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SPORTS Slammers win two of three from Crushers

www.romeovillebugle.com

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NEWS State OKS bill for public-private airport partnership

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Our Community, Our News

G N I R A CLE Y A W E TH

LAURA KATAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

The final stores remaining in the Spartan Square Plaza are set to be demolished by the end of June.

JUNE 6, 2013

Vol. 7 No. 48

Romeoville’s final retail strip to be razed By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Just days before the final closing of the Subway shop in the Spartan Square shopping plaza, customers lined the counter. Though business has always been good, owner Dee Patel, isn’t sorry to see the place go and is ready to say goodbye to the old building, welcoming the thought of increased business once a new retail center is built. Demolition of the remaining stores sitting off of Route 53 is set for the week of June 3, with the site expected to be cleared within weeks, making See RAZED, page 2


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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

News RAZED Continued from page 1 room for the start of Romeoville’s new downtown. Noticeable progress began in the late fall with the ground breaking of the 76,000-squarefoot Athletic and Event Center, which sits adjacent to the decrepit strip mall. Next came the demo of the former Jewel-Osco/Ace Hardware store, tumbling half the retail center earlier this spring. The remaining stores such as the Laundromat, Subway and currency store remained, that is until May 31, when their leases were up. Patel decided to continue operating through the last day and will then move employees to her other location on Weber Road until new development is built. She is working on an agreement with the new developer to set up shop once the new downtown area is set.

PHOTOS BY LAURA KATAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

Subway owner Dee Patel and staff take orders from their customers during its final days before demolition.

For years, it has been the intent of the village to create a town center with retail, office, civic uses and public spaces in a pedestrian-friendly environment. Village documents indicate the downtown site plan was created to provide a multipurpose activity area serving the community.The plan includes the athletic center, on-street parking, and a special event area

Workers gut the Laundromat at Spartan Square.

to host community events.As part of the master plan, there is approximately 2.7 acres available for commercial development. Although Romeoville lacks a “traditional” downtown area, the Village considers the 40-acre established site running from Route 53 to Dalhart Avenue as its downtown and has been working to redevelop the area for nearly a decade.The site was originally developed in the mid 1960s and over time has deteriorated with much of the retail development migrating westward along Weber Road creating an underutilized area. “I’ve always heard my regular clientele sort of complain that they were being gypped with everything moving to the other side of town—now we’re excited with these new plans. I believed once up and running, it will only improve my business,” said Patel. The new athletic and event center is expected to be complete in December.


THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

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Public-private partnership bill for airport passes Legislation creating a privatepublic partnership for the South Suburban Airport was included in economic development legislation approved by the Legislature and Gov. Pat Quinn May 31. Senate Bill 20, co-sponsored by state Sen. Jennifer BertinoTarrant, D-Shorewood, supports economic development projects throughout the state and creates the South Suburban Airport Act, which dedicates funding to the development of a new airport in Peotone. The bill calls for the airport to be built by the Illinois Department of Transportation and operated in a public-private partnership, known as a “P3.”The Illiana Expressway is being built the same way. The Will County Business and Labor Coalition and Will County Officials on Friday applauded the Governor and the General Assembly for the passage of Senate Bill 20. Since 2002 the Business Labor Coalition -- composed of business and labor leaders and locally elected officials from Will, Kankakee and Cook counties -- have actively fought for legislation to move the South Suburban Airport forward. SB 20 as amended contains the majority of the key components from legislation introduced on behalf of the Coalition by state Sen. Toi Hutchinson and former senators A.J.Wilhelmi and Debbie

Halverson. Coalition Chairman Jim Roolf said he is extremely pleased SB 20 passed the General Assembly and is looking forward to the beginning of this long awaited project. “The Coalition has always supported the construction, operation, maintenance and financing of the South Suburban Airport through a public private partnership and has fought hard to ensure that the procurement process for this project is open and transparent and free of outside influence or interference.” In addition, the bill requires that the Illinois Department of Transportation collaborate with the municipalities, counties and other stakeholders. It also requires project labor agreements and legislative oversight by the Commission on Government Forecast and Accountability and the Procurement Policy Board. Will County Executive Larry Walsh praised area legislators for fighting to protect the interests of the working men and women of Will, Kankakee and Cook counties and for helping to create an economic environment in the region that will provide thousands of jobs and new economic develop for many years to come. “The construction and development of the South Suburban Airport will create more than 11,000 construction

jobs over a three-year period and an estimated 3,400 permanent jobs once the airport is operational,” Walsh said. “In addition to the Illiana Expressway, the construction of the SSA will mean more than $2 billion will be spent on new infrastructure in Will County and the region.” State Rep. Larry Walsh Jr., D-Elwood, issued a statement noting his strong support for the bill. “By passing this legislation, we are now one step closer to having a South Suburban Airport in Will County that will settle the governance issue that has been debated for the last 20 plus years,”Walsh Jr. said. “This airport will help to create much-needed jobs, improve our local economy and will improve the transportation needs of the area well, at the same time easing the heavy traffic on I-55 and I-80.” Not everyone is pleased with what has been happening, or not, since Gov. Jim Edgar first identified the site near Peotone and Monee as the preferred one for the third airport 20 years ago. The state, trying to hold off speculators and show the federal government there is “consensus” in the area for the airport, already has purchased thousands of acres, mostly farmland, in the airport footprint, even though there has been little movement on an official plan. Fighting the airport are

Honoring Fallen Heroes

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The village of Romeoville honored all who have served this country in at a ceremony at the Edward “Doc” McCartan Memorial Center on Montrose Drive.

longtime third airport opponents, including members of Shut This Airport Nightmare Down (STAND), who number Board Member Judy Ogalla, R-Monee, among them. She said the state has bulled and intimidated landowners in the proposed airport footprint to sell their properties, and the project has not even been approved. The issue was muddied for several years as former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. offered a plan competing with one supported

by Will County.The county hired consultants to help with the airport issue, including Aaron Quick, Vice President of the Farnsworth Group, Inc. Quick recently told the board Elk Grove Village officials used Jackson’s, in his words, flawed, third airport plan to block O’Hare expansion.


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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

Kids on the road to reading in White Oak program By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Travel to the ends of the earth— to another time, another place. Kick back from the ordinary and go to places you’ve never gone before, all by flipping (or swiping) through the pages of a good book. The White Oak Library District is calling on patrons to get ready for adventures and fun this summer as it starts the “Have Book-Will Travel” Summer Reading Program. Registration began June 3 and will continue through July 26. You can sign up for the program at any of the library branches in Romeoville, Lockport or Crest Hill, or online with your library card at www. whiteoaklibrary.org. Kids of all ages, from birth through sixth grade, teens and adults can participate in reading for prizes. Participating is easy, once you get your log, just start reading. Any book from the library, books from home, e-books or audio books can be read. Participants must read for three hours to receive their first prize; 12 hours completes the program. Various prizes include White Sox tickets, Vertical Endeavors tickets, autographed books, or

Gamestop gift cards. Everyone who completes the Teen Summer Reading Program will receive a book and a raffle ticket for a chance to win one of the larger prizes. For adults, readers must read five books to complete the program. One must be a “themed” book, which can be fiction, or non-fiction relating to travel in the title, covers, or plots of the book. Adult and young adult fiction or nonfiction books, including graphic novels and audiobooks, all count. Magazines, reference materials, almanacs, repair manuals or other similar materials do not count. Once adults complete their reading log, they will receive a book light, and a chance to enter the grand prize drawing for one of two gift cards or a tote bag filled with travel related items. “The whole idea is to keep kids interested in reading, develop their love of reading and have a good time doing it,”said Beverly Krakovec, Romeoville Branch Manager. In addition, the library will host a variety of “travel-related,” events throughout the summer with visits from juggler Jason Kollum and Big Run Wolf Ranch, a balloon show with Smarty Pants, a live-action Oregon Trail

Laura Katauskas/Staff reporter

The White Oak Library prepares the children’s department to get children on the road to reading.

game, The Muppet Movie and more events throughout the summer. Anyone who finishes the

program is invited to visit Hawaii, via Dellwood Park in Lockport for a final party, a Hawaiian luau complete with hula dancers.

For more information or to sign up for any of the events, check the online calendar or visit Facebook.

