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INSIDE

SCHOOLS Valley View denies charter school plan

SPORTS Lewis falls in MIVA championship game PAGE 13

www.romeovillebugle.com

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Our Community, Our News

MAY 2, 2013

Vol. 7 No. 43

CARRYING THE LIGHT FORWARD Arvid Johnson ready to take helm at the University of St. Francis By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

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NiCK ReiheR/mANAGiNG editoR

Arvid Johnson of Frankfort, Lincoln-Way High School Board president, will become the ninth president of the University of St. Francis in Joliet after current President Michael Vinciguerra steps down May 31.

rvid Johnson pops into a meeting room in the Alumni/Advancement Office at the University of St. Francis in Joliet. Despite the gloomy weather outside, Johnson — tall and bespectacled with a sharp suit — is beaming as he rushes in with his planner and a folded-up umbrella. “Sorry,” he says still smiling.“I’m still finding my way around here.” Johnson, 49, deserves a break on his directional difficulties inside USF’s stately Tower Hall. It was, See JOHNSON, page 4


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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

News

Valley View denies charter school plan

Sitting On Top of The World

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Submitted Photo

Tibbott first grader Alonso Guizar checks out the location of Iceland on a huge map of Europe that is on loan to the Bolingbrook elementary school this week from National Geographic.

Valley View 365U School Board recently denied a proposal from the Virtual Learning Solutions Charter School to create an online learning environment for grades kindergarten through 12. School Board President Steve Quigley reported that the Illinois legislature recently passed House Bill 494, which puts a moratorium on virtual charter schools in Illinois for the next 12 months, with the exception of existing charter schools. The Illinois Virtual Charter School @ Fox River Valley (IVCS@FRV) presented its proposal to the school board last month.The online charter school that would open in the fall of 2013 was described as a school that uses technology to connect grade K-12 students, parents, and teachers throughout the Fox River Valley region of Illinois. ILVCS@FRV would partner with K12 Virtual Schools LLC (K12),a for-profit group that delivered online education products. K12 would provide management and curriculum based

on Illinois Learning Standards and Common Core. Quigley explained that the virtual charter school group sought to establish this charter school along with 18 other schools in this area. IVCS@FRV marketed its program, presenting it to schools from St. Charles to Plainfield. In the end, all 18 schools denied the proposal. Groups such as Northern Illinois Jobs with Justice encouraged the denial of such charters, reporting that the project is an attempt to exploit Illinois’ new charter laws and divert taxpayer dollars to the private group. “This is first, the beginning of this,” said Quigley. “If this passes or fails, it will be so noted to the Illinois School Board of Education, which has a charter school component.” The vote to allow the charter still goes before the Illinois Charter Commission. The Valley View school board unanimously denied the proposal with the exception of Liz Campbell, who abstained from the vote.


THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

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Community Service Council offices moving to new location

Lewis Relay for Life

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Submitted photo

With more than 200 participants, a Relay for Life event sponsored by Lewis University students raised more than $22,000 last month for cancer research in support of the American Cancer Society, celebrating cancer survivors and raising awareness. Planning committee members include, back row rom left, Sara harms, Colleen Hennessy, Sophia Barakat, Nicole Carella, Kimbra Runyan, middle row, Katie Uchman, Kayla Kelley, Stefani White and, bottom row, Brian Domke

Young Child Reading

Submitted Photo

As part of the Valley View Early Childhood Center’s observance of the Week of the Young Child, VVSD Superintendent Dr. James Mitchem reads a book to students in the Fish Classroom.

Touted as one of the best resources in the community by both Bolingbrook and Romeoville officials, the Community Service Council of Northern Will County is available to all residents and is alerting the community of its change of address. Effective May 2, the CSC will be moving out of both of its offices and relocating to 440 Quadrangle Drive, Suite C, Bolingbrook. The CSC was founded in 1973 as a social service agency for residents of Bolingbrook, Romeoville and surrounding communities. CSC was incorporated as a 501c3 non-profit agency in 1978 and its main office was located in Romeoville with a

satellite office for foreclosure prevention at 498 Boughton Road, Bolingbrook Executive Director Robert Kalnicky said now the move comes from a need for additional space. “With the increase of programs offered and counselors on staff we needed to increase our office space,” explained Kalnicky. With the numbers of local residents seeking help to prevent foreclosure continually on the rise, the council is always promoting awareness, urging those who need help to come forward. The CSC is certified by HUD to provide housing counseling, primarily in the areas of mortgage default and rental evictions. CSC receives funds through the Emergency Food and Shelter program to

assist those in need with rent or mortgage payments. In addition to offering housing assistance, services for family and marital counseling are provided by licensed professional counselors on an affordable fee schedule. The staff of 16 is experienced in a full range of counseling,such as marital, depression, divorce, parent-child relations, blended marriage concerns, and other problems at a fraction of the cost, while cutting attorney’s fees, said Kalnicky. The agency offers Anger Managementgroupsforbothadults and teens and a court-approved Domestic Violence program. Licensed CADC counselors conduct DUI evaluations and drug assessments. For additional information, visit the CSC’s website, www. thecsc.org.


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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

JOHNSON Continued from page 1 after all, just two months ago that USF Board Chairman J.D. Ross introduced Johnson as the man who would take the helm when the much-revered Michael Vinciguerra retires May 31, a little more than 10 years after becoming USF’s eighth president. Vinciguerra said he knows he’s passing the torch to a worthy successor. “During my 11 years at the University of St. Francis, I have been committed to the importance of Catholic, Franciscan higher education to progressing our community,” Vinciguerra said in a written statement.“I am gratified that the next president, Dr. Arvid Johnson, will continue that commitment and build on the strong foundation that has made us Joliet’s urban university with a national presence. “I wish Dr. Johnson all the best and know he will very soon come to love USF as much as I do.” The soon-to-be ninth president, Johnson barely contains his enthusiasm as he

NICK REIHER/MANAGING EDITOR

Arvid Johnson, incoming USF President, chats with some students in Tower Hall. While running an educational institution is like running a business, he said the main purpose of school is to serve the students so they, too, can learn to serve the community.

speaks of his new post and the greater opportunity he will have to experience a feeling that has driven most of his life: watching as the light goes on in the eyes of teachers he is mentoring, and then as they do the same with their own students. The Oak Lawn native first got that feeling when he tutored

his peers as a National Honor Society student at Brother Rice High School in Chicago. “If you can tutor or teach, you also increase your own understanding,” he said, hands expressive as his face as he makes his point. Rather than head straight into the education field, Johnson instead took his physics degree from Lewis University to industry, designing microwave vacuum tubes for radar devices. “I wanted to see what it was like to get out and work for a living,” he said with a smile.“After five or six years in industry, I started doing some adjunct teaching.” As he moved up in industry, finally with Northrup-Grumman Corp. in Lake of the Hills, Johnson slowly started getting back into teaching, drawn once again by that desire to see students’ eyes light up with epiphanies. Something he saw as well while leading groups in industry. Finally, he was lured into becoming the dean of the Brennan School of Business at Dominican University in River Forest, where he also was a tenured professor of management, teaching undergraduate and graduate business courses. The new job there necessitated a move for the family. So Johnson and wife Anne looked around in the area for the best schools for their three sons. After some thorough research, they found School District 157-C in Frankfort and move there some 10 years

ago.The three boys got great educations there and at LincolnWay High School, Johnson said. He felt that old light go on again when Lincoln-Way’s Stacy Holland invited him to tour Lincoln-Way East in Frankfort as part of a breakfast for local business people. “That event hooked me,” Johnson said, his eyes brightening again.“There were great discussions in the classroom using lots of different (teaching) methods. And, of course, they were getting great results.They are consistently among the lowest spending on each student, and the scores are among the highest. “I asked if there was any way I could help.” Lincoln-Way officials didn’t waste any time, getting him on one of the committees to investigate school district expansion. Residents in the district, enlightened by the information gathered by the committees, passed a referendum allowing for the construction of two new high schools. In late 2008-2009, Johnson again stepped up, taking a Lincoln-Way School Board spot when a current member stepped down. He was elected to the board later in 2009 and again in April. He serves as president of the board. “Since coming on the Board, Arvid has expanded his knowledge of our school district while developing his leadership style, making the board comfortable in electing

him president and the district face when the media is seeking information from the board,” Superintendent Larry Wyllie said.“He is a fine human being, bright, and extremely capable. I have truly enjoyed working with him.” Holland was glad he accepted that initial invitation. “Arvid is a true asset to Lincoln-Way, a fine person and has served Lincoln-Way as an extremely capable school board member and president,” she said. But a higher calling was in the works when he received a call from a search firm late last year suggesting he apply for the position of president. Vinciguerra, who had engineered much of USF’s spiritual and physical growth during the past decade, was retiring to spend more time in Joliet with his wife Grace. Johnson was interested. Asked why he didn’t seek the superintendent’s position at Lincoln-Way, knowing that Larry Wyllie was stepping down after 24 years this year, he said there were two reasons: “The first is practical: I don’t have the state licenses to be a superintendent. And I am really committed to Catholic higher education,” said Johnson, who thought at one time about becoming a Christian Brother. After doing his “due diligence,” Johnson said he met with an interview team from the USF community at a hotel near O’Hare. He was so taken with the group friendliness and camaraderie – their esprit de corps -- that he couldn’t wait to see if everyone at USF was like that. During a following two-day visit to the campus, he found they were … and more. He saw that “the faculty, staff and administration were dedicated to the mission of the school.There is a joy here that makes it a neat place to work.” Going forward, he admits he doesn’t know enough about USF’s day-to-day operations yet to set an agenda. He knows there is nothing critical; Vinciguerra is leaving a tight ship. If anything, he said, they need to find a way to “let USF’s light shine” throughout the community and beyond. And he knows what whatever the course, he will have a lot of help getting there. “People here haven’t been telling me,‘This is what we need to do,’” he said.“They’ve been asking,‘What can I do to help.’That’s the USF way.”


THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

March for Babies Walk

Community Briefs Retire your worn U.S. flag on May 11 A Community Collection Drive is being held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 11 at the Friendship Center at 175 S. Highpoint Drive, Romeoville, for those looking to dispose of their worn U.S. Flag properly. To earn his Eagle Scout badge, Boy Scout Kyle from Troop 19 in Plainfield is hosting the project. In addition, various drop offs are located throughout the Will County area including: St. Mary Immaculate Church, Plainfield, St. John Lutheran Church, Joliet, A. Vito Martinez, Middle School, Romeoville, Romeoville High School, Romeoville Recreation Center, Highpoint Friendship Center, Romeoville, White Oak Library branches in Romeoville, Crest Hill and Lockport, and VFW Post 5788 in Lockport. You can also call Kyle for pick up at 815-886-1196. Flags will be retired in a ceremony at 2 p.m. May 27 at the VFW Post 5788 at 1026 E. 9th Street., Lockport.The public is invited.

ComEd assistance program underway For the seventh year in a row, the Will County Center for Community Concerns will partner with ComEd to educate residents about the company’s Residential Special Hardship Program. This program offers relief to households with incomes up to 250 percent of the poverty level that are experiencing a financial hardship due to job loss, illness, military deployment, or disability. Senior citizens are also eligible to receive this assistance. Income-eligible, residential customers can apply once every two years for grants of up to $500 based on need

and availability of program funds. Since 2007, the program has assisted nearly 4,000 households at a cost of more than $1.4 million. ComEd has worked with the WCCCC to enroll eligible households in this program. According to Jeff Hettrick, the partnership has been very successful. “We are very proud to partner with the Will County Center for Community Concerns. ComEd has created programs to assist the elderly, low income and now we have CHAMP to help with active and disabled military personnel,” Hettrick said.“The WCCCC staff has an amazing knowledge of how to apply our programs and find other innovative ways to assist Will County residents.Together we help our neighbors in these difficult times.” Kris White, executive director of the WCCCC, said the need for this program has increased over the years with last year being one of the highest enrollments.

Illinois Camp 2013 at St. Mary Nativity Students entering second through sixth grade can kickoff their summer with a funfilled week of discovery about our great state on June 10-14 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at St. Mary Nativity School, 702 N. Broadway, Joliet. Campers will experience, create, and explore nature, history and culture of Illinois. Come enjoy a week of games, arts, crafts, geography, and much more about the Land of Lincoln.For more information call Mary Barney 815-722-8518. Students from all area schools are welcome. Registration must be completed by May 23. Cost is $60 per child. See BRIEFS, page 27

Submitted photos

Physicians, nurses and other supporters of Advocate Good Samaritan Hospital raised funds for the March of Dimes by participating in the March for Babies walk in Naperville on April 28. Attached are two team photos. The third photo features, from left, Bolingbrook residents Jon and Kristin Greske, the DuPage County March for Babies Ambassador Family, and Good Samaritan Hospital nurses Caitlin Murphy and Corey Rubeck, holding Henry Greske. Henry weighed just 2 pounds, 3 ounces when he was born at just 26 weeks gestation at Good Samaritan Hospital 13 months ago. Murphy and Rubeck are nurses who cared for him and his family in the neonatal intensive care unit.

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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Robert Hinz, 69, 14121 Faulkner Court, Plainfield, was arrested at 4:44 p.m.April 13 and charged with driving with a suspended license and no front plate near Greenwood Avenue and Route 53.

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Joshua Alvarez, 19, 1005 W. Cottonwood Lane, Mount Prospect, was arrested at 2:49 a.m. April 13 and charged with DUI, speeding, uninsured, improper lane use and possession of cannabis near Route 53 and Airport Road.

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Robert Munch, 21, 52 Beacon Avenue, was arrested at 2:28 p.m.April 14 and charged with retail theft on the 300 block of S. Weber Road.

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Cecilia Cantu, 19, 466 Maggie Lane, was arrested at 10:19 a.m.April 15 and charged with failure to reduce speed and no driver’s license near Romeo and Weber Road.

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Godfrey Adjepong, 41, 1620 Fiddyment Drive, was arrested at 10:19 a.m. April 15 and charged with driving with a suspended license near Romeo and Weber Roads.

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Luis Villamizar, 56, 357 1st Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 1:35 p.m. April 16 and charged with driving without a driver’s license and speeding near Taylor Road and Troxel Avenue.

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Demetria Martinez, 49, 1488 Larksput Court, was arrested at 3:44 p.m. April 16 and charged with failure to reduce speed, no driver’s license, uninsured motor vehicles and failure to restrain a child near Weber Road and Creekside Drive.

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Manuel Aguirre, 24, 106 Mississippi Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 5:01 p.m.April 16 and charged with use of a cell phone in a construction zone, driving with a suspended license and a defective windshield near Weber and Airport Roads.

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Frank Kowal, 38, 36 Abbeywood Drive, was arrested at 10:23 p.m. April

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16 and charged with resisting, obstructing identification and an in-state warrant on the 1200 block of Lakeview Drive. Martha Vega-Chavez, 32, 318 Fairfax, was arrested at 3:15 p.m. April 16 and charged with the use of a wireless devise in a school zone and no driver’s license on the 300 block of Eaton Avenue.

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Dover, 27, 1112 11 Sarah N. Broadway, Joliet, was arrested at 1:15 p.m. April 17 and charged with driving with a suspended license and uninsured on the 400 block of N. Weber Road.

Erica Madding, 30, 31340 Hickory St., Wilmington, was arrested at 1:15 p.m.April17 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of N. Weber Road.

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Serena Staszak, 30, 2607 Sumac Drive, Joliet, was arrested at 4:51 p.m.April 17 and charged with retail theft on the 200 block of S. Weber Road.

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Lee Smith, 18, 534 N. Maggie Lane, was arrested at 5:24 p.m. April 18 and charged with driving with a suspended license and expired registration near Normantown and Weber Roads.

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A customer at a business in the 0-100 block of

Alexander Circle reported a motor vehicle theft at 8:31 p.m. April 18. The customer entered the business, leaving the keys in the vehicle when an unknown male entered the vehicle and drove off. Estimated value of the vehicle is $4,800. A resident in the 1300 block of Alder Creek Drive reported a residential burglary at 3:11 p.m.April 18.A rear window of the residence was broken, and cash, I-Pad and sports memorabilia was taken from the residence. Estimated cost of the items taken and the damage to the window is $3,894.

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Abel Ramirez-Flores,45,1679 E. 19th St., Chicago, was arrested at 1:03 a.m. April 19 and charged with driving without a driver’s license,uninsured and speeding near Route 53 and 135th Street.

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Ricardo Albarran, 20, 304 Hale Ave., was arrested at 7:42 p.m. April 20 and charged with reckless driving, uninsured and failure to reduce speed near Hamrick and Hickory Avenues.

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Herman Burrell, 39, 656 Whitley Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 12:34 a.m. April 23 and charged with driving without a driver’s license and no rear plate light near Route 53 and Murphy Drive.

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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

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Letter to the Editor

Guest View

Romeoville takes care of their own

HERO conference a success

I am inspired again to write about seniors and communities that come together in a very somber need. I am a very proud member of the Romeoville Golden Agers for 14 years. Our club, during any persons need, is always very supportive, I had a phone call to attend a new Carillon member Golden Ager memorial at our local funeral home. As always, many people, of whom I do not know, were comforting each other. Our local funeral home, Anderson and the family go beyond their career with excellent guidance and direction to everyone. I speak because I have had personal experience with their caring expertise. This man, who died, I and most of our local Romeoville Golden Agers

did not know personally. But, because he was “one of us” there was a tremendous turnout. We Golden Agers form a very large circle and hold hands, and recite the Lords Prayer. It is truly “awesome” to watch. I and many other residents are grateful to live in a very helpful and caring community. We all call Romeoville, OUR HOME. All of the old residents (myself included) welcome with open hands and hearts - Carillon, Grand Haven, Lakewood falls, and many new sub-divisions. We are fortunate to call them neighbors and friends. We seniors hope to leave a heritage of values and ethics. We all try to set an example for the younger generation to carry on. these endeavors. Romeoville, with our excellent leadership does “take care of their own” Shirlee J. Pergler Romeoville

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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By Lawrence M. Walsh and James Glasgow

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n April 19, several grassroots organizations brought together an impressive array of speakers from the private sector and from every level of government right up to the White House to outline strategies aimed at curbing the epidemic of heroin abuse in our suburban communities. This insidious drug has infiltrated every collar county in recent years and has laid waste to an alarming number of lives. The second annual Hero Helps Community Forum, held April 19 at Lewis University in Romeoville, brought an estimated 700 people – police officers, doctors, nurses, addiction specialists, educators, pastors, public health experts and concerned parents – all of whom are interested in bringing an end to this horrible plague. Our ultimate goal is to develop a statewide protocol to connect patients who have abused heroin with treatment providers and create a mandatory tracking system targeting those who attempt to fill multiple prescriptions for addictive drugs.

