big snow are minimal. “All season, we have just missed large snowfalls like they’ve seen in Madison (Wis.) and downstate,” said Allsopp.“The overall weather pattern has seen a Pacific flow, from West to East, keeping a wind pattern that has been milder to the area and to the central U.S. We have not seen a persistent pattern of cold air as they have in Alaska, and the real cold that other parts of the world like Asia are experiencing.” But the lack of snow has an upswing, right? Most would think so, said Dan Bromberek, Romeoville PublicWorks Engineer, but not necessarily true. Bromberek said while the village may save on overtime costs for plowing, it’s not much because the lack of snow which usually insulates the ground leaves room for more water main breaks. “So, it basically becomes a wash,” said Bromberek. In addition,most villages buy salt through the state procurement program that doesn’t allow for a return, thus just adding this year’s salt to a growing stockpile. The village buys salt based on a 10-year average, better to be prepared than without, Bromberek said, leaving little cost savings for a year with little snow. And for the Valley View School District, the lack of snow is presenting some interesting dynamics, said Michael M. Lopez, Director of Facility Operations. “On the one hand, we are

saving on snow plowing for the district in terms of budget- at least for now,” said Lopez. “However, we have a large surplus of salt, both in storage and with our state contract procurement. If we continue to experience a mild winter, we will need to look at options to store any salt we don’t use. It’s not unusual for us to store extra salt after winter, but this year’s amount may be fairly large, and storage space may be limited. And the lack of moisture regionally can have negative effects on the turf and landscaping come spring. All in all, the weather has been a mixed blessing for us.” But winter is only half over, and Bolingbrook Public Works Director Mike Drey said you can never tell what may happen. “I do not want to speculate any savings until the season is over,” said Drey. “But in general, savings will be (on) overtime and salt if winter stays away.And less winter does less road damage.” The park district has been taking advantage of a snowless season, completing tasks that normally could not be accomplished with snow on the ground such as pruning shrubs, clearing of woody weeds in their natural areas and fence repair, said Dan Leahy, marketing and communications manager. And for those who are happy not to shovel the snow, Bolingbrook resident Judie Nash has a message: “Every day without snow, is a day closer to spring.”


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Will Co. Board celebrates life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Encourages residents to participate in a day of service The Will County Board paid tribute Jan. 17 to the life of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and remembered the vital role he played in American history. King would have turned 84 years old on Jan. 15. “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a modern American hero whose leadership encouraged people of all races to rise up against injustice,” said Speaker Herbert Brooks, Jr. “Together, we should continue to follow his dream and advice ‘to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.’” King is largely credited with helping to create the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. From 1957 to 1968, he traveled 6 million miles, gave 2500 speeches, and wrote five books and dozens of articles. He is famously known for his

1963 speech, “I Have a Dream,” delivered in front of the Lincoln Memorial. “Dr. King’s dream was and still is a call to all Americans to change their hearts by refusing to judge people by their skin color, national origin, race or religion,” said board member Denise Winfrey (D-Joliet). “Because he made a commitment to peacefully fight for the basic principle that all men and women are created equal, laws were changed and a world of opportunity was formed for millions of Americans.” The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in 1964. In 1983, 15 years after his assassination, President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation making the third Monday of every January a public holiday to celebrate King and what he stood for during his life. “By helping to ensure all men and women were treated equally in the eyes of the law and by their fellow citizens, Dr. King ended

up paying the ultimate price for his courage,” said board member Ken Harris (D-Bolingbrook). “We are forever grateful for his life and sacrifice.” President Obama called for a National Day of Service on Saturday, Jan. 19, to coincide with Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service on Monday, Jan. 21, that honors the legacy and spirit of the Civil Rights leader. Locally, the University of St. Francis and Community Services Council of Will County co-sponsored the MLK Day of Service on Monday. Speaker Brooks will address students as well as members of the community before they do service work for United Way agencies. “To better our communities, I encourage all Will County residents to not take a day off, but instead, take a day on by volunteering for one of the many not-for-profit organizations in our county,” Brooks said.

3

Farm Bureau Foundation Silent Auction set for Jan. 26 The Will County Farm Bureau Foundation will host its annual silent auction at the Will County Farm Bureau’s annual meeting Saturday, Jan. 26. The foundation has received more than 170 silent auction donations/live auction donations, and approximately 20 people and/or businesses have given a cash donation to the auction for the 2013 scholarship fund. Items that will be auctioned off at a live auction this year following the business meeting will include: • Twelve units of Northrup King Roundup Ready soybean seed treated with Cruiser • Four scouts seats at a Chicago White Sox game during the

2013 season • Oak wooden bench/hall tree • September weekend series tickets at Joliet Speedway •Six units of Artesian Golden Harvest drought tolerant seed corn The silent auction will begin at 5:30 p.m. and end at approximately 10 p.m. The live auction will begin at approximately 8:30 p.m. (directly following the business meeting). An afghan raffle will also be held and that name will be drawn at 9:45 p.m. Tickets for the dinner program are $17.50 per person. Reservations are required; call 815-727-4811 to reserve a seat. No tickets will be sold at the door.


4

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Cat workers win settlement from Local 851 Two Caterpillar workers have won a federal settlement from a local Machinist union after union brass illegally charged them full union dues and attempted to punish them for working during a highlypublicized strike against the company even though the workers were not union members. The settlement stems from a federal unfair labor practice charge Daniel Eggleston and Steven Olsen filed with the National Labor Relations Board regional office in Chicago with free legal assistance from National Right to Work Foundation staff attorneys against the International Association of Machinists union and its local District Lodge 851 affiliate. Eggleston and Olsen have refrained from union membership in the IAM union for years and are thus exempted from the union hierarchy’s constitution and bylaws. On May 1, Machinists Local 851 union bosses ordered all of the more than 800 Rockdale Caterpillar workers on strike. Eggleston and Olsen, along with over a hundred other workers, continued to work despite IAM union boss demands. In response, IAM Local 851 union bosses demanded that Eggleston and Olsen, and

scores of other workers, appear before a union tribunal to be disciplined for refusing to leave their jobs during the strike. However, under federal law, workers who are not union members cannot be disciplined for continuing to work during a union boss-ordered strike. Moreover, despite the fact that Eggleston and Olsen exercised their right under Foundation-won U.S. Supreme Court precedent upheld in Communication Workers v. Beck not to pay full union dues, Local 851 union officials continued to extract full dues from their paychecks and then forced them to jump through hoops to get back the money the union illegally took. Because Illinois does not have a Right to Work law, workers who refrain from union membership can be forced to pay part of union dues and fees. However, the court held in Beck that workers who refrain from union membership cannot be forced to pay for union activities unrelated to workplace bargaining, such as politics and ideological causes. The union hierarchy was forced to settle Eggleston and Olsen’s charge. The union officials dropped their attempts to punish

the two workers for continuing to work during the strike and agreed to refund the amount of union dues illegally taken from the workers’ paychecks. Foundation attorneys anticipate that charges will be filed for other Caterpillar workers at the facility in the coming weeks. Some other workers who contacted the Foundation for free legal aid were fined more than $30,000 by the union. “Militant IAM union bosses are trying to intimidate over a hundred Caterpillar workers who had the temerity to not toe the union line and instead provide for their families,” said Mark Mix, president of National Right to Work. “This case underscores the need for an Illinois Right to Work law making union affiliation and dues payments completely voluntary.” The National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation is a nonprofit, charitable organization providing free legal aid to employees whose human or civil rights have been violated by compulsory unionism abuses. The Foundation, which can be contacted toll-free at 800-3363600, is assisting thousands of employees in nearly 200 cases nationwide. Its web address is www.nrtw.org.

Immigration center plan draws flak By Stewart Warren For the Bugle

There are better ways to spend the money that might be spent to build a prison for illegal immigrants, an activist told the Joliet City Council at the Jan. 14 pre-council meeting. It could be used to provide more medical care for needy children or to fund schools, said Dama Calderon, 34, who is working with the Immigrant Coalition for Refugee Rights, a Chicago-based group opposing the privately run immigration detention center that some people fear might be built in Joliet. It’s a topic that has yet to be addressed at length, in depth or publicly by city officials. In late 2012,Joliet City Manager Tom Thanas began discussing the possibility of building an immigration detention center in Joliet with representatives from Corrections Corporation of America. The proposed facility would be run privately and would be able to house as many as 700 people waiting to be deported to their home countries. The facility first had been proposed for Crete, but residents fought and blocked the construction. After the news leaked that the prison might come to Joliet, some members of the local Hispanic community began fighting the possibility. They began meeting at Sacred Heart Church, 337 S. Ottawa St., Joliet, and signs proclaiming “No Immigrant Prison” began popping up in front yards around the city. Calderon was accompanied by a small group of supporters at the Joliet City Council’s precouncil meeting, and they had propped some of the yard signs in nearby chairs. After Calderon spoke briefly -- she apparently is not allowed to address the hot topic during the regular city council meetings held on Tuesdays and broadcast on cable television -- Thanas addressed her comments. Sounding slightly dismissive, he noted there was See IMMIGRATION, page 5


THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Saturday’s Taste of Joliet IMMIGRATION musical line-up unveiled Continued from page 4

The Joliet Park District announced a full day of country stars for the 2013 Taste of Joliet. Saturday’s lineup includes Hunter Hayes, Easton Corbin and Maggie Rose. A fourth act will be announced in mid-March. Hayes is coming off a huge 2012. His single “Wanted” reached No. 1 and just reached double platinum status. Hayes was named CMA New Artist of the Year, and won ACAs for Single of the Year and Video of the Year. He is currently nominated for three Grammy’s and on a nationwide tour with Carrie Underwood. Corbin has two No. 1 singles under his belt as well as “A Little More Country Than That” (2009) and “Roll With It” (2010); both reached the top spot on country charts. His current album “All Over the Road” reached No. 2. He won three ACAs in 2010: Breakthrough Artist of the Year, Single of the Year, and Video of

the Year. Rose is an up-and-coming country talent. Her current single “I Ain’t Your Momma”reached #38 on the country charts. General Admission tickets ($10) include admission to the festival and access to performances. Front section reserved tickets ($35) include admission to the festival and access to a reserved section directly in front of the stage for all performances. Children (under 12 with an adult 18 or over) are free all weekend. Seniors (62+) are $5 per day. The 2013 Taste of Joliet will be held June 28 to 30 at ATI Field at Joliet Memorial Stadium. The festival includes 25 food vendors, a carnival and a kids zone. Tickets and information are available at www.tasteofjoliet. com. The Taste of Joliet title sponsor is D’Arcy Motors and the Entertainment sponsor is Hollywood Casino.

