Page 1

INSIDE

SPORTS Spartans fall in OT

www.romeovillebugle.com

PAGE 11

NEWS Closing doors on a neighborhood favorite

PAGE 3

Our Community, Our News

candid moments

DECEMBER 26, 2013

Vol. 8 No. 25

state news

new illinois law allows 17-year-olds to vote They will be allowed to vote in primary elections if they will turn 18 on or before next General Election Will County Clerk Nancy Schultz Voots announced a new Illinois law will take effect on Jan. 1, 2014, allowing 17-year-olds to vote in primary elections if they will turn 18 on or before the next General Election.

see ‘hide & seek’ on page 2

See VOTE, page 2


2

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

News VOTE

a way to speak your mind. It’s a way to control our future and it’s a way to honor our history.” Individuals can register Continued from page 1 to vote at the Will County Clerk’s Office, A person who is 302 N. Chicago St. 17 years old on the Registrations are also date of a Primary taken at the Secretary Election, and of State Driver’s who is otherwise License facility when qualified to vote, may vote at the applying for a driver’s license or state ID Primary, including card. Many schools voting by absentee, and libraries have grace period, or registrars available early voting ballot Will County Clerk for registration. with respect to There is also a mail-in that Primary, if that Nancy Schultz Voots. registration form on the person will be 18 County Clerk’s website years old on the date at www.thewillcountyclerk. of the immediately following com.When registering in person, General Election. “Let’s get our children talking two forms of identification are about current affairs at the required; at least one must show dinner table,” says Voots.“Parents the registrant’s name and current and teachers need to stress the address. importance of getting eligible Upcoming elections in Will teens registered to vote and of County include the General voting at every election. Each Primary on March 18, 2014, vote does count, and voting is and the General Election on

HIDE & SEEK Continued from page 1

Tibbott students use QR codes to find missing gingerbread men Several hundred kindergarten through third grade students at Tibbott Elementary School searched far and wide for lost gingerbread men earlier this week. It was all part of a unique

QR Code Scavenger Hunt hosted by Tibbott Library Media Center Director Erin Preder who read each class the Monarch Book Award-winning “Gingerbread Man Loose” and then sent student teams armed with Ipads searching for seven gingerbread men hidden throughout the library. The scavenger hunt included at least three different prerecorded Q coded clues for each team that could only be accessed by using the Ipad. Each code sent them to a new QR Code elsewhere in the room.

Let’s get our children talking about current affairs at the dinner table. Parents and teachers need to stress the importance of getting eligible teens registered to vote and of voting at every election. Each vote does count, and voting is a way to speak your mind. It’s a way to control our future and it’s a way to honor our history.” - Will County Clerk Nancy Schultz Voots

WEB LINKS www.thewillcountyclerk.com/

Nov. 4, 2014. The deadline for registering to vote in the Primary Election is Feb. 18, 2014.

Preder labeled the exercise a success with engaged students not only having fun and learning how to work together, but also continuing to learn more about using tablet computers. ON FRONT: Tibbott Library Media Center Director Erin Preder reads “Gingerbread Man Loose” to kindergarten students at the Bolingbrook elementary school before sending them on a QR Code scavenger hunt in the library for lost gingerbread men.


News

community

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

3

Closing doors on a neighborhood favorite

Dominick’s store on Weber, 135th will close its doors for good on Dec. 28 By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

While Dominck’s stores may be part of a Safeway chain, the feeling most shoppers at the Romeoville location is much more personal. Whether it was to grab a gallon of milk or stock up on groceries for the week, shoppers came to the Dominick’s store located on Weber and 135th Street, greeted by loyal employees with a smile and a generous attitude that stuck with its customers and is what will be missed when the store closes Dec. 28. As shoppers came out to peruse the dwindling shelves, it was the employees that guests mentioned most. It was the place where they could order a birthday cake, ask the butcher for the right cut of meat or get help carrying packages to their car. “There was always more of a family feeling here, this was our neighborhood store,” said Tammy Zitzka, Romeoville resident whose been shopping there for years.“It’s not like the big Wal-Marts out there, it was different.” For many employees, it was a job they held for years.

There was always more of a family feeling here, this was our neighborhood store. It’s not like the big Wal-Marts out there, it was different.” Tammy Zitzka, Romeoville resident whose been shopping there for years

Some stifled back tears as customers called out words of encouragement and all others could do were shake their heads at a decision that is changing the livelihood of many. LaShun Lee, bakery department manager, has been working at the store since six months after the store opened in Romeoville in 1999. “People have been shopping here for years, it’s like home, it’s just sad,” said Lee. Even more sad, she says, is that she and her fellow employees were kept in the dark about the closing, finding out the news of Safeway’s decision to exit the Chicagoland market like everyone else who heard it on the news.

Safeway announced the move during its third quarter earnings release at the end of October, stating it decided to exit the Chicago market and focus its efforts in other operating areas where its business is stronger. Safeway currently operates 72 Dominick’s stores and plans to exit each by the end of the year. Jewel-Osco and Mariano’s grocery store operators have been negotiating to take over some store locations, but Romeoville hasn’t made that cut. However Representative for Safeway Brian Dowling said, “We are engaged in a process of identifying purchasers for as many stores as possible. That process is ongoing and confidential.” Many employees have moved on but still others like Lee are working to the end, when doors close Dec. 28. “I am trying to stay hopeful, filling out applications where

Photos by LAURA KTAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

Shoppers peruse the dwindling stock at the Dominick’s store in Romeoville, set to close Dec. 28.

I can,” said Lee. “That’s all you can do.” The store announced 50 percent off savings in its last week, driving shoppers to the

store in hopes of snagging last minute bargains,leaving shelves looking barren and employees and customers looking lost.


4

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

chicagoland

Most Chicago area Post Offices will close at noon Dec. 24, Dec. 31 Each Post Office will post its revised hours of operation for these two days Most Post Offices in the Chicago area will close at noon on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, and New Year’s Eve, Dec. 31. Hours of operation for some are as follows: The following suburban Post Offices will open at their regular times and close at 4 p.m.: Carol Stream and Oak Park Main. The following suburban Post Offices will open at their regular times and close at 5 p.m.: Bolingbrook, Joliet, Orland Park Main, Schaumburg Main, Aurora East, Naperville Main, Plainfield, Batavia, Berwyn, Woodridge, Palatine and Skokie. All other Post Offices in ZIP Codes 600, 601, 602, 603, 604 and 605 will open at their regular times and close at noon Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve. All Chicago Post Office stations

and branches (ZIP Codes 606, 607 and 608) will open at their regular times and close at noon, except for the Main Post Office, 433 W. Harrison St., which will close at 5 p.m. Each Post Office will post its revised hours of operation for these two days. Customers are encouraged to go online to usps.com or call 800-ASK-USPS for information about specific Post Offices. Commercial customers should check with their Business Mail Entry Units for Dec. 24 and Dec. 31 hours of operation. Mail will be delivered on those days as scheduled. In observance of the holidays, Post Offices will be closed Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Only Express Mail will be delivered on those days in most major metropolitan areas.

News village board

Village passes tax levy Finance director says etting the levy artificially high provides the flexibility to set the levy where the Village needs it to be By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The village board approved a $14.2 million tax levy for 2013, representing a 10.45 percent increase over the previous year. Howeverthefinallevyisexpected to be closer to an estimated $12.85 million. Finance Director Kirk Openchowski explains that final Equalized Assessed Valuation information and data pertaining to certain components of the levy are not finalized, such as pensions, and will not be finalized until April. In the past three years, the final tax extension totaled $12.85 after setting an original tax levy at $13.46 million in 2010; $13.9 million in 2011 and $14 million in 2012. “Setting the levy artificially high provides the flexibility to set the levy where the Village needs it

to be,” said Openchowski. “The Village also passed an ordinance, to be filed with the county along with tax levy ordinance, setting a maximum rate and allowing the Village to reduce the levy down to any amount below what is produced by the maximum rate.” Openchowski said that most Romeoville homeowners would see little change in their taxes for the village portion of the tax bill. The total overall value of new homes and businesses, property annexation and whether or not homes have been reassessed according to market value, are all factors in determining the tax levy. “The rate most likely will trend up as it has for almost all taxing bodies over the past several years due to decreasing EAVs. However, each individual taxpayer situation is different due to, if and when EAV changes with their specific

Breaking down the numbers

new tax levy

$14.2 million

The village board approved a $14.2 million tax levy for 2013, representing a 10.45 percent increase over the previous year.

