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Our Community, Our News

NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Vol. 8 No. 19

Editor’s Note: Common Core Standards, Career and College Readiness, Measures of Academic Performance (MAP) testing, datadriven accountability—almost chanted like a mantra, these are the terms educators and parents are hearing on a daily basis when it comes to the business of educating students in Valley View School District 365u. As Illinois embarks on new levels of achievement, and school districts such as Valley View work to comply, changes in the system are abundant, and, to those outside education circles, a mystery. In an effort to break down some of the confusion, Bugle Newspapers is taking a three-part look at how Valley View uses assessments, what parents need to know and what the ramifications are as a district.

STORY BY LAURA KATAUSKAS | STAFF REPORTER

A

s students of Valley View School District 365u complete their first quarter of the 2013-2014 school year, with report card in hand, caregivers are attending parent-teacher conferences throughout the district to receive the first glimpse of their child’s performance. But assessment started long before that grade first hit the report card, for some less than a week into school. In September, shortly after school starts, the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) (PSAE) results come in the mail. But these are the reports from tests taken in the spring from the previous school year.

SEE GRADE • PAGE 4


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

News

Former Marine urges students to celebrate our veterans Speakers shared stories, explained part of history of Veterans Day to students at King Elementary School The military continues to play an important role in protecting the freedoms United States citizens enjoy. So says Vietnam veteran Dave Appel who was one of several veterans who spoke to Irene King Elementary School

students this week about the importance of Veterans Day. “People in other countries don’t have the freedoms you have,” the retired Valley View School District 365U Technology Department member told a third grade class

Wednesday. “Our military helps preserve freedom and peace.” Appel detailed a bit of history for the students, pointing out Veterans Day was once called Armistice Day in honor of the agreement made on the 11th day at the 11th hour in November 1918 bringing peace to the western front during World War I. The name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954. “On Veterans Day, we celebrate and honor all of the people who decided to serve their country,” the ex-Marine said. “And a veteran doesn’t necessarily have to serve in a war.” The four-day visits by veterans were arranged by King LMC Director Janet Fitzgerald.

Submitted photo

Vietnam veteran Dave Appel, a retired VVSD Technology Department staff member, talks about the importance of Veterans Day with third graders at Irene King Elementary School in Romeoville.


THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

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New apartments possible due to new concept plan New apartments would be first built in nearly a decade at the corner of Highpoint Drive and Weber Road By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The first apartments to be built in nearly a decade could become a reality based on a concept plan introduced to the Romeoville Village Board.

The Celtic Development Apartments are planning to build two small“higher-end”apartment buildings with indoor parking at the corner of Highpoint Drive and Weber Road, adjacent to Harris Bank. Combined, the complex would house 46 units,

a combination of both one- and two-bedroom units from 730 to 1,300 square feet in size. The brick buildings will house parking on the ground floor, include balconies and in-unit laundry. Building 1 will be four stories tall to accommodate better circulation of the site, and the second building will be three stories tall. “There is a new generation of workers and residents who have a need for quality style apartment living and this offers them that,”

said Mayor John Noak.“The market is now trending for this style of apartments and it is attractive.” Developer Art Zwemke marketed the apartments as those intended for the college grad, the new couple, or even those entering retirement years. Trustee Sue Miklevitz applauded the move to bring apartments to the area, offering a tasteful product for those looking for such an opportunity but questioned the ability to maintain a nice-looking area for

years to come. “First you have to start out with the right building materials, and we are doing that,” said Zwemke. “The size also plays into it—this is not an institutional complex of 200 units where it gets sold repeatedly. In all likelihood, this is more of a mom and pop (tenant base). We believe the amenities like indoor parking, larger style apartments are conducive to being a high-end unit … It’s a high-caliber building, and we anticipate high-caliber tenants.

Sarah Tomei is Queen and Brian Parro King in the performance. Other students featured include Cassie Buckley, Jena Johnson, Paige Kennedy, Stephanie Gomez, Serenca Huerta, Jordan Nazos, Claire Pigors, Karlie Vega, Campbell Bovaird, Derek Brown, Caleb Hand, Austin Nelson, Malcolm Smith, Jon Slowik and Jon Worlton. Lawrence E. Fisher is the BHS Director of Choirs. The pre-show

and first course will begin at 4:30. Dinner is at 5 p.m. Guests will be seated in tables of 10. Tickets are $35 each and include a choice of either roast chicken or vegetable lasagna entrees as well as a variety of other food and drink. Reservations and more information are both available by calling 630-679-3425, by e-mailing FisherLE@vvsd.org or by going to www.bhsmusicbooster.com.

News Briefs PTA Craft show is Nov. 16 at Martinez The A. Vito Martinez Middle School PTA is sponsoring a craft and vendor show from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 16 at the school, 590 Belmont, Romeoville. The event will feature a variety of vendors including Pampered Chef, Jamberry Nails, Home Décor,Sue’s Crochet Crafts,Crates of Love, Silk Floral Décor, Carol’s

Handmade Goods, Tastefully Simple, Origami Owl, Glasswear by Erin, Avon, Thirty One, Wild Tree, Party Lite Candles, Rodan & Fields, Palmeria Jewelry, Dove Chocolate, Tupperware, Sam’s Club, Vault Denim, Posh, Norma’s Jewelry, Steve’s Cheesecakes and TuTu Creations. Pizza will be available. Raffles will be held.

Dec. 8 BHS Madrigal

Dinner reservation deadline is Nov. 18 The reservation deadline for the 18th annual Bolingbrook High School Madrigal Dinner is Nov. 18. The Dec. 8 dinner, which will be held at Ashton Place on 75th and Clarendon Hills Road in Willowbrook, will feature a fourcourse feast accompanied by festive a capella and brass music.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

COVER STORY

Making the grade continued from page one Next comes a progress report, newly revamped this year to provide more detail. Then in early October, parents receive MAP assessment results, tests taken in large part the first few weeks of school.The first quarter ended Oct. 17, and report cards followed. Everyone is armed with data, yet the ISAT shows the child is exceeding in reading and lower than the state standard in math. But MAP shows the student is on par with reading nationally and math is higher than the average. And the report card may reflect an even different picture.