Island Rendezvous set for June 8-9 By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

This weekend, the Isle a la Cache Museum will be host to a group of travelers from another time when French voyageurs canoed the Des Plaines River to trade for fur, and residents throughout the area are welcome to take a step back and join the voyage. From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 8 and 9, at the Isle a la Cache Museum at 501 E. Romeo Road, vendors, entertainers and reenactors will immerse visitors in the lifestyles of the French and Native Americans who lived in the Illinois Country three centuries ago. The Forest Preserve District of Will County has been organizing the event since 1984 to celebrate the opening in 1983 of the museum, devoted to the 18th century fur trade. Bruce Hodgdon, Forest Preserve Public Information Officer, the

district purchased 48 acres of land in 1982 that was an island in the Des Plaines River, and perhaps used by voyageurs to “cache” their beaver pelts to be collected on their return north. Rendezvous was a time for voyageurs to celebrate the end of the trading season. “Because of this, the district decided to interpret this littleknown period of our history with a museum,” said Hodgdon. “Additional purchases of land brought the preserve total to 80 acres, its size today. As is the case today, we’ve relied on volunteer re-enactors, who go from Rendezvous to Rendezvous, to bring this history to life at Island Rendezvous. These re-enactors have researched the period, and their dress (costumes), accouterments and weapons are historically accurate.” Event highlights include live music, musket shooting, storytelling, a magic show,

children’s games and crafts, falconry demonstrations, a scavenger hunt and re-enactor demonstrations. “We have sponsored this event for 30 years because it is a popular program and because newcomers can discover Isle a la Cache Museum—or can tour the museum again for return visitors,” said Hodgdon. “Today’s museum is far superior to the original one opened in 1983. The passage of a $95 million referendum by Will County voters in 2005 included $13 million for site improvements ($82 million was earmarked for land purchases), including renovation of the Isle a la Cache Museum. The renovation was completed, and a grand re-opening of the museum was celebrated for Island Rendezvous in 2007.” For a complete schedule of activities, visit http:// www.reconnectwithnature. org/information/islandrendezvous-2013.asp.


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O’Keefe honored with independent living award The Will-Grundy Center for Independent Living held its 23rd annual meeting on May 15. Robert O’Keefe was presented with the Ed Roberts Excellence in Independent Living Award. O’Keefe was assisted by the Center in moving out of a nursing home into his own apartment. “Every day in a nursing home means that part of you is wasting away. I now have a life,” he commented. Jean Lamb-Blackmon was recognized as Volunteer of the Year. She teaches computer skills and facilitates the Women’s Group at the Center. The board of directors was introduced and includes: Robert Smith, President; Val Rand, Vice

President; Donald Cordano, Treasurer;JimAlbritton,Secretary; Elaine Sommer, Member at Large; John Stanton, Past President. Directors include: Paul Lagomarcino, Nancy Pohlman, Denise Winfrey, Rhonda Price, Diane Zigrossi, Aleem Junaidi, Anthony Cornoyer, Jac Buchanan, Stephanie White, David Cumbo, Linda Thompson, and Russell Anderson. A United Way agency, the Center for Independent Living annually serves over 2,100 people with disabilities of all types and of all ages. The center is located at 2415 W. Jefferson St. (at Barney Drive) in Joliet and can be reached at 815-729-0162; 815-729-2085,TTY.

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Robert O’Keefe was presented with the Ed Roberts Excellence in Independent Living Award at the Will-Grundy Center for Independent Living’s annual meeting May 15.


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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination. Jesse Ramos, 20, 5 Elgin, was arrested at 2:26 a.m. May 11 and charged with obstructing an officer on the 0-100 block of Elgin.

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Christopher Hernandez, 20, 120 Luana Road, Joliet, was arrested at 1:01 a.m. May 18 and charged with driving with a suspended license, improper lane use, resisting an officer, possession of cannabis and drug equipment, obstructing identification, and no front registration near Weber Road and Lakewood Falls Drive.

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Police Blotter

a.m. May 23 and charged with criminal damage to property/ trespass to vehicle near the 300 block of Hemlock. Syed Jaffery, 30, 577 S. Wynbrooke Road, was arrested at 2:34 p.m. May 23 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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A business in the 300 block of South Weber Road reported a retail theft at 11:55 a.m. May 24. Unknown person(s) entered the electronics section and left with a television without paying for it. Cost of the television is $530.

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Irineo Vargas, 22, 1849 Hillcrest Lane, Woodridge, was arrested at 3:57 a.m. May 24 and charged with driving with a suspended license and speeding near Route 53 and Taylor Road.

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Gabriela Alfaro, 33, 78 Rockledge Drive, was arrested at 11:02 p.m. May 21 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 0 to 100 block of Rockledge Drive.

Hernandez, 37, 13 Araceli 413 N. Briggs, Joliet, was arrested at 6:55 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Murphy Drive and Spangler Road.

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Alexander Reyes-Naya, 19, 290 E. Daisy Circle, was arrested at 12:57 a.m. May 22 and charged with burglary to motor vehicle, and an in-state warrant on the 0 to 100 block of Fairfield.

Hernandez, 22, 734 14 Omar Rogers Road, was arrested at 7:12 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving with a revoked license, no insurance, illegal transport of alcohol, possession of cannabis and the possession of drug equipment near McKool and Spangler Road.

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Jason Marrero, 17, 3854 W. Hirsch, Chicago, was arrested at 12:57 a.m. May 22 and charged with burglary to motor vehicle on the 0 to 100 block of Fairfield.

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Hertiss McDaniel, 52, 8008 S. Sangamon, Chicago, was arrested at 11:26 a.m. May 22 and charged with a theft of more than $500 on the 0 to 100 block of Pinnacle Drive.

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A worker at a construction site located on South Weber Road reported a burglary at 7:33 a.m. May 22. Unknown person(s) removed the lock from a trailer and took a laser transit and a generator. Estimated value of the items is $4500.

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A resident of the 100 block of Amberleigh reported a burglary to motor vehicle at 3:46 p.m. May 22. Unknown person(s) took a car stereo from a vehicle parked in the driveway of the residence. Estimated value of the stereo is $1800.

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Brandon Rehbock, 17, 633 Hudson, was arrested at 9

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Victor Rius-Munoz, 27, 251 Marble St., Joliet, was arrested at 7:14 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license and no insurance near Route 53 and McKool.

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Armando Hernandez, 25, 1310 Tiger Lily Lane, Joliet, was arrested at 7:40 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving with a suspended license near Spangler Road and McKool.

Emma Alvarez, 36, 511 Pasadena, Crest Hill, was arrested at 8:33 p.m. May 24 and charged with no valid driver’s license or insurance near Murphy Drive and Spangler Road.

Mercedes Gomez17 Ma Gutierrez, 33, 4830 W. 15th St., Cicero, was arrested at 7:41 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Route 53 and McKool.

Flores, 30, 202 20 Susana Gordon, was arrested at 10:09 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Route 53 and McKool.

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Judith Kotch, 32, 462 Mallview Lane,Bolingbrook, was arrested at 7:47 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Spangler Road and Sinde Circle.

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Vergara, 48, 707 21 Jose McDonough St., Joliet, was arrested at 10:22 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Route 53 and McKool.

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Addie Holmes, 46, 106 Akin St., Joliet was arrested at

10:29 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving with a suspended license near Route 53 and McKool. Martin Carter, 28, 2537 E. 75th St., Chicago, was arrested at 10:53 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Route 53 and McKool

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Benito Dominguez-Gomez, 36, 5117 W. 31st Place, Cicero, was arrested at 11:16 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Route 53 and McKool

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Claudia Varela-Vega, 36, 609 Jasper St., Joliet, was arrested at 11:33 p.m. May 24 and charged with driving with a

suspended license, no insurance, an expired registration, a defective windshield and one headlight near Route 53 and McKool. Juan Ruiz-Zamora, 20, 1717 Cora St., Crest Hill was arrested at 12 a.m. May 25 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Route 53 and McKool

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Sonya Sims, 33, 202 S. Briggs St., Joliet, was arrested at 12:39 a.m. May 25 and charged with driving without a valid driver’s license near Spangler Road and Sinde Circle.