Crest Hill man named WCBA’s member of month

 The Will County Business Networking Association has selected Eric Essex, Agent for New York Life Insurance Company, as its Member of the Month.

 Essex, of Crest Hill, has been a licensed agent since 1997. He is committed to providing individuals, families, and

businesses with life insurance and financial products and services that meet their needs. He is also Ambassador Chairman and Secretary of the Crest Hill Area Chamber of Commerce and Treasurer of the Chicago Southland NAIFA.

 For more information, call Eric direct at 630-391-8766. 



“a lot of energy” being spent on fighting the possibility of a prison.

The city is not roaming the streets searching for illegals, Thanas noted. “The police department will not go out and look for undocumented aliens to begin deportation,” he added. Joliet police issue traffic tickets only

5

when drivers violate motor vehicle laws, he said. After the meeting, Calderon’s companions gathered the signs. “We don’t want the prison to come here,” she said. “It will pull many families apart.”


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Joliet Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Police Blotter

19 10 11 20

Joliet 13

Joshua F. Miner, 24, 650 W. Jefferson, Joliet, was arrested at 3:55 p.m. Jan. 11 at 150 W. Washington for murder in the first degree.

1

Adam M. Landerman, 19, 1053 Glenwood, Joliet, was arrested at 3:55 p.m. Jan. 11 at 150 W. Washington for murder in the first degree.

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30 28 29

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Shakyra M. Robinson, 22, 529 Nathan Road, University Park, was arrested at 3:53 p.m. Jan. 12 at 3340 Mall Loop for retail theft and battery.

Joseph M. Lucas, 31, 1516 Timberline Drive, Joliet, was arrested at 9:03 a.m. Jan. 11 at the residence for possession of controlled substance with intent to deliver, possession of controlled substance and possession of drug equipment.

Anissa R. Haymon, 19, 220 N. Hickory, Joliet, was arrested at 3:53 p.m. Jan. 12 at 3340 Mall Loop for retail theft.

6

Salvador Tierrablanca, 37, 213 N. Eastern, Joliet, was arrested at 11:22 p.m. Jan. 11 on W. Jefferson and Ottawa for aggravated DUI and blood alcohol content over .08.

7

Dominique D. Travis, 19, 1310 Gilray Drive, Joliet, was arrested at 11:57 p.m. Jan. 11 at 19 Morris for fleeing/ attempting to elude a police officer.

8

Tevon T. Ellis, 22, 100 Girard, Joliet, was arrested at 11:57 Jan. 11 at 19 Morris for resisting/obstructing a police officer.

9

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Sergio Pinedo, 40, 2039 Kentland Drive, Romeoville, was arrested at 9:39 p.m. Jan. 12 in the 100 block of Ingalls for aggravated DUI and blood alcohol content over .08.

12

Joseph E. Nixon, 55, 1225 Arthur Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 9:49 p.m. Jan. 12 at the residence for domestic battery.

13

Calvin S. Hambrick, 21, 4 Morris, Joliet, was arrested at 12:24 a.m. Jan. 12 at 1205 Mayfield for criminal damage to property.

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S. Gould, 20, 15 Alexander 24635 W. Manor Drive, Shorewood, was arrested at 12:24 a.m. Jan. 12 at 1205 Mayfield for criminal damage to property and battery.

16

Byron T. Davis, 28, 2305 W. Jefferson, Joliet, was

arrested at 11:05 p.m. Jan. 12 at the residence for possession of cannabis. Andrea L. Cook, 20, 310 Walnut, Joliet, was arrested at 9:12 a.m. Jan. 13 at 2134 W. Jefferson for disorderly conduct.

17

L. Truesdale, 39, 901 18 Joy Maple, Evanston, was arrested at 10:23 a.m. at 611 E. Cass for false fire alarm. Ricky R. Hawkins Sr., 45, 3002 Indian Springs Court, Joliet, was arrested at 1:19 p.m. Jan. 13 at the residence for endangering the life or health of a child.

19

Frederickson, 21, 20 Michelle 2429 Pecan, Joliet, was arrested at 2:54 p.m. Jan. 13 at 3340 Mall Loop for retail theft. Ryan A. Hilger, 18, 2347 White Birch Lane, Joliet, was arrested at 3:30 p.m. Jan. 13 at 2424 W. Jefferson for theft.

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Timothy C. Coffman, 23, 810 Vine, Lockport, was arrested at 1:24 p.m. Jan. 14 at 2424 W. Jefferson for retail theft.

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L. Contreras, 23 Vanessa 26, 210 Ross, Joliet, was arrested at 2:05 a.m. Jan. 15 on

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Bethany L. McKee, 18, 200 Wetshore Drive, Shorewood, was arrested at 3:55 p.m. Jan. 11 at 150 W. Washington for murder in the first degree.

Luis A. Calderon, 21, 501 Landau, Joliet, was arrested at 11:30 a.m. Jan. 11 the residence for domestic battery.

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Alisa R. Massaro, 18, 1121 N. Hickory, Joliet, was arrested at 3:55 p.m. Jan. 11 at 150 W. Washington for murder in the first degree.

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Hickory and Moran for criminal trespass to real property. Martin, 50, 24 Stephanie 22 E. Clinton, Joliet, was arrested at 1:28 a.m. Jan. 15 at the residence for obstructing a police officer.

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Zeeshan N.Rashid,19,1901 N. Lewis Ave., Waukegan, was arrested at 4 p.m. Jan. 15 on Hickory and Western for obstructing identification.

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Christopher M. Blankenship, 32, 601 Miami, Joliet, was arrested at 3:35 a.m. Jan. 15 at 2424 W. Jefferson for retail theft. Demetrius Clerk, 49, 350 E. Washington, Joliet, was arrested at 3:54 a.m. Jan. 15 at 508 E. Cass for criminal trespass to real property.

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Artrell D. Scroggins, 21, 501 E. Suttenfield, Fort Wayne, Ind., was arrested at 8:17 p.m. Jan. 16 on Springfield and Glenwood for aggravated unlawful use of a weapon and possession of ammo without a FOID card.

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Deitrick T. Ervin, 20, 2501 Lillie St., Fort Wayne, Ind., was arrested at 8:17 p.m. Jan. 16 on Springfield and Glenwood

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for obstructing a police officer. Ronald Ward, 36, 715 Second Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 8:17 p.m. Jan. 16 on Springfield and Glenwood for possession of cannabis, unlawful use of a weapon by a felon and parole violation.

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Timothy E. Moffett, 37, 2432 Walsh Way, Joliet, was arrested at 8:18 p.m. Jan. 16 on West Acres and Border for armed habitual offender, unlawful use of a weapon by a felon, possession of ammo by a felon, possession of a stolen firearm, defacing the identification mark of a firearm, aggravated fleeing/eluding, obstructing a police officer.

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Terion D. Steward, 19, 460 Water, Joliet, was arrested at 7 p.m. Jan. 16 at 210 N. Eastern for aggravated unlawful use of a weapon and aggravated discharge of a firearm.

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Jonathan Cobos, 18, 215 E. Oak St., Addison, was arrested at 7:30 a.m. Jan. 16 at 7016 Lewis Clark Drive for child pornography.

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Charlene L. Garner, 31, 819 Black Road, Joliet, was arrested at 3:30 p.m.Jan.16 at 1125 Oregon for domestic battery.

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ForuM Editorial

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

7

Wreaths Across America: Let’s do this for our veterans The Christmas trees are stripped and taken down, the outside lights are back in the attic (except for that guy down the block) and the extra pounds gained during the holiday parties hang from us like so much stale fruitcake. So now is a great time to think about … next Christmas. We ran a story in December about a program called “Wreaths Across America.” It’s a national program where supporters try their best to make sure every veteran buried at national and state cemeteries are decorated with a fresh, green wreath with a red ribbon at Christmastime. That includes the men

and women who sacrificed their lives who are buried at Abraham Lincoln Cemetery in Elwood. Several years ago, Debbie Smothers, co-founder of Operation Care Package, was excited to get involved with the program. She and others had been supporting men and women in the service overseas by sending them care packages each month; more on holidays. She knows how difficult it can be to rally support for a cause, even one as noble as remembering those who protect our freedom. But even she was surprised the first time she attended the Wreaths Across

Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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America program at Abraham Lincoln Cemetery several years ago. She expected a massive turnout, more like you would see there on Memorial Day.What she found was about 30 people with 40 wreaths, only some 30,000 short of the goal of having one for every veteran’s grave. So Smothers decided she would be the local organizer for Wreaths Across America. Last year, she and other supporters were able to collect enough for 4,700 wreaths, still far short, but in the right direction. Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, ROTC members helped place them properly on the graves, ribbons up. And they were out there

even though it was pouring that day … buckets.They knew it was a small price to pay considering the price the people under them paid. Speaking of small price, the cost of these wreaths is 15 bucks each. You donate the money, Debbie orders the wreaths, and you can even tell her who it’s for and where you would like it placed. Or you can go to the ceremony in December and place it yourself. Or you can sponsor wreath for someone you don’t even know who gave their life for you. And you don’t have to wait until November. You can put in your order(s) now. You can

Illustrated Opinion

keep adding on throughout the year. If you are a member of a community service organization, think about making this one of your projects for the year … and next. I told Debbie I would help her double the number of wreaths this year, and keep doubling it until each grave has a wreath. You can make checks out to Wreaths Across America and mail to: OCP Wreath Project, 611 Wilcox St., Joliet, Il. 60435. If you have any questions, you can email Debbie at ProudArmySis4@ sbcglobal.net. Nick Reiher Managing Editor


8

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Schools

JTHS Foundation to Major corporation highlights JTHS technology in case study host Trivia Challenge International technology corporation, CDW, recently made Joliet Township High School the subject of an in depth case study highlighting the district’s data convergence project.   The project was necessary to support the JTHS one-to-one computing program, which provided freshmen students with laptop computers this year.   JTHS will continue to expand laptop distribution and by the 2014-15 School Year the district will provide all students with a computing device. “I would like to commend our technology staff,” said JTHS Supt. Cheryl McCarthy.  “CDW has selected JTHS as a school district of choice for leading the way in technological advancement and support. The case study is truly a testament to

Submitted photo

Members of Joliet Township High School and incoming freshment students recently participated in a in-depth case study highlighting the district’s data convergence program.

the leadership and dedication put forth by the staff.They are a team that is focused upon what is best for our students and staff, and they work tirelessly to make our district’s mission a reality.”