What? Parents cry foul, many claiming a particular test score isn’t an accurate picture of the student. “It’s one test. What if my child had a bad day (while taking the test)” asked one mom. Others indicate that data from pen and paper or computerbased tests will not define their child, acknowledging that action observed in the classroom or by the parents themselves is what matters most. “I know what my child is capable of, and I don’t care if the test scores show otherwise—I know they can do the work,” said

News another mom. major drivers of the research and ways of differentiating those And still others come from needed.” experiences to scaffold student the camp that too much testing So what is a parent, a teacher, learning. Assessment is the “how takes away from the learning an administrator do with all this well” —its gauges the attainment they need. data? And for parents, what does and growth of student learning “How much time are we it all mean? to inform instructional practices taking to have these kids sit out These, along with other few and the curriculum.” and take a test that they might lesser-known tests such as Fountas Gilbert adds that it does take a not even be prepared for?” and Pinnell (F n P) and AIMSweb, balanced assessment -- including Comments such as these are to everyday observations and formative, summative and largeheard from parents in PTOs and tests in the classroom make up scale -- as is done in school PTAs throughout the district. what administrators say is the districts nationally. But to remove assessment answer—a balanced assessment That is, formative, meaning from instruction would be system that draws a clearer the constant assessment in counter productive,said Assistant picture of the whole student. the classroom by the teacher Superintendent for Educational Director of K-12 Assessment/ through observation, discussion, Services Rachel Kinder. Data Kelly Gilbert contends questioning, non-graded class “We make better teachers by that assessment is an integral work and anecdotal notes. The consistently focus here We make better teachers by monitoring revolves on progress and consistently monitoring progress the teacher holding it to deter mining and holding it to a standard.” a standard,” what learning - Assistant Superintendent for Educational Services Rachel Kinder said Kinder. comes next for “Instruction a student and is no longer what impact it based on just what a teacher part of instruction, providing has on teacher instruction. thinks; there is data to support information about how well Summative assessments it and to help refine classroom students are achieving and include “benchmark teaching.” growing over time. assessments,” that can be Whether all these tests “Standards, curriculum, developed by the teacher, district necessary is debatable, said instruction and assessment or be a commercial product. School Board Vice President Rick are interwoven in the learning These are done to identify Gougis. process, and each informs the strengths and gaps in curriculum “I know people worry about others,” said Gilbert. “Standards and to gauge how instruction whether it takes away from are the what—they define what is aligned to standards and instruction. I don’t want us to we expect students to know how students compare both have “paralysis by analysis,” but and be able to do. Curriculum at the state and national level. data does cause us to ask more is the “how” —it defines a Gilbert said curriculum may be questions,” said Gougis. “Would body of learning experiences refined and teachers may modify I like to see us narrow it down? that are designed to reach the instruction for student groups Yes.We have to look at these tests standards. Instruction is the ‘in based on their progress.Common and see what we can and can do what ways’—it provides the without, without sacrificing the specific learning experiences See GRADE, page 5


News ASSESSMENT GRADE LEVEL TESTING Illinois State Achievement Test (ISAT), Illinois Alternative Assessment (IAA)*, EXPLORE, PLAN, PSAE [The IAA is given to less than 5% of VVSD students whose IEP (Individualized Education Plan) indicates an alternative assessment to the ISAT must be given to measure their academic performance)] GRADE LEVEL

ASSESSMENT

TESTED AREAS

ADMINISTERED

3, 5, 6, 8

ISAT

READING, MATH (ISAT STANDARDS)

3/04 - 4/14/14

4&7

ISAT

READING, MATH & SCIENCE

3/04 - 4/14/14

3 - 11

IAA

READING, MATH (IAA STANDARDS)

2/24 - 3/21/14

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EXPLORE

ENGLISH, MATH, READING, SCIENCE

9/25/13

9

EXPLORE

ENGLISH, MATH, READING, SCIENCE

10/10/13

10

PLAN

ENGLISH, MATH, READING, SCIENCE

10/10/13

11

PSAE/ACT

READING, MATH, SCIENCE, WRITING (PSAE)

4/23 - 4/24/14

GRADE Continued from page 4 Core Standards come in to play here. Tests like Fountas and Pinnell (F n P) is the benchmark test for where a student reading level stands based on state standards. Other tests like the Northwest Evaluation’s Measures of Academic Progress, (MAP) assessment, brought to the district some three years ago, are aligned to common core, and are meant to provide data regarding achievement and growth—which is a whole other debate—gauging achievement versus growth. The MAP data helps further direct a student’s placement in the right group for their skill level, be it an intervention for math or an accelerated reading group that will challenge them, Kinder explains. Gougis, often outspoken about various results on such assessments, holds the MAP test to be the best assessment tool for a parent. “Things do come down to the quality of instruction,” said Gougis. “You need to look at your child’s typical growth, and if there isn’t any growth, you need to raise a little hell. If anything else, go with your gut. Are they progressing? Are they reading better?” Achievement carries a very important focus, said Kinder. “We need to know if they can meet the goal and cross the finish line, but we also know that the norm is not always good enough, and we have to keep moving and that’s when we look at growth and know that they can exceed,” said Kinder.“For instance, if your child’s MAP score is in the 90 percentile, that’s great. But they can’t just sit there; they still need

to show growth and boost that score by the next test. You have to make sure to look at where they started.” Large-scale assessments include ISAT, EXPLORE, PLAN, PSAE, ACT, SAT, NAEP and AP exams given annually. The focus of large-scale assessment is to determine how schools, districts and states are achieving. Kinder categorizes these as the “end of the road’ type of assessment, measuring progress at the end of the year to see if students meet standards. These tests are tied to requirements for the district as well, including funding revenues and district performance consequences. Kinder believes while these tests serve a purpose to gauge where the student and district lies at the end of the year, indicating whether or not it meets state standards, these other assessments are needed to help guide a student through the year, focusing on their strengths and weaknesses, sooner rather than later. “These assessment strategies provide information at differing intervals and for different purposes,” said Gilbert.“Each one provides a different perspective, and one cannot take the place of another. Together, they provide a balanced approach to assessment that informs decisions at the classroom, school, district, state and national levels.” In all cases, results are used to adjust or change teaching be it whether a teacher decides an individual student needs remediation or enrichment, or as a whole curriculum needs to be changed as a district, Gilbert explains. “We use these assessments in conjunction with one another,” said Kinder. “When we receive our MAP data, the teacher can also use what they see in the

classroom, sort of the formative assessments, to help determine what interventions if necessary are needed.” While the complete picture serves the district in compiling its data, the weight of each assessment is different among parents. Some believe in the MAP scores and disregard the others, while others believe solely in report cards and their own judgement. “I don’t necessarily understand how they all correlate, but all I can do is keep checking in with my child and his teacher—I don’t know, some of it is a mystery,” said one parent. Gougis proposes one of the best steps for parents to keep track of their child’s progress. “I think the board needs to listen more, and parents need to be bolder and not be afraid to question teachers,” said Gougis. “Just because you do not have a degree in education doesn’t mean you do not know your child. Ask the questions.” Kinder, too, suggests that assessments allow for that type of interaction. “Standards with assessments gives us that common check, that there are the same expectations for all schools and students,” said Kinder. “It is not just dependent on the teacher alone and what his or her idea of the standard is. There are set expectations.” Right now, the system is being refined, Kinder explains. As the district continues in its third year of its “New View,” interventions and enhancements are being put in place based on data conclusion, something the district did not have in previous years. Next week the Bugle looks at state standards, how the district stacks up, and new tests for next school year.