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For more Romeoville police blotter, go to www.buglenewspapers.com


ForuM Columnist: Nick Reiher

Memorial Day event was one for the books

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was invited by Crest Hill Mayor Ray Soliman to attend the city’s annual Memorial Day ceremony.This would be their 25th. Geez, it’s hard to believe it’s been that long since the Veterans Memorial was set up outside City Hall. But Phyllis Powell, one of the original members of the Crest Hill Veterans and Police Memorial Committee, told the nice crowd gathered in the St.Ambrose Parish gym she remembered the day very well. The day was miserably hot, she said, and she wore high heels. So with every step on the City Hall parking lot surface, her heels dug into the pavement, which, she later learned, was poured only the day before. She also remembers the gathering was honored by the attendance of a “doughboy,” a veteran of World War I. He was in his 90s, Powell said, but he insisted on wearing his uniform buttoned all the way up the neck, as well as his metal hat. Doing anything else would have violated regulations.And he was proud and honored to be there. Powell said the Veterans

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Memorial cost about $80,000, and the nearby Police Memorial was about $20,000, all paid by donations. No tax dollars.There are more than 1,000 names on the Veterans Memorial, she said, and two on the Police Memorial: James W. Nink, killed in 1967 in a car accident while pursuing a suspect; and Timothy A. Simenson, who was killed in 1994 after stopping a suspicious car. I can’t believe it’s been nearly 20 years since Tim Simenson was killed. I was on my way to Manhattan Police on my LincolnWay police blotter rounds. I called in to the office to ask a routine question, and then-Managing Editor Bill Wimbiscus said he couldn’t talk.A police officer had been killed, and they were on deadline. It was just horrible. The celebration on Memorial Day in the St.Ambrose gym (The threat of rain moved it inside at the last minute) was nice for a lot of reasons. For one, the Frankfort Brass Band under the direction of Michael Orenic was outstanding. When they played the Armed Services Medley, it made me wish See MEMORIAL, page 10

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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

Photos

PHOTOS BY LAURA KATAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

One of the highlights at the fest was a fully-restored 1929 EAA Ford Tri-Motor, the first airplane designed for Eastern Airlines. The aircraft was named “The Tin Goose� and pushed Ford towards an aviation future. Some enthusiasts were even able to snag a rise for $75 during the event.

All eyes on the

Sky

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espite a rainy weekend, thousands came out to the 14th annual Calvacade of Planes June 1 and 2 held at the Clow International Airport. Kids, adults, plane enthusiasts and first-time attendees were able to explore aviation up with pilots showcasing planes from general aviation and experimental aircraft to vintage military aircraft.

pServers dressed in WWII took care of thirsty patrons at the Calvacade Canteen, a new eating area held inside one of the hangars decorated with WWII memorabilia. uA few brave souls took a chance on an open-air experimental aircraft. Brad Deckert brought his plane, the VTMB 234, which saw action in WWII.


Calendar JUNE 6 Internet and Computer Basics Level. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Join us for a ninetyminute class on the basics of using a personal computer, and the basics of the Internet! You will learn basic Google searching skills, all about the browser and basic tools to assist you with online safety. Basic computer experience is helpful, as are mouse and keyboard skills. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Movie on the Hill. 8 to 10 p.m. June 6 and August 1 at the town hall complex, Briarcliff Road. Sponsored by the Park District. Movie June 6 will be “The Odd Life of Timothy Green,” and “Paranorman,” August 1.

JUNE 7 Farmers Market. 3 to 8 p.m.Thursdays June 7 through August 16. 3 to 7 p.m. August 13 through Sept. 13 at The Promenade, near the Village Green.

JUNE 8 Relay for Life. 8 a.m. June 8. Relay fundraiser for the American Cancer Society on the village hall grounds. Toddler Time. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Toddler Time at Romeoville is designed to help children and their caregivers develop pre-literacy skills through songs, stories and movement activities.This program is for children 3-35 months with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required.   Location: Romeoville Branch Children’s Programming Room Main Level Computer Basics Level 2. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Prerequisites: Basic computer skills are needed. For patrons who want to know more about general computer usage beyond the basics. Discusses changing the wallpaper; creating, renaming, deleting, and searching for files; creating and using folders; file types, and keyboard combinations. Registration is required. Call, visit, email or

instant messages our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab. Hooks, Needles, & More Craft Club. 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Crafters of all kinds! Join us to work on your favorite portable craft project! Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, scrapbookers, jewelry makers, etc. are welcome. Patterns and helpful tips will be shared. Beginners welcome. Island Rendezvous. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 8 and 9 at the Isle a la Cache Museum, 501 135th Street. A free, two-day celebration, Island Rendezvous brings families together for quality time and a shared experience with hundreds of others during on of the most beautiful times of the year. For more information, contact Harry Klinkhamer at 815-886-1467.

JUNE 9 Route 66 Car Show. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 9 at Romeoville High School. For more information, visit www. showcaseclassics.com or call 815-886-6222.

JUNE 10 Monday Kids Club. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Anything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art, history and more! This program is for children 5 to 9 years of

age.This week we will be will be beginning our Reading Roadtrip at the beach by reading At the Boardwalk by Kelly Ramsdell Fineman and by making sand-dough castles! The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot. A light snack will be included, so please notify us of any food allergies.

JUNE 11 Relay for Life Culver’s Fundraiser. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. at Culvers, 485 N. Weber Road. Come out and show your support and help team “Angels by your Side” raise money for American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life.Twenty percent of your order will be donated back to the cause. Terrific T’s. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.Terrific T’s brings the stories, activities and learning fun of storytime to a slightly younger audience.This program is for children ages 2 and 3 with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required.     Location: Romeoville Branch Children’s Programming Room - Main Level. Computer Basics Level 2. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Prerequisites: Basic computer skills are needed. For patrons who want to know more about general computer usage beyond the basics. Discusses changing the wallpaper;

THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013 creating, renaming, deleting, and searching for files; creating and using folders; file types, and keyboard combinations. Registration is required. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab. Tween Scene. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Superstar Gaming: Be a star with Just Dance, Glee Karaoke, or Lego Rock Band. Do you enjoy hanging out at the library? Well, come to Tween Scene! Each session we’ll have fun things to do like games, science, anime, manga, and crafts.This program is for ages 9-12. Location: Romeoville Branch Children’s Programming Room - Main Level. Pajama Jam. 6 to 6:45 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Join us for stories, songs and projects. Wear your pajamas and get ready some fun! This program is all ages but is most suitable for children 7 years of age and younger.   Registration is required. Location: Romeoville Branch Children’s Programming Room Main Level. Teen Crafts. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Do often wonder what it would be like to live in the past? We are making steampunk  brooches using gears from the past but with a hint design from the

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future. Forget crocheted doilies and itchy knit sweaters! Get your craft on with practical, simple, and decidedly unboring projects for everyone. Grades 7-12.

JUNE 12 Free test drive. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville High School parking lot. Help The Romeoville Marching Band.Take a free test drive and Ford Motor Company will donate up to $6,000 to the Band! You drive for free. Ford donates $20 per test drive. Park District and Village Concerts. 7:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays at the town hall complex, Briarcliff Road. June 12; Peter Oprisko. June 19, Larry Springfield; June 26, Centerfield; July 3, Green 13; July 10, Dueling Pianos; July 17, Jonathan Devin; July 24, Semple; July 31,Timings Everything; August 7, Deacon Blues; August 14, Spoken Four; August 21, 25 or 6 to 4; August 28, 7th Heaven. Storytime. 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Storytime at Romeoville involves stories; songs and projects designed to teach important early learning skills.This program is for children ages 3 to 6 and will run for six weeks. Registration is required. Book Discussion. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown See CALENDAR, page 10


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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

CALENDAR Continued from page 9 Road, Romeoville. Please join us at the Romeoville Library for a discussion of The Chase by Clive Cussler.The first book in an ongoing series, this historical thriller is set in the western states, circa 1906.The U.S. government hires the renowned Van Dorn Detective Agency and its equally renowned lead agent, Isaac Bell, to capture the bank robber known as the Butcher Bandit. Bell heads the manhunt and finally figures out the Butcher’s true identity, which is when the real chase begins! For more information, or to pick up a copy of the book, please ask the staff at the Romeoville Reference Desk. Drop-in Crafts. 11 a.m. to 1p.m.at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. We are on a reading road trip at the Romeoville Branch. Drop-in every Wednesday during the Summer Reading Program to make a super cool traveling craft. While you are there, turn in your reading log for a chance to spin the prize wheel and try to guess where in the USA the

librarians are! No need to register, just drop-in! Location: Romeoville Branch Children’s Programming Room - Main Level. Be Tween. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Hey older tweens! Are you looking for something cool to do? Do you like awesome crafts? Well we have got a great craft just for you!  This program is for tweens ages 10-14.This month we will be making Duct-Tape magic wallets. Please register online or at any White Oak Library branch.     Location: Romeoville Branch Children’s Programming Room - Main Level. See a Juggler, Be a Juggler. 6 to 7 p.m. at Richland School, 1919 Caton Farm Road in Crest Hill. Jason Kollum is coming to White Oak Library District, and he wants to teach YOU to juggle. Join us for an awesome night of family fun.This allages event will be held at Richland School, 1919 Caton Farm Road in Crest Hill. Please register online or at any White Oak Library District branch. Game Night. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West

Normantown Road, Romeoville. GAME ON. It’s BACK! The triumphant return of Game Night, and this time we will be in our beautiful new Romeoville facility Challenge your friends to games on the Wii and 360 while enjoying tasty snacks. Who is the best gamer, we shall see. Location: Romeoville Branch Meeting Room A Main Level.

