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NEWS East Side Plan waits for approval

SPORTS Booker makes basket, memory Page 13

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Our Village, Our News

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MARCH 8, 2012

Vol. 6 No. 34

Raising Hope Romeoville man runs to raise awareness for women and children in Africa By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

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o celebrate the milestone of his fortieth birthday, Dave Fischer did more than mark the day off his calendar. He took the opportunity to reflect not only on his life, but on children a world away that needed his support. Training for months, Romeoville resident, Fischer combined his passion for helping children with his love for running. He took to the pavement Feb. 25, and ran for 40 miles to represent 40 years (of his life) and for 40 submitted photo

kids in Africa in an effort to raise awareness of the many women and children in Africa who live and often die in impoverished communities without access to See HOPE, page 10

We are blessed more than we ever realize here in America. A big part of this is bringing awareness to what goes on in other countries. We don’t have to sacrifice that much to make a difference.� Dave Fischer, Romeoville resident


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THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012


THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

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East Side concept plan awaits approval By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The concept plan for Romeoville’s historical east side paints a picture of a mixed-used development centered around a new Metra station, but the timing of its actual development is tied to the economy. The village was recently awarded a 2011 Community Planning Grant from the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA). The grant is being used to help spur development and redevelopment around the Metra station and east side of the village, and the Romeoville Eastside and Downtown Plan was created to help guide and shape this development in the years to come.

According to the summary of the plan written by Teska and Associates Inc., an analysis indicates that development of the East Side has major fiscal constraints. In part, the summary states, “the economy and real estate market will be influential factors in determining which redevelopment concepts will be feasible and which may not even bear out in the marketplace. Current constraints to extend municipal infrastructure to the East Side will also tend to delay redevelopment due to the costs needed to provide new infrastructure.” Nevertheless, redevelopment takes planning and through the help of the grant, the village will be looking to approve a concept plan for the future.

A report on the plans states, “The potential inability of the preferred concept to materialize in the near term should not be viewed as an erroneous forecast for the East Side; rather, it underscores the evolving nature of the current economy and presents an opportunity for the village to continually assess how the evolution of the East Side will keep pace with the changing economy while still working towards the community’s goals.” The plan is said to be drafted with enough flexibility to enable the village to entertain other development scenarios as time and the economy will dictate. The preferred alternative concept plan envisions the most intensive uses closest to the future Metra station and generally

along 135th Street towards Smith Road including retail businesses and employment-generating uses, such as offices and business parks, and potential for a vocational school as part of the office/business park concept. Residential types will vary depending on the nature of the land and environment, and can include condominiums, duplexes, and townhouses. A prominent feature of the preferred alternative concept plan, according to Teska, is maintaining a portion of Big Run Golf Club as a nine-hole course along 135th Street, with the remaining nine holes redeveloping as townhouses and single family residential units, taking advantage of the landscaping of the area.

In addition to a portion of Big Run Golf Club, other existing land uses would be maintained, including Bambrick Park and the small residential section along Hidden Ridge Lane. Other than the planned Metra station, the area west of the CN Railroad would remain intact, including the preservation of the designated conservation area for the Hine’s emerald dragonfly. A network of existing and proposed trails is also featured on the concept plan, to connect the East Side with the village’s downtown area and other parts of the village. The plan will go before the village board for approval in late March or early April. katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

Three arrests made in Nov. 6 residential shooting By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Romeoville Police arrested three individuals involved with the November shooting on the 300 block of McKool that left an innocent woman injured. According to Assistant Chief Steve Lucchesi, after investigation, police learned that three known gang members

were involved with the Nov. 6 shooting, which was determined to have occurred as retaliation after an earlier dispute between gang members at a local bar. Albert Cotto Sr.,38,of Riverside, Angel Rivera, 39, and AnnMarie Rosado, 39, both of Romeoville were arrested and charged with two counts of aggravated battery with a firearm and two counts of aggravated discharge of a

firearm. Initial reports indicated that at 1:34 a.m. on Nov. 6, police responded to a call that shots were fired in the 300 block of McKool Ave. in the middle of a residential neighborhood near Irene King Elementary School. Two men were walking on the sidewalk when the offenders fired shots in their direction. One bullet struck a 29-year-old

McAsey hosting program to protect children To help parents better assist law enforcement in the event of a lost child, State Rep. Emily McAsey is partnering with the Illinois Masonic Fraternity for an Illinois Child Identification Program (IL CHIP).This free event will be held on Saturday, March 10th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Center, 900 W. Romeo Road, Romeoville. “Far too often we see reports about missing children in the news,” McAsey said. “As a state representative, one of my top

priorities is protecting our most vulnerable, which includes the children of our community. Though I hope there is never a need to use it, having your child’s identifying information compiled and easily accessible is indispensable to police in their investigation.” At the event, parents will be provided with a child protection kit, including a DNA sample, fingerprints of the child, and a CD containing a color photo and recorded interview.This program,

the most comprehensive of its kind, is offered free to parents. “As a state legislator and former criminal prosecutor, I have worked to make our neighborhoods a safer place to live,” McAsey said. “IL CHIP will provide tools to help families in our community better protect their children and improve public safety.” For more information, contact Rep. McAsey’s full-time constituent service office at (815) 372-0085.

man from Addison in the right leg. A second bullet penetrated a house that was behind the two men, and struck a 54-yearold female resident with no gang affiliation in the left arm. A third bullet was found to have penetrated another house on this block, however no one was injured at that location. Cotto Sr. and Rivera are being held on a $1 million bond and

Rosado is being held a $500,000 bond. Lucchesi said the case is still under investigation and that police suspect that a fourth individual was involved as well. Police are encouraging residents with any information to call the police department at 815-8867219. katauskas@buglenewspapers..com


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THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

Joliet Library opens new digital media studio Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

The world of communication is going digital. From MP3 files to social media, YouTube to online anime, connecting to the rest of the world is just a few clicks away…so long as you have the right software and equipment. But for many small businesses and individuals, expensive digital equipment and software is out of reach. But no longer, as the Joliet Public Library has the answer. At its main location on Ottawa Street, library patrons can reserve time in the facility’s newest addition, a digital media studio. Featuring such state-of-the-art technology as Adobe Creative Suite and Anime Studio Debut 4 software, Wacom Bamboo Tablets, condenser microphones, cameras, projectors, and even a green wall for advanced video production, this small-space studio can solve some big creative dilemmas for anyone on a budget. Anyone can reserve space at the studio, not just library card holders. That means entrepreneurs, non-profits, students 14 and older, artists, musicians and aspiring politicians can all take advantage of the studio’s offerings, with no more

Sherri Dauskurdas/Bugle Staff

The new digital media studio offers Wacom tablets, Adobe Creative Suite, a green screen, and more.

than a photo ID and a good idea. “We wanted to provide technology training and enhance skills in technology and social media,” said Library Marketing Director Kim Niedermyer.“There is a growing need for these skills, and a lot of people don’t have the money.” Technology Librarian Mary Golden said the placement of digital studios in libraries is rare, but growing, adding that

facilities in Skokie, Barrington, and Chicago all offer studios that are similar. Fountaindale Library is devoting an entire floor of its new building to the concept. When people cut back, their internet service is often the first to go, she added. Cutbacks in schools often affect the libraries and media centers first. “We have had people come in and ask for software access to

the more expensive products,” she said. “We are in the early stages of what I believe is a trend in many libraries.” The $45,000 Digital Media Studio was made possible through a host of grants and donations, and has been in the works at the library for several years. “Equipment has been collected over the past couple of years, since about 2010,” Golden

said, adding that staff members “walked every inch of the library to find the perfect space,” for the studio to be built. And as excited as they are about the studio, they haven’t stopped seeking equipment and software. “Oh, there’s always a wish list,” quipped Golden. Golden’s wish list includes more Apple/ Mac hardware, higher-end video production software, and at least one more Adobe Suite of products for installation. Niedermyer said they are hoping small businesses will come in, and are building awareness of the studio through visits to chambers, non-profit organizations and schools. More than 80 members of the community showed up to check it out during an open house recently, and already, patrons have started to reserve space. “You can think of it this way,” Golden said.“if you’ve paid taxes to the library, you’ve paid for this. It belongs to you, so come in and use it to your advantage.” Use of the studio must be reserved in advance, and charges apply for printed materials. More information about the Digital Media Studio is available at www. jolietlibrary.org. sdauskurdas@buglenewspapers.com