$1,000

The rate, set at $1.20 is expressed as the amount of property tax revenue that is due for every $1,000 of assessed value.

property occurs. Some will see their bills go up, others down,” said Openchowski. The tax levy is the amount of money the village raises through property tax. The tax rate for a given fiscal year equals the current tax levy divided by the total assessed valuations estimated by township assessors. The rate, set at $1.20 is expressed as the amount of property tax revenue that is due for every $1,000 of assessed value.

transportation

IDOT receives statements of qualifications for Illinois portion of Illiana tollway Qualifications submitted by the 5 teams will be evaluated by IDOT, then list of teams chosen to move forward to next procurement phase The Illinois Department of Transportation has received statements of qualifications from five teams to design, build, finance, maintain and operate the Illinois portion of the Illiana. The request for qualifications submittal period began Nov. 8 and ended Dec. 19. The qualifications submitted by the five teams will be evaluated by IDOT, then a list of teams chosen to move forward to the next procurement phase (short listed) will be announced in January 2014.

WEB LINKS www. IllianaCorridor. org/P3

“We’re very pleased with the level of interest in the procurement of the Illinois portion of the Illiana,” IDOT secretary Ann Schneider said. “These teams are comprised of firms who see this project as a worthwhile investment and a benefit for the regional economy.

“We look forward to reviewing the statements over the next few weeks to ensure the SOQs are complete,” Schneider added. The Indiana procurement will be handled separately by the Indiana Department of Transportation and the Indiana Finance Authority. RFQ submissions for the Indiana portion are due by Jan. 10, 2014. IDOT and INDOT are working together to coordinate technical requirements, tolling policy, the federal environmental approval process, and construction schedules for the two-state project.


Calendar DECEMBER 26 Symphony in Lights Holiday Light Show. Nightly through December 31 at The Promenade, Bolingbrook. Begins at dusk and runs every hour on the hour until 9 p.m. Wacky Water Week at the Bolingbrook Recreation and Aquatic Center. Get the kids out of the house and into some splashtastic fun with Wacky Water Week starting on December 21 through January 5.Themed games and activities are offered starting at noon each day. For full schedule of activities and holiday hours, please visit www.bolingbrookparks.org.

DECEMBER 27 Family Movies. 10:30 to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library,Bolingbrook.All ages preschoolers with an adult. Drop in. For movie title information, call 630-685-4181.

DECEMBER 30 Apps, E-books, Readalouds, Oh My! 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, Bolingbrook. Grades Kindergarten through fifth with adult. Registration is required. Learn all about apps, e-books, and readalouds. We will go over our databases and options for getting “e-content.” After the presentation, families will have access to many e-readers to test and become familiar with.

JANUARY 2 The Winter Reading Program at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. There is “snow” time to read like the present. Our Winter Reading Program, Winter Reading Wonderland, is underway and everyone is invited to join in the fun!  Participating is easy – just stop in to grab a log and start reading! We will have fabulous prizes, plus you can read for a chance to win one of our toy and game filled baskets in our Basket Raffle.  Sign up online, over the phone or at your local library branch today. Winter Break Movie Planes. 2 to 4 p.m. at Romeoville at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.Contact:The Children’s Services Desk  at 815-886-2030. Take a break from winter break at the library.We will be showing the hit new movie Planes.This movie is rated G. All ages are welcome, but children younger than 8 years old must be accompanied by an adult. Registration is required. Location:

Romeoville Branch Meeting Room A - Main Level.      

JANUARY 12 The Romeoville Recreation Department’s 36th annual Open House. 1 to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Center, 900 W. Romeo Road. Open House will feature recreation program demonstrations, free classes, registration for Winter and Spring programs, and information booths from community organizations. Isshin-Ryu Karate, Romeoville Razzlers Dance Team, and Romeoville Tumbleweeds Gymnastics Team will be featured during this event. Fit 4 Life Fitness Center and Jungle Safari Indoor Playground will be open –no admission will be charged. Inflatables,entertainment,activities and giveaways are all part of this exciting event.

JANUARY 16 Romeoville Area Chamber of Commerce Annual Awards Dinner Gala 6 to 9 p.m., Brunswick Zone, 735 Center Boulevard. For more information on tickets or advertising opportunities, call 815-886-2076 or email info@romeovillechamber. org.

JANUARY 26 St. Andrew the Apostle Catholic School Open House. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., 505 Kingston Drive, Romeoville. Are you looking for a safe and nurturing environment for your child’s education, a school with small class sizes and a challenging curriculum? Stop in to our Open House for some refreshments and tour the school, meet the principal, faculty and students while learning about the benefits of enrolling your child at St. Andrew. Full day preschool (3-5 year olds) and Kindergarten through 8th grade. Before and after school care available. For more information please visit the school’s website at www. andrewcc.org or contact Kathy Lifka, principal at 815.886-5953 Ext. 421.

ONGOING Panic Attack Support Group of Bolingbrook. Anyone who is dealing with panic attacks, anxiety attacks,or social phobia is welcome to attend this support group. We meet every second and fourth Thursday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. Please visit Meetup.com to RSVP http://www.meetup.com/ Anxiety-Panic-Attack-SupportGroup-Of-Bolingbrook-Naper/. American

Sign

Language

interpreted Mass is offered at St. Francis of Assisi, 1501 W. Boughton Road in Bolingbrook every Sunday at the 8:15 a.m. Mass. Power Connection’s LARGE FOOD PANTRY. Open on the 2nd and 4th Mondays of the month from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your shopping experience. For a $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/ boxed goods, drinks, deserts, snacks, breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat. There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome. The Resale Connection is also open from 9a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. We carry clothing for men/women/ children as well as household items, furniture, sundries, toys and so much more! Cleaning out your house? We accepts donations Monday-Thursday, 9am-4pm. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit www. thepowerconnection.org for more information/services available such as our Extension Food Pantry, Computer Classes, Forklift Classes. Volunteer opportunities also available to serve your community. Power Connection Computer Classes. Classes begin at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. General or Microsoft Word classes are offered. Cost is $30. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org Power Connection Forklift classes at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. We offer a one week class for forklift certification, you must be able to read/write fluent English. $50 fuel fee due by start of class. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org. Tween Scene. Tuesdays 4 to 5 p. m.at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Do you enjoy hanging out at the library? Well, come to Tween Scene! Each session we’ll have fun things to do like games, science, anime, manga, and crafts. For children 8-12. Registration is required. Contact the Children’s Services Department for more information. Preschool Playtime. 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Brick Building Club. 4 p.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013 5 Branch Library, 201 West environmental organization is Normantown Road, Romeoville. dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For Toddler times. 10:30 a.m. on more information or a meeting Mondays at the Romeoville Branch agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815Library, 201 West Normantown 834-1611. Road, Romeoville. Ages 3 to 36 mos. Bolingbrook Machine Knitting Club. All skill levels Terrific Ts. 10:30 a.m. on are welcome to begin or further Tuesdays at the Romeoville Branch their knowledge of knitting with Library, 201 West Normantown a machine. The group meets the Road, Romeoville.Ages 2 to 3. last Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. There is no charge to Storytimes. 10:30 a.m. and attend this group.They meet in the 1:30 p.m. on Wednesdays at community room of Bolingbrook the Romeoville Branch Library, Fire Station 4, 1111 W. Boughton 201 West Normantown Road, Road. Please park on the West Romeoville.Ages 3 to 6 years. Side of the building. For more information, contact Rose at 630 Pajama-Jam Family 739-2784 or Sharon at 630 471storytime. 6 p.m. on Tuesdays 9650. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Birth After Cesarean. Meet Romeoville. All ages. Wear your other moms who are planning pajamas. their natural birth after cesarean section. Come for encouragement, Family storytime. 7-7:30 p.m. support and information to plan Tuesdays at the Fountaindale Public your next birth. Meetings at noon Library. On Tuesday evenings, get the first Monday every month in the family together to hear stories Romeoville. Contact Melanie at and sing songs in the storytime 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ room. aol.com TOPS (Take Pounds Off Sensibly), IL114 Romeoville, meets 5:15 p.m. Mondays at the Romeoville Police Department, 1050 W. Romeo Road. For more information, call 815-886-9252. Golden Age Club. Thursdays noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Members must be 50 years and up to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Transportation is available by calling the Recreation Department at 815-886-6222 at least 24 hours before the event. For more information about the club, call Noel Maldonado at the Recreation Center. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit

Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www.niafg.org for more information. Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society. The Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society meets on the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Fire Station #5, 1900 W. Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook.All ham radio enthusiasts are invited to attend. Meetings usually include a presentation and refreshments. VE testing is held prior to each meeting at 6:30 p.m. for those wishing to take any level of license exam. Candidates must bring a photo ID, any pending Certificates of Successful Completion, and the test fee of $15. For more information, visit www.k9bar.org.