The JTHS CDW Case Study is now available online: h t t p : / / w e b o b j e c t s . c d w. com/webobjects/media/pdf/ Solutions/Data-Center/JolietTownship-CS.pdf

The Joliet Township High School Foundation will host its eighth annual Trivia Challenge at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 10, at 176 West, Joliet. This event is one of three major fundraisers for the Joliet Township High School Foundation. This year’s trivia theme will be “Slogans and Logos and Ads, Oh My!” Tables for the event are $120 and seat up to eight to10. Answers are decided by the table as a whole vs. individually, so it’s a group project. Cash

awards are given for 1st and 2nd place high scores. A cash award is given to the table with the best decorations and/or costumes. Additionally, during the venue, a Chinese auction raffle and Splitthe-Pot events are held. Light snacks that match your table theme are permitted, but other outside food and beverages are not allowed since the hall will have great food and drinks for sale. For more information, call Don Barnes at 815-254-4578.

St. Joseph Academy to host Catholic Schools Week events St. Joseph Academy invites the community to attend an open house from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, at the school, 51 W. Jackson St., Joliet. The event will kick off Catholic Schools Week, celebrating the tradition of faith-based education. St. Joseph Academy, which opened in the fall of 2010, educates children from preschool through eighth grade. Elementary students attend Mass every morning at nearby St. Joseph Church and study religion through traditional religion classes. The preschool-kindergarten students are introduced to their faith through the Montessori-based Catechesis of the Good Shepherd. Although St. Joseph Academy is a private independent school in the Catholic tradition, students of all faiths are welcome. The preschool-kindergarten program is under the direction of a Montessori-trained teacher. Children from 3 to 6 are educated at their own pace,working through practical life and sensorial materials

to introductory studies of math, reading, geography and science. Emphasis is on understanding and following directions and learning to respect ourselves, our friends, adults and the environment. The elementary program utilizes a blend of traditional and innovative methods, following the Montessori practice of multi-age groupings and personalized instruction.Their studies are based on the Common Core State Standards and include opportunities to pursue studies in the fine arts. St. Joseph Academy also takes advantage of proximity to the Joliet Public Library, the JolietArea Historical Museum, the Rialto Theatre, Billie Limacher Bicentennial Park and other nearby venues to enhance the students’ education. Anyone unable to attend the open house is welcome to call the school and schedule a private tour or have information mailed. Call Jan Novotny, head of school, or Cheryl Wilson, director of admissions, at 815-723-4567.

Boy Scouts Troop 5 to host Feb. 10 pancake breakfast Boy Scouts Troop 5 from Joliet will sponsor a pancake breakfast from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10, at Stone City VFW Post #2199, 124 Stone City Drive, Joliet (just south of Laraway Road and West of Route 53). Tickets are $6 for adults; $5 for children and seniors at the

door. The menu will consist of pancakes, eggs, sausage, biscuits, orange juice, coffee and milk. Gravy is available at an extra fee. Carry-outs are available. There will be a large bakery sale going on at the same time to benefit the various programs of Boy Scout Troop #5.


Calendar JANUARY 17

JANUARY 18

Annual Prayer Breakfast. 9:30 a.m. at the Homer Congregational Church, 14832 W. 163rd St. in Homer Glen. The Lockport Woman’s Club will hold its annual Prayer Breakfast at the Homer Congregational Church. A business meeting and catered breakfast will begin at 9:30 a.m., followed by a program “My Joyful Heart” by Diane Carroll. For information about this program or LWC, please contact Donna at 815-280-5499, Pat at 815-7224003, or Toni at 815-838-9488.

Family Services & Dairy Potlucks. Joliet Jewish Congregation’s monthly Potluck will take place on Friday, January 18th and Friday, February 15th at 6:00PM, with services following at 7:00PM. Please call the office with your RSVP and what dish you plan to bring. We always have a great time and the children enjoy taking part in services with Rabbi Rubovits; 815-741-4600.

Gardener’s Fireside Chat. 6 to 7 p.m. in the Inwood Athletic Club’s Board Room. It may be cold outside, but for gardeners, thoughts turn to the upcoming growing season. Gather your seed catalogs and join Nancy Kuhajda, University of Illinois Master Gardener for an informal talk on what gardening 2013 has in store! For more information, call 815-741-7275. Curious Little Monkeys Play Group. 10:15 to 11 a.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (Birth -36 months) This parent-child play experience combines elements of our traditional Lapsit with an additional 1/2 hour of themerelated free play experiences. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-7402662.

Northern Illinois AlAnon Family Group Open Meeting. 8 p.m. at Hope Lutheran Church, 305 E. Black Road, Shorewood. Speaker: Pat M. of Coal City. Refreshments and fellowship. Please join us. For more information, call 815773-9623. Computer Basics Class. 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. Learn about the parts of a computer, attaching devices (jump drives, etc) to a computer, basic operations in Microsoft Word, saving information and proper shut down of a computer. For more information, call 815-7402660 or visit www.jolietlibrary. org.

JANUARY 19

Toddler Time. 9:45 a.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (18 months - 3 years) Stories, songs, and simple crafts. Caregivers must attend with child. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-740-2662.

Preschool Fair: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Black Road Branch, 3395 Black Road, Joliet. A free community event where parents and families will have the opportunity to learn about preschool programs and services in the Joliet area. Sponsored by the Joliet Area Assocation for the Education of Young Children. For more information, call 815-7402660 or visit www.jolietlibrary. org.

eBook Drop In Training. 2:to 5 p.m., Black Road Branch, 3395 Black Road, Joliet. Learn on how to checkout, download and transfer free eBooks to a portable eReader. Demonstrations will be conducted on a Nook but the process is similar for all eReader devices. 815-846-6500 or www. jolietlibrary.org. 

Celebrate National Blood Donor Month. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bill Jacobs Chevrolet, 2001 W. Jefferson St. In celebration of January National Blood Donor Month, Heartland Blood Centers, an independent not-for-profit blood center serving 47 hospitals in a 12-county region in Illinois and Indiana, invites all healthy

members of the community to share their good health through blood donation. To be a blood donor, individuals must be at least 17 years old, or 16 with written parental permission; weigh at least 110 pounds; be symptom free of cold, flu and allergies; and be in general good health.Donors who have traveled outside the United States within the past 12 months should contact Heartland at 1-800-7TOGIVE to determine eligibility. Retirement Planning Today. 6 to 9:30 p.m. in Donovan Hall at University of St. Francis’s Motherhouse building, 520 Plainfield Road, Joliet. The University of St. Francis Solutions Resource Center and Alumni Relations Office are sponsoring a two-day course on retirement planning for adults.Participants of the “Retirement Planning Today” series can choose Saturdays (Jan. 19 & 26) from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. or Tuesdays (Jan. 22 & 29) from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Cost is $60, which includes one guest and all materials. Participants will learn how to create successful goals and determine amount of money needed for retirement, how to eliminate debt and increase cash flow, how to convert IRAs into a Roth IRAs, how to choose the right retirement plan, and much, much more.The course instructor will be Dave Carl, a registered representative and investment advisor representative with World Equity Group, Inc. For

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013 more information on this event or to register, call 815-7403600, visit www.stfrancis.edu/ solutions or email solutions@ stfrancis.edu. Introduction to Photoshop. 12 to 2 p.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. Limited space- sign up today! Learn the basics of Adobe Photoshop in a new once-a-month class.The class will be held the third Saturday of each month from 12pm-2pm starting on December 15th at the JPL Digital Media Studio at 150 N. Ottawa St. Registration required. For more information, call 815-740-2660 or visit www. jolietlibrary.org.

JANUARY 21 Toddler Time. 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Black Road Branch Library, 3395 Black Road, Joliet. (18 months - 3 years) 9:30,10:30 & 11:30 a.m. Stories, songs and simple crafts. Caregivers must attend with child. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-740-2662. Magic School. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. Students in third to fifth grade. Learn the secrets behind simple magic and card tricks, then put on a show for all your friends. No registration is required. 815-740-2660 or www. jolietlibrary.org

JANUARY 22 Retirement Planning Today.

9

6 to 9:30 p.m. in Donovan Hall at University of St. Francis’s Motherhouse building, 520 Plainfield Road, Joliet. The University of St. Francis Solutions Resource Center and Alumni Relations Office are sponsoring a two-day course on retirement planning for adults.Participants of the “Retirement Planning Today” series can choose Saturdays (Jan. 19 & 26) from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. or Tuesdays (Jan. 22 & 29) from 6 to 9:30 p.m. Cost is $60, which includes one guest and all materials. Participants will learn how to create successful goals and determine amount of money needed for retirement, how to eliminate debt and increase cash flow, how to convert IRAs into a Roth IRAs, how to choose the right retirement plan, and much, much more. For more information on this event or to register, call 815-740-3600, visit www.stfrancis.edu/solutions or email solutions@stfrancis.edu. Guys Read. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. Boys in third to fifth grade can hang out and talk about books and graphic novels. Enjoy pizza and soda! 815- 7402662 or www.jolietlibrary.org Spanish Storytime. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (3 5 years) Stories and crafts for preschools and their families See CALENDAR, page 21


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Will Co. emergency funds now available The Will County Center for Community Concerns now has money available through its Community Service Block Grant. Programs available include: • Emergency Water Assistance (must have a disconnection notice or be disconnected to qualify) • Emergency Rental Assistance (must be at least 30 days delinquent) • Prescription Assistance • Mortgage Assistance (must be delinquent) • Property Tax Assistance (must be delinquent) • Employment Support (must

be working 25 hours or more a week to qualify) Applicants cannot get both rent and water assistance; they must choose between the two. Applicants cannot get Property Tax Assistance and Mortgage Assistance; they must choose between the two. Call the office at 815-722-0722 or visit http://www.wcccc.net/ to see what documents are needed to apply. Applications are taken from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.Applications are taken on a walk-in basis.A limited number of applications are taken each day.