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Ignacio Solis-Lopez, 37, 502 N. Hickory, Joliet, was arrested at 6 a.m. Oct. 30 and charged with no valid driver’s license, driving without lights near Chicago Tube and Innovation Drive.

2

Francisco Giles-Vega, 26, 921 Fourth Ave., Aurora, was arrested at 6:30 a.m. Oct. 30 and charged with no valid driver’s license and speeding near Dalhart and Arcadia.

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3

Jonathan Adams, 29, 229 N. Hebbard, Joliet, was arrested at 9:59 p.m. Oct. 31 and charged with driving with a suspended license, no insurance, failure to signal and an in-state warrant near Naperville Drive and Enterprise.

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Michelle Kehr, 38, 201 Tallman, was arrested at 3:13 p.m. Nov. 1 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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5

Arnulfo Cordoba, 21, 369 Hickory, Joliet, was arrested at 2:16 a.m. Nov. 2 and charged with driving with a suspended license, speeding and no insurance near Route 53 and Taylor Road.

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Demetri Hayward, 21, 277 Oak Creek Lane, was arrested at 9:59 p.m. Nov. 2 and charged with no valid driver’s license, no insurance and possession of drug equipment near Highpoint Drive east of Harmony.

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Luis Loaiza, 33, 681 S. Lake St., Aurora, was arrested at 9:54 p.m. Nov. 2 and charged with no valid driver’s license and no registration near Shenandoah and Murphy Drive.

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Marquel Jimerson, 18, 516 Algonquin St., Joliet, was arrested at 4:21 p.m. Nov. 3 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 200 block of S. Highpoint Drive.

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Hector Palacios Jr., 28, 711 Ledochowski, Lemont, was arrested at 7:15 p.m. Nov. 3 and charged with driving with a suspended license, no insurance,

speeding and no rear registration light near Route 53 and Airport Road. Anna Garcia-Sanchez, Joliet, 619 Meeker, Joliet, was arrested at 6:57 a.m. Nov. 5 and charged with no valid driver’s license, and a suspended registration near Taylor Road and Belmont Avenue.

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Julio Horos-Gaitan, 32, 3724 Honore, Chicago, was arrested at 5:18 a.m. Nov. 5 and charged with no valid driver’s license and disobeying a traffic light near Route 53 and Normantown Road.

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Karina Rodriguez-Martinez, 40, 667 Meeker, Joliet, was arrested at 2:15 p.m. Nov. 5 and charged with no valid driver’s

license and disobeying a traffic sign near Normantown Road near Weber Road. Johnna Kausak, 33, 1007 Nicholson St., Joliet, was arrested at 3:01 p.m. Nov. 5 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Jessica Kittle, 28, 231 McKool, was arrested at

7:32 p.m. Nov. 5 for driving with a suspended license and disobeying a traffic sign near Belmont Avenue and Taylor Road. Cheonte Blackmon, 24, 900 Summit, Joliet, was arrested at 7:55 p.m.Nov.5 for driving with a suspended license, obstructing identification and no registration plate light near Route 53 and Normantown Road.

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ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor Nick Reiher nreiher@buglenewspapers.com Assistant Managing Editor Jonathan Samples jsamples@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sue Baker Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

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Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

News

3rd graders raise $555 to help local homeless children Independence students inspired by YouTube sensation fundraising drive Students in Jessica Groebe’s 3rd grade class at Independence raised a phenomenal $555 last week simply by selling 25 cent post cards to students and staff at the Bolingbrook elementary school. The money was sent to Power Connection, a Bolingbrook-based agency that provides a wide range of services to local residents including low income families and those who are homeless. The class called their fundraising drive “Socktober,” which is a movement started by YouTube sensation, comedian

and motivational speaker Kid President. “My class loves Kid President and we try to live by his pep talk,” Groebe said. “Roughly 250 students in Valley View are homeless. Homeless no longer necessarily means someone on the streets living in a cardboard box. It means people who have lost their jobs and homes, and are now forced to live with relatives, in hotels or in a shelter.” The class’ Socktober event involved a simple concept. They sold the 25-cent postcards in the morning and students wrote

positive messages on them to fellow students, teachers, aides, lunchroom staff, office staff, etc. The postcards were collected and distributed before the end of the day, along with two Jolly Ranchers, to each recipient. “All of the postcards had notes of friendship, encouragement, and gratitude,” Groebe said. “I’m so excited and proud.” The Socktober event lasted five days. Submitted Photo

Jessica Groebe’s 3rd graders at Independence Elementary School in Bolingbrook show the post cards they sold and distributed as part of their “Socktober” fundraising drive for homeless children in the area.

County to host dangers of heroin forum Presentation will feature important prevention strategies A community forum focusing on the dangers of heroin use is planned from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Nov. 20 at Creekside Elementary School, 13909 S. Budler Road in Plainfield. The forum is sponsored by state Rep. Natalie Manley, state Sen. Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant, Will County Executive Larry Walsh and Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow. “We must take every step possible to protect our children

against this deadly drug,” said Manley. “In addition to hearing the facts from experts, we will also brainstorm solutions and establish a dialogue between parents, students, and community leaders about the harmful effects of heroin use and the preventative steps we must take together.” Manley and Bertino-Tarrant were recently appointed to Illinois’ newly formed Young Adult Heroin Task Force to

study the problem as it relates to teenagers and suggest programs and strategies for high schools to implement. Nearly one person died in Will County from a heroin overdose every week in 2012, according to the Will County Coroner’s Office. “Heroin continues to have devastating effects on families across our county,” said Walsh. “We must teach our children why this drug is so deadly. The best way to fight this epidemic is to educate our children and parents about the dangers of heroin. ”

Glasgow said it is important to put information into the hands of parents and students in Will County “It is imperative that parents understand the harmful effects of this addictive drug, especially as its popularity grows among young people,” Glasgow said. The presentation will feature important prevention strategies and discuss how to spot the signals that a loved one or friend has become addicted to heroin. In addition, the forum will include first-hand accounts of

how heroin use controls every aspect of an addict’s life. There will also be a discussion about the myths and realities surrounding reports of “Krocodil” in the region. “It is important to share information of this harmful and deadly drug to as many people as possible,” said BertinoTarrant. “I hope to continue the message to ensure this area recognizes the impact it has on our very own community.” For more information, contact Manley’s office at (815) 725-2741 or e-mail repmanley@gmail.com.