Show support on St. Patrick’s Day for ALS sufferers Judy Wallin had lived in the Beverly Community most of her 65 years before they moved out of the city. By today’s mortality tables, she should have another 20 years to enjoy retirement with her husband of 31 years, Gordon. Sadly, her life is being cut short by a rare disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a motor neuron disease. Most know it as Lou Gehrig’s Disease. It’s related to muscular dystrophy, and for those who are afflicted, it is a cruel death sentence. For nearly five years she has been suffering from this rapidly degenerative disease for which there is no cure. Now struggling daily with basic motor skills, degenerative muscle function, and needing help with basic biological functions, she and her retired husband are rapidly spending down their assets on medical home care and

medications. With a two-fold purpose of helping Wallin and raising awareness about ALS, family and friends along with the Greater Chicago Chapter of the ALS Association will host a benefit St. Patrick’s Day Dance & Fundraiser at the Friendship Centre, 175 S. Highpoint Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 on Saturday evening March 17th at 7:00 p.m. As a community-based function, the Institute for Community has contributed their facility, and the dance music has been contributed by The Moonlight Serenade Orchestra, featuring Johnny B. With a $5 donation at the door, the dancing and raffling of prizes will go on from 7 – 11 p.m. Many area businesses are contributing prizes to be raffled and silent auctioned for this fundraiser. Even the Ladies

of Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority at Lewis University are volunteering to help at the Event. The public is invited to enjoy food, drinks, live music, and raffles for items like Bulls tickets, Cubs tickets, Rounds of Golf, and a grand prize of a 1954 premier edition of Sports Illustrated valued at $1,000. Wallin has dedicated her life to serving others. After growing up in Beverly and studying in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS), she decided to become a teacher in the CPS. Many years of teaching were in the inner city. She was later assigned by the CPS to Barnard Elementary School in Beverly for the final 15 years of her career. With a Master’s degree in teaching, Wallin’s 34-year career was dedicated to improving the lives of students. As a woman of strong character, she committed

her life to edifying others through teaching. Also a mother of two sons, James and Steven, Wallin has spent her life putting the needs of others before her own. “All I wanted to do was see the kids develop and realize their potential,” she said. “Even if the scores were not really high, as long as they had a measurable improvement. She enjoyed her students, and classroom memories are still vivid and bring a smile. “Little kids thought all I could eat was apples,” Wallin said with a grin. “One time the kids and some parents gave me a birthday cake and brought a basket of apples.” In better times, gardening was a comforting hobby. Vegetables, herbs, or flowers, it didn’t matter. It seemed as though her gardening was a metaphor for her love of the children she

taught. “Flowers, all of them have a place.” Wallin said,“variety, order in nature, something blooming all year round - and nothing talks back.” Having taught kindergarten, primary through secondary levels, Wallin was proud to make a difference. “I was fair; but I pushed them to a higher standard,” Wallin said. “I set higher standards and their gifts were developed. All kids want to excel if they’re allowed to or shown how to.” Professional fulfillment for Wallin came when students succeeded, she said. “Oh, Mrs. Wallin, I finally got it! I finally understand!” They learned the lessons, and they applied them.” For more information about this St Patrick’s Day Dance & Fundraiser, call 708-705-1775.


THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

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Open house highlights “Green Team” efforts By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The Romeoville Recreation Department is living, working and recreating “green” this year with a focus on green initiatives at its open house to support the work of the village’s Green Team. The Open House will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on March 16 and will focus on “green” initiatives, education and demonstrations for a more sustainable life. The event also will feature recreation program demonstrations, registration for spring programs and information booths from community organizations. Isshin-Ryu Karate, Romeoville Razzlers Dance Team, and Romeoville Tumbleweeds Gymnastics Team will be featured during this event. Fit 4 Life Fitness Center and Jungle Safari Indoor Playground will be open; no admission will be charged. Inflatables, entertainment, “green” activities and giveaways are all part of this event. For more information on this event, please contact the recreation department at (815) 886-6222. The village has its own “green team,” consistently working to advise the village on ways to target environmental goals. The group’s mission is to

build educational campaigns, encouraging schools, non-profit and religious organizations, businesses, and residents to conserve natural resources, alleviating the effects of global warming and promoting urban sustainability. The team recommends practical solutions to ensure a prosperous community that will sustain healthy lives for its citizens and a healthier earth. A few ideas taken from the Green Team include:

impermeable surfaces such as pavement is another way to reduce stormwater runoff and allow water to soak into the ground. If you can’t reduce the hard surfaces you might consider installing porous paving. There are many different types of porous paving materials that can be used in driveways and sidewalk installations and patios such as bricks, flagstones, interlocking pavers, stone, and various types of porous asphalt and concrete.

• Rain garden - Rain gardens are probably the easiest and most cost efficient thing a homeowner can do to reduce their contribution to stormwater pollution. Rain gardens capture rainwater from roofs, driveways and sidewalks by diverting it into an area where it can slowly soak into the ground, filter contaminants and keep quantities of clean water from going down the sewer system. A rain garden is much like a regular perennial garden in that it is designed with deep rooted plants like flowers, grasses, trees and shrubs. In some locations 90 percent of a 1-inch rainfall would be absorbed by the rain garden.

• Rain Barrels- Rain barrels are containers that collect rain water from rooftops via a downspout. The water is used later to water plants inside and outside the home. Rain barrels can be made from new heavyduty plastic garbage cans, food grade plastic containers or can be purchased from rain barrel makers. During a 1” rain, a typical single family roof can move over 300 gallons of water which would fill most barrels 4-5 times. The barrels sell for $85, and can be purchased by contacting the village hall at 815-886-7200. For more information on the Green Team and ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle, visit www. romeoville.org.

• Porous pavement Reducing or minimizing

katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

Tips to minimize your everyday waste: • Send and store documents electronically instead of on paper • When you must print or copy, do it double-sided • Circulate documents instead of making an individual copy for everyone • Keep windows and doors closed in heated and airconditioned areas. • Turn off computers and printers when they are not in use, especially laser printers. • Don’t use power strips to turn on all computers and desk equipment at once. • When purchasing computers and peripherals, buy low wattage equipment. • Minimize use of screen savers and instead enable power management features. • Try to wash 90% of clothes in cold water. • Conserve water by taking shorter showers and turn off water while brushing teeth, washing face, shaving or washing dishes. • Drive Efficiently - drive a fuel efficient car, (i.e. one which

gets more miles per gallon), and don’t drive it more than necessary • Plastic containers can become food storage, paper can become wrapping paper. The ways in which to reuse things are unlimited. All you need is to be creative. • Reuse envelopes by placing a new label over the old address. • Designate a box for scrap paper and use it for printing all drafts or unofficial documents. • When buying any type of product, see if it is available with post consumer recycled content. • Production of recycled paper uses only half the water and 3/4 of the energy than new paper. • Every ton of recycled paper saves almost 400 gallons of oil, three cubic yards of landfill space and seventeen trees. • Don’t buy bottled water. • Buy food produced locally to reduce the impact of shipping foodstuffs around the world. • Buy products made from postconsumer recycled materials • Reuse packaging


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Heather Harley, 22, 2104 Stonewall Lane, Joliet, was arrested at 9:55 p.m. on Feb. 15 and charged with driving under the influence, uninsured motor vehicle, improper lane use, and the illegal transport of alcohol near Weber Road and Airport Road.

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Amber Olsen, 23, 2 Olive Street, Minooka, was arrested at 4:33 p.m. on Feb. 17 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road.

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Brett Kelly, 20, 19202 Janet Ave, Lockport, was arrested at 8:49 p.m. on Feb. 18 and charged with the possession of cannabis near Arlington and Dalhart Avenue.

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Kareem Ellis, 26, 223 Oak Creek Drive, was arrested at 2:10 a.m. on Feb. 18 and charged with driving with a revoked license near Alder Creek and Highpoint Drive.

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Miguel Gonzalea Jr., 19, 7846 Kolmar Ave, Chicago, was arrested at 1:14 a.m. on Feb. 19 and charged with underage consumption of alcohol, the illegal transport of alcohol and failure to wear a seatbelt near Alexander Circle and Spangler Avenue.

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Julian Garcia-Romero, 31, 7846 Kolmar Ave, Chicago, was arrested at 1:14 a.m. on Feb. 19 and charged with delivery of alcohol to minor, illegal transportation and failure to wear a seatbelt at Alexander Circle and Spangler Avenue.

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Ricky Nieto, 19, 2 Charlotte Court, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 5:11 p.m. on Feb. 21 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of Weber Road.

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Derrick Lewis, 20, 989 Princeton Avenue, was arrested at 7:37 p.m. on Feb. 22 and charged with driving with a suspended license and disobeying a traffic device near Normantown Road and Weber Road.

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Raymond Tobias, 21, 155

Highpoint Drive, was arrested at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 20 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, insurance or front plate near Weber Road and Creekside Drive. Matthew Parker, 21, 16639 Winding Creek Road, Plainfield, was arrested at 9:04 p.m. on Feb. 24 and charged with a Will County warrant and

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obstructing justice on the 2000 block of Whitmore Drive. Kristina Keating, 21, 2058 Whitmore Drive, was arrested at 9:04 p.m. on Feb. 24 and charged with possession of a controlled substance and drug equipment on the 2000 block of Whitmore Drive.

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Russel Held, 30, 109

Kingston Road, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 8:33 p.m. on Feb. 24 and charged with disobeying a traffic device and driving with a suspended license near Normantown Road and Weber Road. Carlos Feliciano,22, 24138 Apple Creek Lane, Plainfield, was arrested at 4:01 p.m. on Feb. 24 and charged

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with failure to reduce speed and driving without a driver’s license near Weber Road and Normantown Road. Marco Hernandez, 20, 132 Beaconridge Ave, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 5:04 a.m. on Feb. 26 and charged with speeding, and driving without a driver’s license near Route 53 and Montrose Drive.

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Forum Our View

Library dedication As a “friend of the library,” I was impressed with 20 caring people who attended our monthly meeting. Scott Painton (Director) of the three White Oak Library District, Romeoville, Lockport and Crest Hill, went into detail about the problems that incurred during the renovations. This has been a difficult time. Work to be done with certain remodeling was not always met as forecasted. This could be discouraging. But Scott and his staff just kept moving along with a positive and encouraging attitude. The patrons and myself admire their continued perseverance. Scott discussed at our meeting that 80% of the labor was provided by the employees of all three libraries. This work was the packing and moving books, shelves, office equipment, etc. This also included the dismantle of the shelves, etc. This director and staff should be applauded. The auction at the Gaylord Building went well. The staff moved 90,000 items in 2 days.All three libraries worked together. The bid for Crest Hill will be in March. Ground breaking will be hopefully in May.