News

Rep. Walsh reminds seniors of benefits available to them With the New Year in full swing, state Rep. Larry Walsh Jr. (D-Elwood) is encouraging local area seniors to apply for the benefits that are available to them through the state. “As we continue working to rebuild our economy, it is important that senior citizens still receive vital services that they need,” Walsh said. “One of my top priorities as a representative is to ensure services that improve the health and well-being of senior citizens are protected in Springfield.” Recently, the Illinois Department on Aging announced its new Benefit Access Program, formerly Circuit Breaker Program, now provides seniors or persons with disabilities a ride free transit card and a license plate

discount. To be determined eligible for these benefits, you must submit a Benefit Access Application on the Internet. Paper applications are not available, but if you need assistance, schedule a meeting with Walsh’s constituent service office at 815-730-8600. You may file this form if you meet the following requirements: You are 65 years or older by Dec. 31 of the current year or 16 years of age or older and totally disabled at the time you file, and your income is less than: $27,610 for a one-person household or $36,635 for a two-person household. Once your application is approved you may print a note of eligibility to take to your local transit authority for the free transit card or to the

Secretary of State’s Office for your license plate discount. If you have a transit card that is good through Dec.31, 2013, you may continue to use it until it expires. Check state.il.us/ aging/ at any time to determine your application status. “Seniors deserve the dignity of aging gracefully and safely,” Walsh said. “I am interested in hearing from community members about new and innovative ways we can provide services for seniors, which is why I am a member of the Will County Senior Services Board.” For questions or concerns regarding state-related issues, please contact Walsh’s constituent service office at 815-730-8600. Walsh represents all or parts of Joliet, Channahon, Elwood, Rockdale and Crest Hill.


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across

Down

1 Yawn-inspiring 6 “Arabian Nights” birds 10 Big name in razors 14 Alpaca kin 15 Pop singer Brickell 16 Washerful 17 Word on a French postcard 18 Laura of “Jurassic Park” 19 Forever, so to speak 20 Shareholder’s bonus 23 Dir. from Memphis to Nashville 24 Something to grind 25 Throw easily 26 Phone bk. info 29 Kitchen island material 32 Spinning sound 35 “It’s a Wonderful Life” studio 36 Brief fisticuffs 37 It has lots of slots

38 Invite to one’s penthouse 41 Some necklines 42 Macaroni shape 44 “I could win on my next turn!” 45 Bk. before Job 46 Wrap for leftovers 50 __-Tiki 51 Wimple wearer 52 Window units, briefly 53 Mud bath venue 56 Laundry convenience 60 Empty room sound 62 Roll of fabric 63 Garlicky sauce 64 In __ of: replacing 65 Everyone, to Ernst 66 Stops bleeding 67 Sail support 68 Meg of “Courage Under Fire” 69 Have an inkling

1 Little shaver 2 Troublemaking chipmunk 3 Too trusting 4 Madame’s “mine” 5 Two-seated carriage 6 Jeff Foxworthy jokes about them 7 Pigged out (on) 8 Word with sewing or traffic 9 Lisbon mister 10 Actor Baldwin 11 Created a study aid in class 12 Was on the ballot 13 Program breaks 21 One in a crowd scene 22 Goes back to sea? 27 Large wedding band 28 Smidge 29 Witch craft? 30 Balderdash 31 Flat 32 Inflict, as havoc 33 Nametag greeting 34 How grapes grow

39 Remove the chain from, say 40 Doggie 43 Skid row regular 47 Crunchy snack 48 Not at all sacred 49 “Compromising Positions” author Susan 53 Gazpacho eater’s need 54 Furrier’s stock 55 Hop out of bed 57 Boorish sort 58 Jazzy Fitzgerald 59 __ High City: Denver 60 Shade source 61 “The Bourne Identity” org.

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

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H o ro s c o p e s Couch potatoes need to be buttered up. Accept an invitation or get out with the crowd. Physical exercise, whether for work or for pleasure, will make your life a bit brighter this week.

Conquer envy by concentrating on contentment. The happiest people in the world don’t necessarily have it all; they just make the best of what they have. Count your blessings in the upcoming week.

Make team work a priority. Soothe ruffled feathers and persuade others to cooperate in work-intensive enterprises. Emphasis is on friendly flirtation and smooth talking salesmanship in the week to come.

Don’t get discouraged in the week ahead if you have not reached your goals. If, for instance, you’ve gained weight, remember it took more than one day to gain it - and you’ll need more than one day to lose it.

Life doesn’t come with a remote control. You have to get up and change it yourself. It is tempting to rest on your laurels in the week ahead, but you will accomplish much more if you get up and get at it.

Call the shots. You can only build muscles by using them, so build up a business, career or store of knowledge in the week ahead. By using selfdiscipline and organizational skills, you can reach your goals.

Getting ahead in life is like riding a bicycle. To remain balanced, you have to keep moving. In the week to come, you might find that a mate or partner offers a sterling example of focused ambition.

You possess the leadership abilities to make a positive difference this week. Inspiring orator Winston Churchill said, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts.”

It is not enough to forgive others. You must learn to forgive yourself first. It is quite possible that you will be able to find permanent relief from at least one old trouble in the coming week.

Supercharge your organizational abilities. In the week ahead, your street smarts get a boost and you will have ample opportunities to show them off. Be sure to set up a tight schedule and prioritize.

If you search, the answers will be found. Get advice or information from an expert in the field for best results. Repetitive tasks may add up to large achievements in the week ahead.

You can use a yardstick to measure ambitions and success, but you can’t measure generosity or sincerity. In the week ahead, you can power up your creativity without losing sight of compassion and sympathy.

Tribune Media Services 2013

Sudoku

J umble

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • YACHT • OAKEN • LEDGER • CALIPH

Answer:

When the grouch answered the phone, it turned into a -- “CRANK” CALL


12

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Lockport, Minooka heads to state in boys bowling, page 14; Minooka girls hoops breezes past Wildcats, page 15

www.buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

13

Central gets revenge on Bolingbrook By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

In two tournaments this season, Bolingbrook faced the two Joliet Township teams in the final games of the event. The Raiders fell to Joliet West in the title game of the Tigers’ Thanksgiving tournament and defeated Joliet Central in the consolation title game at the McDipper Holiday Tournament. Bolingbrook avenged their loss to West in SouthWest Suburban Conference play and last week, Central did the same to Bolingbrook. The Steelmen got 30 points from senior Jalen Heath to key a 55-51 overtime win over Bolingbrook. “When we shoot below 50 percent from the (free throw) line and turn the ball over 20 times, we don’t deserve to win,” said Bolingbrook coach Rob Brost. “When we give up 30 to one kid, knowing he’s their best player, you don’t deserve to win and we didn’t deserve to win.” The Raiders threw different looks at Heath, including a boxand-one defense, but Central was ready. “We knew they would come out with it if I got hot,” Heath said. “We saw it in the Dipper when I was hot, so we were ready for it.” Heath said there was a bitter taste left when they last played.

“We felt that they took our hardware,” he said. “But this was a bigger win in conference.” Central was without leading scorer Jonah Cable, who missed his first of at least two games, for disciplinary reasons. Central coach Jeff Corcoran said Coble violated team rules, but did not specify. It is the second time he has missed time this season. “We talk about when Jalen and Jonah are on the floor together, they get each other going, so we were a little afraid Jalen wouldn’t be able to get going without his running mate,” Corcoran said. “But Eddie (McElrath) really got him going.” The win is indicative of the SWSC, where teams have proven that they can all beat each other. “Anything is possible in the conference and we have been trying to get to the top of it and this is a big step,” Corcoran said. “We have been talking about the effort.” It was the first time all season that Central (10-7, 5-1) has defeated a team with a winning record. “We have been preaching to the guys that they can do it,” Corcoran said. “To be 5-1 in this conference right now and be on the top with a storied program like H-F is where we want to be.” Both teams played in the MLK Day of Hoops Shootout at Joliet Central Monday. mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Eddie McElrath dribbles past a defender in Joliet Central’s 55-51 win over Bolingbrook.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Sports

Porters win sectional, Indians to state By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Lockport’s Brian Hodolitiz (left) gets ready to congratulate teammate Shane Matejcak after a strike as the Porters won the Plainfield North Sectional title Saturday.

It was a day of redemption for both Lockport and Minooka’s boys bowling teams. In recent years both teams have had the talent to go to state, but they couldn’t get out of one of the toughest sectionals in the state. On Saturday, Jan. 19 at AMF Lanes in Bolingbrook, they did. Lockport finished first with a 6,317, while Minooka was second with a 6,268 at the Plainfield North Sectional. The top two teams and top two individuals not on those teams advanced to the state meet. “It’s really special for me, I’ve been working really hard for it,” Lockport’s Shane Matejcak said. “I’m just speechless because we worked so hard as a team. When somebody gets down, we get each other’s back.” “We have a group of amazing seniors, eight seniors, who stuck with it and we became a family,” Lockport’s Brian Hodolitiz said. “We stuck together. We all came together our senior year and now that we’re here, we did it.” Lockport was consistent throughout the day, with just two games below 1,000. It made up for it with a 1,193 in the second game. Jonny Kamba led the way with a 1,318, Hodolitiz shot a 1,317, Alex Wilson had a 1,255, Matejcak recorded a 1,251 and David Wysocki added a 1,176. “The majority of it was definitely picking up spares,” Hodolitiz said. “But strikes also helped and we did a great job. We helped each other out when someone had a low game.” The Porters have been hot the past month of the year, winning the Plainfield Central Invite and the SouthWest Suburban Blue last week. “We had eight seniors this year,” Matejcak said.“If we have anybody struggling, we can put someone else in and we wouldn’t have to worry about it.” “We really came together lately,” Hodolitiz said. “We started practicing together more. We worked together and we helped each other out when we needed it.We clicked.” Now headed to state Friday, Jan. 25, Lockport hopes it can bring home a trophy back with them “We’re going to try (to win it all),” Matejcak said. “If we make top three, we’ll be happy. But if we can win it all and bring it back,

it would be that much better. We have to make good shots and pick up our spares.” For Minooka,junior Zach Segatto returns to state after placing 30th last year. He hopes the team can have the same success this year. “It’s a lot better this year, knowing our team is going,” Segatto said. “It’s going to be a lot more fun. I will know what to expect. I have to tell them it’s basically like a sectional, but a lot louder with a lot better teams and kids. It’s going to be tough. We’re looking for a top five finish.” “I think we’re strong enough as a team to have a really good showing at O’Fallon,” fellow junior John Kaufman said. “Finishing in the top three would be a good goal to have.” The Indians went into the final game in second place by 27 pins over Plainfield Central and they were able to hold off the Wildcats. “I know going into the last game we were up by 30,” Segatto said. “We just wanted to stay with them (Plainfield Central). We didn’t want to get behind them. We got ahead of them and we beat them. (The early strikes) the last game helped us relax and pumped us up. It helped us throw even more strikes.” “We all knew we needed to bowl good,” Kaufman added. “We didn’t worry about what else was going on. That’s more of the coaches’ job. Our job was to make good shots and pick up spares.” They were in fifth place after the morning segment, but rallied in the afternoon with games of 1,118, 1,047 and 1,036. “The lanes dried out and we play better on lanes when they dry out,” Segatto said.“We start off slow and then get really strong in the end.” “It seems to be our theme this year,”Kaufman said.“We seem to do a little worse in the morning then come out strong in the afternoon. We were kind of expecting to put up a good showing and everyone found their shot.” Segatto won the sectional title with a 1,411. Kaufman shot a 1,279, Justin Shepard had a 1,238 and Dylan Pickett rolled a 1,183. Joliet West placed 11th with a 5,499. Freshman Matt Pesavento led the way with a 1,223, good for 17th. Joliet Central was 13th with a 5,390 and was paced by Jason Willis’ 1,173. staylor@buglenewspapers.com


Sports

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Minooka’s Kelly Carnagio drives to the basket in the Indians’ 62-41 win over Plainfield Central.