6

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

1

Arthur Vasquez, 56, 1026 Essington Lane, was arrested at 7:42 p.m. Dec. 6 and charged with criminal trespass to property on the 0 to 100 block of Ponderosa.

2

Nicolas Quiroz, 46, 401 Blair Lane, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 6:51 p.m. Dec. 8 and charged with DUI and no insurance near Route 53 north of Renwick Road.

3

A burglary was reported in the 600 block of Parkwood at 1:26 p.m. Dec. 10. Electrical components and copper wiring were taken from the location by unknown person(s). Estimated value of the items taken is $5300.

4

Monica Salinas, 51, 800 Collins St., Joliet, was arrested at 6:05 a.m. Dec. 11 and charged with no valid driver’s license and no insurance near Veteran’s Parkway north of Hudson.

5

Maribel Gutierrez, 39, 217 Linden, was arrested at 6:05 a.m. Dec. 12 and charged with no valid driver’s license, no insurance, and driving too fast for conditions near Veterans Parkway, north of Hudson.

6

Angella Hamilton-Stark, 42, 564 Liberty St., Joliet, was arrested at 2:30 p.m. Dec. 11 and charged with vehicle theft, driving with a revoked license and no seat belt on the 0-100 block of N. Independence.

7

Christian Medina, 19, 603 Glen, was arrested at 10:49 a.m. Dec. 11 and charged with no valid driver’s license and speeding near Normantown and Sedgemeadow.

8

Michael Rosales, 39, 27 Ponderosa Drive, was arrested at 1:10 p.m. Dec. 12 and charged with unlawful use of fireworks on the 1000 block of Romeo Road.

9

James Bebo, 50, 105 E. Grove St., Lombard, was arrested at 1:29 a.m. Dec. 12 and charged with driving with a suspended license, no insurance,

Police Blotter

an expired registration, no front plate, improper use of registration and possession of a controlled substance near 135th Street and Hale. Jimenez,23, 627 10 Marianna Belmont Drive,was arrested at 3:42 p.m. Dec. 12 and charged with no valid driver’s license, an expired registration near Taylor Road and Route 53.

21

Diaz, 22, 510 Meeker 11 Lisette Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 7:50 p.m. Dec. 12 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road.

16

A residential burglary was reported in the 200 block of Violet Drive at 7:11 p.m. Dec. 13 Unknown person(s) broke a window of the residence and took a game console, laptop, I-pad and currency from the home. Estimated value of the items taken and to repair the window is $1504.

12

4 5 20 22

26 1

7

3

14 23

8 25

15

Gloria Reyes, 38, 225 Smith St., Joliet, was arrested at 4:44 a.m. Dec. 13 and charged with no valid driver’s license, speeding, following too closely, failure to signal and improper use of registration near Route 53 near Airport Road.

13

6

24

12

James Leo, 38, 32 Arlington Ave., was arrested at 9:29 p.m. Dec. 13 and charged with disorderly conduct/assault on the 0 to 100 block of Arlington.

14

10

19 11

13

Robert Fickett, 51, 234 Gordon, was arrested at 10:18 p.m. Dec. 13 and charged with harassment by telephone and resisting an officer on the 300 block of McKool.

15

16

Jose Garcia, 39, 311D Woodcreek, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 11:26 p.m. Dec. 13 and charged with DUI, driving with a suspended license, no insurance, and no seatbelt, too fast for conditions and the illegal transport of alcohol near Route 53 north of Marquette Drive. Arcos, 59, 333 17 Miquel Fairfax, was arrested at 7:35 a.m. Dec. 14 and charged with no valid driver’s license, no insurance, and driving too fast for conditions near Dalhart and Arcadia. J. Jesus Garcia-Reyes, 47, 418 Hallmark Lane, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 7:48 a.m. Dec. 14 and charged with no valid driver’s license and too

18

2 18

fast for conditions near Route 53 north of Renwick Road. Juan Hernandez, 47, 32 Kenilworth Ave., was arrested at 11:57 a.m. Dec. 15 and charged with battery on the 300 block of S. Weber Road.

19

A customer of a business in the 1300 block of Normantown Road reported a theft over $500 at 7:09 p.m. Dec. 15. An unknown person noticed an unattended purse outside the victim’s vehicle and took it. Estimated value of the purse and its contents is $635.

20

Julio Troche, 39, 2711 W. Cermak Road, Chicago, was arrested at 7:08 a.m. Dec. 16 and charged with no valid driver’s

21

license and driving too fast for conditions near Joliet and Bluff Roads. Rene Villanueva, 24, 1839 S. 56th Court, Cicero, was arrested at 6:13 a.m. Dec. 17 and charged with driving with a suspended license, hit and run and improper lane use near Normantown Road, south of I-55.

22

Daniel Vidito, 26, 216 Valley Drive, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 7:28 a.m. Dec. 17 and charged with driving with a suspended license, too fast for conditions and hit and run on the 600 block of Montrose.

23

24

Diamond Wallace, 24, 4048 S. Lake Park, Chicago;

Karenda White, 19, 1118 E. 67th St., Chicago; Mervin Green, 25, 12645 Alpine Drive, Alsip; and Pasheyana Jackson, 26, 6437 S. Rhodes, Chicago, were arrested at 6:33 p.m. Dec. 17 and charged with forgery on the 300 block of S. Weber Road. Alexander Garcia, 25, 931 Highland Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 3:47 p.m. Dec. 18 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 1000 block of W. Romeo Road.

25

Gloria Garcia,28,2712 S.58th Court, Cicero, was arrested at 4:28 p.m. Dec. 18 and charged with no valid driver’s license and speeding near Naperville Drive, west of Six Pines.

26


ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor Nick Reiher nreiher@buglenewspapers.com Assistant Managing Editor Jonathan Samples jsamples@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sue Baker Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

facebook.com/thebuglenewspapers twitter.com/buglenewspapers instagram.com/buglenewspapers

Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

7

letter to the editor

Appreciate your family during the holidays December 21, 1951 started out like any past Christmas weekends, everyone had the Christmas spirit. Mothers and wives were finishing their Christmas shopping and thinking about Christmas Day, when they would be sharing Christmas dinner with family and friends. Except this day would turn out to be one of the darkest days in Southern Illinois history. On December 21, 1951, 250 men went 530 feet below the ground at Orient #2 CoalMines in West Frankfort, Illinois. This was the last shift before shutting down for the Christmas vacation. The holiday spirit changed when a mixture of methane gas and coal dust ignited causing an explosion, trapping 120

men 530 feet below the ground. The West Frankfort Red Birds were playing a basketball game before 2,000 spectators, when an urgent message came over the loudspeaker, “would Dr. Barnett report to the New Orient Mine?” The gym emptied out in minutes as mothers,wives and friends raced to the mine portal. After a lot of chaos, family and friends waited in the wash house for the final count. It wasn’t until Monday, December 24,that the final body was identified. It was a dark Christmas in Franklin County, especially in Benton and West Frankfort, where most of the men lived. The final count was 119 dead with only one survivor out of 120 men.

I was thirteen years old and will always remember that tragic disaster. It was not unusual for coal miners to die or suffer serious injuries in a mining accident. We accepted tragedy as a way of life. Every December I relive this tragic disaster. I often ask myself why. I came to the conclusion that it was because my father and grandfather were coal miners and they both experienced neardeath accidents. Also, because of the number of men killed on that Christmas weekend. Every family in Franklin County lost someone they knew or loved on that day.

illustrated opinions

Jerry Capps


8

News

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

WILL COUNTY

County Board OKs Union Contract Amends agenda language on SSA and Illiana tollway project By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

that employees will continue to receive step increases. One elected official said the board approved the raises, but didn’t approve any extra money for them. They hoped layoffs wouldn’t be necessary to meet budget. AFSCME represents more than 1,200 employees in the county court system, health department, highway department, Board Member Sunny Hill Nursing Suzanne Hart, Home, county jail, R-Naperville and in the offices of the sheriff, coroner, recorder, assessor, clerk, chief judge, circuit clerk, executive and state’s attorney.