JUNE 17 Shop ‘til You Drop. Join the Bolingbrook Park District for one or two Shop ‘til You Drop days. Go on a shopping spree to Lighthouse Premium Outlet Mall in Michigan City, IN. What a great way to find summer bargains. Departs Annerino Community Center at 8:30 a.m. and returns at 4:30 p.m. Fee is $21; $14 w/Resident ID. Deadline to register is June 13.

JUNE 20 Relay for Life Team Meeting. 7 p.m. at Village Hall, 1050 W. Romeo Road.

JUNE 22 Midwest Gear Grinders Car Show. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Promenade. Benefits Misericordia.

MEMORIAL Continued from page 7 I had served, and even more thankful for those who did. It also was a great opportunity to hear Anna Mae Lukancic sing solo again. I still have a cassette tape of religious songs she recorded a few years back when I wrote a story on her.Wonderful lady. Absolutely fantastic voice. Soliman said she has performed at each of the 25 ceremonies. The best thing? There were all ages sitting in those seats.You had the elderly veterans and many of those who waited for them, or lost loved ones in the wars.You had middle-agers there who remembered what their parents had told them they had done in the wars … like flying some 35 bombing runs over Germany as a bombardier on a B-17 before he was 20. Hypothetically. And then you had the young families, with young kids. Maybe they have a loved one serving now. Or maybe they just wanted to honor those who had. It’s really nice when you are able to see the people who helped write history instead of just reading about it.Those guys and ladies are disappearing pretty fast. But like that doughboy 25 years ago, they were sure proud to be there on Memorial Day. So was I. Nick Reiher is managing editor of the Bugle, Enterprise and Sentinel newspapers.


taKe 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Smoldering bit 6 Slip a Mickey 10 It may have all the answers 14 Stiller’s partner 15 High rollers’ destination 16 Half of 10? 17 Speed skater Apolo __ Ohno 18 Health enhancer, so it’s said 20 It “is no problem. You just have to live long enough”: Groucho Marx 22 Pickup facilitator 23 “Friendly skies” co. 24 __ center 27 PC time meas. 29 Performed, in a way 32 Band that performed “Whip It” 33 Bars in stores 34 1965 NCAA tennis champ 35 Aaron’s team for 21 seasons 37 Unexpected

Down twist (and a hint to what’s hidden inside 18-, 20-, 51and 56-Across) 40 Make 41 Gloom mate 42 Rural stretch 43 “... two fives for __?” 44 Skin malady, perhaps 45 What crews use 46 Expression of disappointment 47 Bit of code 49 Hair care purchase 51 “A Moon for the Misbegotten” playwright 56 Longshoremen’s aids 59 Baggy 60 Net reading 61 “Tiger in your tank” company 62 Ban’s predecessor at the U.N. 63 Bastes, e.g. 64 Attic constructions 65 Bridge seats

1 Net reading 2 “Writing on the wall” word 3 Michigan’s Cereal City 4 Steamy 5 Arrested 6 Bore 7 Bank takeback, briefly 8 Deprive of juice? 9 Israel’s Meir 10 Pre-Communism leader 11 Thing to stop on 12 Savings for later yrs. 13 When repeated with “oh” in between, “Wow!” 19 Slippery swimmer 21 Mythical beast, to locals 24 Epiphanies 25 Score-tying shot 26 Olympics broadcaster Bob 27 Mideast capital 28 Last lap efforts 30 Spa sounds 31 Indigent 32 Lake creator 34 Interior decorator’s

concern 35 Juiced 36 Sleep acronym 38 Cooking utensil 39 Dawn goddess 44 French onion soup topping 45 Numbers after nine, often 47 Sam & Dave, e.g. 48 Nixon’s first veep 50 Union acquisition? 51 Vandalizes, in a way 52 Gov’t. train wreck investigators 53 Those, to Pedro 54 Future atty.’s hurdle 55 Eye part 56 “CSI: NY” airer 57 Microbrewery buy 58 Altercation

Tribune Media Services 2013

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Horoscopes Baby steps are better than crawling. The courage to move forward even when bombarded by doubts or on uncertain ground will create momentum. Use logic to overcome obstacles this week.

Knowledge is power. The more you know and learn, the easier it will be to make and keep money this week. Respect sound advice from trusted advisers rather than trying to figure it out for yourself.

Rather than rocking the boat, pick up a paddle and choose a clear direction. You can count on being diverted from impulsive actions by a guardian angel in the week to come - if you heed friendly advice.

Put on your thinking cap. Mercury is traveling through your sign and you might get a chance to figure something out in a creative way during the week ahead. Put your best thoughts down on paper.

Think before you act. In the first part of the week, you might be tempted to take spur-of-the-moment steps or change something that is better left alone. You will benefit by the advice of trusted friends.

Strive for popularity this week, but you don’t bend over backward to earn esteem. Keep relationships in perspective; someone who asks much of you may be doing you a favor by showing you your limits.

Multitasking could be counterproductive in the approaching week. You may find that you can do one thing well or several things poorly. Focus on one thing at a time; avoid frequent changes of direction.

Suspicions may be grounded in fact. It might be wise to check the facts twice before embarking on new enterprises in the early part of the week. Someone may only show you what you want to see.

Tit for tat. Remain open and sincere with others in the upcoming week and they will reciprocate. You may be called upon to be generous to those who helped you in the past.

Focus on constructive activities in the week ahead. You can wrap things up that have been pending for a long time with a flourish. Remain secure in your solid routine and a reliable work ethic.

In the week to come, you might meet up with people who have your best interests at heart. There’s a whole world of endless possibilities to explore. Accept invitations to find opportunities.

Fads fade and won’t fit your future. You can’t alter your fate by changing your clothes or your habits. You will be considered more trustworthy and reliable if you stick to routines in the week ahead.

Sudoku

Jumble

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • FACET • NOVEL • LOTION • CYMBAL

Answer:

A happy hour can end up with -ONE TOO MANY


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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Romeoville High School announces spring MVPs, page 14; New system making its way into prep volleyball, page 15

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

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Slammers win series over Crushers So far in 2013, it’s been the pitching that has carried the Joliet Slammers. But the offense carried Joliet to victory on Sunday. The Slammers (6-9) recorded a season high 16 hits and also scored the game’s first run for the first time this year, topping the Lake Erie Crushers (6-9) by a final score of 9-5. Marquis Riley led off the ballgame with a single and after both Nate Wilder and Grant DeBruin followed with groundouts, it looked like the Slammers would strand the leadoff man. Clean-up man David Christensen silenced those worries by hitting his first home run of the season to give Joliet a 2-0 lead. The Slammers were not done in the first, as Michael Wing followed up Christensen with a ground rule double and he eventually would score on an error by Crusher’s catcher Emmanual Quilles. Lake Erie responded right back in the home half of the first, plating two runs in Kevin Berard and Andrew Davis both on RBI groundouts from Russell Moldenhour and Anderson Hidalgo. It was a 3-2 Joliet lead after one inning. The Slammers continued to

Courtesy of Joliet Slammers

Michael Wing and the offense erupted for 16 hits in the series finale win over Lake Erie.

add to their lead in the second inning with two more runs. In fact, Joliet scored again not only in the second, but also one run in

both the third and the fourth. Tyler Goodro led off the second inning with a single and Marquis Riley also reached the base paths

after an error by Lake Erie second baseman Max Casper. Nate Wilder bunted both runners over on a sacrifice and DeBruin brought

both home on a two-RBI double. After the two more runs scored See SLAMMERS, page 17


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Sports

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

SPRING MVPs Romeoville High School recently announced its 2013 spring most valuable players. They included: Softball: Briana Floyd (pictured) and Ceara Floyd; Baseball: Michael Torres; Boys Tennis: David Ridderhoff; Girls Badminton: Melanie Underwood and Rosalinda Vazquez; Girls Track: Raven Kelly; Girls Soccer: Veronica Patino; Boys Track: Prosper Osin-Loye and Armando Cortez; Boys Volleyball: Kyren Hamilton.