We are grateful to the distinguished experts who donated their time to educate our citizens, particularly Deputy Director Michael Botticelli from the Office of National Drug Control Policy. Other speakers from the medical community included Illinois Director of Public Health Dr. Lamar Hasbrouck, Dr. David Mikolaczyk of Silver Cross Hospital, Dr. Steven Aks of Toxicon Consortium of Chicago and Dr. Seth Eisenberg of the Illinois Department of Human Services. James Roache of the FBIChicago Division shed light on the shady business of the heroin trade and why Chicago is a critical link in the distribution chain of this dangerous narcotic. Kathleen Burke of the Robert Crown Center for Health Education demonstrated the heroin prevention initiative that is currently being piloted in several of our Will County schools. We also want to acknowledge John Cicero and Dr. Joseph Troiani from the Will County Health Department, Will County Coroner Pat O’Neil and Judge Ray Nash, all of whom have been educating the public about the dangers of heroin use. We were also pleased to get

Illustrated Opinion

the attention of United States Congressman Bill Foster, who was able to join us and pledged his support in this initiative. Brother James Gaffney, president of Lewis University, graciously allowed us to use the JFK Sports Complex to accommodate the large crowd who attended this forum. And finally, thanks to Paul Lauridsen, clinical director for Stepping Stones Treatment Center, for moderating the event. We are grateful to the more than 40 organizations that participated in our resource fair and shared information about treatment and education programs to offer solutions to individuals battling an addiction. We are also grateful to the many volunteers who donated their time to make this event a success. Unfortunately, heroin continues to affect Will County. But we believe that educational forums like these will bring together people from many different disciplines to rid our communities of this heinous drug. Working together, we will be successful. Lawrence M.Walsh is Will County Executive; James Glasgow is Will County State’s Attorney.


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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

News

Great Read closing gala scheduled for May 2 Plainfield-area community members are invited to witness a portrayal of President Abraham Lincoln’s last moments at the White House with his beloved wife, Mary Todd just before his assassination at the 2013 Great Read community literacy program’s Closing Gala at 7 p.m. May 2. Husband-and-wife actors Max and Donna Daniels will portray the 16th American president and Mary Todd Lincoln in a free program titled, “A Night at the Theater” at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Refreshments will be served. This year, the 2013 Great Read celebrates the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation, made in 1863. Plainfield-area community members are

encouraged to read any books about the 16th president and take part in the Great Read’s numerous fun, historical and educational programs dedicated to Lincoln. The Emancipation Proclamation is one of Lincoln’s greatest achievements. It led to the passage of the 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865, which abolished slavery. The winners of the “All About Abe Lincoln Art Contest” will also be announced. The contest features artwork from area students. Several pieces will also be on display at the Plainfield Historical Museum, 23836 W. Main St., in downtown Plainfield. Plus students in preschool through fifth grade are also encouraged to attend the program dressed as Abraham or Mary Todd Lincoln. Prizes

will be given in three age categories: Preschool, K-3 and 3-5. “This year’s Great Read program has been very well received,” said Ceil Carey, Plainfield Public Library Director of Outreach.“Abraham Lincoln’s life continues to fascinate so many people because of his monumental achievements, and we hope as many community residents as possible will come to the Closing Gala for this very special presentation.” The Great Read promotes literacy, conversation, reading and community in the Plainfield area. The program typically focuses on a single book each year that connects to the community, a literary theme or an issue important at the time. However, President Lincoln had such an immense impact

on the country and the world that the Great Read instead decided this year to feature a theme – Abraham Lincoln – rather than a single book. The Plainfield Public Library and Plainfield School District 202 co-founded the Great Read program in September 2004 as Reading Across Plainfield. That year, a panel hosted by the Plainfield School District and Plainfield Public Library debated the theme of government censorship as illustrated in “Fahrenheit 451,” Ray Bradbury’s science fiction classic. In 2008, Reading Across Plainfield became The Great Read, and new partners from Joliet and Bolingbrook joined the program to encourage broader community participation,better reflect the areas served and emphasize the program’s literary focus. This year, The Great Read

added three more community partners: Shorewood-Troy Public Library,Troy Community Consolidated School District and Joliet Junior College. The Great Read 2013 is also presented by the Joliet Public Library; the Fountaindale Public Library; Plainfield Township; Troy Community Consolidated School District and the Joliet-area Barnes and Noble stores. The Great Read is also supported by grants from the Plainfield Foundation for Excellence, the Friends of the Plainfield Public Library; and additional funding from Enterprise Publications and participating member organizations. Visit The Great Read website for a complete list of books, events and Great Read program information: http:// www.psd202.org/greatread.

Penn Station serving up subs at Bolingbrook locale By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Made-to-order sandwiches and a quality product---that’s what is bringing customers into the new Penn Station East Coast Subs sandwich shop in Bolingbrook -- and what possessed owner Julie Beckett to commit to the business. Nationally known for its signature Philadelphia Cheesesteak sandwich, Penn Station is not new to success, but it is new to the area. The chain currently only has three locations in Illinois: Lombard, Gurnee, and Grayslake. That is, until now. Since April 9, customers have been lining up during the lunch hour at its newest location on the northeast corner of Weber Road and Lily Cache Lane. “I lived on these sandwiches in college,” said Joe Ooten, a local businessman stopping in for lunch. “They are made to order and are so fresh. It’s pure quality.” Penn Station East Coast Subs is an upscale, fast-casual restaurant that serves a variety of hot and cold subs, as well as fresh, handcut, made-to-order french fries, hand-squeezed lemonade made several times daily and chocolate chunk cookies baked fresh in the restaurant.

Naperville resident Beckett signed on to develop five restaurants in the southwest suburbs over the next three years, opting to make Bolingbrook her first choice. “I fell in love with this location,” said Beckett.“It has a small-town feel to it in an established area that I think will do well.” She said when she was looking for a project to franchise; she simply loved the product, noting that nothing is cooked ahead of time. In fact, she warns, sandwiches take eight minutes to cook—and it’s worth the wait, saying its made-to-order, fresh take on the hot and cold sub is what makes Penn Station stand out from the crowd. The new shop employs 25 people and is now open for operation seven days a week: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday; and from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sunday. Founded in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1985, Penn Station has more than 250 restaurants in 13 states, including Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. “We are so excited to bring Penn Station to Bolingbrook

LAURA KATAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

Customers line up to order at the new Penn Station East Coast Subs sandwich shop in Bolingbrook.

and help grow this brand in the Chicago suburbs,” Beckett said. “Penn Station has a unique menu full of fresh, flavorful products, and the franchising

model is transparent, stable, and incredibly investor-friendly. We know this is going to be a great fit for the community.” The company plans to have 20

to 25 restaurants throughout the Chicago area by 2015. For menu options and email savings check out http://www.penn-station. com.


Calendar MAY 2 The Great Read Grande Finale. Dress up as Abe or Mary Todd Lincoln and enter The Great Read. A variety of activities including a Kids LookA-Like Contest; Abe & Mary Todd Look-A-Like Contest for three age categories including preschool, grades K-3 and Grades 3-5. We will take Contestant Photos and Registration from 6:30-7pm Winners will be announced after the Performance. A Night at the Theater: The Great Read Grand Finale. 7 p.m. Fountaindale Public Library District, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Celebrating the great life of a great man, The Great Read presents an evening with President and Mrs. Lincoln. History comes alive with the reenactment of President Lincoln’s last moments at the White House with his beloved Mary Todd.

MAY 4 May the Fourth Be With You. Chicago 1 to 2 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Celebrate Star Wars Day (May 4th) at the Library! Make cool Star Wars crafts, learn the Force with awesome games, and eat delicious snacks from out of this world! Bring your camera for a galactic photo shoot. This program is all ages. Registration is required.

MAY 7 Power Connection Computer Classes. Classes begin May 6 at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook.General or Microsoft Word classes are offered. Cost is $30. Call Power Connection at (630)679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org Power Connection Forklift classes. Classes begin May 16 or June 13 at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. We offer a one week class for forklift certification, you must be able to read/write fluent English. $50 fuel fee due by start of class.Call Power Connection at (630)679-6899, or visit www.thepowerconection. org.

MAY 8 Bolingbrook Women’s Club. 7:30 p.m. at in the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive. At this event, participants can socialize and learn about the club’s activities. Bolingbrook Mayor Roger Claar will be the guest speaker. The club is a non-

profit organization involved in the community through fund-raising events. For more information call Laura Voss at (630) 803-1802 or visit http:// bolingbrookwomensclub. blogspot.com.

eBooks from the Library’s OverDrive collection at no cost to you. After the short presentation, stay for a hands-on training with your own e-reader. Registration is required.

Building the Canal to Save Chicago 2-4 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Today it would not be possible to reverse the flow of a river, but in Chicago near the end of the 19th century, it became a matter of survival. Join us as author Richard Lanyon discusses his book Building the Canal To Save Chicago. After the talk, Mr. Lanyon will be available to sign copies of his book, which will be available for purchase. Registration is recommended as light refreshments will be provided.

Monday Kids Club. (Snakes) 4 to 5 p.m.at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Anything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art, history and more! This program is for children 5 to 9 years of age. The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot.

Book Club. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford will be discussed. Copies of each title may be picked up at the Adult Services desk one month prior to the book discussion. Be-Tween! Tween/Teen Crossover. Marble Magnets. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Hey older tweens! Are you looking for something cool to do? Do you like awesome crafts? Well we’ve got some awesome crafts just for you! This program is for tweens ages 10-14. Register at the Children’s Services Desk or online.