The Will County Board on Dec.19 approved the contract covering more than 1,000 m e m b e r s Frankfort Bob Howard, t h r o u g h o u t Republican D-Beecher, chair of d i f f e r e n t Dave Izzo the Legislative and departments. Policy Committee The 24-1 vote, with Frankfort Republican Dave Izzo voting no, follows a Dec. 5 vote when members of AFSCME Local 1028 “overwhelmingly” approved the contract. The votes ended 15 months of negotiations that culminated in a 16day strike by some 1,000 Board Member Chuck Maher, R-Naperville Will County employees. A Judy Ogalla, tentative agreement had R-Monee been reached around 2:30 a.m. Dec. 4. County employees The new four-year agreement returned to work Dec. 5. is retroactive to Dec. 1, 2012, and The main sticking points extends through Nov. 30, 2016. were increased health care costs It includes cost-of-living wage and wage increases. Previously, increases totaling 4.5 percent, or employee contributions were 14 percent during the life of the based on a percentage of their contract. salary. One of the county’s major County officials say the contract goals of these negotiations was to also eliminates the county pay make a switch to employees paying plan’s two bottom steps, in effect a percentage of the premium of adjusting the wage scale upward a their healthcare benefits. further 5 percent while ensuring

Legislative agenda amended A bi-partisan skirmish broke out among the holiday goodwill after Board Member Judy Ogalla, R-Monee, offered two amendments she said were necessary to reinforce the county’s position as protecting the rights of landowners in the path of the proposed South Suburban Airport and the Illiana Tollway. Bob Howard, D-Beecher, chair of the Legislative and Policy Committee, said the intent of the additional language already was included. He and other board members, predominantly Democrats, said the measure also was ill-timed.

quick facts about the dec. 19 will county board meeting • The 24-1 vote, with Frankfort Republican Dave Izzo voting no, follows a Dec. 5 vote when members of AFSCME Local 1028 “overwhelmingly” approved the contract. • The votes ended 15 months of negotiations that culminated in a 16-day strike by some 1,000 Will County employees. • The new four-year agreement is retroactive to Dec. 1, 2012, and extends through Nov. 30, 2016. • It includes cost-of-living wage increases totaling 4.5 percent, or 14 percent during the life of the contract. • Board Member Judy Ogalla, R-Monee, offered two amendments she said were necessary to reinforce the county’s position as protecting the rights of landowners in the path of the proposed South Suburban Airport and the Illiana Tollway.

Howard said the issue of the language, including other changes Ogalla wanted, was taken care of during committee meetings. He said offering them from the floor, while there was additional media present, amounted to a political “dog and pony show.” Board Member Suzanne Hart, R-Naperville, said on the board floor the Republicans had discussed Ogalla’s amendments during their caucus before the meeting. But Ogalla, an ardent opponent of both the Illiana and the SSA, had no typed items for the county clerk, or anyone else at the meeting. At one point, Chuck Maher, R-Naperville, said voting against adding Ogalla’s amendments was akin to voting against the integrity

WEB LINKS www. willcountyboard. com/

of property rights for Will County residents. Howard and the others opposed to introducing the amendments on the floor during the county board meeting, a somewhat unusual occurrence, said they simply preferred amendments be vetted through committee before going to the floor. In the end, the amendments, and the county’s legislative agenda for 2014, passed with a bi-partisan vote.


Take 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Behold, to Ovid 5 Graded 10 Stow on board 14 Décembre event 15 Mosul resident 16 Supply-anddemand subj. 17 Group for jive fools? 19 Boat that can navigate in shallow waters 20 Big name in taco sauce 21 Smooch 23 NHL legend 24 Kingston Trio song that inspired the Boston subway’s CharlieCard 25 “Superman Returns” character 27 Fed. nutrition std. 29 Great joy 31 Quick swim in la mer? 33 Lip-__ 34 FDR had three of them 35 Started the day

Down 36 Like single-malt scotch 38 Ran when wet 39 Iron clothes? 41 Lingerie top 42 Short run 46 GI unlikely to pass inspection? 48 “When Worlds Collide” coauthor Philip 49 Zenith’s opposite 50 Tour de France stage 52 Jurisprudence org. 53 Justice Fortas 54 Drying oven 56 Boring tool 58 Longtime Lucci role 60 Reneged on politically motivated funding? 62 Rescue teams, briefly 63 Kiddie’s refrain 64 Jim Davis pooch 65 Lip 66 Sunset __ 67 Campus official

1 Puts in a vault, in a way 2 Refined, as manners 3 Positive 4 Sexy Sommer 5 Saudi capital 6 Parenthesis, e.g. 7 Loquacious types 8 Like some track stars 9 “Mine!” 10 Arles article 11 Camp David __ 12 Like a Hail Mary pass 13 Swaddle 18 They may clash on a set 22 Bolivian capital 26 Calif. law group 28 Poorly made 30 Shrimp dish 32 “The Lion King” lioness 34 Très 37 Hit the big leagues 38 La __ Tar Pits 39 Talladega’s home 40 Capybaras, e.g. 41 Coca-Cola producer 43 Apple pie order 44 Remote,

undesirable locale, figuratively 45 Pay heed, in literature 46 Racers and rattlers 47 Ignatius of Loyola follower 48 Garden intruder 51 Hosp. area 55 Zoo primates 57 ... peas in __ 59 Last of the Mohicans? 61 Year in Claudius’ reign

Tribune Content Agency 2013

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

Horoscopes When you go along with the crowd you often get no further than the crowd. Being independent allows you to go places no one else has ever been before. This week, you should think for yourself.

Anyone can love you and it’s easy to show love toward others when the sun is shining. It’s when you must share an umbrella that love is tested. In the upcoming week, show your true colors.

The best diet for you is not prepackaged “happy” meals available 24 four hours a day at a fast food kiosk but happy thoughts. What you think about today sets the stage for tomorrow.

Look on the bright side. Now that the shortest day of the year (Saturday) has past, every day this week will be fuller! Keep your positive attitude in full gear to cope with last-minute holiday crises.

In the week ahead, devote more energy to achieving your hopes and dreams and less energy to your fears. Try to be less defensive and more understanding if the holiday hustle and bustle becomes briefly exasperating.

Use logic to evaluate financial matters and imagination to consider ways to make improvements. You might see where changes are needed in the coming week, but wait until after the holidays to implement them.

In the week to come, cuddle up with whatever and whoever makes you happy to be alive. There will be plenty of time for social activities, but remember to take care of necessary obligations before the holiday festivities begin.

Sometimes being tested doesn’t show your weakness, but proves your strengths. You may be challenged to find a last-minute gift in the week ahead, but will pass the test with flying colors.

If problems crop up, the situation will change soon, but if you’re experiencing smooth going, things will simply get better. Put your networking skills to work with helpful new acquaintances this week.

An edgy undercurrent may tempt you to take actions you might regret later. Be patient and abide by the rules during the week ahead, even if key contacts push your buttons or challenge your patience.

The itch to fight off what you consider to be senseless traditions could put you at odds with those in charge during the week to come. It might be wise to simply go along with the crowd and avoid confrontations.

Be glad you have some glad rags. There may be numerous occasions to dress up in the week ahead. You’ll also have plenty of opportunities to show off your sparkling personality and entertain others.