There will be 88,000 feet of library space for the patrons when all three library renovations are completed. The Romeoville White Oak library is scheduled to be completed in May. I personally took two beginner computer classes at the Romeoville Library (White Oak). Two of their employees, Austin and Dennis are excellent instructors. At this time, only daytime classes are available. When the renovations are completed, nighttime and Saturday will be offered. Our friends of the library will start Facebook. Also the friends are working on a fundraiser. We need new books for all three libraries. When renovations are completed the libraries will purchase all the books that are needed. As the work continues -I am sure that our three White Oak Libraries will be the very best in the country. The phrase “The More You Know” continues to grow in our villages - thanks to the dedicated employees of these three libraries. Shirlee J. Pergler Friend of the Library

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

Publisher & Editor Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor Matt Honold mhonold@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdas Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Debbie Lively Sports Reporters Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

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THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

Schools

St. Baldrick’s event to raise money for cancer research It takes a community to cure childhood cancer. That’s why the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a volunteer-driven charity dedicated to raising money for childhood cancer research, will host one of its signature headshaving events at Romeoville High School on March 23. More than 50 students and staff members will shave their heads in solidarity with kids with cancer. Worldwide, more than 160,000

children are diagnosed with cancer each year, and it remains the leading cause of death by disease among children in the United States. With only four percent of all federal cancer research funding dedicated to pediatric cancer research, St. Baldrick’s Foundation grant funds are critical to continue the battle against this devastating disease. The RHS St. Baldrick’s activities will begin with the third annual

RHS “Peg a Cop” Dodge Ball Tournament from 6-9 p.m. on March 21. Romeoville, Joliet and Plainfield police departments will compete against RHS students who will be offered the opportunity to “Peg A Cop” just for the fun of it. Prizes donated by Target of Romeoville, Eterna Med Spa of Shorewood, Back to Basics Chiropractic of Romeoville, and Ats A Nice Pizza of Romeoville will be raffled off at this event

as well. A bake sale will also be held. The main event will take place on March 23 at 1 p.m. in the RHS gym in front of RHS students and invited guests. The RHS “We Baldin”Team will raffle off prizes at the main event. Two years ago, the “We Baldin” Team raised over $8,600 and that number soared to $26,500 which means the 2012 team is already well on its way to meeting a three-year total goal of

$50,000. Members of the community who would like to donate to the event can go to www. stbaldricks.org/search/ everythingresults/searchValue/ romeoville+high+school/ submitEverything/Search/ If you would like to be a part of this event, please contact Romeoville Police Detective Kelley Henson at khenson@ romeoville.org or hensonkd@ vvsd.org.

Will County Spelling Bee coming to Lewis University March 8 Dr.Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant,Will County Regional Superintendent of Schools, will welcome 44 middle school and junior high school spelling champs to the Annual Will County Spelling Bee on March 8. The winner of the Will County competition slated for 6 p.m. March 8 at Lewis University’s John F. Kennedy Sports and Recreation Center in Romeoville will win a trip to the National Spelling Bee to be held in Washington D.C. in the spring. The academic enrichment event is sponsored by the Will County Regional Office of Education, the Lewis University School of Education and Com Ed.

Contestants include: Jacob Cowart of A.Vito Martinez Middle School, Nicole Cirrencione of Alex M. Martino Junior High School, Sharon Palli of Brooks Middle School, Nina Montello of the Cathedral of St. Raymond School, Clara Smith of ChaneyMonge School, Christopher Flanagan of Channahon Junior High School and Jessica Hale of Crete-Monee Middle School. Other spellers are: Jalen Williams of Dirksen Junior High School, Sarah Hassan of Drauden Point Middle School, Alex Kulak of Elwood Community Consolidated School, Samantha Zanches of Fairmont School, Jonathan Hernandez of Gompers Junior High School, Karli Boyd of Hadley School, Parsia Hedayat of

Heritage Grove Middle School, and Megan Hixon of Holy Family School. Also participating are: ChiGozie Nwachukwu of Homer Junior High School, Kim Belser of Hubert Humphrey Middle School, Mariah Frykholm of Hufford Junior High School, Bryanna Hybert of Illinois Lutheran School, T.J. Olson of Indian Trail Middle School, Edward Owusu of Jane Addams Middle School, Esmeralda Castelan of John F. Kennedy Middle School,Elizabeth Zahorick of John Lukancic Middle School, Rachel Singh of Liberty Junior High School, Ben Morris of Peotone Junior High School and Griffin Dahlberg of Potter’s Hand School. Other contestants are: Kenna

Romeoville High School gathering focuses on teens’ cultural differences, similarities In an effort to break down linguistic and cultural barriers, students from three Will County schools got together for food, conversation and fun at Romeoville High School. “The goal was to help these kids understand the cultural differences for teenagers in the United States and Latin American countries,” said David Gutierrez, who heads up the RHS Heritage Spanish program. Joining RHS students at the third annual Language and

Cultural Exchange Program were English Language Learners (ELL) from Joliet Central High School, many of whom have recently moved to the United States, and fourth year Spanish students from Providence Catholic High School in New Lenox. Following breakfast in the RHS cafeteria, students met in groups to carry on the conversations entirely in Spanish using their personal knowledge and experience based on where they grew up.

“The Providence and RHS kids mostly talked about what you need to do to survive and be successful as a teenager in school and out of school,” Gutierrez said. “Many of the Joliet Central kids brought their own experiences from Latin American schools where periods are longer but they only go to school two days a week.” Following the conversations, students moved into the auditorium where they relaxed and danced together.

Wilkey of Reed-Custer Middle School, Savanna Wells of Richland Junior High School, Sandra Ortega of Rockdale School, Steven Salvino of St. Dennis School, John Patchell of St. Dominic School, Lexie Krupske of St. Joseph School, David Napoli of St. Joseph School, Zeusan Balquin of St. Jude Parish School, Amanda Vollmer of St. Mary Immaculate School, Audrey

Greder of St. Paul the Apostle School, Grace Cooper of St. Rose School, Jack Zinsky of Summit Hill Junior High School, Kevin Becker of Taft School, Courtney Lloyd of Trinity Christian School, Faith Bonds of Troy Middle School, Kaitlyn Ludvigsen of Union School, Emma Regal of Washington Junior High School and Alec Roth of Wilmington Middle School.


Calendar ONGOING Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section.Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville.  Call Melanie/Birth Educator & Doula at 253-8615897 -VBACesarean@aol.com Managing Multiples. A support group open to couples that are still expecting, parents of multiples or even parents who have one or more children who just need to get their life in order. The group will meet the second Thursday of each month from 10 – 11:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to bring their babies.The class is free. For more information call (630) 527-5369. Breastfeeding support group. Led by a certified Lactation Counselor, meets on the first and third Wednesdays of the month from 11:30–noon (following CradleTalk).Join other breastfeeding moms for support and to have any questions answered. No registration required. For information and location, please call (630) 5273957. Nurturing Mom. A support group is a free support group for new moms or moms-to-be who are experiencing emotional lows, depression, anxiety, fearful thoughts, difficulty sleeping, or other troubling behavior. Led by a licensed clinical psychologist and a therapist with extensive backgrounds in women’s services and postpartum depression, this

support group meets weekly; on Thursdays from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Registration is suggested.To register for these classes, please call (630) 527-6363. Need a Job or GED Classes? Education Service Network NFP Inc.’s Career Seekers GED/ Workforce program, a program of the Regional Office of Education is located at 179 North Chicago St. Joliet, Illinois 60432. We offer GED classes/resume preparation/ job placement for participants between the ages of 16 and 21. Classes meet Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon; Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. We also offer GED classes at our satellite site at the Friendship Centre at HighPoint, 175 South HighPoint Drive,Romeoville on Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m.This program is conducted with funds from the Workforce Investment Board of Will County, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and the United States Department of Labor. Equal Opportunity Employer/Program Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. For more information call 815-774-8902 or 815-7748922.

MARCH 9 Swirling paint and dyes. 4-5:30 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. For ages 7-10. Mix up chemistry, physics, and creativity. Make designs with paint, tie-dye, and marbleize paper. For registration and payment information, visit www.dupagechildrensmuseum. org or call 630-637-8000. Treasured stories of Eric Carle. 6 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. The Mermaid Theatre Company of Nova Scotia will perform a preview of Treasured Stories of Eric Carle. For more information, visit www.

dupagechildrensmuseum.org or call 630-637-8000.

MARCH 10 Childbirth express. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Provena St. Joseph Medical Center, 333 N. Madison St., Joliet. This class is designed for expectant parents in the last trimester of pregnancy. This fast-paced class will include pregnancy issues, labor and delivery basics, comfort measures, and postpartum. Tour of unit included. Lunch will be provided. Cost is $50. Call 815725-9438 for more information. Tiny Great Performances. 10:45 a.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. The Sundown Serenaders will have all the little ones singing and dancing along to original and classic songs of the prairie, including upbeat fiddle tunes, fun Western numbers, and fast tales of the trails. For more information, visit www.dupagechildrensmuseum. org or call 630-637-8000. Gaslight Era Killers. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Join Chicago author Rich Lindberg as he discusses some of the most famous and intriguing killers of the gaslight era. The talk will focus on Lizzie Borden, Belle Gunness, Johann Hoch, and Dr. H.H. Holmes, also known as the Devil in the White City. Contact the library at 815-886-2030 to sign up.

MARCH 11 Corned beef dinner. Noon to 5 p.m.at the Knights of Columbus #4400, 1813 E. Cass St., Joliet. Dinner includes corned beef,

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012 rye bread, carrots, cabbage, and potatoes. Cost is $9 for dinner or $6 sandwich only. Dine in or carry out available, call 815-7233827 for carry out orders.

MARCH 12-18 Collage Studio Drop-in. During opening hours at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. Construct colorful designs while practicing cutting and exploring composition. Morning and afternoon sessions are scheduled most days. For more information, visit www. dupagechildrensmuseum.org or call 630-637-8000.