Minooka rolls past Wildcats By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Plainfield Central kept with Minooka early, but a late first half run helped the Indians pull away in a 62-41 win Friday, Jan. 18 at Central. It was a 20-17 game in the second quarter when Minooka (815, 5-4) opened up the lead with a 9-0 run. It led 31-23 at the half. Three three-pointers in the

second half from senior Sam Wurtz helped put the game away as she finished with a game-high 18 points. with five three-pointers. “My teammates just got me the ball,” Wurtz said. “Without their passes I wouldn’t have had any of them. After the first two or three, I felt I could hit more. I was pretty surprised how open I was. After the first half I didn’t think I would be, but I was able to find holes. They doubled

down and I found the holes and my teammates got me the ball.” “Sam Wurtz obviously stepped up tonight,” Minooka coach Ray Liberatore said.“We got her a lot of open looks and she did a great job of knocking them down. I thought we did a great job of making the extra pass tonight. It worked out really nice for us. Larissa (McLemen) got the ball See ROLLS, page 17

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Sports

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Lockport’s Brian Rossi took second place at the SWSC meet Saturday in the 113-pound weight class.

SWSC meet provides challenge By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

While most sports fans would agree the real season for any sport truly begins in the post season when the stakes are higher, wrestlers in the SouthWest Suburban Conference might have an argument for you. When the two sides of the SWSC come together for the annual conference tournament, featuring all 16 teams from the Red and Blue divisions combined, the competition level is as difficult, if not more difficult than many regional or sectional tournaments. The conference has five teams ranked in the top 25 by illinoismatmen.com, and every weight class has at least one

wrestler ranked in the top eight in the state in Class 3A. While both of the SWSC champions from the Joliet area came from Joliet Central, the match of the day took place soon after the finals got started. Lockport’s Brian Rossi (35-3), ranked No. 3 in the state at 113 pounds, went up against Kris Williams (13-0) of Thornton, ranked No. 2. Williams won the title with the 9-5 win, but the match illustrated to the letter the kind of battles the SWSC features on a class-by-class level. While Rossi had the first shot at an SWSC title for the Bugle area, the first one claimed was by Joliet Central’s Trayvon Zabala at 120 pounds. Zabala (39-0) has wrestled

most of the season up a weight at 126, preparing to cut before the state run. His extra strength showed as he manhandled Jake Vales (29-9) of Sandburg to the tune of a 13-5 major decision. Zabala knows that at this point in the season, he is the only one that can truly beat him. “If I stay focused and keep my composure, no, I can’t be beat,” Zabala said. “If I get out of control, then I messed up.” What Zabala used in the SWSC meet is something he has used more this year than in the past – turning defense into offense. “Coach told me to work more on defense this year and I have really worked on it,” he See SWSC, page 17


Sports SWSC Continued from page 16 said. “This is it for me. It’s my senior year, I can’t come back so I have to leave it all out.” Before the title match, Zabala had a pair of pins, one over Matt McGowan of Lincoln-Way Central in 5 minutes, 27 seconds and one over Jesus Fernandez of Thornwood in 2:23. He then earned a 16-7 major over Cory Winchell of Joliet West to get to the final. The other champion in the area was Central’s Sharod Wilson (37-2) at 182 pounds. Wilson opened the match

ROLLS Continued from page 15 inside and she found Sam. We haven’t faced a lot of zone this year and their style is different from what we normally see.” McLemen added 16 points for the Indians as they were able to work their inside-outside game

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

17

with a forfeit win and then pinned Thornwood’s Jimani Rivers in 2:26 in the quarterfinals. In the semis, he defeated Brendan Ditchman of Lincoln-Way Central 4-3. In the title match,Wilson beat Sandburg’s 3-1. Three other locals advanced to the final round but placed second. At 126 pounds, Lockport’s Dan Radcliffe (34-8) fell in the finals to Jacob  Igartua of Bradley Bourbonnais 8-3. To get there, Radcliffe opened with a pin over Deshaun Ramey of Thornton in 3:48. He then earned a 7-2 decision over Lincoln-Way West’s Matt Ryan and a 5-2 win over Lincoln-

Way Central’s Joey Nelson. “My goal was to win the tournament, but it was a tough tournament,” Radcliffe said. “This is a tough tournament and it gives me two weeks to get ready for regionals.” Joliet West’s Jayvin Bandy also earned a second place finish in the SWSC at 132 with a 1-0 win over Kyle Rodriguez of LincolnWay West. “I wrestled him earlier in the year in a dual meet earlier in the year and it was close then too,” Bandy said. “He is good, but I think I should have had that match. Overall, this is a great tournament to get you ready for the state series. This is one of or the toughest conference

in the state.” Bandy opened the tournament with a 6-0 win over Nick Marolda of Lockport. He then advanced via injury default before beating Bradley’s Bailey Schultz in the semifinals. The third Porter to finish second in the league was Luis Montoya at 195. In the finals, Montoya was pinned by Sandburg’s Ricky Robertson, who is undefeated and pinned all four opponents in the SWSC meet. Montoya opened with a pin of Joliet Central’s Kevin Muldrow in 4:57. He then earned a 12-0 major over Bradley’s Joe Page and he beat Tyler Hill of LincolnWay North 3-2 in overtime.

Team-wise, Sandburg won the meet with 269 points, while Lincoln-Way Central was second with 230 and Lockport was third with 173. The Porters were followed by Bradley (165), Lincoln-Way West (147.5), HomewoodFlossmoor (140.5) and LincolnWay East (127). Joliet Central was eighth with 124 and West was right behind with 112. Many teams in the SWSC use next week as a week to get healthy and prepare for the state series. In two weeks, Joliet Central and Lockport will both host regionals, while Joliet West will go to Central.

after beating the press. Their biggest lead of the game was 23 points, at 57-34. “I was very pleased with how we played tonight,” Liberatore said. “For the most part I was happy with how we handled their pressure tonight.” It was a good win for the Indians, who had faced top 15-ranked teams in the Chicagoland area their prior three games.

They played Plainfield East on consecutive Tuesdays and faced JCA on a Monday. “We’ve had a tough stretch,” Liberatore stated. “In the span of a week we played Plainfield East twice and JCA. Those are two quality teams. But that’s how you get better and I think that showed up tonight. With the teams we’ve played, when you win a regional, you are

going to have to beat a good team. We’re definitely going to be battle-tested when we get there.” “It is very nice,” Wurtz said of getting the win.“We needed a win after the last few games. I think we will win more now. We need to keep handling the pressure better. It’s a good experience (to play the top teams), it keeps making us better.”

The first time they played the Bengals, they only lost by one, 50-49. However, in the meeting a week later on Jan. 15, they lost 60-32. “The big difference in the game was we played Monday against JCA,” Liberatore said. “Not to make excuses, but there wasn’t anything left in the tank. It is what it is.”

mark@buglenewspapers.com

staylor@buglenewspapers.com


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sPorts

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

BOYS Points per game Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Matt Mooney, Notre Dame Nick Norton, Downers North Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook David McCoy, Niles West Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Ryan Peter, JCA Jordan Cannon, Downers South Darrin Myers, Minooka Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central John Solari, Maine South Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South Robert Mara, Downers South Duante Stephens, Notre Dame Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Corey Evers, Plainfield South South David Robinson, Lockport Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook Carl Terrell, Joliet West Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central Joe Younan, Niles West Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Justin Halloran, Notre Dame Jimmy Moon, Romeoville

18.5 15.3 15.3 15.0 14.6 14.2 14.1 14.1 13.7 12.7 12.6 12.3 12.2 12.4 11.4 11.4 11.0 10.6 10.5 10.5 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 10.0 10.0 9.9

Jake Hogen, Minooka Danny Quinn, Maine South Marcus Fair, Plainfield North Frank Dounis, Maine South Kendal Interial, Plainfield North Brandon McCullum, Joliet West Rebounds per game Robert Mara, Downers South Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Jean Pertrzak, Westmont Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Devo Goodlow, Plainfield Central Ryan Peter, JCA Eddie Serrano, Notre Dame David McCoy, Niles West Andre Hardy, Joliet West John Solari, Maine South Josh Smith, Plainfield East David Robinson, Lockport Matt Mooney, Notre Dame Mohammad Qureshi, Niles West Corey Evak, Plainfield North Kevin Fervil, Plainfield East Andre Hardy, Joliet West Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Dave Edwards, Downers North Scott McNellis, Downers South Keith Craig, JCA Assists Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Donte Stephenson, Notre Dame

9.7 9.6 9.4 9.2 8.8 8.3 10.6 8.9 8.9 8.9 8.8 8.4 8.0 6.7 6.6 6.6 6.5 6.4 6.0 5.7 5.7 5.3 5.3 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 85 85

Kris Pierce, Westmont Caleb Demarigny, Maine South Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Christian Diaz, Romeoville Frank Dounis, Maine South Ahmad Gibson, Niles West C.J. Redmond, Bolingbrook Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Daniel LoGiuarto, Westmont Perry Jones, Minooka Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook Ryan Peter, JCA Marcus Fair, Plainfield North Shakar Washington, JCA Darrin Myers, Minooka David McCoy, Niles West Matt Mooney, Notre Dame Danny Quinn, Maine South Keegan Tyrell, JCA Daniel Dwyer, Westmont Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West Isiah Webster, Plainfield North Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jean Pietrzak, Westmont John Solari, Maine South Kendal Interial, Plainfield North Tray Simmons, Downers South Steals Donte Stephenson, Notre Dame Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Kris Pierce, Westmont Tray Simmons, Downers South Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook C.J. Redmond, Bolingbrook Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central Daniel LoGiuarto, Westmont John Campbell, Lockport Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Caleb Demarigny, Maine South Carl Terrell, Joliet West David McCoy, Niles West Christian Diaz, Romeoville Ryan Peter, JCA Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Nick Norton, Downers North Jake Hogen, Minooka Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Brandon McCullum, Joliet West Daniel Dwyer, Westmont Keegan Tyrell, JCA Field Goal %