Sudoku

Jumble

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • DANDY • FENCE • PREACH • FRIGID

Answer:

When the doctor’s assistant conducted the sound test, she was -- A HEARING “AID”

9


10

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

BuGle kids


INSIDE: Romeoville hosts third annual boys basketball holiday tournament, page 12; High school hoops stats, page 13

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

11

Spartans fall to Minooka in overtime By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

For the third-straight game, the young Romeoville boys basketball team could not finish a game in regulation. And for the second of the three games, the Spartans came out on the losing end, falling to Southwest Prairie Conference opponent Minooka 39-37. “We have to do a better job of executing late in the game,” said Romeoville coach Marc Howard. “We left some opportunities out there that cost us in regulation. We missed a couple lay-ups and threw the ball away a few times and missed some free throws. If we could get one of those back, we win the game in regulation. I thought in overtime, we didn’t let that go. Some of the guys were still thinking about what they could have done and I could tell they weren’t all the way there and I was trying to get them back focused.” The Indians jumped out to a 15-7 lead after the first quarter and held a 21-14 halftime advantage. “In the first half we weren’t ourselves, our defense was sluggish and we weren’t getting

in a groove,” Howard said. “We had a pep talk and fired them up and in the second half we were a lot more active and creating some more turnovers and putting more pressure on them.We attacked the basket and forced them to foul us. We were 0-8 from three point in the first half and we told the kids let’s forget the three pointers and lets get to the basket. We did that and got more aggressive.” Minooka was whistled for nine fouls in the third quarter and picked up its 10th foul thirty seconds into the fourth quarter, putting Romeoville in the double bonus the entire stanza. It also forced the Indians out of what they wanted to do offensively. “All the fouls that were called on us didn’t allow us to play our game and they were able to chip away,” said Minooka coach Scott Tanaka.“I don’t know if we were playing too aggressive, but they were being called and we need to do a better job of moving our feet.” Romeoville was able to then dictate the pace of play, taking Minooka’s 6-foot, 7-inch big man Mark Geers out of the game after Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

See SPARTANS, page 16

Christian Diaz and Romeoville fell to Minooka 39-37 in overtime.


12

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

Sports

Romeoville hosts third holiday tournament By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

A spin-off of the long-time Lemont Christmas Classic, the Romeoville Tournament features two divisions,one for small schools and one for large schools. The Spartans are in the small school bracket and open against Oak Forest at 8 p.m. Dec. 26. First-year Romeoville coach Marc Howard likes the format. “It is different that some of the other tournaments,” he said.“But it gives school a chance to compete. Some of these small schools, even though their enrollment is down, they are still able to compete at a high level on the court. Looking at the teams, everyone is pretty decent and everyone

has a different style. We will play some teams that want to get up and down, some teams that want to slow it up. Lemont plays can play slow or fast. No matter who we play, we will see some good basketball out there.” In game two, Romeoville will meet either host Joliet Catholic Academy or Lincoln-Way West. “We have a quick turnaround when we play in these tournaments,” Howard said. “We are hosting out here for four nights. You don’t have time to think about what happened on the court, It is let it go, come back on the court and compete. That is how it was at the WJOL (Thanksgiving tournament). We have to go out there and be ready.” Howard is happy that Romeoville is hosting, both for the lack of travel as well as the home court advantage. “These kids love their school and they love playing in front of their peers and hopefully we can give the fans some exciting basketball to watch,” Howard said. “We also don’t have to worry about the bis rides, we just have to come here See HOLIDAY, page 14

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Chuck Hunter and Romeoville are ready for their own tournament.


Sports

Lewis duo on All-MIVA team The Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (MIVA) announced on Friday (Dec. 20) that Lewis University’s BJ Boldog (Palatine, Ill./Palatine) and Geoff Powell (Claremont, Calif./ Claremont) were named to the 2014 Preseason All-MIVA Team, as voted on by the league’s coaches. “It’s great to have two players recognized for their potential for the season,” Lewis head men’s volleyball coach Dan Friend said. “I know they both will use it as motivation to help make our team better.” Boldog, a setter, finished the 2013 season 10th in the country averaging 10.29 assists-per-set. Last year, the redshirt senior garnered American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) and Volleyball Magazine All-America Second Team status, as well as CoSIDA Capital One Academic All-America Men’s At-Large Third Team accolades. Boldog, with 3,356 total assists, is 33 assists shy of breaking the Lewis school record of 3,389 helpers set by Mike Iandolo (2008-10) in the

rally-scoring era. Powell, an outside hitter, is a 2013 AVCA All-America Second Team and Volleyball Magazine AllAmerica First Team selection. He led the Flyers in kills (385) and kills-per-set average (3.68), which put him 14th nationally. The Flyers open the 2014 season hosting two-time defending national champion and AVCA Preseason No. 1 UC Irvine on Wednesday, January 1st at Neil Carey Arena. First serve is set for 7 PM.

CROSS COUNTRY The Great Lakes Valley Conference announced that the Lewis University men’s cross country team has been elected as a recipient of the GLVC StudentAthlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) Sportsmanship Award by their peers for the 2013-14 fall season as best displaying ‘Good Sportsmanship’. This is the first ever GLVC SAAC Sportsmanship Award for the men’s cross country team and Lewis’ seventh honor of all

time. The Flyers share this award with the Maryville’s men’s cross country team. “It’s nice to see our team recognized for how well they handle themselves as a team, with class and respect for others,” Lewis head men’s cross country coach Dana Schwarting said. The SAAC Sportsmanship Award is determined by a vote of the GLVC member institutions’ campus SAACs. The committees select their top three choices in each sport based on their view of sportsmanship. Each team that received a first-place vote received three points, second place received two points, and third place received one point.The GLVC sponsors the award in each of the league’s 20 championship sports, including six in the fall season. A team trophy will be presented to each of the squads claiming the GLVC Sportsmanship Award. An overall ‘Good Sportsmanship’ award will be presented to the See LEWIS, page 16

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

13


14

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

Sports HOLIDAY Continued from page 12 and compete.” Win or lose, Howard said the Spartans will make teams battle for 32 minutes every night. “We are going to compete,” he said. “There will not be an easy game when teams play us. We are going to make them work.”

BIG DIPPER TOURNAMENT For the past three seasons, Bolingbrook has had success at The McDipper Tournament, held at Rich South High School, playing in the consolation championship game the past three seasons, winning last season and losing the two years prior. The Raiders’ first round opponent, Crete-Monee, has also enjoyed success at the McDipper, placing third last season and second the three years prior. The goal for Bolingbrook this season is to play in the final game on the other side of the bracket. “We want to win the tournament,” Bolingbrook coach Rob Brost

said. “We like this tournament because of the tradition, high level of competition and it has a shot clock.” This year’s tournament again features one of the state’s top teams in Marian Catholic and Kentucky recruit Tyler Ulis. The Raiders bring their own high-powered scoring attack which is paced by junior guard Prentiss Nixon and senior Gage Davis. They are joined by a host of big men, including the recently returned senior Kenny Williams. A win over Crete-Monee would place Bolingbrook against the winner of Rich South and University High.

HILLCREST TOURNAMENT A lot of people hope to be home for the holidays, and this season, the Bolingbrook girls basketball team is doing just that. After spending the last few seasons at the Nike Shootout in Arizona,the Raiders are competing this season at the Hillcrest Holiday Tournament, where Bolingbrook is the No. 2 seed as voted by the coaches. Joliet Catholic Academy is the

No. 1 seed in the tournament, while Hillcrest is third and Marist is fourth. The Raiders open the tournament at 10:30 a.m. Dec. 26 against Queen of Peace.They then return to the court later that day at 4:30 p.m. against either Rich Central or SouthWest Suburban Conference opponent Lockport.

BOILERMAKER TOURNAMENT Romeoville will follow up its appearance in the Oak Lawn Tournament before Christmas with a showing at the Boilermaker Holiday Basketball Tournament at Bradley-Bourbonnais High School after Christmas. The tournament is a pool play format and each team is guaranteed to play four games in the three days. The Spartans open play at 9 a.m. against Thornridge and then will play again at 10:45 a.m. against host Bradley-Bourbonnais. On the second day of play, Romeoville will face Eisenhower at 1 p.m. Crossover games will be at 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Dec. 28. mark@buglenewspapers.com


sPorts

BOYS BBALL Points Per Game Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook George Sargeant, Maine South Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Andrew Palucki, Maine South Corey Evers, Plainfield South Romeo Magliore, Niles West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Jacob Buchner, Plainfield South Jojo Rios, Niles West Jake Smith, Minooka Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Nick Novak, Plainfield East Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Evan Hines, Niles West Shane Murray, Lisle Antonio Dyson, Joliet Central Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Kevin Krieger, Plainfield North Adam Alexander, Minooka Joe Butler, Minooka Devon Sams, Bolingbrook Justin Windt, Plainfield Central Jon Arenas, Maine South Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Rebounds Per Game Jeremy Glavanovits, Lisle Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Josh Smith, Plainfield East Joe Butler, Minooka Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Zach Trussell, Lisle Shane Murray, Lisle George Sargeant, Maine South Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Romeo Magliore, Niles West Hund, Plainfield Central Calvin Brooks, Plainfield South Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Tristin Esker, Plainfield East Andrew Palucki, Maine South Joshua Dillingham, Bolingbrook Assists Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Myles Ward, Plainfield East CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook Jonah Coble, Joliet Central Jonny Butler, Minooka Nick Novak, Plainfield East Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Jon Arenas, Maine South Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Joe Butler, Minooka Denzel Leslie, Joliet West Neal Tyrell, Minooka D’Vonta Jones, Joliet West Gage Davis, Bolingbrook D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West