MARCH 13 Creative Kids. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Get ready to use all your creative talents as you learn the art of storytelling. For ages 8 and up. Stop by the library or call 815-886-2030 to sign up. Teen Crafts: Moustaches. 6:30-8 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. This meeting’s project is making a moustache on a stick. Contact the library at 815-8862030 to sign up.

MARCH 14 Forces: Magnetism. 4-5 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. For ages 4-6. Learn what is magnetic, what is not, and just how powerful some magnets can be. For registration and payment information, visit www.dupagechildrensmuseum. org or call 630-637-8000. Tween Scene. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library.This program

9

is for tweens aged 9-12. Stop by the library or call 815-886-2030 to sign up.

MARCH 15 Game time. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Play your favorite board games, or learn a new one. For ages 6-12. No registration required. Third Thursdays at DCM. 5-7 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. Third Thursdays are a special time for families of children with autism spectrum disorder, visual, or mobility impairments to come play at the museum. For more information, visit www. dupagechildrensmuseum.org or call 630-637-8000.

MARCH 16 Wildlife Science Club. 5-7 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. Science for kids, by kids. Washington Jr. High students will bring hands-on science fun for ages 4-6 and 7-10. For more information visit www. dupagechildrensmuseum.org or call 630-637-8000. Farming for fuels. 5:30 p.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N.Washington St., Naperville. Explore the science of biofuels in a family-friendly environment. For more information, visit www. dupagechildrensmuseum.org or call 630-637-8000. Romeoville Recreation Department Open House. 6-9 p.m.at the Romeoville Recreation See CALENDAR, page 10


10

gold by being bold. You can make proposals in the week to come that will fall on eager ears. When you speak, people listen - so take advantage of any opportunity to air your ideas.

verbalizing your ideas in a way that resonates with others, you can impress others with your knowledge and expertise. Gain trust in the week ahead by speaking to other people’s needs.

Clean up or make up.

Prove your mettle and

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

HOPE

Whatever hasisfallen by the wayside earn a medal. Nothing looks better at experience at the Step into in America. A big part of this can be picked up in the week ahead. An the end of a game than having more points Africa exhibit, sponsored in bringing awareness to what goes apology will be accepted if you take the time to offer than an opponent. Your take-charge attitude will win Bolingbrook by the Bolingbrook on in other countries. We don’t it. Revise your goals and plans for the future. appreciation in the upcoming week. Continued from page 1 Clergy’s Association, that Fischer have to sacrifice that much to becameDown aware of the opportunity make a difference.” Across basic resources as clean__ to 1sponsor children in megapopular Africa. It Not only is Fischer a firm WWII auxiliaries 1 Birthday secret such 43 Composer The simplest solution 2 Calvary web videos 5 “Back in Black” water, food or shelter. Carlo Menotti became evident that there were believer in Team World Vision’sThe past is but prologue. When one door closes, another opens is often the best. Whatever comes to inscription 35 Cardinal who band 44 Transp. group in As Director of Elementary nearly 200 children in one village cause, he is also “adoptive” but in an the week to come, be sure that you don’t 3 Twinkie or Ding was a foe of you effortlessly is beneficial, but you can’t 9 Visibly amazed the Loop look so long regretfully upon the closed door that Ministries for Westbrook aloneDong called Magamba,the Tanzania. ofand four children, Musketeers parent sponsor, exert your will and force some things into being in 14 __ Domini 45 Pago Pago you dohis not see the one has opened. Game with sticks Wildfitting about Christian Church in Bolingbrook, He 4 thought it would36 be along with wife andthattwo the week ahead. 15 Bodybuilder’s people 5 Pointy tool 37 “Zounds!” Fischer has been involved with to try to take on sponsoring the daughters. In fact, last year, for supplement 48 Did a farrier’s 6 Slip in a pot 39 Unwanted 16 Hand-dyeing job Vision, entire the work of Team World village, making itplayground a “sister” his third marathon he had his 7 Strips of leaves craft Where to wear acommunity To move on to the 8 Swan game a division of World49Vision that for Bolingbrook. “son’s” name printed on his TWVYou will want everyone constellation teammate 17 Very narrow training bra? to jump on the bandwagon when you next chapter, you need a blank page. trains runners and non-runners He then heard 40ofRecycling others jersey, pinned his picture on it 9 The N.Y. Nets fissure? 52 Lacking spice are part of the band. Don’t exclude anyone During the upcoming week, you will be filled alike in exchange raising with TeamvesselWorld and mailed finisher to encouragement and were its last 19 Vintage violin 54for Chain selling working from his your circle, medal but offer with useful and creative ideas to create a prosperous champion 41 Brewer’s kiln awareness and helping to raise Vision, running marathons to his sponsored child.in the week ahead. submitted photo 20 Michael Moore stacks educate others future. Gather support to put ideas into motion. 10 Warren 43 Yuri who was health-care film 55 Clue in a case funds to help fulfill their mission raise Harding’s money, and was inspired. “While many run for sport the first to Melody poverty. 57 Dip for a chip His training food, healthcare, education, and of21ending began for orbit the Earth eight and while many have a heart said colleague Karla Martinez. middle name 23 Rock ‘n’ roll 60 Mila of “Black 11 Asteroids Fischer and his wife, along hour, 40 mile trek46 Wire as measure more to help others, few have foundYour life To isdate, Fischer has raised more. Even a reluctant lived on middle name Swan” maker 47 Punch sequence you up are ainterested in doing with a team have run than 30 others joined him on the creativity to combine to help a stage. You are theenough star of yourawareness own warrior Ifpicks weapon when 24 Didn’t sell of others, 62 Very young 12 Spike for a 48 Some tees but most events happen necessary. learncontact to acceptFischer the sponsor 28 kids, and has no You so, must you can at a 26few other raising 9.5 mile loop trail at Waterfall their hobbiesproduction, and passions to key mountaineer 49 Pedaled Landfill in a marathons, toy hobo? without a rehearsal. During the coming week, go necessity of fighting your way to the top of the food 13 Squeezing (out) 50 Freedom, in city? 64 “Fear of Flying” $3500 the first year and by the Glenn Woods near the Argonne discover their life’s mission. doubt he will reach his goal to dave.fischer@westbrookchurch. ahead and act on impulse; those who hesitate are chain. Be aggressive in the week ahead. 18 Keystone 28 CIA part: Abbr.surpasses authortheir Jong second year National Laboratory. 51 Swahili For Dave, that is exactly what sponsor 40 and plans to continue org or 1-630-749-4320. character Part of SST lost. 30 Arthur Fiedler 65 Sneaky trick For more information about goal of $13,000 to provide the “My faith comes play with this is. Running and helping to until the village is cared for. A 22 Ambulance VIP into 53 “Antony and et al. 66 Luke’s sci-fi 25 Bur. of Fischer. “You Cleopatra” infrastructure to get sister water to this,” said read killer in change and potentially save lives child can be sponsored for $35 World Vision, visit www. 32 Hamm of soccer Prohibition Tyne with a a 33village in Kenya 67and raised the Bible all the time 56 that we are – many of which he will never a month. Child sponsorship worldvision.org. Ryder rentals Waterfowl employee Tony and Emmys 34 Where eaglets whose young to help $16,000. therelative poor. We 58 are blessed have the opportunity to know provides access to life-saving 27 Shrimp Salon sound this more 28 Key withwe no ever realize 59 “What here __!”: “How It hatch was after a inspired touching than personally – is Dave’s passion,” basics like clean water, nutritious katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

SUDOKU

38 Minuscule tattoo? 40 Dollhouse dress adornment? 42 Opposite of perfect pitch

sharps or flats: puzzle’s theme Abbr. 68 Black stone 29 NFL Hall of 69 Enjoys a Marchetti Hands-Only smorgasbord adultFamer

CALENDAR

Zambia use,31 neighbor: Child Abbr. CPR Infant CPR, and 33 Like

fun!” 61 Palindromic airline 63 Tex-__ CPR and AED Adventist cuisine©2012

andTRIBUNE AED MEDIA use, INC. howSERVICES, to relieve Continued from page 9 choking in an adult, child, or P r e v i o u s p uinfant. z z l e This ’ s aisn not s w ea rcertification s Department, 900 W. Romeo Road. course. Cost is $10 per person. This year’s open house focuses Register by calling 630-527on green initiatives, education, 6363. and demonstrations for a more MARCH 19-25 sustainable life. There will also be program demonstrations, Symmetrical Flowers studio registration for spring program, drop-in.at the DuPage Children’s and information on community Museum, 301 N. Washington St., organizations. The Fit 4 Life Naperville. Create multi-colored Fitness Center and Jungle Safari painted flowers that reveal the Indoor Playground will be open, mathematical beauty of rotational with no admission charged. For symmetry in this math-focused more information call 815-886- activity. Morning and afternoon 6222. sessions available most days. For more information, visit www. MARCH 18 dupagechildrensmuseum.org or CPR/First Aid for family call 630-637-8000. and friends. 1-4:30 p.m. at MARCH 20 the Edward Hospital Education Center, third floor. This video- Healthy Meals on a Budget. based classroom course teaches 6:30 p.m. at Bolingbrook TOP POP ALBUMS February 19 through February 25 TITLE

21 Whitney: The Greatest Hits Now 41:That’s What I Call Music

19 2012 Grammy Nominees A Different Kind of Truth Kisses on the Bottom Doo Wops & Hooligans Own the Night Barton Hollow

Hospital, 500 Remington Blvd. Healthy eating doesn’t have to be expensive. Learn how to plan healthy family meals for under $10, and get tips on how to create healthy meals and snacks for eating on the run. Sign up at www.keepingyouwell. com/abh/home.aspx. Hunger Games Trivia Feast. 6:30-8 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Are you ready to play Previous puzzle ’s the Hunger Games? Challenge yourself to survive epic trivia and a feast of foods from the books. The winner receives lifesaving prizes. Contact the library at 815-886-2030 to sign up.