Calendar NOVEMBER 14 The 39 Steps. A Theatreon-the-Hill’s production, in Bolingbrook. Adapted from an Alfred Hitchcock film based on a book by John Buchan, The 39 Steps is a fast-paced whodunit with laughs all along the way. The play will run at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 3 p.m. Sundays from Nov. 8 through Nov. 24 at the Bolingbrook Performing Arts Center, 375 W. Briarcliff. March of Dimes Suburban Signature Chef’s Auction. 6 to 9 p.m. at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive, Bolingbrook. Senator Pat McGuire cordially invites you to attend this event to celebrate 75 years of life-changing work. This event is your opportunity to support the March of Dimes’ mission while bidding on vacation, dining and entertainment packages. Tickets: $75 per person, $750 for table of ten. Call 815-6008087 or visit http://www. marchofdimes.com/illinois Internet for Job Seekers. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. This class will help you organize the information you need to apply for jobs online, and then shows you tips and tricks to register online for jobs, shows how to email a copy of your resume or attach a copy of

your resume to an online job application, and teaches how to navigate those confusing job posting websites. Contact: Adult Services Desk 815-8862030. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab. Valley View WorkshopElementary Schools. 7 p.m. Skoff Elementary School, Romeoville. Workshops in your neighborhood that will give you an opportunity to understand how changing expectations impact your child and how you can best support your child’s success. What do teaching and learning look like in my child’s classroom? What major shifts in learning and assessment are occurring? How can I best support my child’s learning and understand his/ her progress? Spanish language interpreters will be available at all Community Forums and School Workshops. National Gaming in Libraries Day. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Come to the Library to celebrate National Gaming in Libraries Day. We will have life-size versions of your favorite board games. Please register. Contact: Children’s Services Desk at 815-886-2030 or email rtracy@ whiteoaklibrary.org. Location: Romeoville Branch Meeting Room A – Main Level.

NOVEMBER 16 Martinez PTA craft show. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at A.Vito Martinez Middle School, 590 Belmont. The A. Vito Martinez Middle School PTA is sponsoring a craft and vendor show featuring a variety of vendors including Pampered Chef, Jamberry Nails, Home Décor, Sue’s Crochet Crafts, Crates of Love, Silk Floral Décor, Carol’s Handmade Goods, Tastefully Simple, Origami Owl, Glasswear by Erin, Avon, Thirty One, Wild Tree, Party Lite Candles, Rodan & Fields, Palmeria Jewelry, Dove Chocolate, Tupperware, Sam’s Club,Vault Denim,Posh,Norma’s Jewelry, Steve’s Cheesecakes and TuTu Creations. Pizza will be available. Raffles will be held. Symphony in Lights. 3 p.m. at the Promenade, Bolingbrook. The fun-filled day will have crafts for the kids, ice sculptures, hay rides and more. Kids can visit with Santa from 3 to 6 p.m. The tree lighting ceremony begins at 6:30 p.m. immediately followed by the first Symphony in Lights show. The first 300 people to bring a non-perishable food donation or cash donation will get a goodie bag. One per person must be present, while supplies last. Food/cash donations will benefit Power Connections. Designer Ornaments at Romeoville. 2 to 3:30 p.m. at

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013 the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. We’ll be using ink pens, glitter and who knows what else to create two glass ornaments for the holiday season. You take one of your creations home with you for your tree, and the other ornament will be festooning the “Festival of Trees” event, held at the Gladys Fox Museum on Saturday, November 30, 2013.All materials are provided.  Limit to 20 crafters, ages 13 and up. You can register for this event by contacting Adult Services, Romeoville Branch Library, 815-886-2030, or contact Beverly Krakovec at 815-552-4225 bkrakovec@ whiteoaklibrary.org.  Location: Romeoville Branch Meeting Room A - Main Level.  International Games Day. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, Bolingbrook. Drop into the Vortex. Registration is required for game tournaments. Toy Exchange. 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, Bolingbrook. Please check fountaindale.org for more information about donation dates and guidelines.

NOVEMBER 17 Midwest Indoor Sprint Triathlon. At the Bolingbrook Recreation and Aquatic Complex. Distance

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of the event is completely up to you. It’s all about how much ground and water you can cover in the allotted time. Participants will swim for 10 minutes, cycle for 15 minutes and run for 15 minutes. This Indoor Sprint Triathlon is part of the Midwest Indoor Sprint Triathlon Series (MIST) with Arlington Heights, Bartlett, Bolingbrook, Elk Grove, Lemont, Oak Brook, South Barrington and Streamwood park districts. Fee is $40; $35 with Resident ID. Register at the Bolingbrook Recreation and Aquatic Complex or visit signmeup.com. For more information call 630-739-1705. SAC Thanksgiving Fundraiser. 11 a.m. at Lost Acres, 7 Alexander Circle, Romeoville.

NOVEMBER 18 Veterans Job Fair. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Center, 900 W. Romeo Road. Job fair is open to all veterans and is presented by Congressman Dan Lipinski in conjuction with the Romeoville Veteran’s Commission and Mayor John Noak.

NOVEMBER 19 To Upgrade or Not Upgrade: Is that Old Computer Worth Keeping? 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, Bolingbrook. Adults. Registration is required.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Dot-__ printer 7 Hash house sign 11 Org. that financed many public murals 14 Brand with a Justice For Potatoes League 15 Inside information? 16 Ancient pillager 17 Pop 20 Air France-__: European flier 21 Cathedral areas 22 Place in a 1969 Western 23 Tech staff member 24 Camel hair colors 26 Pop 32 Bat mitzvah locale 33 Bands from Japan 34 Gp. concerned with dropout prevention 35 Run smoothly 36 Condor’s booster 39 Ruckus

Down 40 “__ you sure?” 41 Charcutier offering 42 2010 Angelina Jolie spy film 43 Pop 48 “Sooey!” reply 49 “Goodness gracious!” 50 Kitty’s sunny sleeping spot 52 TV and radio 53 Toulouse : oeil :: Toledo : __ 56 Pop 60 An official lang. of Kenya 61 The “a” in “a = lw” 62 First word of Longfellow’s “Paul Revere’s Ride” 63 Technique 64 Chews the fat 65 First step toward nirvana

1 Poke fun at 2 Shrinking sea 3 Duration 4 Poke fun at 5 Defensive denial 6 Second word of Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” 7 Outdoor security options 8 Battling god 9 Itty bit 10 Pink Floyd’s Barrett 11 Pentecost 12 Flat-bottomed boat 13 “Put Your Head on My Shoulder” singer 18 Claim with conviction 19 Truckee River city 23 II into D 24 “Yay, the weekend!” 25 Short right hand? 26 “Balderdash!” 27 Chekov bridgemate 28 Quantitative “science”? 29 Bulls’ org.

30 “Jurassic Park” co-star 31 Father of modern Italian, per linguists 36 Very soon after 37 President between Tyler and Taylor 38 No and Who: Abbr. 42 Messy room 44 Excalibur part 45 Change the colors of, say 46 Wavy lines, in music 47 Justice who’s the son of an Italian immigrant 50 Get into a lather 51 New Rochelle college 52 Overly submissive 53 “The Simpsons” bus driver 54 Poke fun (at) 55 Intro to science? 57 Put into words 58 It’s usually FDIC-insured 59 Bassoon end?

Horoscopes You may be busy as a bee but not too busy to think about the birds and bees. The pressure to meet a deadline or irritations might slow you down in the week ahead, but you will have plenty of company.

Two heads are better than one, just as two sets of hands are better than one. In the upcoming week, call on handy helpers to get a job done or brainstorm with congenial people. Work side by side with others.