25.1 20.7 18.4 16.7 15.6 15.2 15.0 13.9 13.7 13.6 12.4 12.4 12.4 11.6 11.6 11.4 11.2 11.1 10.9 10.7 10.5 10.5 10.2 9.8 9.4 9.4 9.4 8.9 8.5 8.5 8.4 8.4 8.3 8.0 9.0 8.6 8.4 8.0 7.6 7.3 7.2 6.8 6.7 5.7 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.4 5.1 5.1 5.0 5.0 4.9 40 30 22 21 20 19 19 19 16 16 15 15 14 14 14 14 13

Sean Maloney, Maine South Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook Steals Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Caleb deMarigny, Maine South D’Vonta Jones, Joliet West Neal Tyrell, Minooka Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East CJ Redmond, Bolingbrook D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Jake Smith, Minooka Romeo Magliore, Niles West Denzel Leslie, Joliet West Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook Jon Arenas, Maine South Jeff Washington, Joliet West Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Kyle Hendzel, Lisle Myles Ward, Plainfield East Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Ryan, Plainfield Central Field Goal % Shane Murray, Lisle Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Shakur Triplett, Bolingbrook Jeff Washington, Joliet West George Sargeant, Maine South Julian Torres, Bolingbrook Andrew Palucki, Maine South Tristin Esker, Plainfield East Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Romeo Magliore, Niles West Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Free Throw % Caleb deMarigny, Maine South George Sargeant, Maine South Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Neal Tyrell, Minooka Odi Audisho, Niles West Jake Pedrelli, Maine South Davis, Plainfield Central Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Romeo Magliore, Niles West Allias Roberts-Burnett, Joliet West Connor Bielat, Lisle Elliot Fizer, Joliet West Emin Ademi, Niles West Brodric Thomas, Bolingbrook D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West 3-pointers Nick Novak, Plainfield East Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jake Smith, Minooka Gage Davis, Bolingbrook Mike Ruwoldt, Joliet West Caleb deMarigny, Maine South Kostelz, Plainfield Central Jojo Rios, Niles West Evan Hines, Niles West D’Anthony Wright, Joliet West Joe Butler, Minooka GIRLS BBALL Points Per Game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Erin Heide, Minooka Chavon Banks, Joliet Central

13 12 12 16 14 13 13 13 13 12 11 10 10 10 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 .667 .650 .649 .640 .630 .618 .580 .577 .545 .542 .500 .950 .850 .824 .816 .810 .810 .810 .800 .800 .800 .788 .770 .760 .760 .750 .727 .720 18 17 17 14 11 11 10 9 9 9 8 8

20.4 18.6 14.9 14.8 14.6

Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Peyton Winters, Downers North Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Monica Barefield, Joliet West Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Sarah Costello, Downers North Lexi Marin, Romeoville Destiny Hollins, Lockport Juatece McNear, Joliet Central Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Naomi Mayes, Lockport Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Nina Anderson, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Rebounds Per Game Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Peyton Winters, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Sarah Costello, Downers North Kelly Carnagio, Minooka Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Sydney Arlis, Minooka Laurel Kucharski, Lockport Kyla Creal, Lockport Rachel Sutphin, Plainfield South Ally Fink, Plainfield South Kailey Foster, Joliet West Ty Battle, JCA Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Cherish Smith, Romeoville Jaida Green, Downers North Faith Heitman, Romeoville Assists Sarah Costello, Downers North Kelly Kons, Maine South Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Jaida Green, Downers North Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Lexi Marin, Romeoville Sydney Arlis, Minooka Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Bethany Bachmann, Minooka Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Nina Anderson, Maine South Christina Ekhomu, JCA Hailey Schoenman, Maine South Gabriella Galassini, Resurrection Giahanna Martorano, Resurrection Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Megan Roberts, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West Ty Battle, JCA Skye Osborne, Romeoville Jnaya Walker, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Steals Sarah Costello, Downers North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Tyler Everett, Plainfield South Jaida Green, Downers North Naomi Mayes, Lockport Chavon Banks, Joliet Central

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

12.5 12.5 12.4 12.3 12.3 12.0 11.7 11.3 10.3 10.0 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.5 9.1 9.0 8.6 8.6 11.0 9.1 8.7 8.6 8.0 8.0 7.2 6.7 6.5 6.5 6.3 5.9 5.9 5.4 5.4 5.0 5.0 5.0 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.6 56 37 31 28 27 27 25 24 20 20 19 17 17 16 15 15 14 14 14 13 13 12 12 12 12 36 25 24 23 21 20

Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Nina Anderson, Maine South Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Destiny Hollins, Lockport Lauren Porcelli, Downers North Bre Sobotka, Resurrection Jamari McAfee, Lockport Kelly Kons, Maine South Kianna Campbell, Lockport Jamie Hopper, Romeoville Christina Ekhomu, JCA Jnaya Walker, JCA Field Goal % Ty Battle, JCA Kyla Creal, Lockport Adriana Acosta, JCA Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Peyton Winters, Downers North Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Emilie McGuire, Maine South

20 20 19 18 17 17 17 17 16 15 15 15 .609 .580 .540 .540 .530 .513 .502 .500

Kennedy Weigt, JCA Jaida Green, Downers North Free Throw % Faith Heitman, Romeoville Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Brooklyn Bachmann, Minooka Destiny Hollins, Lockport Naomi Mayes, Lockport Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Jacqui Eubanks, Plainfield South Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Kelly Kons, Maine South 3-pointers Jaida Green, Downers North Sam Fagenholz, Maine South Erin Heide, Minooka Kennedy Weigt, JCA Nina Anderson, Maine South Sarah Costello, Downers North Taylor Farrell, Resurrection Nicole Ekhomu, JCA

15

.460 .460 .821 .792 .770 .730 .720 .720 .719 .718 .710 19 16 16 15 15 13 12 11


16

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

LEWIS Continued from page 13 institution with the most points during the 2013-14 academic year.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The tale of the box score in the Lewis University women’s basketball team’s 77-65 win over Lincoln Memorial on Thursday (Dec. 19) at Neil Carey Arena will show the Flyers’ key to victory was pulling down a season-high

SPARTANS Continued from page 11 he tallied a game-high 13 points, all in the first three quarters. “They sped us up and we allowed them to speed us up,” Tanaka said. “We wanted to speed it up and tire him out and not let them set up,” Howard said. “Minooka is good when they can spread you

Sports

61 rebounds. Cleaning the board led to 17 big second-chance points for the Flyers, now 6-2 on the year, while holding a 19 rebound advantage over the Railsplitters, who fall to 4-5 on the season, and to four second-chance buckets. Lewis sophomore forward Mariyah Brawner-Henley (Skokie, Ill./Niles North) paced the Flyers with 15 points, matched a careerhigh 17 rebounds and had three blocked shots. Junior forward Jess Reinhart (Normal, Ill./ Bloomington Central Catholic) totaled 11 points and 13 rebounds while redshirt-sophomore guard Jamie Johnson (South Holland, Ill./

Marian Catholic) had 13 points and three steals. Flyer junior guard Nikki Nellen (New Berlin, Wis./Pius XI) tallied 12 points and five assists while classmate Kristin Itschner (Metamora, Ill./Peoria Notre Dame) collected 11 points, five assists and three blocked shots. Sophomore guard Alyssa Dengler (Chicago, Ill./Trinity) scored a career-high 10 points, including two three-pointers, and collected two assists and two rebounds in the win. “Lincoln Memorial did a nice job clogging up the lane to make it difficult for us to consistently get the ball to Jess and Mariyah,”

Lewis head women’s basketball coach Lisa Carlsen said.“We did a nice job competing on the glass tonight, which was the difference in the game.” In the up-tempo first half, both teams struggled to gain the upper hand. Lewis redshirt junior guard Angel Brooks (Chicago, Ill./De La Salle) provided the spark off the bench, scoring five straight points, including a three-pointer, to give Lewis a four-point lead at 25-21 at the 5:14 mark. The Flyers then went on a 14-9 run to close out the half as Itschner and Nellen both chipped in five points during the run. Lewis took a 39-30 lead into the locker room.