Sports

Is 6-2 the new thing in prep volleyball? By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

There are three basic formations in volleyball: The 4-2, 6-2 and 5-1. Over the years it seems the 5-1 formation, where there is the same setter at all times, has been the most popular option. However, while the 4-2 is still fairly rare (four hitters, two setters), the 6-2 (six hitters, two setters) seems to be taking off, on both the college (women) and high school levels. In this formation the setter position is generally in the back row at all times.This allows three front row hitters on the court at all times. In some situations, such as high school and women’s collegiate volleyball, teams will sub out setters once they go into

the front row and replace them with a hitter. In other situations the setter will become a hitter in the front row if they are left in. This has hit the high school and women’s NCAA college volleyball levels because of the number of substitutions allowed per set. In high school you are allowed 18 subs per set, while in NCAA women’s volleyball, rules changed this past year, going from 12 to 15 subs. Men’s NCAA Division I volleyball carries the Olympic rule of six subs per set, which makes you need to have two setters who can hit if you run a 6-2. So, while the number of subs have increased in many levels, that has allowed more hitters on the court at a time and it is adding to the amount of setters being played across the area and

has been seen by many boys volleyball teams. “It’s not necessarily I like the 6-2 better than the 5-1 or the 4-2,” Plainfield East coach Dan Vergo said. “The big reason why (we run it) is our clientele. If you have short setters, you have to go with guys who can play in the front row. We’ve also had six pretty good hitters so you want to get all your hitters out there.” “We’ve got eight kids that can hit,” Notre Dame College Prep coach Patrick Cole said.“It’s hard enough to squeeze those into the five offensive positions taking one away. We’ve got two very talented setters.They set the ball up very well and they have good rapport with their hitters.There’s really no downside (to using the See VOLLEYBALL, page 18

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Sports

Valley View posts successful IESA track and field season Plenty of medals for VVSD at state middle school track meet Valley View School District middle school athletes came home from the Illinois Elementary School Association�s state track championships with 26 top-20 finishes. Brooks Middle School registered the highest boys team finish among VVSD�s five schools, finishing 20th in 7th grade and 24th in 8th grade. Martinez� 7th grade girls led the way with a 13th place team finish, while Jane Addams� 8th grade girls got the top finish at 11th. 7th grade girls top-20 finishes included: *Alex Henderson (Martinez), 2nd in the 100m *Martinez (Idara Young, Sydney Murphy, Tomi Vandyke, Henderson and Katie Kerwin) 3rd place in the 4x100 relay

*Brooks (Alexis Lewis, April Lowery, Tsimba Malonga, Kayla Perry and Taylor Robinson) 4th place in the 4x100 relay *Jahnetta Jones (Lukancic), 5th place in the 200m *Lowery (Brooks), 13th in the long jump *Allie Platon (Addams), 15th in the shot put *Alena Hood (Lukancic), 17th in the discus *Perry (Brooks), 18th in the 400m 8th grade girls top-20 finishes included: *Addams (Danielle Cinquepalmi, Josalyn Clark, Jamie Perakis, Karli Seay and Kiara Watts) 3rd in 4x200 relay *Seay (Addams), 3rd in long jump *Brooks (Camille Jordan, Brittany Mercier, Maribeth Murray, Mackenzie Williams and Claire Young) 4th in 4x100

relay *Young (Brooks), 5th in high jump *Perakis (Addams), 6th in 400m *Seay (Addams), 9th in 200m 7th grade boys top-20 finishes included: *Shawn Showalter (Brooks), 5th in 200m *Brooks (Gordon Martin, Quentin Pringle, Showalter, Cameron Mitchell and Chris Bavaro) 5th in 4x100 relay *Humphrey (Jesus Bravo, Mark Brown, Marshaun Brown, Shakeer Davis and Jaylen Plaxico) 12th in 4x100 relay *Marc Wallace (Lukancic), 14th in high jump 8th grade top-20 finishes included: *Brooks (Tanner Banks, Nana Busia, Joe Coates, Jarvis Crutcher and Damion Gather) 2nd in 4x400 relay *Addams (Jacob Perakis,Joshua Perakis, Caleb Robertston, Zyon Bell and Darrien Cole) 5th in 4x200 relay *Tyler Elmore (Humphrey), 5th in 100m *Elmore (Humphrey), 7th in 400m *Piotr Miskiewicz (Lukancic), 7th in 110 hurdles *Jazontae Howard (Humphrey), 8th in 100m *Humphrey (Vashun Burns, Elmore, Michael Hill, Matthew Merriweather, and Howard), 9th in 4x100 relay *Brooks (Nana Busia, Joe Coates, Jarvis Crutcher, Jared Price and Josh Simpson) 10th place in 4x100 relay All total, 70 VVSD studentathletes qualified for the IESA state track finals See IESA, page 17


Sports SLAMMERS Continued from page 13 in the third and fourth innings, Joliet was in control, 7-2. However Lake Erie climbed back into the ballgame, driving one run home in the bottom of the fourth and two more in the home half of the fifth. Moldenhauer started the bottom of the fifth inning by grounding out to second base, but then Lake Erie would get three consecutive hits. Andrew Davis reached on a single, Daniel Bowman hit a double and Anderson Hidalgo drove both home on a two-RBI single to make it a 7-5 ballgame after five innings. The Slammers offense continued to build on its lead, scoring two insurance runs, one in the seventh and one more in the eighth to make it a 9-5 score, which was how the game came to an end. The win gave the Slammers back-to-back victories in Ohio, as they won the middle game of the set 3-1, breaking their six game losing streak. Starting pitcher Jacob Sanchez (0-1) continues to dominate as he matched his 10-strikeout performance from his last outing against the Florence Freedom. Unfortunately Sanchez did not pick up his first victory as he lasted through eight innings, allowing only one run on four hits. The Slammers once again had to pick up this victory from behind as the Crushers scored the game’s first run in the bottom of the third. David Roney reached on a

IESA Continued from page 16 Brooks Middle School won the 8th grade boys regional championship, and was 2nd in 7th grade boys, and both 7th and 8th grade girls. Bulldogs’ 7th grade state qualifiers included: Shawn Showalter (1st) in 100m dash and 200m dash (2nd); girls 4x100m relay of Alexis Lewis, April Lowery, Tsimba Malonga, Kayla Perry and Taylor Robinson (1st); boys 4x100m relay team of Gordon Martin, Quenntin Pringle, Showalter, Cameron Mitchell and Chris Bravaro (1st); Lowery (2nd) in long jump; Perry (1st) in 400m dash; Martin (1st) in 400m dash; the girls 4x200m relay of Amber

THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

17

lead-off single and was eventually batted home on a  RBI double from Gauntlett Eldemire. It would remain a 1-0 Lake Erie lead until the eighth inning when Joliet tied the ballgame after Marquis Riley scored on a RBI, infield single from DeBruin. Both teams were shutout in the ninth but Joliet would take command in the tenth. Ben Hewett led off the inning with a walk and he was moved over on a sacrifice bunt from Riley. Wilder and DeBruin would both follow with walks of their own to fill the bases for Christensen. Christensen did not have to use his bat as Lake Erie relief pitcher Ricky Bowen was a little wild and he walked Christensen, forcing in the eventual  winning run for Joliet. The Slammers would add one more on a sacrifice fly from Michael Wing, scoring Wilder to make it a 3-1 game and Justin Erasmus closed the door in the bottom of the tenth for his fourth save of the year. Joliet caused itself the loss in the series opener, committing a franchise record five errors in a 5-1 loss to the Lake Erie Crushers (6-7). Slammers’ starter Bret Zawacki (0-2) did strikeout five batters through five innings but he was hurt by the defensive mistakes and picked up his second loss of the year. Once again the Slammers failed to score first as Lake Erie got on the board in the bottom of the second inning. Anderson Hidalgo scored on a sacrifice fly from Quilles to make it a 1-0 ballgame. The Crushers added one more in the bottom of the third and would have their largest inning

in the bottom of the fourth when Lake Erie plated two more runs to push their lead to 4-0. Andrew Davis reached on a ground rule double and eventual score on an RBI triple from Daniel Bowman. Quilles would then bring Bowman home on a RBI single. Joliet went down in order in the top of the fifth and the Crushers scored one more in the home half of the inning. Modenhour scored on an error by shortstop Wing. The Slammers picked up their only run in the top of the seventh when Wing came home on a

The Joliet Slammers announced Friday they will be hosting a workout at Silver Cross Field after the June MLB draft. The event will take place on Monday, June 10, starting at 9:00 a.m. Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. and it costs $50 per player to participate in the workout. All participants must be 20 years of age or over and cannot have

turned 27 years old after January 1, 2013. Players should bring all their own baseball equipment for the workout. “This is an opportunity for players who were overlooked in the June Major League Baseball Draft to get noticed by a professional baseball team,” manager Mike Breyman said.“The Slammers have had seven players signed to affiliated baseball in two seasons so we have already proven ourselves as a good launching point for a player’s career.” A sign-up form can be found at jolietslammers.com.