Show off your knowledge. Early in the week, you can offer good advice or receive it because people trust in your talents. You may have the wherewithal to perform a good deed when sympathies are aroused.

Launch your ship or your plans. Make crucial decisions that affect your finances in the early part of the week, when your judgment is at its best. A mild flirtation could lead to a serious romantic relationship.

Take advantage of inspiration and raise your sights higher. A deep and abiding faith in others will act as an anchor if storms blow you off course. The people you meet the first half of the week are worthwhile.

Tell it like it is. Spell things out clearly and discuss plans with loved ones early this week to prevent misunderstandings. Indulge an appetite for the good things in life; get in the hot tub or visit the spa.

Make it by mixing in your mojo. You’ll be able to persuade others at work to cooperate with you and listen to your ideas. Focus on family ties and romantic outings in the second half of the week.

Dive in and determine what you deserve. It’s never wise to melt the plastic off your credit card by overworking it, but you should enjoy at least one special treat in the week ahead.

Teamwork can overcome challenges this week. If too many tasks are heaped on your plate make an effort to enlist other people to help out. Offer assistance when others need a helping hand.

Cooperation from others in the early part of the week may give you the leverage needed to get a backlog of business affairs in order. Allocate time sensibly so there’s room for romance.

Deep discussion draws dollars nearer. Make good use of time spent with partners and family this week, as they will be able to provide beneficial advice. You could strike it rich with a good idea.

Whip it up. Smooth talkers will get their ideas across in the week ahead. Loved ones will listen with a compassionate ear. Show your affection by cooking up some family entertainment.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2013

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • DUSKY • RIGOR • MORTAR • JACKAL

Answer:

When the geologist made an important discovery, he became a “ROCK” STAR


INSIDE: Bolingbrook falls in second round of playoffs to Marist, page 14; Lewis men win opener, page 15

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

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Chemistry key for Spartans By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Although the season ended earlier than it had hoped for, the Romeoville football team made an impact on the local football landscape that it hopes to keep building on. The Spartans converted an 0-9 season a year ago to a 5-5 record this year and the program’s first playoff berth in more than a decade. The transformation from one year to another is not unheard of, but usually when it takes place, it is done so with a massive senior class and is only a one-year turnaround. That is not the case with the Spartans, as coach Jeff Kuna credits the cohesion between the upper and lower classmen that made the turnaround successful. “This senior class and junior class bonded really well and they worked together all summer well,” Kuna said. “But it goes back to the winter months when they formed that cohesion See KEY, page 13

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Miguel Ford is one of the three-year seniors graduating from the Spartans.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Sports KEY Continued from page 11 between themselves.This wasn’t one class dominating another, they complimented each other really well. “A lot of them knew each other and a lot of them played together in middle school and they always had a good relationship with each other and they realized when they had the chance to play together, it could be a good team if they made the commitment.” Kuna said the merging of the classes was something the senior class took upon themselves. “The senior class went a long way in their four years. Their freshman and sophomore years they didn’t win a lot of games and they had a tough time their junior year,” Kuna said. “They did a lot of the work

themselves their junior year and when you look back at that, statistically, they provided a lot of the offensive and defensive stats. I think they realized their potential and took it upon themselves after their junior year in the end of October and they got the sophomore class to get involved with them.” While the Spartans will miss the likes of seniors Miguel Ford and Anthony Love, both three year starters, they have several talented players returning. Ford, who tallied 802 yards this season on 140 carries and nine scores, is the only offensive weapon leaving the squad. Romeoville returns Gil Whitaker, who carried the ball 158 times for 817 this season. They also bring back Kelvin Jones, one of the area’s top passers. This season, he completed 91-of-206 passes for 1,537 yards and 18 touchdowns.

His two top pass catchers are also returning to the Spartans next season. Chuck Hunter is the area’s top wide receiver this season, grabbing 45 passes for 923 yards and 11 touchdowns. He averaged 20.5 yards per catch. Not far behind him in average is Manuel Nartey, who averaged 17.3 yards per catch. He caught 16 total passes for 276 yards and three scores. “We have our top two receivers coming back, our quarterback returning. We have four offensive linemen that started five or more games,” Kuna said. “Gil Whitaker is one of the top running backs in the area coming back. Defensively, we have six core players coming back. They realized they have the responsibility to take this further and not just be a playoff qualifier, but to take it deeper in the playoffs.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Sports

Raiders fall 21-7 to Marist By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Senior Parrker Westphal played his final game for Bolingbrook Friday against Marist.

The game was billed to be a contest between Marist’s offense and Bolingbrook’s defense, however, it was the other matchup that decided the game. The Bolingbrook defense held Marist’s high-powered offense to 14 points in the 21-7 loss, but the Raider offense had a hard time moving the ball against the RedHawks. After playing to a 7-7 tie in the first half, Bolingbrook looked to be in position to do what it has all season and get the offense going after intermission. The Raiders moved down the field in the third quarter and had a second-and-three at the Marist 15, however, a personal foul penalty for the chop block moved them up and stopped the drive. “That was tough to take there,” said Bolingbrook coach John Ivlow. “They changed that rule a couple of years ago. Low, high never used to be a penalty, it was always high, low. So if the guy was engaged high and you came in low, but two years ago they changed it to any combination of high, low or low, high. So, by nature, if your

back side is cutting a defensive tackle and we zone block it and there is a big pile and your tackle falls over the pile, that is a low, high. I know exactly what we got called for and that is unfortunate.” After a blocked 36-yard field goal attempt, Marist drove the ball down the field and grabbed a 14-7 lead with 7:25 left. Two plays later, Bolingbrook fullback Jaden Huff had one of his best runs of the game and was fighting for even more yardage when he was stripped of the ball. It popped in the air and right into the arms of Nic Weishar who ran it 32 yards for the TD and made the game 217. All game, Marist used its big offensive line to control the Raider defense enough to get two long scoring drives. “They stayed on their blocks and they are physical and they moved the ball,” said senior defensive back Parrker Westphal. “They were big. We knew they were going to come with the run, but their O Line held the blocks.” Ivlow wasn’t surprised that Marist had the size and talent it did. See FALL, page 15