MAY 11 Hooks, Needles, & More Craft Club. 1-2:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Crafters of all kinds! Join us to work on your favorite portable craft project! Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, scrapbookers, jewelry makers, etc. are welcome! Patterns and helpful tips will be shared. Beginners welcome, and if you’d like to learn to embroider or cross stitch at Crest Hill, contact Amy before the event to get a short list of supplies to bring. How to check out library e-books. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Library staff will demonstrate how to download

MAY 13

MAY 15 Learn About Medicare. 6 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Join us for an introduction and overview of Medicare and how it works. David Wylly, of the Medicare Solutions Network, will detail what  Medicare covers, what it doesn’t, and your options for additional coverage. We will discuss Medicare Supplements, Part D Drug Prescription coverage, and Advantage Plans, as well as cost saving strategies for the years ahead. There will be a question and answer session after the presentation. An Evening with Dan Brown. 6 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. We are excited to offer our patrons an unique opportunity to take part in a LIVE VIDEO STREAM with #1 international bestselling author Dan Brown. Join us for Dan Brown at Lincoln Center: An Evening of Codes, Symbols, and Secrets. Mr. Brown will be talking about his new novel Inferno

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013 (on sale May14th), and about science, religion, code, book publishing, movie making, and a few surprise topics. There will be refreshments and a drawing for a copy of Inferno so join in the fun! Registration is required.

MAY 16 Trash or Treasure 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Trash or Treasure? Professional appraiser Rex Newell of Rex’s Antiques will take a look at your collectibles and let you know what they’re worth. The first 40 registrants to sign up will have one (1) handheld item appraised—only one (1) item per household. Seating is limited,so register early!Those not bringing in items or those on the waiting list are welcome to come and watch as Rex appraises the items of the first 40 people.

MAY 18 Plant Sale. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Bolingbrook Garden Club, under the tent at the Bolingbrook Aquatic Park at 200 LindseyLane, rain or shine.

MAY 20 Monday Kids Club. (Seed Buddies) 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library,

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201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Anything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art, history and more! This program is for children 5 to 9 years of age. The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot.

MAY 23 Stay Safe Online. 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Annerino Community Center, Bolingbrook. Just in time for summer vacation this informative 90-minute program will provide you with the tools and information needed to prevent online threats. Learn how to control Facebook, Instagram and Skype settings and profiles. Valuable techniques will be taught to ensure your children are safe and protected from online threats. Understand the latest cyber bullying tactics, how to discuss sexting, and how our “always-on” society impacts personal and family safety. Keep your data private and understand how to close leaks in your home network. This class will take a proactive approach to keeping your data private and secure.


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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

News

USF hosts Feed My Starving Children event Many months of planning culminatedApril 6 as the University of St. Francis community pulled off a major event to feed hungry children across the globe. The Twin Cities-based Feed My Starving Children organization partnered with students and community members to successfully execute a MobilePack event on USF’s campus. Led by the University Ministry staff and junior Brandon Collofello(Minooka), the USF student team worked tirelessly for months to make the event a reality. Key participants included Samantha Aguilera(Montgomery), Kristen Anderson(Romeoville), Marisa Dressler(New Lenox), Leslie Durden(Oak Park), Ryan Kalinoski(Oak Forest), Judith Legorreta(Vernon Hills), Kenny Mason(Oak Lawn), Allison Rhodes(Minooka), Mary Kate Sanders, Ashley Sikyta(Normal), Erin Suttman(Joliet), Ketura Taylor(Cary) and Devan Trueba(Chicago). The entire event was overseen by USF’s Director of University Ministry, Julie Krakora, who reported, “Some members of the student leadership team had tears of joy when they heard we packed over 101,000 meals. We were also astounded by the nearly $2,000 in funds which came in that day. While we still need $6,000 to reach our $22,000 goal, this was an absolute success to be celebrated-- born from our students’ passion.” The meals were packed by teams of volunteers from USF and the community, including local high schools, area churches, scouting groups, families and more. Even the Future Teachers Club from Joliet Central attended in light of their special partnership with USF through the MERIT Scholarship Program.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

More than 400 volunteers worked in shifts through the day to pack meals for the hungry at a Feed My Starving Children event at University of St. Francis.

Birthday celebration One group of eighth graders from Crone Middle School in Naperville was there to volunteer and celebrate a birthday. Alyssa Metlicka, daughter of USF College of Education professor Donna Metlicka, decided earlier in the month that she wanted her 14th birthday party to happen during the Feed My Starving Children event at USF. Said her mom, “Girls her age usually have parties with roller skating or nail-painting, but Alyssa said she wanted to volunteer. She

Alyssa Metlicka and her mom, Donna (University of St. Francis instructor), celebrated Alyssa’s 14th birthday with family and friends as volunteers at the Feed My Starving Children event at USF.

realized she’d have family coming to celebrate her birthday with her, and that she’d be getting presents, all while there are kids out there who don’t even have food. I thought it was really sweet for a 14-year old to be so selfless.” When asked what she looked most forward to about volunteering, the birthday girl

said with a humble smile,“A lot of people don’t get the opportunities I do, so I just want to give back. I am excited about packing food and having fun.” Alyssa’s brother, father and grandmother also came to participate in the MobilePack event. The Metlickas weren’t the only

family working together for others. In addition to some alumni and staff family groups and husbandwife teams, USF nursing student Kylie Pommier (Plainfield) had her clan at her side. Included were two best friends from USF, Katie Mitchell(Plainfield) and Megan Tjelle(Coal City); her two younger sisters, Maria and

Taryn Truppa; and her mom, Jennifer Truppa, who joked that she was a mega-volunteer that day. Truppa had started her day by taking kids to track practice, then to softball practice, then helping at “Operation Welcome You Home” in Plainfield to greet a returning Marine, then finishing up by packing meals at Feed My Starving Children. “And after this, it might be time for a margarita!” she laughed. When Pommier was asked how she first became interested in FMSC, she explained, “One day I asked my mom if we could volunteer at a soup kitchen sometime. She looked around and found Feed My Starving Children. We went to the facility in Aurora first and really liked it, and now we’ve done a bunch of their events. I was really excited when I heard there was going to be one at USF.” Seven-year-oldTaryn was having a ball with the meal packing but also seemed to sense the more sensitive issues at hand.“I did this about seven or eight times with my whole family and I really like how all of the people are helping other people who are starving. I really like how everybody cares about each other.”


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across

Down

1 Shoots the breeze 6 1940s-’50s Israeli U.N. ambassador 10 Game __ 14 “The Wolf and the Crane” author 15 Cross off 16 Piece of one’s mind? 17 Halloween tricksters’ route? 19 Awestruck 20 Roy Halladay stat 21 Sister of Calliope 22 It may be icy 23 Best place to watch “Animal House”? 25 Close, for instance 28 Unburden 29 Kate of “Ironclad” 30 Soften by soaking 35 How most reading is done, and this puzzle’s title 39 Sherry alternatives 40 Albany’s father-

in-law 41 “Piers Morgan Tonight” channel 42 Eisenhower library site 45 Feathers? 50 Nigerian seaport 51 Noted Beethoven interpreter 52 CIA’s ancestor 55 Cancel 56 Work the late shift at the diner? 58 “__ no kick from Champagne”: song lyric 59 Steady 60 Response to a skeptic 61 Gets into 62 Employee IDs 63 Third shift hr.

1 Champs Élysées feature 2 Bach title? 3 Land east of the Urals 4 Dress finely, with “out” 5 Field of influence 6 Americans in Paris, maybe 7 Tug and junk 8 Overlord 9 Ultimate 10 Home at the park? 11 Airport whose code is BOS 12 Decide not to finish 13 Desert bordering the Sinai Peninsula 18 Choral syllables 22 Feast in the month of Nisan 23 Position in a viewfinder 24 Moneyed, in Monterrey 25 Like some switches 26 Word spoken with amore 27 Put one’s foot down

30 Summer escapes: Abbr. 31 Little streams 32 “The African Queen” coscreenwriter 33 Instead of 34 Raison d’__ 36 Trounces 37 Cube creator Rubik 38 Royal introductions 42 France-based jet maker 43 Sound from Eeyore 44 “Beats me!” 45 Not fixed 46 Title chameleon voiced by Johnny Depp in a 2011 animated film 47 Osmonds’ hometown 48 Codgers 49 Two-time loser to McKinley 52 Look like a creep? 53 Brnch of Islam 54 Check 56 NFL ball carriers 57 Fluoride, for one

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

11

H o ro s c o p e s Risky business is not show business. Sometimes you like to walk on the wild side and push your limits but in the week to come, you would be wise to avoid strenuous escapades like rock-climbing.

Party animals on the prowl sometimes growl. With funloving Venus in your sign, you may have numerous opportunities to socialize in the week ahead - but a heavy work load could cramp your style.

Strive to be a voice, not an echo. You might have a tendency to adopt other people’s opinions as your own in the week to come. You can’t take it for granted that those opinions are based on due diligence.

A satisfying job and financial security might be your priority in the week ahead. Family and social life could take a back seat to career, as you focus on realizing your ambitions.

Focus on achieving ambitions, not on group consensus. Interpersonal relationships could be a bit challenging early in the week. Be as straightforward as possible to avoid alienating those you value the most.