MARCH 21 CPR Heartsaver AED. 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Edward Hospital Education Center. Classroom-based, video-driven course led by

an AHA Heartsaver of Basic Life Support instructor. Upon successful completion of all course requirements, students received a course completion card, valid for two years. Register by calling 630-5276363.

Adele Whitney Houston Various artists Adele Various artists Van Halen Paul McCartney Bruno Mars Lady Antebellum The Civil Wars

TITLE

Own the Night My Kinda Party The Band Perry Tailgates & Tanlines Home Speak Now Emotional Traffic Red River Blue Clear as Day Chief

Golden Age Club. Noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department, 900 W. Romeo Road. Members must be 50+ to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Stop in, join up, and make some new friends. Transportation is available to members by calling 815-886-6222 the day before a meeting or event.

A color of his own. 9:3010:15 a.m. at the DuPage Children’s Museum, 301 N. Washington St., Naperville. answers MARCH 23 For ages 2-3. Learn about the story of this mixed-up Insect Zoo. 10 a.m. to noon at chameleon. Use color printing the DuPage Children’s Museum, and collage to create a story 301 N.Washington St., Naperville. of your own. For registration The experts from Anderson information, visit www. Pest Solutions will introduce Previous puzzle ’s answers dupagechildrensmuseum.org children to good bugs, like or call 630-637-8000.Jumbles: Hercules beetles, giant lubber grasshoppers, • BROOK • TUNED • LADING •giant OSSIFYpumpkin Village Board Answer: Meeting. millipedes, and more. For all ages. 6-8 p.m. at 1050 West Romeo registration visit A successful dress For designer is good withinformation, this Road, Romeoville. The public www.dupagechildrensmuseum. -- “FIGURES” is invited to attend. org or call 630-637-8000. TOP DVD RENTALS February 19 through February 25

TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS February 19 through February 25 ARTIST

MARCH 22

ARTIST

Lady Antebellum Jason Aldean the Band Perry Luke Bryan Dierks Bentley Taylor Swift Tim McGraw Blake Shelton Scotty McCreery Eric Church

TITLE Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1

Puss in Boots The Rum Diary Drive Real Steel Moneyball 50/50 Contagion A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas

Killer Elite

LABEL Summit Entertainment

Paramount Pictures FilmDistrict FilmDistrict DreamWorks Studios Columbia TriStar Summit Entertainment Warner Bros. Warner Bros. Open Road Films


Take 5

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

H o ro s c o p e s

Across

1 Birthday secret 5 “Back in Black” band 9 Visibly amazed 14 __ Domini 15 Bodybuilder’s supplement 16 Hand-dyeing craft 17 Very narrow fissure? 19 Vintage violin 20 Michael Moore health-care film 21 Melody 23 Rock ‘n’ roll middle name 24 Didn’t sell 26 Landfill in a toy city? 28 CIA part: Abbr. 30 Arthur Fiedler et al. 32 Hamm of soccer 33 Ryder rentals 34 Where eaglets hatch 38 Minuscule tattoo? 40 Dollhouse dress adornment? 42 Opposite of perfect pitch

43 Composer __ Carlo Menotti 44 Transp. group in the Loop 45 Pago Pago people 48 Did a farrier’s job 49 Where to wear a training bra? 52 Lacking spice 54 Chain selling stacks 55 Clue in a case 57 Dip for a chip 60 Mila of “Black Swan” 62 Very young hobo? 64 “Fear of Flying” author Jong 65 Sneaky trick 66 Luke’s sci-fi sister 67 Waterfowl whose young inspired this puzzle’s theme 68 Black stone 69 Enjoys a smorgasbord

Initiative isn’t something for the uninitiated. Luckily, you can overlook a lack of experience and charge forward fearlessly in the week ahead. Your industry on the job should enrich your bank account.

You can benefit by giving others the benefit of the doubt. Do not waste time trying to see through people but focus on ways to see people through. This is a week to take advantage of every opportunity.

Line your pockets with gold by being bold. You can make proposals in the week to come that will fall on eager ears. When you speak, people listen - so take advantage of any opportunity to air your ideas.

Learn the lingo. By verbalizing your ideas in a way that resonates with others, you can impress others with your knowledge and expertise. Gain trust in the week ahead by speaking to other people’s needs.

Clean up or make up. Whatever has fallen by the wayside can be picked up in the week ahead. An apology will be accepted if you take the time to offer it. Revise your goals and plans for the future.

Prove your mettle and earn a medal. Nothing looks better at the end of a game than having more points than an opponent. Your take-charge attitude will win appreciation in the upcoming week.

The past is but prologue. When one door closes, another opens but in the week to come, be sure that you don’t look so long and regretfully upon the closed door that you do not see the one that has opened.

The simplest solution is often the best. Whatever comes to you effortlessly is beneficial, but you can’t exert your will and force some things into being in the week ahead.

You will want everyone to jump on the bandwagon when you are part of the band. Don’t exclude anyone from your circle, but offer encouragement and educate others in the week ahead.

To move on to the next chapter, you need a blank page. During the upcoming week, you will be filled with useful and creative ideas to create a prosperous future. Gather support to put ideas into motion.

Your life is lived on a stage. You are the star of your own production, but most key events happen without a rehearsal. During the coming week, go ahead and act on impulse; those who hesitate are lost.

Even a reluctant warrior picks up a weapon when necessary. You must learn to accept the necessity of fighting your way to the top of the food chain. Be aggressive in the week ahead.

Down 1 WWII auxiliaries 2 Calvary inscription 3 Twinkie or Ding Dong 4 Game with sticks 5 Pointy tool 6 Slip in a pot 7 Strips of leaves 8 Swan constellation 9 The N.Y. Nets were its last champion 10 Warren Harding’s middle name 11 Asteroids maker 12 Spike for a mountaineer 13 Squeezing (out) 18 Keystone character 22 Ambulance VIP 25 Bur. of Prohibition employee 27 Shrimp relative 28 Key with no sharps or flats: Abbr. 29 NFL Hall of Famer Marchetti 31 Zambia neighbor: Abbr. 33 Like

megapopular web videos 35 Cardinal who was a foe of the Musketeers 36 Wild about 37 “Zounds!” 39 Unwanted playground game teammate 40 Recycling vessel 41 Brewer’s kiln 43 Yuri who was the first to orbit Earth 46 Wire measure 47 Punch sequence 48 Some tees 49 Pedaled 50 Freedom, in Swahili 51 Part of SST 53 “Antony and Cleopatra” killer 56 Tyne with a Tony and Emmys 58 Salon sound 59 “What __!”: “How fun!” 61 Palindromic airline 63 Tex-__ cuisine©2012

SUDOKU

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • BROOK • TUNED • LADING • OSSIFY

Answer:

A successful dress designer is good with this -- “FIGURES”

11


12

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Lewis Flyers make tournament, page 17; Voyager Media Senior All-Star Game is March 18 - Make sure you are there

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

13

Booker adds special moment to Spartan’s season By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

Murphy’s Law, unfortunately, turned out to be the rule rather than the exception for Romeoville’s boys basketball team throughout the justconcluded 2011-12 campaign.

BOYS BASKETBALL The Spartans struggled through a 6-22 season, which ended with a 64-53 loss to Oswego East in a Downers South regional play-in game early last week. It marked the third time this year that Romeoville had played their Southwest Prairie Conference opponents, and the Spartans were on the short end of all three games. “Anything that could happen to this team happened,” said head coach Jeff Bambule.“It was a tough season, but you play with pride, you play with class, you play until the buzzer and that’s all we can ask.” The team’s trio of senior starters—Uchenna Akuba, Jaylen Nunn and Nate Washington— exhibited versatility and athleticism despite the Spartans’ record. Washington and the 6-5 Akuba are good scorers, and Nunn helped the Spartans get back into the game vs. Oswego

East last week with a one-hand slam towards the end of the first quarter. Ryan Hurtado and Ezekiel Williams (6-5 and 6-4, respectively) join Akuba, Nunn and Washington as the team’s graduating seniors. “Those kids they gave four years to the program and we really appreciate it,” Bambule said. “They’re great kids; three of them are going to move on and play at the next level which is fantastic. Nate is going to Millikin; Jalen is going to Carthage. I don’t know where Uchenna’s going to go but he’s going to play somewhere.” Akuba said he wants to play college basketball; it’s just a matter of where. “No particular college,” said Akuba when asked if there are certain schools in which he’s interested. “I’m looking for any colleges that will want me on their team and be grateful to have me. It doesn’t really matter to me (where he goes). I just love the game of basketball and I’m willing to play anywhere.” Although Romeoville is losing these seniors, Bambule hopes his underclassmen will step up into prominent roles next season. Sophomore guard Christian Diaz started the regional contest, and 6-6 classmate Armari Bonilla, saw

Submitted photo

Romeoville’s Maurice Booker scored his lone career basket on senior night.

quite a bit of playing time in the game. “Chris did a great job handling the point for us, and Armani will definitely be a post (player) for us next year,” Bambule said. Bambule also brought up

sophomores Darrion King and James Boyd, along with freshman Josh Krueger, for the regional game. “We had some young guys on the bench that got in there at the end (of the regional game),”

Bambule said. “I hope that they learned a little bit practicing with us the last week-and-a-half. They’re good kids and I think they’re going to be good players See SEASON, page 14