Armstrong, Autumn Armstrong, Ngozi Edeh, Tiana McClain and Gabby Morganfield; and the girls 4x400m relay of Alexis Baber, Allie Hays, Malonga, Robinson and Emily Romero (1st). Brooks 8th grade state qualifiers included: Claire Young (1st) high jump and (2nd) in 100m dash; Kameron Vaca (1st) and Jared Price (2nd) in long jump; Camille Jordan (2nd) in long jump; the girls 4x100m relay team of Jordan, Brittany Mercier, Maribeth Murray, Mackenzie Williams and Young (1st); the boys 4x100m relay of Nana Busia, Joe Coates, Jarvis Crutcher, Jared Price and Josh Simpson (2nd); and the girls 4x400m relay of Kyra Dickerson, Jordan, Murray, Williams and Young (1st). Jane Addams’ 7th grade girls finished 7th, and 8th grade girls

finished 4th.The 7th grade boys were 7th and the 8th grade boys were 5th. State qualifiers included 8th graders Kiara Watts, Jocelyn Clark, Danielle Cinquelpalmi and Jamie Perakis (1st) in the 4x100 relay; Perakis (2nd) in the 400m dash; Watts, Clark, Cinquelpalmi, Perakis and Karli Seay (1st) in the 4x200 relay; Seay in the 200 meter dash (2nd); Josh Perakis, Darion Cole, Caleb Robertson, Jacob Perakis, and Zyon Bell (1st) in the 4x200 relay; Robertson (2nd) in the 1600m run, Jacob Perakis (2nd) in the 800; and Bell (1st) in the 200m dash. Qualifiers in 7th grade were Joseph Yesufu, Thaji Robinson, Elijah Porter, Clayton Harris, and Juwan Robinson (2nd) in the 4x200 relay and Allie Platon (1st) in the shot

put. Humphrey’s girls finished 9th at 7th grade and 6th at 8th grade, while the boys were 4th at 7th grade and 2nd at 8th grade. State qualifiers include the first place 8th grade boys 4x400 relay team of Michael Hill, Vashaun Burns, Matthew Merriweather, Tyler Elmore and Jazontae Howard. Elmore and Howard also finished one-two in the 100 meter dash and Elmore won the 400m dash. The seventh grade 4x400 relay team also qualified for state with a second place finish. The team consists of Mark Brown, Marshaun Brown, Jaylen Plaxico, Shakeer Davis, and Jesus Bravo. Deja Brown won the long jump and JaShun Harrington finished second in 7th grade shot put.

Lukancic Middle School’s girls were 6th in the 7th grade division and 9th in 8th grade, while boys finished 9th in both 7th and 8th grades. State qualifiers for Lukancic were 7th grade division members Jahnetta Jones (2nd) in the 200m, Marc Wallace (2nd) in the high Jump, and Alena Hood (1st) in the discus, as well as 8th graders Piotr Miskiewicz (1st) in 100m hurdles and Christian Wagner (2nd) in discus. Martinez Middle School’s 7th grade girls finished fifth. State qualifiers were Idara Anyang (2nd) in the 100m hurdles; the 4x100m relay of Anyang, Sydney Murph, Tomi Vandyke, Alec Henderson and Katie Kerwin (2nd); and Henderson (1st) in 100m dash and 200m dash (1st).

Courtesy of Joliet Slammers

Jacob Sanchez struck out 10 but did not get the the win in the middle game of the series.

sacrifice fly from Goose Kallunki making it a 5-1 ballgame.

POST-DRAFT WORKOUT


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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013

VOLLEYBALL Continued from page 15 6-2 formation); we really just get an extra attacker.” “At Lockport we do run it,” Lockport coach Austin Lindley said.“The main reason is because you always have three hitters in the front row witch opens up more options for your setter. If you have just one setter when he is front row it makes it slightly easier for the blockers in the other side especially the middle. We are lucky enough to have a setter who can also hit and block very well. So when he is front row he hits when he goes to the back row he sets. And we sub out our other setter for a good right side hitter/blocker.” Running a 5-1 system makes you have a more well-rounded

setter, which is harder to find on the high school level. “To run a 5-1 you would need a tall and strong setter,”Lindley said. Tall to block and strong meaning very good so the defense would always have to be ready for him to dump and then also he would be tough to read.” The athletic ability of players and the advent of the libero have also helped the system as there are more defensive specialists available, so that hitters can focus more on hitting rather than playing back row.” “I think athletes nowadays are getting more athletic,” Vergo said. “If you have more hitters out there and a setter that can play defense, why not? You have to play your clientele and I think that’s why a lot of teams are doing it, to get as much fire power as possible out there.” For Minooka, a state power,

Sports a 5-1 system is currently better thanks to the strong play of senior setter Phil Hanson. “We do not run a 6-2 because our setter is very good and consistent and his opposite plays all the way around (hits from the back row, as well),” Minooka coach Janel Gretich said.“I prefer to run a 5-1 with our team, but if I had a setter I also wanted or needed to use as a hitting option, I would consider a 6-2.” Benet coach Amy Van Eekeren has used both systems during her career but prefers the 5-1 this year for her team as it provides a different option with the setter being able to kill. “With a 5-1, you have a setter in the front row, but with a 6-2, you have three hitters in the front line at all times, so that’s the benefit,” she said. “The disadvantage is with a front-row setter, you can also take tips, you can pull the blocker because if your front-row setter is jumpsetting—in our case, we always want our setter jump-setting— the plan is that he will hold the blocker and somewhere we get a one-on-one attack.” While both systems are still used regularly, it will be interesting to see if the 6-2 continues to pick up steam as the substitution rules increase. This allows more athletes to specialize in a specific position and a 6-2 formation allows more players to get into the game. Mark Gregory and Mike Sandrolini contributed

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Alignment changes are happening in prep boys volleyball.


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Stewart rallies back to win at Dover There was a day when Tony Stewart was a big force at Dover International Speedway. He had 11 top-10 finishes in his first 12 races at the Monster Mile, nine of which were in the top five.Two of those were wins. However, the bulk of that was more than a decade ago, spanning 1999 to 2004. Since then, things have been almost the exact opposite – one top-five finish in 16 races, and an average finishing position of 20.75. In fact, he hadn’t finished better than 20th in five consecutive Dover races. But the past all came roaring back for Stewart on Sunday, June 2. He ran down Juan Pablo Montoya with three laps to go and held on to win the “FedEx 400 benefiting

Autism Speaks” NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race, his first win at the Monster Mile since sweeping both races 13 years ago, in 2000. It was so long ago that he was driving a Pontiac at the time. “If somebody would have told me it was going to be that way yesterday I would have told them they were crazy,” Stewart said. “This thing was not a car that could win the race. Just great pit strategy at the end. [Crew Chief] Steve Addington made a great call there that last caution and gave us the opportunity to race for it up there. “It didn’t seem like the guys that took four tires had a huge advantage taking off there.We had a car that was solid, we just never

Sean Gardner/NASCAR via Getty Images

Tony Stewart, driver of the #14 Code 3 Associates/Mobil 1 Chevrolet, celebrates with the trophy in Victory Lane after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks at Dover International Speedway on June 2, 2013 in Dover, Delaware.

got track position to get in clean air. It felt a lot better up front.” The last chapter of the race started with 25 laps remaining when pole-sitter Denny Hamlin, running sixth at the time, blew a right-front tire and slammed the wall in Turn 2. That interrupted about 20 crew chiefs who had been spending the previous few minutes furiously working fuel numbers to see if they could make it to the finish on green. But

Hamlin’s mishap rendered those moot, and set up a sprint to the finish. As is the case with many NASCAR races, Stewart was the beneficiary of luck. And as is the case with luck in NASCAR, what’s good luck for one driver is bad luck for another. This time, it was Jimmie Johnson, who has had his share of good luck at Dover, drawing the bad-luck side of the card.

For a moment, it looked like it didn’t matter. Johnson had an extremely strong restart, leaving Montoya fairly far behind. But it turned out to be too good. NASCAR ruled Johnson had jumped the restart, and ordered a pass-through penalty with 18 laps remaining. Johnson protested over the radio, asking NASCAR to reconsider, but eventually came through the pits. He finished 17th.

WEEKLY RACING UPDATE STANDINGS

DAYTONA TICKETS ON SALE Tickets to the 56th annual Daytona 500 on Sunday, Feb. 23 – NASCAR’s biggest, richest and most prestigious race – went on sale May 30. Tickets for the Daytona 500, which was won earlier this year for a second time by Jimmie Johnson, will start at $65. “The tradition, excitement and drama of the Daytona 500 are unmatched in motorsports,” Daytona International Speedway President Joie Chitwood III said.“From the pageantry of kicking off the new NASCAR Sprint Cup Series season to the classic nail-biting finishes, the Daytona 500 is an event that all race fans should experience in person.” The Speedway will once again offer special youth pricing for the 56th annual Daytona 500. Children 12 and under will receive 50 percent off all backstretch grandstand seats for the Daytona 500 while supplies last. In addition to the 56th annual Daytona 500, tickets for Budweiser Speedweeks 2014 events will be available for purchase including the DRIVE4COPD 300 NASCAR Nationwide Series race, the NextEra Energy Resources 250 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race, the inaugural nighttime running of the Budweiser Duel, The Sprint Unlimited At Daytona and Lucas Oil 200 Presented By MAV TV American Real doubleheader and Daytona 500 Qualifying Presented By Kroger.