Pay attention to what is going on in the outside world. In the upcoming week, tune into the news, the radio or TV, and you will find guidance for your job and career problems right there in plain sight.

You won’t be able to make permanent plans with temporary people. You may be frustrated in attempts to stand up for yourself. The week ahead isn’t a good time to invest your money or your emotions.

Buck up. The more you talk about the drama and demands in your life, the more you reinforce them. In the upcoming week, simply get on with your jobs and refuse to dwell on the nagging negatives.

Beautify your surroundings. Harmony around you will reflect the harmony within during the week ahead. You might take a few minutes to make a difference by improving work conditions.

The secret to success in the week ahead is to focus your energy on building up something new rather than tearing down something old. You may feel that your private space is threatened by others.

Having a few adventures may be good for you. Remain cautious, however, and don’t neglect duties. If you are thinking of beginning anything long-lasting or important, hold off until this week is over.

The love of your life may be difficult to find, but once found, will be impossible to forget. During the upcoming week, you may experience a few trials and tribulations but will be rewarded for your efforts.

Sudoku

J umble

Tribune Media Services 2013

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • STAID • FRUIT • AUTHOR • CROUCH

Answer:

What he considered his wife’s new hat -“HAT-ROCIOUS”


12

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Romeoville badminton finishes second in SPC, page 15; Lewis’ Carlson earns national award, page 16

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

13

Lewis spikers fall in MIVA title game By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Steve Woltmann/Lewis University

Downers Grove North alum Jay Petty finished his career at Lewis Saturday.

When the Lewis University men’s volleyball team fell in five games to Loyola in the 2013 Midwestern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association Championship, it not only ended the season for the Flyers, it also ended the career for Flyer standout Jay Petty from Downers Grove North High School “I don’t know that you can say enough about Jay Petty,” said Lewis coach Dan Friend. “Not only what he has done for the team, but what he has done for the program over his time here over five years. He basically carried us to the Final Four last year and this year after shoulder surgery, he found another role passing and playing defense while still managing to score points and block.” In the 23-25, 25-23, 10-25, 2522, 15-7 loss to Loyola April 27, Petty posted nine kills, eight digs three block assists and a solo block. He was also named to the MIVA All-Tournament Team along with teammates B.J Boldog, Geoff Powell and Eric Fitterer. “It is not the way I wanted to end my career, but it is what it

is,” Petty said. “We played up and down volleyball this year and even in this match. It has been fun. The people that I have met here, it has been great.” Petty said he has enjoyed the fact that the majority of the Flyers’ squad is from the greater Chicagoland area, something he did not expect coming out of high school five years ago. “When I started playing club, there was a big emphasis on the California kids being the best players and I got to see that change over my career,” he said. “In a sense I am the last. I was overlooked and I had a chip on my shoulder and Dan (Friend) was the only to take a chance on me and used that chip while I was here.” One of those Chicago area players, Eric Butch, a redshirt sophomore out of Maine South, is happy Petty broke the mold. “Jay Petty did a great job all season,” Butch said. “He is such an inspiration. He raised the level of play every day in practice and in games and we are going to miss that.” Butch, who posted eight digs from his libero position in the See MIVA, page 14


14

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

Sports MIVA Continued from page 13 loss, will return next season, along with a lot of other players that should have the Flyers back ready to contend again. One of those returners will definitely keep Jay Petty watching his alma mater, as younger brother Greg is a sophomore on the Flyers. After battling mono for nearly two months this season, Greg did not play as much as he did a year ago, but did get on the floor in the fifth set and record a pair of kills. “It was nice (to be on the floor together to end it),” Jay said.“Last year was great when I got to spend almost the whole season on the floor with him and that

was great.” Greg knows that although his brother will be gone next season, the talent is there to compete for another trip to the Final Four. “The great thing about us is, we are all still pretty raw,” Greg said. “We are all really from the Chicagoland area and a lot of us started playing volleyball late, so we still have a lot we can learn. We are going to work hard and try to get back to the final four again next year.” Lewis ended the season this year with a 20-10 record. In the loss, Lewis came out and won the first set with a .583 hitting percentage, picking up 14 kills on 24 total attempts with no errors and out-blocking the Ramblers, 3.5 total team blocks to zero. Powell paced Lewis with six kills while Fitterer picked up five.

The Ramblers came right back in the second and tied the match a one set each. In the third, it looked like Lewis took control. The Flyers swung at a .529 clip, posting 11 kills and two errors in 17 attempts, while holding the Ramblers to a negative .130 (6 kills, 9 errors, 23 total attempts). Fitterer had four kills and Powell had three. In the fourth, the teams were tied at 17-17 when Loyola took control of the match. The Ramblers took advantage of three late Flyer errors for the set victory and force a fifth set, which was all Loyola. The Ramblers jumped out to a 3-0 lead and never looked back, taking the win. Fitterer led the Flyers with 16 kills, six digs and three block assists while Powell had 15 kills, eight digs and two block assists. Boldog had 44 assists, nine digs and two block assists and freshman middle blocker Bobby Walsh had seven kills while collecting one solo block and four block assists. Follow Mark @2Mark_My_Words mark@buglenewspapers.com


Sports

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Cree Johnson won the No. 8 singles title at the Southwest Prairie Conference meet Saturday.

Spartans second in SPC By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

For the past few years the Romeoville badminton team has found itself in the bottom half of the Southwest Prairie Conference standings. That all changed this year. Thanks to a strong and committed senior class, the

Spartans went undefeated in the SPC in the regular season and were second at the tournament Saturday,April 27. Romeoville finished with 43 points, while Oswego won with 45. “It shows a lot of character in the kids,” Romeoville coach Chaz Kuhn said. “They continued to buy into what we were selling.

They were good examples for the younger levels. Programs have to be built somewhere and I think this was a huge step forward to solidify us as a contender for years to come. I can’t thank the seniors enough.” “We had a very successful year by taking second in conference,” See SPC, page 16

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

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16

Sports

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

Lewis’ Carlson wins national award The Illinois Basketball Coaches Association announced that Lewis University head women’s basketball coach Lisa Carlsen has been named the 2013 NCAA Division II Coach of the Year, following the Flyers’ run to the NCAA Tournament this past season. Carlsen guided the Flyers to a 24-6 record, a Great Lakes Valley Conference title and was named the 2013 GLVC Coach of the Year. “This year’s team was able to

accomplish something that was very special,” Carlsen said. “A GLVC championship with the caliber of basketball in this league is something to be proud of. “The credit really goes to our student athletes, my great staff (Kerri James and Kierra McCleary), and the support of many people.”

BASEBALL The No. 12 Lewis University baseball team dropped two Great

Lakes Valley Conference games to Saint Joseph’s, 8-5 and 4-2, on Sunday (April 28) at Gil Hodges Field. The Flyers fall to 26-11 on the season and 20-9 in conference games to drop to second in the GLVC East.The Pumas move to 2613, and take over first in the East Division with 21-9 record against GLVC opponents. “Saint Joseph’s did everything better than us this weekend,” Lewis head baseball coach Tim

McDonough said. “In this league, you have to find ways to win and we didn’t do that.” “We had some chances today to win both games, but we didn’t get the big hits or limit them when we had to. Saint Joseph’s just kept coming and we didn’t respond like we had all season long.” In the first game of the day, the Flyers jumped on the board in the first inning, as junior Kyle Kapka (Mount Prospect, Ill./Prospect) hit a two-RBI double to score junior

Jake Murray (Downers Grove, Ill./ Downers Grove North/Moraine Valley C.C.) and senior Michael Schroeder (Crown Point, Ind./ Triton). The Puma’s answered in the bottom of the first with three runs on two hits. Saint Joseph’s Kolin Connor hit a two-RBI triple before he crossed home plate two batters later on a single by Garrett O’Neill.

SPC

better to get first. It’s a good accomplishment still.” “I was very happy with taking second,” Underwood said. “I have really learned some things over the years playing singles and it has really helped me.” Both will move on to compete in the singles bracket at sectionals this week. “I believe I can make it to state,” Underwood said. “I hear coaches talk about me and that gives me a lot of confidence. I have a lot of confidence in myself, but I have to play my game. If I play my game, I feel I have a good chance to make it to state.That is my ultimate goal. I’ve played for four years and to make it to state as a senior, I would feel so accomplished. To have my face on the wall would be a really good feeling.”

“Hopefully I can make it to state and go from there,” Vazquez said. “I’ve been trying to make it to state since sophomore year, so hopefully I will. I have to work hard during practice.” Kuhn feels they are ready to give it a run at becoming sate qualifiers. “The good think about them is they do play other sports so they are competitors,” Kuhn said. “They are peaking at the right time.That will be an advantage for them going forward. Everything is up for grabs and it is who takes advantage of the opportunities given.” Singles champions for Romeoville in the SPC meet were Angeleah Barin (No. 4), Cree Johnson (No.8) and Nikki Crowley (No 9). Finishing second in were Faith Mancol (No. 10), Klaudia Kuklinska (No. 7), Jacqueline Crowley (No. 6) and the No. 5 doubles team of Jacqueline Crowley and Sara Teichman.

Continued from page 15 Romeoville senior Melanie Underwood said. “We were coming from a team last year who didn’t place at all and we took second this year. We worked hard as a team.” “We started off slow low my freshman year,” Romeoville senior Rosie Vazquez said. “Getting second place and almost winning is a great accomplishment.” Underwood and Vazquez teamed up to place second at No. 1 doubles and they each were second at first and second singles, respectively. “It was pretty good,” Vazquez said. “It would have been

See LEWIS, page 17

BASEBALL Romeoville fell to Plainfield East 8-5 despite Brandon Lisak going 3-for-3.