14

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

SEASON Continued from page 13 at the varsity level next year.” Bambule said juniors Bobby Leach, Jake Bambule , Jimmy Moon and Jaylon Richardson “will have the opportunity to be significant contributors next year.” “At different times this year, they all stepped up and contributed for us,” he said. The Spartans, who went 2-12 in league play, registered what turned out to be their final victory of the season, 56-49, over Plainfield Central on Jan. 24. Romeoville then dropped its final nine games, which includes the regional loss. But in the midst of this nine-

game skid, the Spartans and their fans experienced a heartwarming moment during a 57-39 loss to Oswego on Senior Night Feb. 17. Bambule dressed senior manager Maurice Booker, a special needs student, and inserted him into the lineup late in the game. “We told him (before the game) that he was going to get in uniform,” Bambule said. “We told him that we didn’t know if he was going to get into the game. We really tried to emphasize that so he didn’t get disappointed.” Booker brought the crowd to its feet when he swished a 15foot jumper in the final seconds. “The crowd just exploded,” Romeoville High School Principal Derek Kinder said. “It was a big roar from both sides for a good

Sports 30 seconds.” “The coach has a good heart,” Booker said. “I love all my teammates.” Prior to making the 15-footer, Booker took a shot from the top of the key, but missed. However, Washington grabbed the rebound as it was going out of bounds and passed the ball to Booker for another attempt. Booker sank the shot from the free-throw line. “It was unbelievable,” Bambule said. “Maurice is a great kid and he’s been with us for four years. He just brings such enthusiasm. To have the opportunity to have him not only get in the game but drain a shot from the free-throw line. “There weren’t too many dry eyes in the house.” mikes@buglenewspapers.com


THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

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THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012


Sports

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

17

Flyers make tourney; locals ink with soccer The NCAA Division II Men’s Basketball Committee announced on Sunday (March 4) that the Lewis University men’s basketball team has earned an at-large bid and will compete in the 2012 NCAA Division II Men’s Basketball Championship for the first time since 2008.

LEWIS The Flyers (17-11) take on No. 1 ranked and defending national champion, Bellarmine (25-3) on Saturday (March 10) at BU’s Knights Hall. Tip-off is set for 6 p.m. (EST). “We’ll take it,” Lewis head men’s basketball coach Scott Trost said. “I’m excited for our seniors and I’m happy for our program to be able to do this in the toughest conference in the country, by far.” Saturday’s showdown with Bellarmine will be the fourth meeting between the two teams this year with the Knights winning all three contests. Their most recent victory over Lewis came in the GLVC Quarterfinals on Friday (March 2) night. “(Bellarmine) is the number one team in the country and deservedly so,” Trost said. “They have great players and a great coach. “We’re going to give it our best shot and see what can happen.”

MEN’S SOCCER Lewis University head men’s soccer coach Evan Fiffles announced on March 5 that he has signed Jordan Blair (Plainfield, Ill./Plainfield East), Anthony Cetera (Frankfort, Ill./ Lincoln-Way East), Colin Donnally (Plainfield, Ill./Plainfield North), John McLachlan (LaGrange Park, Ill./Nazareth Academy), Lenin Roa-Tapia (Schaumburg, Ill./ Hoffman Estates) and Robert Zieba (Lockport, Ill./Lockport) to National Letters of Intent to play for the Flyers in 2012. “Each of these guys are exactly what we look for in a studentathlete,” Fiffles said. “They’re all good students, players and most of all, have good character.” Blair, a 6-foot, 190-pound defender, was a two-time Team MVP for Plainfield East and was selected to the Southwest Prairie All-Conference team as a senior. In 2011, Blair recorded two goals and six assists. Prior to his senior campaign, Blair started at

goalkeeper for the Bengals as a sophomore and junior. A fouryear member of the honor roll, Blair was selected as the varsity Defensive Player of the Year as a junior. Cetera, a 6-foot, 152-pound midfielder/defender, was a fouryear varsity letterwinner for Lincoln-Way East. In 2011, Cetera helped the Griffins advance to Class 3A supersectional final where they dropped a 1-0, fourovertime decision to eventual state champion, Morton. A twotime All-Southwest Suburban Conference selection, Cetera led Lincoln-Way East with 17 points (5 goals, team-high 7 assists) as a senior. He is a two-time Joliet Herald News All-Area and IHSSCA All-Sectional honoree who scored 63 points (17 goals, 29 assists) in four varsity campaigns. Donnally,a 5-foot-11,170-pound midfielder, earned three varsity letters for Plainfield North, where he totaled 33 goals and 11 assists from 2009-11. He was a twotime Team MVP and Southwest Prairie All-Conference selection and finished as the Tigers’ alltime leading scorer. Donnally is a member of the Honor Roll and National Honors Society who has competed for both the Chicago Fire Juniors Development Academy (2008-10) and Naperville Galaxy Blue (2011-12) in the U.S. Youth Soccer National League. Zieba, a 6-foot, 175-pound forward, was a three-year letterwinner for Lockport where he finished his varsity career with 28 goals and 18 assits. As a senior, he recorded 12 goals and nine assists to help the Porters to the 3A regional championship and earn Chicago Fire/SouthtownStar All-Area, All-Southwest Suburban Conference and IHSCA AllSectional honors.

BASEBALL Lewis baseball slammed five solo home runs in the opener of a doubleheader sweep of Findlay on Sunday (March 4) afternoon. Lewis took the first game 6-1 and the nightcap 6-4. In game one, Lewis scored in the bottom of the first on an RBI single by sophomore Ben Albano (West Dundee, Ill./Jacobs). Junior Michael Schroeder (Crown Point, Ind./ North Newton/Triton) See LEWIS, page 18

Steve Woltmann/Lewis University

Julian Lewis and the Flyers will compete in the NCAA Division II tournament.


18

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

LEWIS Continued from page 17 started the second inning with a solo home run. Albano hit a solo home run in the third before Schroeder hit his second of the game in the third to make the score 4-1. Solo home runs by junior Brian Norwood (Medinah, Ill./Lake Park) in the fifth and senior Mike Bolling (Chicago, Ill./ Guerin Prep/Triton) in the sixth rounded out the scoring. “The wind was blowing out and we took advantage but we had a good game one at the plate all around,” Lewis head coach Tim McDonough said. “Bolling got on base four times, Schroeder was 3-for-3 in his first game at Lewis and Ben was good all day.” While the Lewis bats were celebrating the opening of the 2012 season with some offensive fireworks; Lewis pitcher senior Pat Lahey (Downers Grove, Ill./ Downers Grove South) was keeping the Oilers from doing the same. Lahey allowed one run on five hits with three strikeouts

in a complete game seven inning performance.The Oilers only run came in the second to tie the game up. “It was a tough day to pitch and it was good to see Pat come out of the gates with a good effort,” McDonough said. “He set the tone and was very efficient, throwing around 80 pitches for the complete game.” The Lewis offense started where it left off in game two by tallying a run in the first inning. Bolling began the game with a walk. He stole second and then Albano knocked him home with a two-out RBI single. It was the same combination in the third with Albano knocking in Bolling with a one-out single. Same story, different cast of characters in the fourth as senior Michael Wido (Downers Grove, Ill./Downers Grove South) singled,stole second and was driven in with one out by sophomore Kyle Thomas (Homer Glen, Ill./Providence Catholic). Thomas’ RBI gave Lewis a 3-1 lead which didn’t last long as Findlay tied it up with a pair of runs in the bottom of the fourth. Following a scoreless fifth,Lewis

Sports took the lead for good with a pair of runs in the sixth. Schroeder and Thomas each batted in a run in the frame. Findlay scored a lone run in the sixth to cut the Lewis lead to a single run. A Norwood sacrifice fly in the seventh scored freshman Mike Barajas (Chicago, Ill./Nazareth) to make the score 6-4.The insurance run was set up by a Barajas hit by pitch to start VOTE ONLINE! the frame.T hat would be the final after senior Drew Hicks (Pekin, Ill./ Jewell Loyd, Niles West Robby Bain, Bolingbrook Pekin) earned a four-out save. -Scored 3,000th career point -Second in state at 285-pounds Three of the outs came by way of a strikeout. Cullen Cummings, Downers South Brad Johnson, Lockport “Ben had two big hits early to -Second in state at 132-pounds -Back-to-back state champ put us up,”McDonough said.“After they tied it at three it was good to Abby Smith, Romeoville Nathan Davis, Plainfield Central see us come back and score some -10 points, 5 assists, 3 steals per. -Second place in state at 126-pounds runs. That’s a good way to win a game early in the season.” Sophomore Tom Helwich (New for your winner for the Athlete of the Month for February Lenox, Ill./Lincoln Way Central) online at www.buglenewspapers.com up until March 12. The picked up the win for Lewis. He winner will be announced in the March 14/15 issue. went five innings, allowing three runs (one earned) on six hits.