74 68 56 52 52 50 44 43 40 40 40 39 39 38 35 35 34 32 32 30 30 29 28 28 28 28 27 27 67 51 35 30 30 30 28 28 28 26 26 26 25 23 22 22 21 21 21 21 21 20 20 20 20 19

Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Shawn Goff, Plainfield South Romeo Magliore, Niles West George Sargeant, Maine South John Solari, Maine South Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Joe Younan, Niles West Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Justin Windt, Plainfield Central Nick Norton, Downers North Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook Tim Smith, Joliet West Danny Quinn, Maine South Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Free throw % Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Mitch Young, Plainfield Central Keith Craig, JCA Jimmy Moon, Romeoville Ryan Modiest, Joliet West Rinas Barsketis, Downers North Derrick Lockhart, Lockport David Robinson, Lockport Jaylon Richardson, Romeoville Isiah Webster, Plainfield North Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South Robert Mara, Downers South Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Nick Norton, Downers North Romeo Magliore, Niles West Darrin Myers, Minooka Alex Darville, Niles West Romeo Magliore, Niles West 3-pointers Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jimmy Moon, Romeoville Joe Younan, Niles West Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South Daniel Dwyer, Westmont Jordan Cannon, Downers South Caleb Demarigny, Maine South Rashad Steele, Romeoville Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Deivis Skirgalia, Downers North Neal Tyrell, Minooka Carl Terrell, Joliet West Corey Evers, Plainfield South Andrew Palucki, Maine South Mitch Young, Plainfield Central Jake Smith, Minooka Jake Nowak, Plainfield North

.750 .640 .639 .620 .610 .594 .593 .589 .580 .571 .543 .542 .530 .530 .525 .930 .880 .800 .774 .770 .769 .760 .760 .750 .750 .742 .740 .740 .740 .740 .739 .739 .733 .728 .727 .722 37 33 30 28 22 22 22 21 19 19 18 17 17 16 14 14 14

BOYS BOWLING 1. Lockport 2. Minooka 3. Romeoville 4. Plainfield Central 5. Bolingbrook 6. Plainfield North 7. Joliet West

GIRLS BOWLING 1. Minooka 2. Lockport 3. Joliet West 4. Plainfield East 5. Plainfield North 6. Plainfield Central 7. Downers South

BOYS BASKETBALL 1. Benet 2. Notre Dame 3. Maine South 4. Bolingbrook 5. Joliet West 6. Downers South 7. Joliet Central

GIRLS BASKETBALL 1. Bolingbrook 2. Maine South 3. JCA 4. Romeoville 5. Plainfield East 6. Benet 7. Downers South

WRESTLING 1. Lockport 2. Plainfield Central 3. Minooka 4. Downers North 5. Notre Dame 6. Downers South 7. Niles West Rankings are compiled by Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.


50 www.buglenewspapers.com/basketball

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THE BUGLE JANUARY 23, 2013

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McInerney’s free throw sinks Marian By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

In police jargon, a 5150 can mean “a crazy one on the loose.” So, by that definition, the 51-50 score in Benet’s upset win over Marian Catholic Thursday was a fitting conclusion to a crazy game. The game between the two top teams in the East Suburban Catholic Conference featured several lead changes, three bloodrelated uniform changes and a random-seen play in the final seconds. After Benet and junior center Sean O’Mara controlled the first half, the Spartans tried all they could to take O’Mara out of the game in the second half and they did relatively well. However, Benet teammate Pat McInerney stepped up and tallied 11 of the Redwings’ 13 third quarter points. “We got a lead in the third quarter and then we just seesawed back and forth after that,” he said. In the fourth quarter, things got crazy for Benet. While sharpshooter Eddie Eshoo was just returning from the locker room, where he went to switch jerseys because he had blood on his, McInerney took an elbow to the face, sending him to the trainer with a bloodied nose. “The team really held their own when I came out,” he said. “We really could have lost the momentum then, but the team really did a great job holding true.” While he was still being attended to, O’Mara was sent off the floor with some of McInerney’s blood on him. “I think we have some tough kids and they just toughed through it,” said Benet coach Gene Heidkamp.“They have been through many difficult situations this year already. Our kids did a nice job keeping us in the game when they were out. This was a team win, I know three guys had most of the scoring, but the contributions of the other players really meant something. “I was really worried that we

would be without some of our main kids, but they fought hard to get back on the floor.” O’Mara would return first, then McInerney. Counting Eshoo, Benet had three players on the floor at the end of the game in numbers different that when they started. It was an Eshoo three-pointer that put Benet ahead by four points with less than a minute to play in the game. It looked to be a safe margin until Marian’s star junior guard Tyler Ulis hit a three-pointer and was fouled with 22 seconds left to play. He connected on the free throw and knotted the game at 50-50. “When he hit that and-one three, we could have folded, but we didn’t,” McInerney said. “I am really proud of our guys.” McInerney again came up big for Benet, as he took the final jumper and was fouled with 1.8 seconds left. He hit the first free throw, securing the win. “I had a one dribble pull up and I felt him behind me, so I pulled up,” he said. “I am glad he fouled be because I am not sure if it would have gone in.” O’Mara added 19 points and nine rebounds for the Redwings (16-2, 2-1 ESCC), including six in the opening stanza to get Benet going and eight straight in the fourth quarter. O’Mara said having a balanced attack offensively is something the Redwings has been able to use this season. “You have to pick your poison with us. I have been playing with him (McInerney) for three years now and he is great to play with,” O’Mara said. Despite the balanced offense, Benet still knows there are no style points when it comes to their wins. “The last two years, most of the wins have been won any way we can,” McInerney said.“But, we will take them, a win is a win. I can’t even count on one hand the number of 10 point wins we have had. We play a lot of close games.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Pat McInerney led in Benet’s 51-50 win over Marian Catholic.

PLAYER OF THE WEEK Nominees Kiera Currie, Romeoville 30 points vs. Plainfield East in win

Last week’s results Nick Norton Downers North

Abby Smith Romeoville

Faith Suggs Plainfield East

Morris Dunnigan Joliet West

Joe Younan, Niles West 24 points in loss Aysia Bugg, Bolingbrook 22 pts, 6 3-pointers vs. LWE Pat McInerney, Benet 11 third quarter pts, GW FT Go to buglenewspapers.com to vote for your winner!

83%

10%

3%

3%


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

Food

A taste of summer picnic food for midwinter In the depths of winter, it can often feel like summer and its many eating pleasures are a long way off. If you live in a colder climate than my home in Southern California, a glance out the kitchen window might reveal a picnic table covered in snow. Even here, I sometimes feel a little wistful when I see water from LA’s seasonal rainstorms pooling on our patio furniture, while our outdoor grill huddles underneath its weatherproof covering. But then, I remind myself that cooking and serving just the right recipe can have the power to change the way you see the world. If you prepare a spring or summertime favorite, it can seem as if the sun is suddenly shining in your kitchen and dining room, even when it’s cold and damp outside. It always felt that way during my childhood whenever my mother and grandmother made us fried chicken for Sunday dinner in our little cottage in the southern Austrian village of Sankt Viet. Golden-brown, crispy, juicy, and full of flavor, that simple family-style main course offered proof with every

bite that good food can brighten your spirits as wonderfully as rays of sunshine breaking through a cloudy sky. My recipe for Austrian-style fried chicken is fairly easy to prepare, especially because it starts with boneless, skinless chicken pieces you can find in supermarkets everywhere. A simple dipping processturning it first in flour, then egg, and finally in breadcrumbsproduces a coating that adheres well and cooks to a crunchy, golden-brown surface. Speaking of breadcrumbs, take note that the ingredients list gives you the option of using the Japanese breadcrumbs known as panko, which are available more and more in supermarkets today, either in the Asian foods section or where regular breadcrumbs are shelved. These are coarser and drier, yielding the extracrispy results that many people enjoy in Japanese-style fried foods. Take special care when deepfrying the chicken, using a deep, heavy pot on your stove’s back burner and a deep-frying

Tribune Media Services

Take special care when deep-frying chicken, to avoid spattering the hot oil. Or buy a good quality, electric counter-top deep-fryer.

thermometer to monitor the temperature; keep children away, and be extra cautious to avoid spattering of the hot oil. Or buy a good quality, relatively inexpensive electric countertop deep-fryer, which removes some of the guesswork with its built-in thermostat and safety features.

I hope you enjoy sharing this with your friends and family. (As with all fried chicken, any leftovers are also excellent cold for lunch the next day.) Put together a fresh green salad to serve alongside it, or maybe your favorite potato salad recipe. You might even want to set the table with

your best gingham tablecloth and napkins, to make it seem even more like you’re having a summertime picnic in the middle of winter. (c) 2013 WOLFGANG PUCK WORLDWIDE, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

VIENNESE FRIED CHICKEN WITH LEMON-ROSEMARY BUTTER SAUCE Serves 6 to 8 Vegetable oil for deep frying 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts and thighs Salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 cups all-purpose flour 3 large eggs, beaten 2 cups dry breadcrumbs or panko (Japanese-style breadcrumbs) 2 lemons, cut into wedges Lemon-Rosemary Butter Sauce (recipe follows) Pour the oil into a heavy, deep pot to a depth of at least 4 inches, or into an automatic electric countertop deep fryer. Heat the oil over high heat until

it reaches a temperature of 365 F on a deep-frying thermometer, or set the automatic deep-fryer’s thermostat to the same temperature. Meanwhile, cut the chicken into pieces about 2 inches wide and season them evenly all over with salt and pepper. Put the flour in a large, shallow bowl or soup plate, the beaten eggs in another, and the breadcrumbs or panko in a third, side by side. Place a clean platter or tray nearby. Bread the chicken pieces: First, dredge each piece in flour; then, dip it into the egg to coat evenly; and finally, roll it evenly in the breadcrumbs before putting it on the platter.

When the oil is hot, working in batches as necessary to avoid overcrowding the oil, carefully place the breaded chicken pieces one at a time into the pot or deepfryer. Deep-fry the chicken until cooked through and evenly deep golden brown, 6 to 8 minutes, carefully turning the pieces over with a wire skimmer about halfway through. While the chicken is frying, prepare the Lemon-Rosemary Butter Sauce. Transfer the chicken to a tray lined with paper towels to drain. Sprinkle with some salt and squeeze a little lemon over them. Arrange the chicken pieces on a heated serving platter or individual plates. Pass

lemon wedges and the Lemon-Rosemary Butter Sauce on the side.