VOLLEYBALL Oswego edged out Romeoville 25-23, 20-25, 25-23. K.J. Hamilton and Mickey Crnkovich paced the way for the Spartans (4-11, 2-5) with eight kills apiece in the Southwest Prairie contest. Evan Banasiak had a team-best 16 assists and three aces for the Romeoville.

SOCCER Plainfield Central blanked Romeoville 6-0 in the Southwest Prairie game. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@buglenewspapers.com


Sports LEWIS Continued from page 16 Lewis scored two more runs in the top of the second as sophomore Mike Barajas (Chicago, Ill./Nazareth) and juniors Drew Buddle (Bartlett, Ill./South Elgin) and Alex Slaby (Davenport, Iowa/Davenport West/Blackhawk College) led off the inning with three-straight hits. Slaby scored Barajas on a bunt single for the Flyers first run of the inning. Murray advanced the runners on a sacrifice bunt before Schroeder hit a sacrifice fly to left field to score Buddle. Saint Joseph’s again answered the Flyers’ runs with some of their own, getting four runs on five hits, all singles, in the bottom of the second frame.The Puma’s added a single run in the fourth to increase their lead to 8-4. The Flyers picked up a run in the top of the seventh when Schroeder doubled in Murray, who reached base after getting hit by a pitch. Flyers senior pitcher Matt Frahm (McLean, Ill./Olympia) took the

loss, giving up seven runs, six earned,on seven hits in 1.2 innings of work. Frahm (6-1) walked three and struck out two. SJC’s Brett Maus (4-4) pitched seven innings for the victory, as he gave up five runs on 10 hits and fanned seven. In game two, the Pumas carried a 3-0 lead through six innings, picking up the runs on five hits and a Flyer error. Lewis cut into Saint Joseph’s lead in the top of the seventh, as junior Ben Albano (West Dundee, Ill./Jacobs), Kapka and senior Brian Norwood (Medinah, Ill./ Lake Park) strung together threestraight singles. The Flyers base runners put pressure on the Puma’s defense as Albano scored on a throwing error on Norwood’s bunt single. Kapka crossed the plate on a groundout to third by Barajas to make the score 3-2 Pumas. The Pumas’ added an insurance run in the bottom of the eighth, as Conner legged out a RBI triple. Lewis’ starting pitcher, junior Tom Helwich (New Lenox, Ill./ Lincoln Way Central) took the loss in 7.1 innings of work. Helwich (72) gave up four runs, three earned, on eight hits while striking out

seven. Saint Joseph’s Jake Harper (4-2) picked up the win, after throwing nine innings. Harper allowed two runs, neither earned, on six hits while striking out six and walking two.

SOFTBALL The Lewis University softball team split their third-consecutive Great Lakes Valley Conference doubleheader as the host Flyers earned the 4-0 win in the opener against Saint Joseph’s, before falling 5-1 in the nightcap on ‘Senior Day’ at the Lewis Softball Field on Sunday (Apr. 28) afternoon. “I thought this weekend was a good test for us to prepare for the GLVC Tournament,” Lewis head softball coach George DiMatteo said.“I was very pleased with the way we played in game one, but I thought we had a bit of a hangover in the second game because of the ‘Senior Day’ festivities, which is understandable.” With the split, Lewis is now 26-14 overall and 20-8 in GLVC action, while the visiting Pumas move to 26-17 on the campaign and 14-17 in conference play.

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013 In the opener, Lewis starting pitcher Kelly Bowler (Lockport, Ill./Lockport) earned the complete-game, three-hit shutout win for the Flyers. Bowler (14-7) struck out six batters. Bowler’s counterpart, Sarah Franklin (10-8) scattered four runs and 11 hits in six innings of work, while fanning four. Lewis senior right fielder Lauren Hanford (Morris, Ill./Morris) went 2-for-3 with three RBI, including a two-run homer, to lead the Flyers offensively in game one. Flyer sophomore second baseman Frankie Rys (Homer Glen, Ill./ Marist) was 3-for-3 with a RBI, while senior shortstop Michelle Vucsko (Chicago, Ill./Marist) collected two hits and scored a run. In the nightcap, Lewis held a 1-0 lead until the fourth inning when Saint Joseph’s center fielder Kristin Paris (2-for-3, 2 RBI, run) put the Pumas ahead, 2-1, on a two-run home run off of Lewis starting pitcher Ali Brems (Kenosha,Wis./Harborside). The Pumas would tack on three more runs in the fifth inning on RBI singles by designated player Caitlin Enright (2-for-4, RBI, run) and left fielder Kylie Weeks (3-

17

for-4, RBI, run). SJC would score another run on a fielding error by Bowler - who came on in relief of Brems. Brems (12-7) allowed five runs and six hits in 4.2 innings of work, while striking out three batters.She, along with senior center fielder Jayme Hefler (Glen Ellyn, Ill./Glenbard West), each collected two hits at the plate in game two. Lewis advances to the 2013 Great Lakes Valley Conference tournament in East Peoria, Ill., on Friday (May 3rd).

GIRLS GOLF The Lewis University women’s golf team wrapped up the 2013 season with a ninth-place (672) finish at the Great Lakes Valley Conference Championship, playing at the par-72, 5,882-yard Annbriar Golf Course. Senior Vanessa Phillips finished among the top-20 individuals after putting together a tworound score of 163 (74-89). Senior Nicole Tucker turned in a total of 168 (84-84) while freshman Alexandra O’Laughlin (Arvada, Colo./Ralston) also shot a two-round score of 168 (88-80).


18

sPorts

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

BASEBALL Average Cody Grosse, Joliet West Matt Ryan, Plainfield Central Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Derek Bangert, Lockport Max Brozovich, Minooka Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Sam Ferri, Notre Dame Charlie Donovan, Westmont Zack Thomas, Joliet West Alex Voitik, JCA Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook Phil Papaioannou, Maine East Jack Arkus, Niles West Nick Dalesandro, JCA Mario Samuel, Bolingbrook Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Tommy Toledo, Niles West Jeff Duschene, Lockport Kyle Colletta, Niles West Larry Holman, Joliet West Thomas Smith, Lockport Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Troy Carlson, Joliet Central Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West Hits Max Brozovich, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Derek Bangert, Lockport Zack Thomas, Joliet West Cody Grosse, Joliet West Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Joe Carnagio, Minooka

.459 .457 .444 .439 .426 .423 .421 .417 .415 .412 .400 .390 .385 .375 .372 .370 .365 .364 .364 .353 .350 .350 .349 .349 .344 .341 20 19 19 18 17 17 16 16

Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Matt Ryan, Plainfield Central Nick Dalesandro, JCA Sam Ferri, Notre Dame Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Charlie Donovan, Westmont Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West Thomas Smith, Lockport Zach Moran, Westmont Alex Voitik, JCA Larry Holman, Joliet West Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Chris Costa, Minooka Jovany Urbieta, Plainfield East Runs Ryan Schlicher, Westmont Joe Carnagio, Minooka Charlie Donovan, Westmont Neal Tyrell, Minooka Max Brozovich, Minooka Larry Holman, Joliet West Avery Lochow, Lockport Zack Thomas, Joliet West Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Brennan Polcyn, Minooka Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Mark Fox, Minooka Sam Montalbano, Westmont Dan Sullivan, Lockport Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Cody Grosse, Joliet West Ted Snidenko, Lockport Rylan Bannon, JCA Chris Tschida, JCA RBI Derek Bangert, Lockport Max Brozovich, Minooka Charlie Donovan, Westmont

16 16 16 16 16 15 15 15 15 14 14 14 14 13 13 21 16 15 15 15 14 14 13 13 13 13 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 21 18 17

Anthony DiNardo, Joliet West Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Doug Matthews, Lockport Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West John Kelly, Westmont Chris Costa, Minooka Zach Moran, Westmont Tommy Toledo, Niles West Zack Thomas, Joliet West Ted Snidenko, Lockport Jon Trotto, JCA Chris Tschida, JCA Doubles Max Brozovich, Minooka Chayancze Stirbis, Plainfield East Zack Thomas, Joliet West Joe Kukla, Notre Dame Tommy Simon, Notre Dame Jovany Urbieta, Plainfield East Nick Sramek, Bolingbrook Brad Elmore, Bolingbrook Michael Ferri, Notre Dame Dion Ursino, Notre Dame Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Mark Fox, Minooka HR Derek Bangert, Lockport Doug Matthews, Lockport Ted Snidenko, Lockport Kevin Ganzer, Joliet West Steve Wittkamp, Minooka Joe Carnagio, Minooka Max Brozovich, Minooka ERA Patrick Dillon, Notre Dame Cody Pazik, Niles West Eric Duzan, Lockport Kyle Colletta, Niles West Josh Mitchell, Minooka Nick Yusko, Plainfield Central Evan Martens, Lockport Nick Dalesandro, JCA Sam Couch, JCA Jake Herron, Joliet West Jordan Hartanovich, Plainfield East Ryan Nikolich, Notre Dame Tomas Aguilar, Plainfield Central Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Mario Samuel, Bolingbrook Strikeouts Jake Herron, Joliet West Josh Mitchell, Minooka Mitch Vogrin, Minooka Cody Pazik, Niles West Quinn Ahern, Joliet West