Vote


ame G OF THE WEEK presents

Bringing you the top game of the week in the Voyager Media coverage area.

www.buglenewspapers.com/basketball

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

19

Three schools claim regionals By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

The sign of a great team is winning when you aren’t at your best and facing adversity. Plainfield East (27-1) proved that it was a great team Friday night after overcoming a rough night offensively to beat Neuqua Valley at Neuqua Valley 4745 in the Neuqua Regional Championship. The Bengals, the No. 1 seed in the East Aurora Sectional, face No. 4 seed West Aurora Tuesday. The winner advances to Friday’s sectional title. No Plainfield boys hoops team has ever won a sectional game. The win marked the first regional title for East in any sport, and once the buzzer sounded, was more of a relief than jubilation. East held on to narrow leads at the end of each quarter (13-11, 22-20, 37-33). Its biggest lead was 34-27 late in the third quarter.The Bengals held a 42-36 lead in the fourth, but missed free throws (6-of-16 for the game) kept the Wildcats alive. The lead was sliced to one at 46-45 when Dee Brown made one of two free throws with 37.8 seconds left. Neuqua took a lot of time off the clock before a miss and Jawan Straughter was fouled with 6.6 seconds left. He missed the front end of a 1-and-1 and Neuqua grabbed the rebound, but a halfcourt heave was long. Brown led the way with 17 points. Brian Bennett added 13 points and 11 rebounds and Myles Walters contributed 10 points. •As one of four senior starters

playing their final home game for Downers Grove South, Jamall Millison was determined to make sure it wasn’t the last game of their high school careers. Millison scored nine of his 17 points, all on three-pointers, in the decisive third quarter as the Mustangs rallied to beat upsetminded Hinsdale Central 64-51 Friday night to win their second consecutive Class 4A regional championship. Second-seeded Downers South (23-5) advances to the East Aurora Sectional semifinals, where it will face No. 3 seed Metea Valley (24-4), which edged Benet 45-44, tonight at 7:30 p.m. “It means a lot to me as a senior and I know [also for] the rest of them because this is our last time ever playing here,” Millison said. “So we wanted to go out with a win for everybody and give the fans a good show.” The fans got a good show, albeit one a little more nervewracking than it would have liked. The Mustangs had beaten No. 10 seed Hinsdale Central 7156 on this same floor nine days before, but the Red Devils (17-10) came out hustling and stymied Downers South’s offense, forcing the Mustangs into taking tough shots. The Red Devils led 19-11 with 5:17 left in the second quarter before senior Kevin Honn got the rally started by sinking a three-pointer from the right corner. The visitors were still up by seven before the Mustangs tallied the last seven points of the half to forge a 24-24 halftime tie. •Maine South’s boys basketball team advances to sectional play

for the first time in two years this week after handing No. 3-seeded St. Patrick a 43-30 loss on its home court in the regional championship Friday night. The Hawks, who led 20-12 at halftime, took a 27-21 lead into the fourth quarter. St. Patrick cut Maine South’s lead to five twice during the fourth, but the Hawks finished off the Shamrocks with a 9-0 run. John Solari scored 15 points to lead Maine South, while Frank Dounis added 10. Maine South (19-12), seeded sixth, will square off with Niles North (20-8) in the Glenbrook South sectional semifinals at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. The Hawks defeated Niles North in late January, 55-53. •Evanston put an end to the Dons’ 2011-12 basketball season at Friday night’s Notre Dame regional title game, holding off a late charge by the host team to win, 51-48. The Dons (20-9) took their only lead of the contest, 33-32, late in the third quarter on threepointers from Justin Halloran and Joe Ferrici. Evanston regained the lead at the end of the quarter and kept it despite Notre Dame coming within two points (4543) and one point (49-48) late in

the game. Notre Dame had a chance to tie it, but Matt Mooney couldn’t get a jumper to fall just before the horn sounded. Mooney and Ferrici each finished with 17 points for the Dons. The Wildkits advance to face top-seeded New Trier in a Glenbrook South sectional semifinal game Tuesday night. •For the second time this season, free throws played a big part in a loss for Joliet West. Unfortunately for the Tigers, the 45-41 loss to Thornton came in the regional final and ended their season. West (17-10) finished the game 16-for-30 from the free throw line. “Free throws came back to haunt us,” said West coach Luke Yaklich. “Free thrown hurt us in two games this year, West Aurora and then this one. It came down to free throw shooting. I tip my hat to Thornton, they played hard all game and in a four-point game, it is going to come down to free throws. “We had our opportunities to win, I thought we executed very well down the stretch. We got great looks, but we did not make free throws and we did not make shots in the lane. We missed a lot

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Dee Brown, Plainfield East 17 points in regional final win

Kevin Honn, Downers S. 20 points in regional final win

John Solari, Maine South 15 points in regional final win

Pat McInerney, Benet 17 second half pts in semi win

Go to buglenewspapers.com to vote for your winner! Results here next week! SPONSORED BY

of bunnies tonight.” One of those bunnies, was a Marlon Johnson dunk with 27 seconds left to play that would have tied the game. Joliet West was down 17-16 at the intermission and after Johnson picked up his third personal foul less than a minute into the second half. That forced him to the bench for nearly six minutes in which the Wildcats opened the game to a 10-point lead and held a 31-26 lead after three. “As a coach, we wanted to get him a couple minutes,” Yaklich said about Johnson. “We got him a couple minutes and unfortunately those couple minutes let them stretch the lead to a point where we had to work to get back the whole rest of the game.” After the Tigers cut the lead to 40-34 with 2 minutes, 55 seconds left to play, Thornton didn’t connect on another field goal, but unlike West, the Wildcats were 5-for-6 from the free-throw line in the closing minutes. Junior Morris Dunnigan led Joliet West with 16 points, while Johnson tallied 13 points and Brandon McCullum added seven. Matt Le Cren, Mike Sandrolini and Mark Gregory also contributed.

LAST WEEK’S RESULTS


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THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

Health & Fitness

Whatever happened to peptic ulcer surgery? Those of us who are old enough to know who LBJ was or remember when Richard Nixon was president are old enough to remember the epidemic of ulcers in the 1950’s and 1960’s.We all knew someone who had to eat a “bland diet” and swallow liquid antacids by the handful.  Many required surgery for control. In fact, during my medical training days, peptic ulcer surgery (known as Bill Roth I, Bill Roth II, and vagotomy) was the most commonly performed surgery.  What happened? Are our lives now so perfect that people no longer have ulcers? Hardly. Peptic ulcers, ulcers of the stomach or duodenum, are still very common but our better understanding of their causes and more effective treatments have greatly decreased their impact on public health. Ulcer diets have gone the way of eight track tapes, and ulcer surgeries are now seldom needed.  Two major advances are responsible

for this significant change. First, our medicines are much better. The first advance was the development of H2 blockers, such as Zantac and Tagamet, in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. These products block hormonerelated release of acid in the stomach and are reasonably effective. No acid resulted in no ulcers.Thus, the need for surgery declined.  In the following decade proton pump inhibitors such as Prilosec, Protonix and Nexium became available. These medicines actually block the pumping of hydrochloric acid (yes, your stomach produces hydrochloric acid) into the stomach. These agents have proven to be highly effective and decrease acid production by over 90%.The need for ulcer surgeries became almost non-existent.  The second major advancement came from our better understanding of the causes of ulcers. Certain medications such as aspirin and arthritis pain medications are a major cause, but the other major cause is not “stress,” as many believed. Almost all duodenal ulcers and the majority of stomach ulcers are cause by an infection.  The

bacterium, Helicobacter Pylori, has found a way to survive in the very acid environment of the stomach.It is the irritation caused by this bacterium that is thought to provoke the inflammation that eventually leads to an ulcer. Our ability to identify this infection and treat it simply with antibiotics and the proton pump inhibitors (PPI’s) mentioned above has significantly decreased the incidence of ulcers. As always, there must be some downside to this advance. Fortunately, there has been relatively few. PPI’s are suspected to decrease the efficacy of Plavix, a medication important to those with coronary artery disease. Stopping PPI’s quickly may result in a surge of acid production. Also, at the same time ulcers have been decreasing, there has been a corresponding increase in the relatively uncommon cancer occurring at the junction of the stomach and esophagus. There is no proven link, but coincidence has raised suspicions.

treatments are pills, not surgery.  consequences. Please seek medical advice before you take the non-prescription Dr. Christopher Rose, M.D. is a varieties as it may adversely physician and author based in Niles, Illinois. The advice contained in this effect your other medications. column is for informational purposes To avoid any possible long-term only. Readers should consult with their ill effects take only the strength own physician to evaluate any illness you need for as long as you need or medical condition. Contact Dr. Rose it, not longer. This way you can at (847) 965-3200 or visit his web site at: www.cancercenterschicago.com avoid unforeseen long-term

Doctor’s RX:  If you are experiencing stomach problems, there is no good reason not to pursue medical care. The

Lump, even without pain, should be checked out DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I’m 71 and recently noticed a lump in my scrotum. It doesn’t hurt, but I am a bit concerned it is cancer. What else could cause this? ANSWER: A lump or swelling within the pouch of skin (scrotum) that holds your testicles, or even near your testicles, may not cause harm or even need to be treated. But it is still important you see your doctor so he or she can determine what’s causing the lump. For older men, it’s not necessarily cancer. It’s uncommon for men over 40 to develop testicular cancer - and even more rare in men over 65. However, numerous other problems can cause scrotal lumps (masses). Diagnosing the cause of a

scrotal mass often can be done based on the signs and symptoms it’s causing and the location and feel of the mass. Additional visualization is usually done with ultrasound imaging, and by viewing the mass while shining a bright light through the scrotum (transillumination). Urine or blood tests may be done to test for a bacterial or viral infection. Causes of relatively painless lumps may include: Varicocele: This is an enlargement of the veins that carry oxygen-depleted blood away from scrotal tissues. Most varicoceles occur on the left side of the scrotum. Less commonly, they occur on both sides. They may not cause symptoms and often don’t require treatment. When a varicocele causes

symptoms, they’re usually felt as a dull ache in the scrotum that’s more noticeable when standing and goes away when lying down. Treatment of problem varicoceles typically involves sealing off the enlarged veins with a minimally invasive surgical procedure. Hydrocele: This occurs when fluid accumulates within the tissue layers that surround the testicle (tunica vaginalis). Typically, hydroceles begin small and fill slowly over time. They’re usually harmless with painless swelling their only sign. However, they can become quite large and tense, leading to discomfort and making it difficult for your doctor to examine your scrotum for other problems. Treatment of a problematic hydrocele involves surgical

removal of the tunica vaginalis. Draining the hydrocele won’t work, as it will quickly refill. Spermatocele: This is a fluidfilled bulge (cyst) that occurs on an area of tissue (epididymis) at the top of the testicle that stores and transports sperm. Surgical removal of the cyst isn’t necessary unless it becomes bothersome. Testicular cancer: Although rare, testicular cancer can occur in older men, usually as a painless lump on the testicle that may be accompanied by a dull ache or sense of heaviness of the scrotum. It’s important to know that pain in this area - with or without a scrotal mass - typically signals the need for emergency care, as certain causes of pain can

begin to cause permanent tissue damage within hours of the start of pain. Even if you’re not experiencing pain or other symptoms, any scrotal mass should be examined by a doctor for accurate diagnosis and treatment. - Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D., Endocrinology/Metabolism, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic is an educational resource and doesn’t replace regular medical care. E-mail a question to medicaledge(AT SIGN) mayo.edu , or write: Medical Edge from Mayo Clinic, c/o TMS, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, N.Y., 14207. For more information, visit www. mayoclinic.org. (c) 2012 MAYO FOUNDATION FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION AND RESEARCH