2012 Sprint Cup Series 1) Jimmie Johnson 473 2) Carl Edwards -30 3) Clint Bowyer - 50 4) Matt Kenseth -74 5) Kevin Harvick -74 6) Dale Earnhardt, Jr. - 75 7) Kasey Kahne -81 8) Brad Keselowski -98 9) Kyle Busch -98 10) Paul Menard -102 11) Jeff Gordon -112 12) Aric Almirola -119

2013 Nationwide Series 1) Regan Smith 2) Sam Hornish, Jr 3) Brian Vickers 4) Justin Allgaier 4) Austin Dillon

411 -27 -42 -43 -53

2013 FedEx 400 finishers 1) Tony Stewart 2) Juan Montoya 3) Jeff Gordon 4) Kyle Busch 5) Brad Keselowski 6) Clint Bowyer 7) Joey Logano 8) Kevin Harvick 9) Mark Martin 10) Dale Earnhardt, Jr. 11) Jeff Burton 12) Kurt Busch 13) Ricky Stenhouse, Jr. 14) Carl Edwards 15) Greg Biffle 16) Casey Mears 17) Jimmie Johnson 18) Aric Almirola 19) Marcos Ambrose 20) Paul Menard


FIFTY PLUS

KEEPING HEALTHY, STAYING HAPPY

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Medications for Parkinson’s only control symptoms By Tribune Media Services

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: What are the latest findings on Parkinson’s disease? Are there any new medications? I’ve heard a lot about CoQ10 as a promising alternative for those with Parkinson’s. Is there any truth to this? ANSWER: CoQ10 initially seemed to be a promising therapy for Parkinson’s in early research involving small numbers of patients. However, follow-up studies using larger numbers and higher doses have failed to confirm benefit from this drug. The medications currently available for Parkinson’s are directed at controlling symptoms. They can be very effective. Unfortunately, despite decades of intensive research, no drugs have been proven to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system

that develops gradually over time.The hallmark symptoms include tremor, muscle rigidity and slowness of movements. In later stages, new symptoms may develop that include difficulties with memory and thinking, as well as bladder and bowel problems and, in some people, low blood pressure. In the 1960s, researchers discovered that the brains of people with Parkinson’s disease are low in a brain chemical called dopamine.This was a huge step forward in understanding and treating the disease.After that, researchers began to focus Parkinson’s treatment on replenishing dopamine.The early result of those efforts was a medication known as carbidopa-levodopa, which effectively restores brain dopamine and typically reduces many Parkinson’s symptoms. Four decades later, carbidopa-levodopa

is still the best drug available for Parkinson’s.Although it does not treat the cause, carbidopalevodopa does restore some of the normal brain chemistry. Unfortunately, as Parkinson’s advances, levodopa and related medications often become less effective in controlling symptoms, and the problems caused by the disease tend to get worse. Thus, with advancing Parkinson’s disease, the problems go beyond brain dopamine. Understanding the cause of Parkinson’s disease is the crucial first step to finding a way to slow or halt disease progression.A variety of environmental factors have been identified that influence the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. However, these account for only a small part of this risk. Genetics have also been extensively studied and remain a strong focus among researchers. Initial genetic studies

investigated rare families in which many members had Parkinson’s disease.Although gene mutations were identified to explain the cause in many of these families, these same gene mutations were not found to cause Parkinson’s disease in general. Known gene mutations account for just a small percent of typical Parkinson’s disease. However, these genetic studies shed light on processes that appear to play important roles in causing Parkinson’s disease. One important genetic finding surfaced early in these studies of familial Parkinson’s disease. In selected Parkinson’s disease families from Italy and Greece, the cause turned out to be the gene coding for alpha synuclein.This gene mutation was not found in run-ofthe-mill Parkinson’s disease, but led to another important discovery. People with typical Parkinson’s disease were found to have deposits of alpha synuclein in affected brain

cells, suggesting that this molecule might play an important role in all Parkinson’s disease. Of further interest has been the recognition that people with a disease somewhat similar to Parkinson’s but associated with early dementia, called dementia with Lewy bodies, also is marked by brain alpha synuclein deposits. Researchers are now studying the relationship between these two disorders, which appear to have a common link. Although we do not have a drug that halts the progression of Parkinson’s disease, that should not be reason for pessimism.After all, before you can fix either a car or a body, you have to know how it works.That is certainly true for Parkinson’s disease. Once we fully understand what causes it, new treatment should quickly follow. - J. Eric Ahlskog, M.D., Ph.D., Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.

Happiness could be key to good health By StatePoint Media

Everyone knows that proper diet, regular exercise and avoidance of bad habits like smoking are crucial to great health. But some experts say that a truly positive outlook on life can be just as powerful a factor in improving overall wellness. In fact, possessing “emotional vitality” and a sense of hopefulness, was found in a Harvard School of Public Health study to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. And many other studies have yielded results with similar implications. “An internal dialogue that is filled with negative, judgmental or self-defeating thoughts can be a self-fulfilling prophecy,” says Sean Meshorer, a spiritual teacher and author of the new book,“The Bliss Experiment: 28 Days to Personal Transformation.” “Bringing bliss into your work, relationships, family and service, no matter what your personal struggles may be, can help you live a more focused, stress-free, fulfilling life.” Meshorer, who sustained an

injury seven years ago that left him with severe, disabling and incurable chronic pain, believes your circumstances in life don’t need to define your happiness. In his new book, he offers readers science-based spiritual solutions to changing the way one thinks. With that in mind, Meshorer shared a few ways to get started: • Have compassion: You can’t be genuinely happy while you’re indifferent to the pain of others. Compassion reinforces our feeling to the world around us and breaks down barriers of loneliness. Make a conscious decision to act compassionately toward others -- including strangers and enemies -- without the expectation of receiving anything in return. • Dispute negative thoughts: Don’t suppress your negative thoughts or paint them over with pretty colors. Running from reality can be counterproductive. Instead, recognize that not all your negative thoughts are rational or justified. Analyze your thoughts for how they began and why they may

not be entirely accurate.Attempt to think about the people or things that are making you unhappy in the most objective light possible. • Be optimistic: Optimism is a practical and effective life strategy. Let go of your fears that being positive leads to disappointment. • Don’t place material conditions on happiness: To place your happiness at the whim of complex economic conditions out of your control is like playing Russian roulette with your soul. Don’t let your bank account define your happiness. • Practice affirmations: Our words are extremely powerful. What we say to ourselves and how we say it are vitally important, impacting our bodily health and mental well-being. More tips about personal transformation, along with information about Meshorer’s new book, can be found at www. TheBlissExperiment.com. By pursuing your happiness, you can live a more functional, fulfilled life.


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Classical Europe See and hear the best of the Old World

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

The star of Salzburg’s Mozart Residence is one of Mozart’s very own pianos, seen here near the windows.

I

’ve always taught what I loved - and I’ve always loved music. I spent my high school years as a piano teacher. I’d start out my students with boogies and pop songs, and eventually get them turned on to Bach and Beethoven. In 1980, a truck dropped off 2,500 copies of my first guidebook - “Europe Through the Back Door.” During that year’s Christmas recital, some parents sat on boxes of travel books while their kids played carols, boogies, and Bach. By the next Christmas, I had let my piano students go. From that point on, I would be teaching European culture in print rather than on the keyboard. But I haven’t abandoned my Bach and Beethoven. Just as travel broadens your perspectives, so can music. Mixing the two on a trip to Europe brings an extra dimension to your travels.And four European cities - Salzburg, Leipzig, Bergen and Vienna - really rock when it comes to sights honoring local composers and their music. Salzburg is forever smiling to the tunes of Mozart.You’ll

get a double dose of Wolfgang Amadeus here - the Mozart Birthplace and the Mozart Residence (www.mozarteum. at).The house where Mozart was born is also where he composed most of his boy-genius works. Today it’s the most popular Mozart sight in town. You’ll peruse three floors of rooms with exhibits displaying paintings, letters, personal items, and lots of facsimiles, all attempting to bring life to the Mozart story. The Mozart Residence - Mozart’s second home (his family moved here when he was 17) - is less interesting than the house where he was born, but it’s also roomier, less crowded, and holds a piano that Mozart actually owned. It also comes with an informative audioguide and a 30-minute narrated slideshow. If you’re looking for a deal, one combo ticket will get you into both places. For those traveling to Germany, there are two sights in Leipzig that pay homage to another musical genius - Johann Sebastian Bach.The historic