LEMON-ROSEMARY BUTTER SAUCE Makes about 1/2 cup 4 ounces unsalted butter 1 sprig fresh rosemary 1 lemon, juiced Put the butter and rosemary in a small saucepan. Melt the butter over low heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Pour through a wire-mesh strainer into a warm sauce bowl.


News CALENDAR - you can even bring the older siblings. This storytime is presented completely in Spanish. No registration is required. If you have questions call 815- 7402662.

Cloud Computing for Everyone. 12 to 2 p.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. Discover the benefits of cloud computing in this presentation and learn how you can get started! Seating is limited, registration encouraged. For more information, call 815-7402660 or visit www.jolietlibrary. org.

JANUARY 23

JANUARY 28

Toddler Time. 9:45, 10:45 and 11:45 a.m. at the Black Road Branch Library, 3395 Black Road, Joliet. (18 months - 3 years) 9:30,10:30 & 11:30 a.m. Stories, songs and simple crafts. Caregivers must attend with child. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-740-2662.

Toddler Time. 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Black Road Branch Library, 3395 Black Road, Joliet. (18 months - 3 years) 9:30,10:30 & 11:30 a.m. Stories, songs and simple crafts. Caregivers must attend with child. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-740-2662.

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Pokemon League(Grades 2-8) Become a Pokemon Master and take on your friends during free play or a tournament! No registration is required, but any children who want to “duel” should bring their own deck of 60 cards. JANUARY 24 Curious Little Monkeys Play Group. 10:15 to 11 a.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (Birth -36 months) This parent-child play experience combines elements of our traditional Lapsit with an additional 1/2 hour of themerelated free play experiences. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-7402662. Toddler Time. 9:45 a.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (18 months - 3 years) Stories, songs, and simple crafts. Caregivers must attend with child. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-740-2662.

JANUARY 25 Cookies and Milk Storytime. 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. (Ages 3-5) Join us for songs and stories at Panera Bread, located in the Westfield Louis Joliet mall and get a free cookie. Registration is required. For more information, call 815-740-2660 or visit www. jolietlibrary.org. JANUARY 26 Coupon Exchange. 10 to 11 a.m., Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. Trade your extra coupons for the ones you need. ! 815- 740-2660 or www. jolietlibrary.org

MLK 3 on 3 Hoops Shootout. 10 a.m., Hartman Recreation Center, 511 N. Collins St., Joliet. Show off your skills in this 3 on 3 co-ed shootout! First place of each division will receive awards. When registering, each team captain will receive a packet of information containing rules and rosters. Register as a team or an individual. Competition for teams ages 6 to 8, 9 to 11 and 12 to 16. Application deadline Jan. 17. Fee $50 per team/$10 per person

JANUARY 29 Celebrate National Blood Donor Month. 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at First Midwest Bank: 50 W. Jefferson Ave. In celebration of January National Blood Donor Month, Heartland Blood Centers, an independent not-for-profit blood center serving 47 hospitals in a 12-county region in Illinois and Indiana, invites all healthy members of the community to share their good health through blood donation. To be a blood donor, individuals must be at least 17 years old, or 16 with written parental permission; weigh at least 110 pounds; be symptom free of cold, flu and allergies; and be in general good health.Donors who have traveled outside the United States within the past 12 months should contact Heartland at 1-800-7TOGIVE to determine eligibility. Spanish Storytime. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (3 5 years) Stories and crafts for preschools and their families - you can even bring the older siblings. This storytime is presented completely in Spanish. No registration is required. If you have questions call 815- 740-

2662.

JANUARY 30 Celebrate National Blood Donor Month. 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at States Attorney’s Office: 121 N. Chicago St. In celebration of January National Blood Donor Month, Heartland Blood Centers, an independent not-for-profit blood center serving 47 hospitals in a 12-county region in Illinois and Indiana, invites all healthy members of the community to share their good health through blood donation. To be a blood donor, individuals must be at least 17 years old, or 16 with written parental permission; weigh at least 110 pounds; be symptom free of cold, flu and allergies; and be in general good health.Donors who have traveled outside the United States within the past 12 months should contact Heartland at 1-800-7TOGIVE to determine eligibility. Magic School. 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Black Road Branch Library, 3395 Black Road, Joliet. Students in third to fifth grade. Learn the secrets behind simple magic and card tricks, then put on a show for all your friends. No registration is required. 815-7402660 or www.jolietlibrary.org Toddler Time. 9:45, 10:45 and 11:45 a.m. at the Black Road Branch Library, 3395 Black Road, Joliet. (18 months - 3 years) 9:30,10:30 & 11:30 a.m. Stories, songs and simple crafts. Caregivers must attend with child. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-740-2662.

JANUARY 31 Curious Little Monkeys Play Group. 10:15 to 11 a.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (Birth -36 months) This parent-child play experience combines elements of our traditional Lapsit with an additional 1/2 hour of themerelated free play experiences. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-7402662. Toddler Time. 9:45 a.m. at the Joliet Public Library, 150 N. Ottawa St. (18 months - 3 years) Stories, songs, and simple crafts. Caregivers must attend with child. No registration is required. If you have any questions call 815-740-2662.

FEBRUARY 2 Hugs and Wishes Chocolate Ball. 7 to 11 p.m. at the

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013 Shorewood Village Hall. Come out to the fourth annual “Hugs & Wishes” Chocolate Ball. This year’s theme is “HUGS Goes Hollywood”. Enjoy entertainment by Michael J Perkins, one free drink of choice, raffles, silent auction, appetizers, cash bar and taste some of the finest chocolate creations in our area; Elegant Touch Catering, Bella Cucina, Barolo, Cutting Edge Catering, Hollingworth Candies, and Aunt Nina’s Sweets and Treats! Chocolates will be judged by local “Celebrity Judges” and “Best Chocolate Creation” will be awarded, all in fun! Tickets are $45 per person and are available at Shorewood Village Hall or through any member of Shorewood HUGS ($55 at door). Proceeds benefit our Hugs & Wishes Program; fulfilling wishes for those that are disabled, deserving or in need in our community. To date HUGS has fulfilled close to 90 wishes in Shorewood, Joliet and the surrounding areas.This year’s event is sponsored by Heartland Bank and Trust Company. For more information please go to www.shorewoodhugs.org.

ONGOING “Hooks & Needles” Needlecraft Club. Second Wednesday of the month from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Lockport Branch Library, Gaylord Building, 200 W. 8th Street.Bring your needlework or other craft projects to work on, and sit back and enjoy chatting and sharing skills with other “crafters.” Refreshments will be offered! Please register with the Adult Services Desk. To register, or for further information on this program, please contact the Lockport Branch Library at 815838-0755. www.whiteoaklibrary. org. Bingo at St. Mary Nativity Catholic School. Every Friday at 7 p.m. in the school gym. Doors open at 4 p.m. and the kitchen opens at 5 p.m. Pull tabs go on sale at 5:30 p.m. and cards at 6 p.m. First game starts at 7 p.m. All are most welcome to come and play. Serenity on Sunday AlAnon/Adult Child of Alcoholics Women’s Group. Sundays from 1 to 2 p.m. at the Resurrection Lutheran Church, 25050 W. Eames Street, Channahon. The only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of alcoholism in a relative or friend. There are no fees or dues. Each

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group is self-supporting with voluntary contributions. As a mutual helping group, there is no other affiliation. Feel free to visit www.niafg.org for more information or to leave a message on the Al-Anon line at 815-7739623. Rockdale Lions Club Weekly Bingo. On Mondays door will open at 4 p.m., the early bird game will start at 6 p.m. and regular games start at 7 p.m. So come on out to our club at 48 Meadow Ave. in Rockdale, IL for an evening of bingo and fun. Contact our club at 815-729-3201 or Lion Steve at 815-791-8282 or Lion Wayne at 708-341-4433. Joliet Lupus Support Group Meeting. 6:15 to 8 p.m. at the Provena Physical Rehab & Sports Injury Center, 2132 Jefferson St. (in Marycrest Plaza), Joliet. Anyone with lupus or a family member or friend with lupus is welcome to join this group. Meeting dates for 2012 are on the 4th Wednesdays of odd months: 7/25, 9/26, and 11/28. Contact Tari at (815) 351-2544 or e-mail: tlapurdue82@gmail. com. Go www.lupus.org for more information on lupus. WomenHeart Support Group. Meetings are from 6 to 8 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the PSJMC Conference Room A, 333 N. Madison St., Joliet. WomenHeart of Joliet is here for you to provide the support, education and friendships that you need to live well with heart disease. WomenHeart will offer information and support that you may not find with your friends and loved ones. We can share fears, thoughts, and concerns in a relaxed and caring environment. For more information or agenda please call Michele at (815) 7034142. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/ Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www.niafg.org for more information.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

News

Joliet, Shorewood hard hit by flu bug By Nick Reiher and Laura Katauskas Enterprise pubications

Achoo! Cover that sneeze! Clean. Cover. Contain. That is, clean your hands; cover your cough, cover your sneeze; and contain your illness. These three “Cs” just may be the best prevention in addition to a flu shot against an outbreak that is wreaking havoc across the nation, with 27 flu-related deaths reported in Illinois alone. The Illinois Department of Health reports that the strain of flu predominately circulating throughout Illinois has historically been a more severe strain, causing more hospitalizations and deaths than in previous years, with 368 flu-related intensive care unit hospitalizations so far this year. The majority of hospitalizations and deaths are of people in their 50s and older. Presence St. Joseph Medical Center in Joliet has seen triple the flu cases this year, with sufferers in all age groups, said Tiesa Hughes-Dillard, emergency room nursing director. She isn’t sure why the flu is so bad this year, but “maybe it caught people by surprise. It’s a lot earlier this season. But it’s not too late to get vaccinated. … Once they’ve had symptoms for 48 hours, there’s nothing we can do for them … unless they’re having severe symptoms or have other health issues. They just need to stay home and rest.” Hughes-Dillard said St. Joe’s did 1,915 flu tests in December, with 467 positive. Of those, 70 were admitted and seven were placed in the ICU.As of Jan. 7, she said the hospital has performed 430 tests; 60 were positive,16 were admitted and two were checked into the ICU. Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital alone reports that since the start of January, 195 people have been tested due to flu-like illness. Of those, 67 came back positive for the flu virus. Not every person who comes in displaying flulike symptoms is tested. Some people may be treated and sent home because they don’t require hospitalization. Valley View School District, one of the largest school districts in Will County, has seen attendance dip significantly, with peaks in November and the last weeks of December.