Real Estate & Business

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

21

If you want more money, redefine your scope Q. I’m in a field that is not highly paid. I’m tired of working long hours and doing hard work for a small paycheck. Is there any way to take my current skills and make more money? A.Yes, stop thinking of yourself as your job title. Instead, redefine yourself as a professional with a toolkit full of skills. Start by making a list of everything you know how to do and have done. Now make a

list of every job you can imagine that would benefit from these types of skills. If you have trouble brainstorming, do an Internet search or look at occupational handbooks that list skills for different jobs. When you get done with your research, you should have a list of many new job titles other than the one you currently possess to explore jobs with a higher salary. Now consider your life circumstances and your flexibility about where you live and work. The wider the geographic net you can cast, the more job opportunities you will have. Make sure you note jobs that

use your special skills that are more plentiful and often have openings. You’ll increase your chances of getting a better paid job if you know there are more of these types of opportunities. Now do research on the companies that hire people for these jobs. Find out if they have online applications, and start getting your resume out to as many companies as you can identify. Also consider whether there are professional associations for people within these departments and go to some meetings.Personal contacts are always your best entry into a new job.

Some people think making money is simply luck or an Ivy League education. The truth is that neither luck nor a prestigious degree guarantees a higher salary. In today’s economy, every employee needs to see himself or herself as an entrepreneur. Your company may be bought out, and the needs of your industry may change, but your skill set can stay relevant if you don’t rigidly identify with your job title. Even when you are happy with your salary and job, keep your eyes open to changes in your industry. Look for new ways to apply the old tools you already have. Be keenly aware that the

rapid pace of change has created two classes of employees: those who get run over by the wave of change and those who ride the wave of change to the career of their dreams. Be the latter.

Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies. (c) 2012 INTERPERSONAL EDGE

Get rid of $7,000 debt, but don’t lose relationship war Dear Dave, I got divorced recently, and have custody of our children who are 12 and 17. I’m lucky enough to be debt-free, and I own the house we’re living in, which is worth about $350,000. I also have $160,000 in savings, and we receive $1,200 in child support every month. People are all telling me I should be investing, but each one tells me to do a different kind of investing. What do you suggest?

Mary Dear Mary, I know going through a divorce has got to be hard on you and your kids. Make sure you spend lots of time hugging on them and letting them know they’re loved. Fortunately, things are still pretty good in your world in a financial sense. Your net worth is a half-million dollars, plus you have no debt. Most ladies don’t find themselves as lucky moneywise after a divorce. Don’t do too much with the $160,000 right now. Just park $100,000 of it in a CD for a year until you get over the shock of everything that has happened. You won’t make much money,

but you won’t lose anything, either. Then, take the remaining $60,000, and invest it in good growth stock mutual funds – ones that are very conservative and have at least a 10-year track record of success. You’ve also got to take a look down the road and decide what you want to do with the rest of your life. You’re going to be an empty-nester is a few years. Do you want to go back to school or maybe start your own business? You’ve got a little learning to do about investing, too.Taking a year or so will allow for education and thinking about what you want out of life. Knowledge has a way of erasing fear. Plus, you’ve

got a responsibility to your kids to invest this money wisely. When everything settles down a bit, just take your time, find a good investment professional with the heart of a teacher, and make sure you don’t put money into anything you don’t

understand. Spend lots of time loving on your kids, too. That’ll help with the healing process as much as anything. —Dave For more financial help please visit daveramsey.com.


22

THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1355 W. Alder Creek Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Town Home). On the 28th day of March, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE TRUST 2006-2 Plaintiff V. ZAFAR IQBAL, STATE OF ILLINOIS-DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and CREEKSIDE AT ROMEOVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 516 Everette Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 21st day of March, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee for RASC 2006KS6 Plaintiff V. Pablo Deanda; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 10 CH 2309 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Case No. 09 CH 4389 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/1, 3/8, 3/15 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 752 HILLCREST DRIVE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 ((none available)). On the 4th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff V. BRUNO AND CAROL LORGUS Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 4359 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 189,738.86 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/8, 3/15, 3/22 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 362 Daffodil Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single famliy, two story). On the 4th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff V. BRIAN W. O’SULLIVAN A/K/A BRIAN O’SULLIVAN; MEGAN A. O’SULLIVAN A/K/A MEGAN O’SULLIVAN; USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK (USAA FSB); WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 3342 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/8, 3/15, 3/22

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-09-27554 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/23, 3/1, 3/8

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 640 Montrose Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Detatched). On the 28th day of March, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: ING BANK, FSB Plaintiff V. RODNEY MILLER, ET, AL. Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 5914 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Weltman, Weinberg & Reis 180 N. LaSalle Street Suite 2400 Chicago, Illinois 60601 312-253-9617 312-253-9602 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/1, 3/8, 3/15

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 2091 LONGWOOD COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (FRAME SINGLE FAMILY WITH ATTACHED 2 CAR). On the 28th day of March, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIE S 2006-FF15 Plaintiff V. MARITES NUNEZ Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 6562 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 197,538.21 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/1, 3/8, 3/15


THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012

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THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee for RASC 2006KS6 Plaintiff,

ING BANK, FSB Plaintiff,

WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIE S 2006-FF15 Plaintiff,

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH MORTGAGE TRUST 2006-2 Plaintiff,

vs. Pablo Deanda; et. al. Defendant. No. 09 CH 4389 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 7th day of December, 2011, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 21st day of March, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 22 IN BLOCK 7 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NUMBER 2, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 33 AND THE WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED SEPTEMBER 4, 1958 AS DOCUMENT 856059, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 516 Everette Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 02-33-217-015 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-09-27554 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/23, 3/1, 3/8

vs. RODNEY MILLER, ET, AL. Defendant. No. 09 CH 5914 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 6th day of December, 2011, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 28th day of March, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 21, IN BLOCK 1 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 1 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 33 AND IN THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN DUPAGE TOWNSHIP, INCLUDING A PORTION OF ROGER’S SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 23, 1958 AS DOCUMENT NO. 851430 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 640 Montrose Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Detatched P.I.N.: 12-02-33-200-007 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Weltman, Weinberg & Reis 180 N. LaSalle Street Suite 2400 Chicago, Illinois 60601 312-253-9617 312-253-9602 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/1, 3/8, 3/15

vs. MARITES NUNEZ Defendant. No. 09 CH 6562 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 16th day of November, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 28th day of March, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 724 IN WESLAKE SUBDIVISION NEIGHBORHOOD 8 UNIT 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 25, 1998 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R98-98992, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 2091 LONGWOOD COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: FRAME SINGLE FAMILY WITH ATTACHED 2 CAR P.I.N.: 06-03-12-101-051-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 197,538.21 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/1, 3/8, 3/15

THE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

ZAFAR IQBAL, STATE OF ILLINOISDEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and CREEKSIDE AT ROMEOVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. No. 10 CH 2309

BRUNO AND CAROL LORGUS Defendant. No. 10 CH 4359

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 7th day of June, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 28th day of March, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: Unit 3321504 in Creekside of Romeoville Condominium, as delineated on a Survey of the following described real estate: Certain Lots in Pasquinelliís Creekside Subdivision, being a Subdivision of part of the East 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 7, Township 36 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded April 22, 2005 as Document R2005-66952 and Certificate of Correction recorded as Document No. R2005-173623; which Survey is attached as Exhibit ìAî to the Declaration of Condominium recorded October 20, 2005 as Document No. R2005182333, and as amended; together with its undivided percentage interest in the common elements, all in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 1355 W. Alder Creek Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: To w n Home P.I.N.: 11-04-07-405-028-1004 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 20th day of December, 2011, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 4th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 30 IN BLOCK 7 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NUMBER 5 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 752 HILLCREST DRIVE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: (none available) P.I.N.: 02-28-407-018 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 189,738.86 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 3/1, 3/8, 3/15

Published 3/8, 3/15, 3/22


THE BUGLE MARCH 8, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE ROMEOVILLE PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL ) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN W. O’SULLIVAN A/K/A BRIAN O’SULLIVAN; MEGAN A. O’SULLIVAN A/K/A MEGAN O’SULLIVAN; USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK (USAA FSB); WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 11 CH 3342 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 22nd day of December, 2011, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 4th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 860, IN WESGLEN SUBDIVISION NEIGHBORHOOD 4 UNIT 3, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 17, 2001 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2001-140322, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 362 Daffodil Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single famliy, two story P.I.N.: 04-07-313-043-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/8, 3/15, 3/22

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Romeoville Bugle 3-8-12