Sports

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Lewis wins opener vs. Olivet Nazarene The Lewis University men’s basketball team spun its wheels in the opening half of their contest against Olivet Nazarene, but they kicked it into gear in the final 20 minutes on their way to the 79-64 non-conference victory over the Tigers in the season opener at Neil Carey Arena on Nov. 11. “I thought that we were sluggish in the first half and didn’t execute defensively,” Lewis head men’s basketball coach Scott Trost said. “We played well and did a lot of good things offensively in the second half. “Overall, it was a good win and a great tape to learn from,” Trost continued. “We just have to keep making progress and keep getting better.” Lewis junior guard Ryan Jackson (Bolingbrook, Ill./ Riverside-Brookfield) led all

scorers with 24 points, including a 12-for-13 outing from the free throw line. Junior forward Julian Lewis (Flossmoor, Ill./ Homewood-Flossmoor) finished with 19 points, eight rebounds and five blocks, while point guard Jeff Jarosz (Lyons, Ill./ Morton) pitched in 12 points, three steals and two assists. As a team, Lewis was lethal from the charity stripe, as the Flyers knocked down 91.7% (22-for-24) of their attempts, including a perfect 16-for-16 in the second half. Olivet Nazarene junior guard Austin Davis paced the Tigers with 22 points, including six three-pointers. Sophomore forward Aaron Larson had 12 points and a team-best seven rebounds, while sophomore center Zach Wagner had 10 points. Davis was the catalyst for the

TIgers in the first half, as he drained five three-pointers and finished with 19 points to give ONU the 37-36 advantage at the break. The Flyers, however would hold Davis to three points and ONU to a 29.0% (9-for-31) shooting performance in the second half. Larson would give the Tigers their final lead of the game at 44-42 with a threepointer at the 17:38 mark of the second half. Lewis would answer Larson’s trifecta with a 21-7 run over the next 8:20 to take a 63-51 lead with 9:18 left in the contest. Jackson led the run with 10 points for the lead that the Flyers would never relinquish. As a team, Lewis shot 48.2% (27-for-56) from the field and held a 46-16 points in the paint advantage over Olivet Nazarene.

FALL

ending,” he said. “Especially a Chicago Catholic school, they have those big horses. It makes for a nice run game when you have those big guys up there. I am proud of our kids, we play with who walks through the door and we are pretty competitive and we are proud of that.” Despite losing earlier than they had hoped, this year’s

Raider team is still in school lore. “This group has done something that only three other teams in school history has done and that is going undefeated in the regular season,” Ivlow said. “And on the positive side, we have about 14 guys off of this team coming back next season.”

Continued from page 14 “They are a very good, solid football team. If you watch them from week one until week 10, they are a team that has grown. They don’t make many mistakes, but that is the beauty of a Catholic school, it is never

mark@buglenewspapers.com

Lewis returns to action on November 20th,as the Flyers will welcome in-region opponent Ferris State to Neil Carey Arene for a 7:30 PM tip-off.

SOCCER The Lewis University men’s soccer team returns to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since their magical run to the 2009 ‘Final Four’ as the fifthseeded Flyers (12-2-4) battle fourth-seeded Indianapolis (153-2) in a Super Region 3 First Round showdown at 1 PM ET on Friday (Nov. 15) on the campus of Ohio Dominican in Columbus, Ohio. Earlier this season, both teams battled to a 1-1 (2 OT) tie at Lewis Stadium on September 13th. The winner of the contest will meet top-seeded Ohio Dominican on Sunday (Nov. 17)

at 1 PM ET. “We know how difficult it is to get an invitation to the NCAA’s,” Lewis head men’s soccer coach Evan Fiffles said. “The guys are excited and are looking forward to the challenge.” Lewis is led offensively by senior forward Cristhian Ramirez (Wheeling, Ill./Wheeling) who has totaled a team-best six goals, four assists and 16 points on the season. The Flyers are anchored by senior goalkeeper and Great Lakes Valley Conference Defensive Player of the Year,Alec Pickett (Mokena, Ill./Providence ). Pickett has eight solo shutouts this season and has been a part of 11 Lewis whitewashes in 2013. He is fifth in the country in goals against average (0.49) and owns the sixth-best save percentage (.877) in the NCAA.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

buglenewspapers.com/football

JCA wins, earns rematch with Montini By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Nick Borgra had 140 yards and two TDs in JCA’s win over Kaneland Saturday.

The 45-8 JCA win over Kaneland Saturday night win sets up a rematch with Montini, a 1 p.m. kickoff in Lombard. It is the fourth time in five seasons the two will meet in the playoffs. Montini has won all three of the previous matchups, including a 40-37 win last season in the semifinals and wins in the state title game in 2011 (70-45) and 2009 (29-28). Montini has won four consecutive Class 5A state titles. “Since last year we have wanted Montini,” JCA running back Mike Ivlow said. “It will be a good game, we have been looking forward to this. It is now or never for us.” The Broncos are paced by quarterback Alex Wills, who passed for 301 yards and five touchdowns in the Broncos’ win over Marian last week. Defensively, the Hilltoppers will have to deal with Ohio State-bound Dylan Thompson and linebacker Nile Sykes. “We have to look at the film and our defensive coaches will do a great job getting the guys ready and the offensively we will prepare. We are playing against some superior personnel,” Sharp said. “They are not only some of the best personnel not only in Illinois, but maybe in the Midwest. Our guys are looking forward to that. “That is the thing we love about athletics. We get to play against all these Division-I athletes. This is a challenge, but

I feel if we can execute and do the things we do, it will be an interesting game. It will be a great football game.”

CHASING HISTORY Ivlow’s 220 yards gave him 2,360 yards on the season, placing him third on the Hilltoppers’ all-time list ahead of JR Zwierzynski, who had 2,340 in 2001. He is 264 yards away from second place (James Randle, 1995) and 269 yards shy of tying Ty Isaac (2,629, 2011) for the all-time lead. Isaac broke the record in the 2011 state final loss to Montini with a 515-yard performance. Currently, Ivlow is averaging 214.5 yards per game. It stands as the best per-game average by a JCA running back, as Isaac holds the mark with an average of 187.8 yards per game in 2011. mark@buglenewspapers.com

3

The numbers of consecutive years JCA and Montini have met in the Class 5A playoffs.


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THE KID’S DOCTOR By Sue Hubbard, M.D. www.kidsdr.com

soon after birth. But whenever a baby I recently saw aTV segment on comes into my office wearing “blinging” your baby or toddler. a necklace, I discuss the It seems that the latest craze possibility, even if remote, of the is decking out not only little child suffocating if the necklace girls, but also little boys. Being got caught or twisted around the mother of three sons, I can the infant’s neck.There’s just no understand wanting to “dress reason to even risk it! up” your little boy (clothes for Baby bling is great if you want this group can be a bit boring), to dress your child in cute shirts, but a few of the young TV hats, or even trendy jeans. Go for models were it! But I would even wearing never put a We necklaces. pediatricians necklace on a Now, a child. It’s akin are no boy wearing to the adage longer a necklace about peanuts: Worried doesn’t bother When should me at all, but a about peanut allergies a child be baby or toddler in young children; the allowed to with a necklace choking haZard is the eat peanuts? is cause for real concern. When they concern. This can spell the isn’t about word! gender, but rather safety. A We pediatricians are no longer necklace is a genuine choking worried about peanut allergies and strangling danger for babies in young children; the choking and young children. hazard is the real concern. It’s I realize that many parents the same for necklaces. Let your receive necklaces for their child wear one of these when babies on the occasion of a they can spell the word, or put baptism, and in some cultures one on when your 3-year-old an infant is given a necklace plays dress up, but take it off made of string or beads to wear once the play session is over. No

Baby bling can be a choking hazard for infants young child should ever sleep in a necklace, or anything that has a cord. Children ages 4 and under, and especially those under the age of a year, are at the greatest risk for airway obstruction and suffocation. So, put that cute

necklace back in the box for a while.You can re-gift it at a later date. Safety before bling!