Knowing your symptoms Common symptoms of flu include sore throat, high fever, cough, body aches and feeling fatigued. The Health Department recommends you contact a health professional before going to an emergency department if you are experiencing flu symptoms. The majority of people suffering from the flu simply need to stay home, rest, use over-the-counter remedies as needed and let the flu run its course. Several hospital emergency departments have recently had to refer patients with such symptoms to other hospitals as they were at capacity. Typically only people with severe respiratory illness who have trouble breathing need to visit a hospital emergency department.

Where to get a flu shot Vaccine is available at physician offices, pharmacies, many grocery stores, quick care facilities, and Will County Health Department offices in Joliet, Bolingbrook, and University Park. Persons with questions about the need for a flu shot should consult with a health care provider. To find locations where flu vaccine is offered you can log onto www.idph.state. il.us and enter your zip code in the Flu Vaccine Finder. Although flu vaccine is still widely available, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says some doctor’s offices and pharmacies have spot shortages.

“There is no doubt we are experiencing a severe flu season,” said Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck in a statement released Jan. 11. “However, we have seen severe flu seasons before, and we will continue to work to reduce the number of people who become ill. It is important for people to take precautions - get vaccinated, stay home if you’re sick, and wash your hands frequently. Doing all these things will not only help keep you healthy, but the people around you healthy.” In December 2012, 19 Will County patients required Intensive Care Unit hospitalization due to influenzarelated issues. Only one ICU hospitalization involving influenza was reported in December 2011. Sharp increases in influenza-related hospitalizations compel public health authorities to keep a wary eye on schools and long-term care facilities, where influenza can quickly spread.

Therefore, call ahead before going to get a vaccination.

Will County Health Department Bolingbrook Office; 323 Quadrangle Drive call for appointments at 815-740-8143 Joliet; 501 Ella Avenue; 815-727-8480 Walk-ins available Monday and Tuesday from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Wednesday, 1 to 4 p.m.; Thursday, 1 to 6 p.m.; and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

The IDPH expects to see an increase in the number of hospitalizations and deaths as more health care providers report cases from previous weeks as well as current cases. And the flu season is just getting started.The normal cycle ends in late March, though some cases have been reported as late as May, said Will County Health Department’s Vic Reato. “These numbers speak volumes about what we are facing and should be taken seriously,” Reato said. “Viruses can mutate—they are much smarter than us, and they can genetically change themselves.” Reato explains that flu vaccines are reformulated every year with experts comparing the 200 most common strains of viruses. The flu vaccine is composed of what is thought to be the top three most active viruses. Public health officials agree it is not too late to get a flu vaccination. “We’re seeing significant increases involving respiratory

problems consistent with influenza-like illness,” according to John Kahler M.D., FAAP, Chief Medical Officer for the Will County Community Health Center in Joliet. “At our facility, patients presenting with ILI have increased by at least 20 percent. A flu shot is still a good idea for most of those who haven’t received one yet.” The 2012-13 flu vaccine will protect against an influenza A H3N2 virus, an influenza B virus and the influenza A H1N1. The vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months and older. According to the IDPH, the estimated effectiveness of the vaccine is 62 percent. If you have been vaccinated but still get the flu, the vaccine can reduce the amount of time you’re sick and the severity of symptoms. By getting vaccinated, you can also help protect infants, the elderly and those with chronic diseases that are at greatest risk for complications due to the flu. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports

that every year, influenza affects employers and businesses.The flu costs businesses approximately $10.4 billion in direct costs for hospitalizations and outpatient visits for adults. The CDC recommends two strategies this season for businesses and employers to help fight the flu: Host a flu vaccination clinic at low or no cost; and promote flu vaccinations for the community, bringing awareness to where families can get vaccinated. As a large employer, Valley View School District offered free flu shots to its employees, with 324 employees taking advantage so far. As Health Services Coordinator at Valley View, Cathy Rigali, has said the district has seen a combination of those experiencing both 24-hourrelated illnesses and those associated with a true case of influenza, including many staff members. Rigali said the best defense is common sense. If you are sick, she recommends the basics— rest and fluids. “Sometimes common sense is so uncommon,” said Rigali. “When you are sick, you need hydration, rest, vitamins, fluids and good, healthy eating habits. Unfortunately, that is all you can do for the flu.’ And for parents of sick children—keep them home until they are fever free for 24 hours. She also stresses being proactive, paying attention to when you are in contact with germs the most. A list on tips to avoid the flu is posted on the district website at www.vvsd.org. “When you are out in public and are in contact with others, do not touch your face, your mouth, nose, eyes-where germs can affect you,” said Rigali. “Just think about touching a cart and take a stroll through the store and watch what some people do.Wash your hands. Do not touch your face—I cannot stress that enough.” Staying home to contain the virus is equally important agree public officials. In fact,MaryAnderson,Infection Control Manager of Edward Hospital, recently announced that in light of the current prevalence of flu, and in order to help keep its patients, staff and community safe, Edward Hospital is asking people with the flu or flu-like symptoms to refrain from visiting family members and friends who are patients or employees at Edward Hospital.


News Manley announces district-wide listening tour State Rep. Natalie Manley, D-Joliet, is planning a series of informal, public meetings at area coffee shops to gather community input on the many issues facing the state of Illinois. “I look forward to meeting with members of the community in a welcoming setting where we can put politics and partisan bickering aside and discuss the real challenges facing our communities and our state,” Manley said. “Hearing local feedback on proposals before us in the House is crucial to my effectiveness and strength as an advocate for our region.” Manley’s Listening Tour schedule will be: • 8 to 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 24, at Southern Belle’s Pancake House, 1819 Knapp Drive, Crest Hill. • Noon to 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26, Louis-Joliet Mall (food court), 3340 Mall Loop Drive, Joliet. • 8 to 9:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 28, Starbucks, 261 S. Weber Road, Bolingbrook.

Rep. Lipinski opens office in Lockport U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski (D-Willow Springs) will open a 3rd Congressional District office at Central Square in Lockport on Friday, Jan. 25. The congressman will be joined by other local officials for a ceremonial ribbon cutting at 11 a.m. In keeping with the congressman’s goal of locating his district offices in close proximity to local government offices, the Lockport office will be in the same building as the City of Lockport, Lockport Township, and the Lockport Township Park District, providing area residents with convenient access to all their elected officials and the services they provide. The new office will be on Central Square’s first floor, 222 East 9th St., Lockport. The hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. No appointments are necessary.

Illiana Two

THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013

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First route selection will link Wilmington, I-55 By Nick Reiher Managing editor

The announcement was no surprise, but it provides a benchmark for the next step in what Gov. Pat Quinn calls “a priority for my administration.” Transportation officials in Indiana and Illinois announced Jan. 18 the completion of the first tier of the Illiana Corridor project, and with it, the selection of the 50-mile B3 route, which would link Interstate 55 near Wilmington to Interstate 65 in Indiana. The Illinois Department of Transportation, the Indiana Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration were involved in the final section following a handful of meetings with officials throughout Will County, as well as those who would be affected by construction of the path, anticipated to cost $1.25 billion in 2018 dollars. Officials have said they would consider private financing, and it is likely the Illiana will be a tollway. Corridor officials say the project is the first in the nation to use a combined federal and environmental clearance process using the latest federal highway authorization bill, also known as Map-21. Both states have accelerated the work to gain this approval to expedite economic development and job creation. This process also enables prompt decision making to inform potentially affected stakeholders more quickly. “This decision represents an important step forward for the Illiana Corridor, which is a priority for my administration,” said Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn. “The Illiana will create a new, much needed east-west link at the Crossroads of America, improving travel and commerce across the region. Building this expressway will create thousands of new jobs and pave the way for more longterm economic development in Illinois.”

Roads mean jobs “Roads mean jobs, and the Illiana Expressway will boost economic growth

in northwest Indiana and across our state,” said Indiana Governor Mike Pence. “We are pleased that Indiana has been able to partner with Illinois to take this significant step forward.” Supporters say the expressway will reduce the strain of truck traffic on local roads, improving safety, cutting commuting times, reducing congestion, and improving accessibility to jobs. Environmentally, it will help by reducing the number of travel hours and fuel wasted due to cars and trucks caught in congestion. IDOT and INDOT estimate the project will create or retain more than 9,000 construction jobs immediately, and more than 25,000 longterm jobs. “This is a significant milestone in the development of the Illiana Corridor,” said Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider. “The selection of Corridor B3 could not have been made without the input from residents, communities, local officials, agencies, and other stakeholders who greatly assisted IDOT and INDOT every step of the way.” The Corridor B3 recommendation reflects comments and input received after the release of the Tier One Draft Environmental Impact Statement on July 13, 2012, and throughout the study. Formal comments also were received in response to the public hearings held for the Tier One Draft Environmental Impact Statement on July 31, 2012, and Aug. 1, 2012.

Farmers concerned Although corridor officials noted that public opinion favored Corridor B3, it was far from unanimous. Much of the land in the path belongs to farmers who now must be concerned if and how their acreage will be divided by the road. Also in the path are several dozen homes in Wilmington and in Beecher. State officials say they will work with all landowners to make the process as easy for them as possible. One major concern throughout the

process has been the use of “quick take” to acquire the land necessary for the Illiana. Officials from both states said they will not make any official offers to buy land for the interstate until they have the money to do so. They don’t expect to be making any of those offers until the second phase is complete, sometime in 2014. But if landowners in the path are interested in selling before that time, he said, they will listen. But the states must show a need for the property before the land acquisition process can begin, officials said. Once they have determined a need, the state will get an independent appraisal of the property and then make an offer to the property owner based on that appraisal. If the property owner declines the state’s offer, the matter is referred to the courts where a judge and jury will decide. How long that process takes is up to the court’s schedule, he added, not the state’s.

Federal approval As a result of Tier One studies, IDOT and INDOT have secured federal approval for an approximate 2,000-foot-wide planning corridor.Tier Two studies can now begin to identify a refined alignment and preferred 400-foot right-of-way for the Illiana project. Tier Two also will shift the focus from the original broad 952 square-mile study area to the communities, landowners and access needs along the preferred corridor. Some of the engineering work will include interchange locations and layout, drainage studies, and determining overpass or underpass opportunities. During this process, corridor officials say, stakeholder outreach will again be a top priority with careful consideration of community needs including farm operations, emergency services, school routes and local land use planning. Tier Two may take an additional 12 to 24 months to complete. Further information regarding the study can be found at www.Illianacorridor.org.


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THE BUGLE/SENTINEL JANUARY 23, 2013


Sentinel 1-23-13