16 14 14 13 12 11 10 10 10 10 10 10 7 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 3 3 2 2 2 2 0.31 0.41 0.43 0.51 1.18 1.20 1.43 1.58 1.65 1.62 1.84 1.87 1.91 2.13 2.15 40 40 25 24 24

Patrick Dillon, Notre Dame Sam Couch, JCA Nick Dalesandro, JCA Adnan Sator, Notre Dame Steve Waldrop, Bolingbrook Lukas Parker, Maine East Zack Thomas, Joliet West Cal Placher, JCA Nick Rana, Plainfield Central Ryan Nikolich, Notre Dame Kyle Colletta, Niles West Wins Jake Herron, Joliet West Cody Pazik, Niles West Aleks Stobbe, Joliet West Josh Mitchell, Minooka Cal Placher, JCA Quinn Ahern, Joliet West Jordan Hartanovich, Plainfield East Patrick Dillon, Notre Dame Nick Dalesandro, JCA Adnan Sator, Notre Dame Mitch Vogrin, Minooka Steve Szymanski, Minooka Dom Matrisciano, Minooka

24 21 20 18 17 16 15 15 14 14 13 4-1 3-0 3-0 3-1 3-3 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-2 2-2 2-2 2-2

SOFTBALL Average Stephanie Abello, Benet Ashley Beck, Romeoville Maeve McGuire, Benet Marissa Panko, Benet Julianne Rurka, Benet Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Adri Cura, Plainfield South Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North Briana Floyd, Romeoville Erica Kramer, Plainfield North Ali Michalik, Benet Kristine Bourg, Joliet West Courtney Richardson, Maine South Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Annie Molek, Plainfield East Emily York, Benet Olivia Valdez, Romeoville Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South Joy Treasure, Joliet West Cece Floyd, Romeoville Angie Vargas, Plainfield South Hits Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central Kristine Bourg, Joliet West

.750 .714 .700 .690 .586 .529 .515 .511 .500 .484 .481 .472 .458 .448 .448 .440 .438 .421 .417 .411 .407 .400 27 25

Carolyn Nojiri, Downers North 23 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 23 Rosa Gonzalez, Joliet Central 21 Marissa Panko, Benet 20 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 19 Stephanie Abello, Benet 18 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 18 Karina Vargas, Joliet West 18 Julie Liceaga, Joliet West 18 Julianne Rurka, Benet 17 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 17 Briana Floyd, Romeoville 17 Katie McKay, Joliet West 16 Kristina Shahan, Plainfield Central 16 Lorelei Tokarczyk, Joliet West 16 Michaela Schlattmann, Plainfield C. 15 Erica Kramer, Plainfield North 15 Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West 15 Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South 15 Taelor Martin, Joliet Central 15 Jaelyn Tate, Joliet Central 15 Autumn Lawson, Joliet Central 15 Maeve McGuire, Benet 14 Tara Cannella, Plainfield Central 14 Runs Kristine Bourg, Joliet West 25 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 22 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 20 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 19 Paloma Singletary, Joliet Central 17 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 17 Maeve McGuire, Benet 16 Jaelyn Tate, Joliet Central 16 Karina Vargas, Joliet West 15 Julianne Rurka, Benet 14 Marissa Panko, Benet 14 Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South 14 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 13 Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West 13 RBI Stephanie Abello, Benet 26 Emily Eichholzer, Joliet Central 23 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 21 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 20 Julianne Rurka, Benet 18 Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West 16 Julia Liceaga, Joliet West 15 Katie McKay, Joliet West 15 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 13 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 13 Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South 13 Doubles Lorelei Tokarczyk, Joliet West 7 Jaelyn Tate, Joliet Central 7 Alora O’Malley-Molk, Plainfield East 6 Julia Liceaga, Joliet West 6 Kristine Bourg, Joliet West 6 Alysia Rodriguez, Joliet West 5 Joy Treasure, Joliet West 5 Julianne Rurka, Benet 5 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 5 HR Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 7 Stephanie Abello, Benet 6 Jennifer Ames, Joliet West 6 Alyssa Mannucci, Plainfield South 6 Adri Cura, Plainfield South 4 Megan Stoppelman, Benet 4 ERA Elaine Heflin, Downers North 0.73 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 0.95 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 1.83 Strikeouts Elaine Heflin, Downers North 125 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 65 Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 57 Jenna Christie, Maine South 47 Sydney Schmittel, Plainfield North 42 Hannah Gawenda, Joliet Central 40 Katie McKay, Joliet West 36 Annie Molek, Plainfield East 32 Wins Kaleigh Nagle, Plainfield Central 9-1 Elaine Heflin, Downers North 8-2 Jordan Harbacek, Plainfield South 8-3 Katie McKay, Joliet West 6-6 Sydney Schmittel, Plainfield North 5-3 Hannah Gawenda, Joliet Central 5-4 Emily York, Benet 4-1


buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

19

Kahne’s Hendrick resume gets better Call it motivation from within. And Rick Hendrick likely wouldn’t have it any other way. Jimmie Johnson’s road to a sixth NASCAR Sprint Cup Series championship well might converge with those of one or more Hendrick Motorsports teammates. Dale Earnhardt Jr., in fifth place, headed the standings earlier this year. Now the pressure comes

from Kasey Kahne, who ended the 2012 season with a flourish and has yet to lift his foot from the accelerator of the No. 5 Chevrolet. Kahne’s third top-two finish of the season last Sunday at Kansas Speedway boosted the Washington native to the No. 2 spot in rankings entering Saturday night’s Toyota Owners 400 at Richmond International Raceway. Kahne trails Johnson by

37 points. A year ago – his first with the Hendrick organization – Kahne had just begun his climb from the purgatory of four finishes of 29th or worse in the season’s opening six races. A fifth-place finish at Richmond was part of a 10-race run of top 10s that included a Coca-Cola 600 victory in Charlotte. Kahne made the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup™ and

finished fourth in points. His current second place matches a career best, and he’s never been this high in the points this late in the season. “I feel like we have a great team and we’re in a really good spot right now,” said Kahne after running second to Kansas winner Matt Kenseth. Statistically speaking,Kahne has been hot and cold at Richmond. He scored his first Sprint Cup

victory at the 0.75-mile track in spring 2005 leading 242 of the 400 laps. Kahne’s Driver Rating of 87.8, however, ranks 12th among current competitors and his average finish is 18.0. Judging a driver’s present with his past can be deceiving. Kahne’s Richmond statistics are a mix of 18 races with Hendrick, Red Bull Racing,Richard Petty Motorsports and Evernham Motorsports.

WEEKLY RACING UPDATE FAMILY BUSINESS

Warshaw/NASCAR via Getty Images

Kasey Kahne is the driver of the No. 5 Chevrolet for Hendrick Motorsports.

With the Earnhardt name comes lofty expectations from the fans, media and … family. Jeffrey Earnhardt, the son of Kerry Earnhardt and grandson of the late Dale Earnhardt, finished 17th in the the No. 5 JR Motorsports Chevrolet in Friday’s NASCAR Nationwide Series race at Richmond. He drove for 10-time NMPA Most Popular driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., who just happens to be his uncle. The opportunity could be Jeffrey’s last chance to prove that he has the chops to succeed in one of NASCAR’s national series. He’ll be in top-notch equipment as JR Motorsports receives engines and support from Hendrick Motorsports. So, there will be very little room for excuses. In five races this season, the youngest member in the Earnhardt NASCAR lineage has an average finishing position of 24.4, with his best finish (20th) coming at Phoenix. In 15 career starts in the NNS, his best finish was a 19th in the July 2011 event at Daytona International Speedway. In 10 career races in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, Jeffrey’s best finish is a seventh in the 2011 season opener at Daytona.

STANDINGS 2012 Sprint Cup 2013 Nationwide Series Series 1) Sam Hornish, Jr. . 1) Jimmie Johnson 2) Regan Smith 343 3) Austin Dillon 2) Carl Edwards 4) Justin Allgaier -43 3) Brian Scott 3) Kasey Kahne 2013 TOYOTA OWNERS -46 400 finishers 4) Dale Earnhardt, 1) Kevin Harvick Jr. 2) Clint Bowyer -46 3) Joey Logano 5) Clint Bowyer 4) Juan Montoya -53 5) Jeff Burton 6) Brad Keselowski 6) Carl Edwards 7) Matt Kenseth -59 8) Aric Almirola 7) Kyle Busch 9) Kurt Busch -65 10) Dale Earnhardt Jr. 8) Greg Biffle 11) Jeff Gordon -71 12) Jimmie Johnson 9) Kevin Harvick 13) Paul Menard 14) AJ Allmendinger -72 15) Ryan Newman 10) Paul Menard 16) Ricky Stenhouse -72 Jr. 11) Aric Almirola 17) Martin Truex Jr. -85 18) Tony Stewart 19) Bobby Labonte 12) Jamie McMurray


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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

traVel

Going Dutch

ON A DAY TRIP FROM AMSTERDAM

tRibuNe mediA SeRViCeS

Less than an hour away from Amsterdam, the fishing village of Marken is a time-warp trip into old Holland.