Lincoln Memorial picked up the intensity in the second half, as they chipped away at Lewis’ lead. The Railsplitters were able to get within two points at 46-44, on an Aisjah Roan lay-up at the 13:58 mark. Lewis responded and quickly pushed the lead back up to nine points at 53-44, when Nellen led the run when she drained one of her three three-pointers of the night at the 12:20 mark. The Flyers are off for two weeks before opening the Great Lakes Valley Conference slate on Friday, January 3rd, when they host Truman State at Neil Carey Arena. Tip-off is set for 5:30 PM.

out and get their back cuts going and do the screening that they like to do. We wanted to take that away and apply pressure and make them do it more so off the dribble than off the pass.” Even when Minooka was able to get open looks at the basket, their shots were not falling. “We just can’t shoot. We haven’t been able to shoot all year, everything is 30 percent and the three-point line is 10 percent,” Tanaka said. “The shots are all

there, we are just not finishing. It is a mental thing now. We were 37 percent from the free throw line, we had one kid go 0-5 and we have to do a better job of that. It is all mental.We are young without a lot of experience. All we did all week is shoot and it didn’t work.” Despite the poor effort shooting the basketball, Tanaka said he was happy to walk away with a conference win. “We have needed a win so bad,

so to play as bad as we did and escape with a win is nice. It was a good high school basketball game and it was fun to play in,” he said. “Marc is doing a great job here at Romeoville. His kids play really hard and we knew it was going to be a battle. Their kids battled hard all game and to come away with a win in their gym is good because Marc really is doing an awesome job here.” Just like Minooka, Howard said the Spartans have to learn to

close the games and get over the hump mentally and start winning games. “They are kids and they are learning and we are working on teaching them how to win,” he said.“But, we are competing hard every night.” Romeoville was led by 10 points from Josh Krueger and eight from Diamonte’ Gaston, while Minooka got 10 from Jake Smith and seven from Joe Butler. mark@buglenewspapers.com


buglenewspapers.com/basketball

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

17

Stumpe, North top Jordan, East By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

In front of a packed house at Plainfield North Friday, Dec. 20, it was two juniors who stole the show in a Southwest Prairie Conference game between Plainfield North and Plainfield East. North’s Trevor Stumpe and East’s Aaron Jordan scored 32 points apiece, but it was sophomore Kevin Krieger who made clutch free throws down the stretch for the Tigers (7-2, 2-1) in a 78-72 win. “This is a good rivalry,” East coach Branden Adkins said. “We have two great players going back and forth.They were making big-time shots and bigtime plays. He (Stumpe) is a momentum kid and when he makes some shots, he is tough to stop. That’s what Division-I basketball players do. Aaron did a good job of leading our guys and knocked down some tough shots.” With the score 75-72 with 12 seconds left, Krieger hit the front end of a 1-and-1 to give the Tigers a 76-72 lead and after a missed three pointer from the Bengals (6-2, 2-1), Krieger (17 points, 8 in fourth quarter) iced the game with two more free throws. “I just had to knock them down and get the game over with,” Krieger said.“I just had to put the game away. I wasn’t nervous, I just had to knock them down.” “Krieger is a very good player,” North coach Bob Krahulik said. “We knew they were doubleteaming Trevor on the inbounds pass and he (Krieger) was the one we wanted to get the ball to then. We have that much confidence in him to make those free throws.” With Stumpe being limited to two points over the final 12 minutes of the game, others had to step up and Krieger was one of them. “Last game I struggled in

the fourth quarter and I just wanted to help the team and do whatever I needed to do,” Krieger said.“My job was to knock down those free throws and build my confidence.” “It’s a lot of weight off my shoulders,” Stumpe said. “When they have two guys on me I can’t just start throwing up shots, although I might have forced up a few. It’s great when the other guys can make buckets and clutch free throws.” North jumped out to a quick 10-0 lead and led 19-4 midway through the first quarter before East responded to make it 23-18 after one. “We got a lot of stops and steals,” Stumpe said. “I knew my shot wasn’t on in warm-ups so I got it going by taking the ball to the basket.” “We played defense, forced turnovers and pressured the ball and we were able to run because of that,” Krahulik said of the quick start. “When they play good defense, we are a very good team.” The Bengals took a 32-29 lead in the second quarter, but North came back for a 41-36 lead at the half. That lead quickly expanded to 55-42 four minutes into the second half thanks to 10 points from Stumpe. “We’ve been starting off slow lately,” Jordan said. “That’s one thing we need to fix. We can’t keep digging ourselves a hole and expect to come back every time. That’s definitely something we have to fix.” “We dug ourselves some holes, we came back and then we would make some bad plays,” Adkins said. “We had to expend a lot of energy to get back into it. At halftime we thought if we made the adjustments we were talking about all week, we would be fine.” However, the Bengals would not go quietly. They cut the lead to 61-54 after three and scored the first eight points of the fourth

quarter to take the lead. That would be their last lead of the game though as North went on a 9-2 run to regain control. “I’m very proud of them for (withstanding the East runs),” Krahulik stated. “The Plainfield South game really hurt, the way we didn’t finish the game off. We finished the game the way we wanted to today.We did what we were supposed to do.” “We settled and didn’t make the right choices when we got the lead,” Jordan said.“That’s one thing we have to go back and look and to see what we could have done there.” Jordan hit a three and Myles Ward had a three-point play to make it a one-possession game in the closing seconds before Krieger finished the scoring off at the line. North was 27-of-45 from the floor (60 percent) and 19-of-27 from the free throw line (70 percent). Stumpe went 11-of-21 from the floor and 8-of-10 at the line. Jake Nowak added 12 points. “It was a huge win,” Krieger said. “We just came off of two losses.We needed to get that win and get our confidence back.” “This was big,” Stumpe said. “We knew we could do it, but now a lot of people know it too. It was a great bounce back and we have our confidence back. This was a big win because if we would have lost it, it would have been tough to get back in the conference race. Now, it’s all evened up.” For the game East shot 48 percent from the field and 72 percent from the free throw line (18-of-25). Jordan was 10-of-17 from the field (58 percent), 4-of7 from three and 8-of-9 from the line (88 percent). Ward added 13 points. “This one is behind us but we will always remember it,” Jordan said.“We have to go to Pekin and get back in the win column. We won’t forget this.” •Plainfield South beat Plainfield

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Trevor Stumpe scored 32 points in Plainfield North’s 78-72 win over Plainfield East.

Central 75-71. Corey Evers had 27 points for South (4-5, 2-1), while Shane Ritter added 13. Logan Velasquez

had 23 for Central (3-5, 1-2), 13 in the fourth. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@enterprisepublications.com


18

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013


Real Estate & Business DAVE SAYS

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

19

Don’t forget Christmas, stay merry Get control of spending without causing a rift during the holidays Dear Dave, My wife and I have $15,000 in debt left to pay off. We bring home around $32,000 a year,and we usually spend $250 to $300 on Christmas. I started talking to her about your plan earlier this year, and she finally agreed and got on board a couple of months ago.How should we handle Christmas budgeting in the middle of working our debt snowball? Scott Dear Scott, The first thing I’d suggest is to not mention my name for a while. If she’s agreed to start working the plan and help you guys get control of your money, that’s enough for now.We don’t want to cause a rift

during the holidays. Just sit down together and ask her what she thinks is a reasonable amount to spend for Christmas while you’re trying to get out of debt. If it’s a reasonable figure, smile and tell her you agree.You might even ask if she’s okay with your old Christmas budget. If she is, then pencil it in and move on to other things. The big thing is to make sure you listen to her opinion and work on this together. On the off chance that she gives some crazy dollar amount, just nod and ask how she came to that figure.Then, talk things out. Don’t bring up my name or go crazy about things. It sounds like you two are on the

right track! —Dave

Switch to Roth TSP? Dear Dave, Do you think I should consider switching from my traditional TSP (Thrift Savings Plan) to a Roth TSP? Jeremy Dear Jeremy, If I’ve got a choice, I’m going with the Roth TSP. Now, if you’re starting out really late with your saving and investing, the math might work out either way. But in most cases, when you’ve got several years ahead of you, a Roth TSP, or even a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) where your money grows tax free, is a much better choice. Remember, unless you’ve waited until you’re in your sixties, the vast majority of the money in the account will be growth. Ten percent or less will be the money you actually put into the account.