(Dr. Sue Hubbard is an awardwinning pediatrician, medical editor and media host.“The Kid’s Doctor” TV feature can be seen on more than

90 stations across the U.S. Submit questions at www.kidsdr.com.)

(c) 2013, KIDSDR.COM DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC

MAYO CLINIC

Post-polio syndrome can surface decades later Years after the initial illness, many polio survivors have symptoms of worsening weakness, pain, fatigue By Eric J. Sorenson, M.D. Tribune Content Agency

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: How is post-polio syndrome diagnosed? Are there any new treatments for it? ANSWER: Post-polio syndrome refers to a group of symptoms that can surface decades - often up to 30 or 40 years - after a person has polio. In previous generations, polio was a much-feared illness. But as a result of the now-famous Salk vaccine, polio was virtually wiped out in developed countries in the mid-1950s. The World

Health Organization, or WHO, almost accomplished worldwide elimination of polio by the early 2000s. But because of political turmoil, WHO could not reach all the areas where polio still occurs. As a result, there have been recent polio outbreaks.They have been largely limited to isolated epidemics in areas of central Africa, with rarer cases in central Asia. No polio epidemics have occurred in the United States since the introduction of polio vaccination. There remains, however, a large population of people who were infected

with polio before the start of vaccination programs who continue to live with significant muscle weakness as a result of the disease. In the United States, that number is about 250,000. Years after the initial illness, many polio survivors have symptoms of worsening weakness, pain and fatigue. This group of symptoms has been called “postpolio syndrome.” The people who have muscle weakness from polio are at highest risk for postpolio syndrome, while those who recovered without muscle weakness are at lower risk for developing this syndrome later in life. About two-thirds or more of people left with muscle weakness after their polio attack go on to develop post-polio syndrome. Fortunately, in most cases the symptoms get worse

slowly and remain mild. A small number, however, may be more significantly affected and need to make lifestyle adjustments or use adaptive equipment to help them stay mobile. There is no specific diagnostic test for post-polio syndrome. Doctors usually diagnose it by excluding other possible causes for a person’s symptoms. For example, it’s very common for polio survivors to develop degenerative arthritis at an early age. This often comes from the unnatural stress they put on their joints over a lifetime of living with muscle weakness. Other overuse problems are also common in people who’ve had polio. They include chronic tendonitis, bursitis and other musculoskeletal problems. Once these conditions have been ruled out, post-polio syndrome can be considered.

No treatment is currently available that can repair or restore the strength of muscles affected by post-polio syndrome. The goal of treatment is to effectively manage the symptoms and keep people with this condition as comfortable and independent as possible. Energy conservation and rest are important for those dealing with post-polio syndrome. This may include pacing one’s physical activity throughout the day, and alternating it with frequent periods of rest. Assistive devices, such as leg braces, a cane, walker or, in rare cases, a wheelchair or motorized scooter, may also help conserve energy and improve mobility. (c) 2013 MAYO FOUNDATION FOR MEDICAL EDUCATION AND RESEARCH. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Real Estate & Business

Most powerful question at work: How? - not Why? Q. I’m a bright, ambitious professional, and I often ask a lot of questions. I notice when I ask people why they are doing something, they get hostile. When I ask if I can do something, I often get turned down. Is there some better way to gather information that gets better results? A.Yes! Drop the question “why” from your vocabulary and never again ask if you can do something.The word “why” makes people feel d efensive, and using the word “if” brings up an automatic refusal for most people. So what are your more powerful alternatives? The most effective word to use in a question is some version of “how.”Asking a coworker,“How would your new proposal work?” will simply encourage information not defense. Asking your manager,“How can I work

Mondays from home,” will encourage brainstorming, not a quick turn down. If you want to discover for yourself why the question why is a bad idea.Try the following experiment on anyone you know. Ask them a why question like, “Why did you wear a red shirt today?”Then, no matter what they say, keep asking them why as they try to explain themselves.You’ll find out that you will make them extremely hostile in a matter of minutes. Now try asking them “how” they chose a red shirt and see how differently they respond. No one in or out of your workplace enjoys feeling like they must defend their choices when you ask why. You can also experiment with the word “how.” Next time you have a customer service problem, don’t ask the

representative if they can help you. Instead, ask them how to get what you want. Notice that the word “how” automatically focuses the other person on solving your problem.You don’t end up putting their attention on whether they will help you but rather the process of getting your outcome. Using the word “how” rather than “if” or “why” won’t guarantee that no one in you workplace gets hostile or tells you no.You will encounter some coworkers that get mad when you say,“Good Morning!” because they believe you are trying to control the kind of morning they are having. Consider that communication is a lot like a camera aperture. By learning to use different language and tools with your coworkers, you are more likely to have their aperture wider and able to let in more light when they deal with you. No interpersonal technique

By learning to use different language and tools with your coworkers, you are more likely to have their aperture wider and able to let in more light when they deal with you.

will allow you to control everyone you deal with at your office.The best techniques will simply dramatically increase your odds of being influential, effective, and supported in your career.

Last word(s) Q. Are there good reasons to get mad at work? I try to be reasonable but sometimes I think people need to know I’m furious! A.Yes, there are good reasons to get mad, but there are never good reasons to respond in ways they will undermine your

future success.You will only punish yourself.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

The prodigal daughter Dear Dave, Do you have any tips for how a single person can stay on track with their finances? Debbie Dear Debbie, It’s really pretty simple. The first thing is the same advice I give to married couples, and that is to live on a monthly budget. Sit down at the end of each month and write down—on paper—all your expenses and income for the following month. When you think about it, budgeting really isn’t that difficult. Some of your expenses, like your rent or mortgage payment, will be the same.If you have a car payment (which I really hope you don’t), it will remain constant, as well. Things like groceries and utilities may fluctuate based on the time of year, but you can make a pretty accurate estimate by looking at past months. The second thing I’d recommend is that you find someone to be your accountability partner. It should be someone who is wise and good with money and a person who loves you enough to call your bluff

or hurt your feelings a little when necessary. They can be a close friend, parent or even your pastor. Just sit down together over a cup of coffee once a month and talk about your finances. You could even go over your budget together line by line. Ideally an accountability partner is someone who’s ahead of you on a particular journey and can help direct you along the path to wisdom. It’s their job to hold you accountable for what you’re doing and the decisions you’re making, for your own good! —Dave Dear Dave, My daughter used to live an irresponsible lifestyle and was bad with money, too. While she was in college she also took on $20,000 in student loan debt. Since that time she experienced a serious illness. She’s recovering now, and it has really changed her behavior and her outlook on life, spiritual matters and money for the better. I could pay off the loans for her, but