St.Thomas Church (www. thomaskirche.org) is where Bach ran the boys’ choir from 1723 until 1750.While here, Bach was remarkably prolific - for a time, he even composed a new cantata every week. In front of the altar is the composer’s tomb. Across the little square from St.Thomas is the small, pricey, but very well-presented Bach Museum (www.bach-leipzig. de).You’ll see the actual organ console where Bach played his favorite instrument, an iron chest that came from his household and original manuscripts. With the help of the excellent audioguide, this museum is an absolute delight for music lovers. Far to the north near the Norwegian port of Bergen is Edvard Grieg’s home,Troldhaugen (www.kunstmuseene.no/ troldhaugen). Norway’s greatest composer spent his last 22 summers here, soaking up inspirational fjord beauty and composing many of his greatest works.You can visit his house on your own, but it’s more enjoyable if you take the included 20-minute tour. In summer, try to also attend the lunchtime piano concert.And don’t miss his little studio near

the fjord; in this tiny space Grieg created some huge works. Vienna is to classical music what Athens is to sculpture, Florence to painting, and Milwaukee to beer.You can make pilgrimages to the homes (now mostly small museums) of many composers: Schubert, Brahms, Haydn, Beethoven or Mozart. But I find these places inconveniently located and generally underwhelming. My favorite musical setting in Vienna is not a single home but an entire “House of Music.”The Haus der Musik (www.hdm.at) is a hightech experience that celebrates the hometown specialty.The museum, spread over five floors and well-described in English, is unique for its effective use of interactive touch-screen computers and headphones to explore the physics of sound. The museum also features fine audiovisual exhibits on each of the famous local heroes (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Strauss and Mahler). Before leaving, pick up a virtual baton to conduct the Vienna Philharmonic. Each time you screw up, the musicians put their instruments down and ridicule you; make it through the piece, and you’ll get a

rousing round of applause. If you can’t get to Europe soon,“Rick Steves’ Europe:A Symphonic Journey,” is debuting all across the United States on public television this spring. I team up with my hometown Cascade Symphony Orchestra on a musical tour that begins in the U.S. and then touches down in seven European countries, with each classical work accompanied by video footage of that country’s landmarks. It focuses on the rise of nationalism in European history and music, celebrating how, in the late 19th century, music partnered with freedom-lovers. Romanticism and Nationalism were on the same team. Even if powdered wigs and conductor’s batons aren’t your thing, take time to weave travel and classical music together. You’ll find that in Europe, and all over the world, music is an international language - it cuts across borders and joins people together. Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.


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Real Estate & Business

Build buzz for yourself by setting career agenda Q. I like to live each day at a time. I’m pretty laid back and like to be spontaneous, but I’m in my late 30s and my career is not thriving. How can I start getting the promotions and the salary I want? A. If you want to move up a corporate food chain, you cannot be a leaf in the wind. You’ll simply end up with everyone else’s agenda blowing you around in ways that serve their goals. My clients tell me one of the hardest aspects of executive coaching is realizing that they have got to define their own goals. No good fairy is going to show up someday and tell them what they ought to be when they grow up.

As we age, it does tend to occur to us that the grown-ups are now us. The only guarantee we have at work is our failure to define our goals means we will end up somewhere else. A liberating way to start goal setting is to pretend you do know a magic fairy and that it’s on your schedule this week to have lunch with her. What would you ask her for? If you believed you could do absolutely anything, where would you tell her you want to go? Now, the scary part is to put a road map between where you are now and where you want to be. Most of my time with clients is spent building this road. The

biggest challenge for them is to be willing to break the journey into baby steps. The reason baby steps are tough is most people want something they could do tomorrow that will cause the clouds to break open and the angels to sing. Unfortunately, no goal you can put on your list will give you this Technicolor result. Instead, we have to be willing to pick away at what looks like a mountain with a fork but do it every day. You’d be amazed at the steps you can carve into the side of the mountain with a fork by tenacity, consistency and clarity of direction. Once you know where you are going and the steps you are going to take, it is much easier to influence other people toward your goals. During meetings, you

can articulate where you will end up. During your conversations with your boss you can get his counsel on how best to go where you want. As you have these conversations, you build a buzz and belief in others that you are going to do exactly what you’ve been saying. Others will then support and anticipate your future achievements. Floating on the latest corporate breeze and crossing your fingers that people will support the goals that you yourself can’t even articulate is only a recipe for misery. At the end of a long career, you may have been spontaneous but it is highly unlikely you will be happy or well paid.

Last word(s) Q. One of my employees

tends to make mistakes that I always end up reminding him about. Is there any diplomatic way to get him to remember? I’m tired of being his external memory unit! A. Yes, tell him you know he knows it is critical in his job to remember his job. Let him know you want to keep him but need him to come up with a technique to remember. Otherwise, he may need a job with fewer memory demands.

Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.


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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 206 Murphy Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 26th day of June, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff V. Brenda Benes a/k/a Brenda K. Benes; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 5986 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-41378 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 5/30, 6/6, 6/13

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1226 GRAND BOULEVARD ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR GARAGE). On the 19th day of June, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff V. ADWOA ABOAGYE AND DANIEL ABOAGYE Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 2922 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 243,089.68 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 5/23, 5/30, 6/6


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THE BUGLE JUNE 6, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff,

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff,

vs. ADWOA ABOAGYE AND ABOAGYE Defendant. No. 10 CH 2922

DANIEL

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 3rd day of December, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 19th day of June, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: THAT PART OF LOT 117 IN MARQUETTE’S LANDING, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOT 2 IN FAIRFIELD MEADOWS, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 21, 1999 AS DOCUMENT NO. R99-77477, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 117; THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 51.44 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 70.99 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST 30.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 155.46 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 46 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 15.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 43 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 40 SECONDSWEST 80.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1226 GRAND BOULEVARD ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR GARAGE P.I.N.: 12-02-32-302-029-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 243,089.68 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/23, 5/30, 6/6

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

vs. Brenda Benes a/k/a Brenda K. Benes; et. al. Defendant. No. 11 CH 5986 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 21st day of December, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 26th day of June, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN WILL COUNTY, STATE OF ILLINOIS, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 20 IN BLOCK 6 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 11, A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION 3 AND 4, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 3, 1968 AS DOCUMENT NO. R68-6758, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 206 Murphy Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 04-03-108-020 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-41378 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/30, 6/6, 6/13


News

New Mr. R.I.G.H.T group helping to empower RHS By Delorise Ivy Valley View School District

With several years of positive experiences through the R.I.G.H.T. (Really intelligent Girls Hang Together) organization under their belts, Romeoville High School officials this year launched a Mr. R.I.G.H.T (The Really Intelligent Guys Hang Together) group as well. Organized by Assistant Principal Yolanda Jordan, Mr. R.I.G.H.T. is designed to assist male RHS students by establishing

relationships with adult male mentors.The program provides a place for male students to meet and interact with one another in a more relaxed, yet structured and supervised, environment. During the course of the academic year, students met regularly to discuss topics, attend workshops, participate in community service projects and collaborate with their female R.I.G.H.T. counterparts. Many males today are experiencing issues that they are unable to deal with due to lack

of knowledge, resources and/ or positive male influences,” said Jordan, who originally founded R.I.G.H.T. when she was at Bolingbrook High School and later brought the female version with her when she moved to RHS. Mr. R.I.G.H.T., Jordan said, “will serve as a platform to educate young men while empowering them to help themselves and others.” The Mr. R.I.G.H.T. group began meeting in March and will likely return in the fall when classes begin again.

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Mexican folk tale at Salk School It was a Mexican folk tale involving a rich, greedy farmer and his family who were fooled by a clever mischief maker. And, by all measures, it was a huge success. Fourth and fifth grade bilingual students at Salk Elementary School (Bolingbrook) staged “Pedro de Urdemalas” four different times for fellow students, teachers and parents during the week prior to Memorial Day. Actors had to memorize large scripts and perform in front of a live audience. Students helped with lighting, music, sets and costumes. Plus, they all had to write multiple reflections about their experiences before, during and after the play. “It was wonderful,” said Shaira De Leon, Salk’s 4-5 bilingual teacher. “I am certain that students and parents will remember this experience for many years to come.” The cast included Joshua Vera (Jose), Jocelyn Romero (Maria), Edwin Dominguez (Pedro de Urdemalas), Byron Ramirez (Senior Manuel de los Cerdos), Joana Velasquez (Senora Isabella),Atlantis Canty & Daisy Arteaga (Senorita Dolores), Javier Villagran (Guest 1), and Ronnie Torres (Guest 2).


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Romeoville 06-06-13