This tax-free growth is what makes the Roth TSP an excellent choice. In other words, if you’ve got $1 million in your current investment, and $900,000 is growth, you’ll get taxed on that portion.That would amount to around $300,000. If your money is in a Roth, there are no taxes. You just saved $300,000 out of every $1 million. Not a bad deal, is it? —Dave

Online bank okay? Dear Dave, What do you think about using an online bank for my emergency fund? Raphael Dear Raphael, It’s not a bad idea at all, as long as you can easily check out the institution’s reputation and stability. There are lots of financial scams online, so you want to do some research and make sure they’re a reputable and trustworthy organization.

Due diligence is the key,Raphael. There are reliable household names that are online banks, but you can’t just assume the group you’re dealing with online is made up of honest, stand-up folks any more than you can with a traditional brick-and-mortar bank. Make sure you take your time and know exactly what you’re getting into before going into business with them. Remember, it’s not as simple with an online bank as just walking in the door to get your money back if something goes wrong! —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

interpersonal edge

Helping others in office a way to help yourself Q. The advice in your column often seems geared to avoid making other people uncomfortable. My job is hard enough without having to walk on eggshells about other people’s feelings. Since the tools you teach seem to be tricky to learn and take time, how does it benefit me to help other people feel good about their jobs? A. The better you can get other people to feel and act around you, the better your own job will be. You are correct that to reduce the amount of suffering and bad decisions in people around us, we have to be responsible to change our habits. The hardest habit to break is the luxury of blaming everyone around us for our problems at work. If you are part of a situation that is causing you suffering, you are at least in some small way opening a door for someone to treat you badly. It’s not

necessarily your fault if people treat you poorly. However, there are a number of clever strategies to make it nearly impossible for even abusive people to keep hurting you. As satisfying as it is to bite back on someone upsetting us, the long-term consequence is that other people get even. If you don’t enjoy the long-term experience of people seeking revenge on you, then you have to give away the shortlived bliss of telling people off. For instance, next time a customer, coworker, or boss is angry at you, instead of defending yourself or counterattacking, try taking a deep breath and neutrally repeating back in your own words what they just said. You’ll discover that other people have a very hard time staying mad at anyone who so clearly understands their point of view. Once you’ve established that

www.interpersonaledge.com

you truly get the other’s point of view, they will be highly likely to be willing to listen to your ideas. Brilliant defenses and counterattacks will never give you a chance to influence others as much as a simple demonstration of listening skills. Most of my clients would tell you that in the beginning they felt like aliens when they focused on the long-term result they wanted rather than venting. They would also tell you it took longer than they wanted and it was harder than they thought to change their bad interpersonal habits. However, when they come in my office delighted that they are no longer at the center of office wars and almost always have the result they want, they tell me it was more than worth the price.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 544 South Holloway Road Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Home). On the 23rd day of January, 2014, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Bank of America, N.A.; Plaintiff V. David F. Livermore Jr.; The Pointe at Fieldstone Condominium Association; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of David F. Livermore Jr., if any; Unknown Owners and Non Record Claimants; Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 4004 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Wirbicki Law Group 33 W Monroe Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60625 312-360-9455 312-572-7823 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 12/26, 1/2, 1/9


20

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

21


22

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE ROMEOVILLE PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL ) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Bank of America, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. David F. Livermore Jr.; The Pointe at Fieldstone Condominium Association; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of David F. Livermore Jr., if any; Unknown Owners and Non Record Claimants; Defendant. No. 12 CH 4004 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 28th day of November, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 23rd day of January, 2014, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 134 IN PASQUINELLI`S PRESERVE AT FIELDSTONE, UNIT TWO, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 13, AND THAT PART OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 13 LYING NORTHWESTERLY OF THE COMMONWEALTH EDISON RIGHT OF WAY AS ESTABLISHED IN WARRANTY DEED RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. 848691, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 28, 2004 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2004-95170, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 544 South Holloway Road Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 06-03-13-108-021-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Wirbicki Law Group 33 W Monroe Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60625 312-360-9455 312-572-7823 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 12/26, 1/2, 1/9


Food wolfgang puck’s kitchen

WE’RE TALKING

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

recipe roast prime rib of beef with garlic-herb crust Serves 6 to 8

1 bone-in prime rib of beef, 4 to 5 pounds 8 garlic cloves, minced 4 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary 2 teaspoons dried thyme 4 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons kosher salt

plan ahead for the ultimate holiday roast beef dinner Stop by your local butcher or supermarket and order the roast as soon as possible Thanksgiving is barely over when you suddenly realize the time has come to start thinking seriously about what you’ll cook for Christmas dinner. And I always wonder: Why do so many people cook another turkey on December 24 or 25? Maybe it’s because memories of the previous holiday’s golden-brown turkey are still so deliciously fresh. Or perhaps that’s the way family tradition has always said the Christmas menu should be. Or, just maybe, our minds are so fatigued by entertaining at this time of year that we find it easier to switch to autopilot and cook the same thing all over again. So I’d like to propose a different main course for your holiday table this Christmas. Try my recipe for Roast Prime Rib of Beef with Garlic-Herb Crust. I find roast beef to be one of the most impressive main courses you could present for a special meal, especially when you start with a bone-in roast. Boldly shaped and deeply browned, with a tempting crust and juicy, rose-colored interior,

the roast seems to me to announce like nothing else that a real feast is about to begin. If your mouth is watering at that description, I suggest you act now. Stop by your local butcher or supermarket and order the roast as soon as possible, just to make sure there will be one on hand and reserved

i find roast beef to be one of the most imPressive main courses you couLd Present for a sPeciaL meaL, esPeciaLLy when you start with a bone-in roast. for you when you shop for the meal. You can keep it in the refrigerator for a good three days before you cook it. Then, simply follow my recipe. The keys to success are simple. To begin, while the oven

preheats, rub the exterior of the roast thoroughly with the seasoning mixture. During cooking, the seasonings will not only subtly flavor the inside of the meat but will also mingle with the juices to form the muchdesired crust, which will add excitement to every serving. The roasting itself happens in two stages. For the first 25 minutes, I like to cook the meat at a high temperature to help the crust form, sealing in the juices. Then, I reduce the temperature and complete the cooking at a more gentle heat that enhances the meat’s tenderness. Finally, once the roast is done to your liking (which you can test easily with an instant-read thermometer), be sure to let it rest, covered, at warm room temperature for 30 minutes before carving. This crucial yet easy step allows the bubbling-hot juices to settle back into the meat, so more of them stay in every bite. Follow these few pointers and you’ll have a roast everyone will love. In fact, you may love it so much that you might even be tempted to make it again for New Year’s Eve! (c) 2013 WOLFGANG PUCK WORLDWIDE, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

remove the roast from the refrigerator and leave it at room temperature while you preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Place the rack in the center of the oven - or, if the roast won’t fit into your oven with the rack in the center, place the rack in the lower position. While the oven is heating, put the roast rib side down on a rack inside a large, heavy roasting pan. In a small bowl, stir together the garlic, rosemary, thyme, pepper and salt. spread the garlicherb mixture evenly all over the surface of the meat, pressing down firmly with your hands to help the mixture adhere. Place the roasting pan on the oven rack. Cook the roast for 25 minutes. then, reduce the temperature setting to 250 degrees f. and continue roasting until an instant-read thermometer, inserted into the center of the roast without touching bone, reads 120 degrees f. for rare or 125 degrees f. for medium rare, 1-1/2 to 2 hours longer. remove the roast from the oven and transfer it to a platter. cover the roast with aluminum foil and leave it to rest in a warm spot for 30 minutes. uncover the roast and transfer it to a carving board. Pour the juices that have accumulated on the platter into a sauceboat for serving. With a sharp carving knife, and steadying the roast with a carving fork, cut the meat across the grain into thick or thin slices, as you and your guests prefer; if guests like, include rib bones as part of their portions, cutting carefully between the bones. Pass the juices at table for guests to help themselves.

cut here

23


24

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 26, 2013

Romeoville 12-26-13  

Romeoville 12-26-13

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you