I’m wondering if there’s a better way to help. Eddie Dear Eddie, If I were in your shoes, and I had the means to pay off her student loan debt without putting myself at risk financially, that’s exactly what I’d do. Sometimes the best gift you can give a person is to let them wallow around for a while in the mess they made. Being forced to work your way out of bad decisions and irresponsible behaviors is a great remedy in lots of cases. But in this situation, with what you’ve told me about her previous health issue, and the fact that she’s now being responsible with money, behaving and making better life choices, I’d want her to be as free as possible as she takes up this new walk. —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter


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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 352 Richmond Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 5th day of December, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: OneWest Bank, FSB Plaintiff V. Donald A. Swen; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 3587 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-12-17159 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/7, 11/14, 11/21 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 206 Murphy Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 5th day of December, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff V. Brenda Benes a/k/a Brenda K. Benes; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 5986 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-41378 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/7, 11/14, 11/21


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 14, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY-ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-6, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-6 PLAINTIFF VS. FANNIE M. THARPE, CURRENT SPOUSE OR CIVIL UNION PARTNER, IF ANY, OF FANNIE M. THARPE, LAKEWOOD FALLS PHASE 5 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS. DEFENDANTS 13 CH 1352 Property Address: 286 Richmond Dr. Romeoville, IL 60446 NOTICE OF PUBLICATION AS TO UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to: Current Spouse or Civil Union Partner, if any, of Fannie M. Tharpe, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants in the above-entitled action, that a Complaint for Foreclosure and Other Relief has been commenced in the Circuit Court of Will County, by said Plaintiff against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of certain mortgages conveying the premises legally described as follows: LOT 71, IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 22, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 12 , TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R99-124554, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS, EXCEPT THAT PART DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 71, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 56’35.9” WEST, 105.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 03’23” EAST, 33.42 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 57 DEGREES 58’06” EAST, 105.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 03’24” WEST, 33.46 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, ALL IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. P.I.N.: 06-03-12-407-037-0000 COMMON ADDRESS: 286 Richmond Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 And which mortgages were made by Fannie M. Tharpe, as Mortgagor; and given to Option One Mortgage Corporation as Mortgagee; to wit: that certain “Mortgage” dated April 9, 2007 and recorded as Document No.R2007062849, that Summons was duly issued out of said court against you as provided by law, and that the said Complaint is now pending for foreclosure of said mortgages and for other relief. Now, therefore, unless you Current Spouse or Civil Union Partner, if any, of Fannie M. Tharpe, UNKNOWN OWNERS, GENERALLY, AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, file your Appearance and Answer to the Complaint in said action in the office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Will County, Chancery Division, on or before December 9, 2013 default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance with the prayer for relief in said Complaint. Pamela J. McGuire Clerk of the Court 14 W Jefferson, Suite 212 Joliet, Illinois 60432 Kluever & Platt, LLC 65 E. Wacker Place, Suite 2300 Chicago, Illinois 60601 (312) 201-6679 Attorney No. 06187248 Our File #: OLXF.0375

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee, for New Century Home Equity Loan Trust 2005-1 PLAINTIFF VS Aidan J. McCormack; Eleonora V. McCormack; Honeytree Townhouse Improvement Association; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, DEFENDANT(S) 13CH 3083 NOTICE OF PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: Aidan J. McCormack; ELEONORA V. MCCORMACK; Honeytree Townhouse ImprovementAssociation; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; defendants, that this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, asking for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: Unit 1, Building 31, Lot 1, Honeytree Subdivision Unit No. 1, a Subdivision of part of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 27, in Township 37 North, and Range 10 East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the plat thereof recorded July 11, 1972 as Document No. R72-19368, and as corrected by Certificate of Correction recorded October 31, 1972 as Document No. R72-31828, in DuPage Township, in Will County, Illinois Commonly known as: 311 Beechwood Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 and which said mortgage was made by, Aidan J. McCormack and Eleonora V. McCormack, his wife, in joint tenancy; Mortgagor(s), to New Century Mortgage Corporation; Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. Brenda Benes a/k/a Brenda K. Benes; et. al. Defendant. No. 11 CH 5986 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 21st day of December, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 5th day of December, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN WILL COUNTY, STATE OF ILLINOIS, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 20 IN BLOCK 6 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 11, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION 3 AND 4, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 3, 1968 AS DOCUMENT NO. R68-6758, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 206 Murphy Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 04-03-108-020 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-41378 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/7, 11/14, 11/21

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS OneWest Bank, FSB Plaintiff, vs. Donald A. Swen; et. al. Defendant. No. 12 CH 3587 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 1st day of May, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 5th day of December, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the followingdescribed real estate: THAT PART OF LOT 13 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 22, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999 AS DOCUMENT R99-124554 DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 13; THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 12.5 SECONDS WEST, 105.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST, 29.58 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 28 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, 106.49 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG A CURVE NON TANGENT TO THE LAST DESCRIBED LINE BEING CONCAVE NORTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 398.00 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 64 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 40.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 352 Richmond Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 03-12-407-070 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-12-17159 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/7, 11/14, 11/21

I567179 Published 11/7, 11/14, 11/21

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE County, Illinois, as Document No. R2005005476; and for other relief. UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this County, 14 W. Jefferson St., Ste. 212, Joliet, IL 60432 on or before December 9, 2013 A JUDGMENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 120 North LaSalle Street, Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60602 Phone: (312) 239-3432 Fax: (312) 284-4820 Attorney No: 6238055 File No: 13IL00166-1 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that this firm may be deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT. By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit Court, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation on November 7, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. at the Will County Court, Annex 3rd Floor (Arbitration Center) 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to pre-screen you for a potential mortgage modification. YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIAITION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR MEDIAITON WILL BE TERMINATED. I568932 Published 11/7, 11/14, 11/21


News

Submitted Photo

‘U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski (IL-3) on Veterans Day joined local residents, schoolchildren, elected officials and veterans’ organizations in honoring America’s veterans at Romeoville’s Veterans Day ceremony at the Edward “Doc” McCartan Veterans Memorial Garden. “Today we all should take a moment to reflect and honor those brave men and women who have served the United States of America,” said Lipinski.“We would not be home to the greatest country in the world if not for the dedication and selfless service

of those who wore our nation’s uniform to protect our freedoms and our values. We owe them the life we know today. For these very reasons, I am committed to fighting for our veterans and military men and women to see that they are afforded the respect, recognition and assistance they deserve. I believe, as a nation, that this is our obligation to uphold not just today, but every day.” The village and Lipinski will be hosting a Veterans’ Job Fair from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Nov. 18, at the Romeoville Recreation Center,900 W. Romeo Road. Veterans seeking

jobs will have the chance to meet with area businesses interested in hiring veterans. Attendees should bring multiple copies of their resumes.

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Romeoville 11-14-13