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hen researching my guidebooks, almost by definition I have to revisit the same places. But I also like to take a few day trips here and there to scout out new destinations - both for future editions and for future TV shows. On my last visit to Europe, I explored many places, including the lush lowlands of Holland. In a country as tiny as the Netherlands, daytripping is easy to do. Within a half-hour of leaving Amsterdam’s main train station, you can be deep in the Dutch countryside - awash with tulips, red-brick houses, quaint waterways, and black-andwhite cows. I found canals with reflections that would inspire Monet to set up his easel. While there are lots of day-trip options - such as Haarlem, Delft, the Hague, or Arnhem - I spent my day visiting Edam, Marken, and Volendam - three picturesque villages in a region northeast of Amsterdam aptly called the

Waterland. Edam - known for its famous cheese covered in red or yellow wax - is full of history, charm, great hotels, and ambience. I loved it. This adorable village is sweet but not saccharine, and is just 30 minutes by bus from Amsterdam. If you go, try to visit during Edam’s Wednesday morning market; it’s held yearround, but is best in July and August, when farmers bring their cheese by boat and horse to the center of town.You can watch as the cheese is weighed and traded by Edamers in traditional garb. Although Edam is known today for cheese, it was once an industrious shipyard and port. That’s why, in the 17th century, the town’s specialty became one of the most popular cheeses in the world. Sailors took wheels of Edam on their voyages - the cheese doesn’t spoil easily and could be traded for spices and other riches of the East.

The ships are long gone; today, Edam’s main trade is tourism.The best thing to do is to just wander its storybook lanes and canals. Consider taking a short walking tour; ask for a free tour booklet available at the tourist-info office on the main square. While the town itself is the real attraction, I also checked out the Edam Museum - a 400-yearold historical residence that provides a fun peek at what old canal houses once looked like (www.edamsmuseum.nl).This house is particularly interesting for its floating cellar, designed to accommodate changes in water level without destabilizing the structure. After a cheesy morning in Edam, I traveled to one of the Netherlands’ most traditional fishing communities - Marken. This time-passed hamlet in a bottle - once virtually abandoned - has been kept alive as a tourist attraction. It’s quiet, perfectly quaint, and well-preserved, but not annoyingly crowded. This island town once had a harbor for whaling and herring

fishing, but when the Zuiderzee began to silt up in the late 17th century, it became more and more difficult to eke out a living here. Centuries later, when the Zuiderzee was diked off, Marken became a virtual ghost town. But in 1957, engineers built a long causeway from the mainland to the island hamlet, which allowed easy access for visitors to marvel at its cuteness. Walking around Marken, I was impressed with the town’s unique architecture, adapted to survive the challenging local conditions. Because the tides could be so temperamental, houses here tend to cluster on little hills called werven, or are built on pilings to keep them high and dry.Traditional Marken homes, while dull and blacktarred outside, are painted a cheerful yellow and blue inside. In the extremely charming neighborhood of Kerkbuurt, I found the modest Marker Museum, which celebrates the 16th-century costumes (still worn for special events) and traditional lifestyles of the people of Marken

(www.markermuseum.nl). For sustenance, I nibbled on some kibbeling (local fish-and-chips) at an idyllic eatery on the harbor. Some visitors take a 40-minute walk out to the town’s lighthouse, picturesquely situated at the far end of the island, at the tip of a sandy spit. The third town I visited Volendam - was grotesquely touristic ... mix Killarney and Coney Island and then drizzle with herring juice.The town’s promenade is lined with souvenir shops, indoor/outdoor eateries, and Dutch cliches. For a megadose of kitsch, visit the Volendam Museum’s Cigarband House, where a local artist has glued 11 million cigarbands to big boards to create giant images - from Dutch windmills to a sour-looking Statue of Liberty. Amsterdam can be thrilling, but any native will tell you:To really experience everyday life in the Netherlands, get out of town. In postcard-perfect Dutch villages like Edam, you can mellow out like a hunk of aging cheese.


Business Profile Index Five things you should never say during a job interview

Retire Smart: vs. managed funds By Jill Schlesinger Tribune Media Services

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hat does your fund manager do?” screamed the headline of the April 8 edition of Barron’s. All I could think was, “What, indeed!” The article says some superstar fund managers “fly around the world, they crunch reams of data, they dissect industries” - and, for good measure, ultimately beat the index against which their funds are measured. Here’s the problem: Even if there are some diamonds in the rough (and believe me, it’s rough out there in managed mutual fund land!), it may not even be worth trying. The reason is that it is very difficult to beat the index after factoring in costs and fees. A recent survey by the London investment firm Style Research analyzed 425 global equity funds versus the MSCI World index. Without fees, 59 percent of the managers beat the index. However, after investor fees were included, only 31 percent beat the index last year. And it gets harder to beat year after year, because investors tend to pile into the good funds only after they have beaten their relative indexes. Once new money flows into these funds, costs tend to rise and the funds can get too large and cumbersome for the manager, which together make outperformance more difficult to achieve in the future. There has been some good news on fees. According to the Investment Company Institute, mutual fund fees have been trending lower. The average expense ratios for equity funds have fallen from 0.99 percent in 1990 to 0.79 percent in 2011, a 20 percent decline. But a good chunk of that decrease may be attributable to the shift toward no-load (no commission) funds. Actively managed equity funds still have average fees of 0.93 percent, while index equity funds have average fees of 0.13 percent. How do you find the good ones? It will take some work. You will need to identify active investment managers with a proven track record who can consistently stick to an articulated and prudent strategy. You will also want to look for a fund with low investment costs

and administrative and advisory fees; also watch out for costs due to portfolio turnover, commissions and execution. If you prefer to spend your time in other ways and want to make your investment life a little easier, there’s a simple solution. Instead of trying to beat the index, just buy the index! Last month, index fund pioneer Vanguard issued a research report comparing index versus managed funds and noted “persistence of performance among past [managed fund] winners is no more predictable than a flip of a coin ... low-cost index funds have displayed a greater probability of outperforming higher-cost actively managed funds.” Index funds have been around since the early 1970s, but suffered from a definitive “un-cool” status for a long time. It was much more fun to think that some manager held the keys to the investment kingdom than to imagine that all you needed was a few index funds in different asset classes. And there was no massive brokerage sales force and marketing campaign blazing the trail for the stodgy index fund. Of course, the commission-based broker who was touting managed mutual funds had a great incentive - only the expensive, loaded mutual funds would pay them. But in the aftermath of the financial crisis, boring has become more attractive. Many investors dumped their managed funds and decided that they would prefer to start the investing year with the extra 0.80 percent in their own pockets. According to fund-tracking firm Morningstar, assets in U.S. index mutual funds and exchangetraded funds (ETFs) accounted for 34 percent of equity and 18 percent of fixed income funds as of year-end 2012. My hope is to see those levels steadily rise, as do-it-yourself investors wise up or as investors who work with advisers choose feeonly or fee-based professionals who adhere to an indexing strategy. Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Editor-at-Large for www.CBSMoneyWatch.com. She covers the economy, markets, investing or anything else with a dollar sign on her podcast and blog, Jill on Money, as well as on television and radio. She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney.com.

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

By StatePoint Media

Are you having trouble landing a job and you’re not sure why? The right skills and an impressive resume may get you an interview, but getting hired is another story. Experts say it’s all about presenting your character, personality, abilities and values in a positive, relatable light that is attractive to employers. “There’s no such thing as the perfect response to any question in a job interview,” says Andrea Kay, career columnist and consultant, and author of the new book, “This is How to Get Your Next Job: An Inside Look at What Employers Really Want,” (AMACOM). “But what you talk about in the interview could cost you the job offer if you aren’t careful. These are the top five things Kay says you should never talk about or say in a job interview: • Don’t talk about things you can’t back up. Before you state your claim to a quality that sets you apart, think it through. Just saying you’re a great team player or terrific problem solver doesn’t make it so, even if it’s true. Discuss where, how, and exactly what you did that made you so effective. Be ready to cite one or two examples of how you’ve done what you say you can do. • Never say “I have good people skills.”The words are so overused they mean nothing. Consider what it is you do that makes you effective when dealing with others.Are you good at working through difficult issues

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with co-workers? Do you have a knack for writing and talking to customers in a way that explains things? Tell interviewers about that instead. • Never say“I just want to learn.”Employers aren`t in business to teach, but rather to deliver a service or product. An interview is an opportunity to show an employer how you can apply what you know to the business. So rather than focus solely on your eagerness to learn, tell an interviewer how you will use the skills you have begun to develop to solve problems. • Avoid too much personal information that has nothing to do with your qualifications. Don’t talk about why you need the job (even if you do have a hard-luck story about sick children or a spouse whose been laid off). Don’t talk about politics, religion or sexual preferences. When a person can’t leave personal issues at home, it makes an employer wonder: does he lack the necessary maturity and good judgment? Is her personal life such a wreck that she may not be dependable? • Don’t talk about irrelevant things that pop into your head. To be less impulsive, literally practice interviewing. Slow down, count to five, and give yourself a chance to consider how your comment will sound. More job search tips and information from Kay can be found at www.AndreaKay. com. If your search for employment has been frustrating, consider your interviewing technique. A few tweaks to your approach could mean a fantastic job offer.


22

THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

Real Estate & Business

Speak up if you want gratitude Q. No one seems to be noticing all the good work I have done. I am very good at my job, tackle the hard projects, and even help out when my coworkers are swamped. Do I just work for an unusually ungrateful organization? A. No, unless you make coworkers aware of what you do and require a certain level of appreciation, you almost certainly will not get it. Gratitude is a hallmark of high mental health. People who are emotionally well are spontaneously and keenly aware of gratitude pretty much 24 hours a day. They appreciate the extra work you do, the competency with which you do it, and even the fact you just made coffee. On the other end of the mental

health spectrum are people who wouldn’t appreciate it if you just saved their life and their job. In fact, these people might even get mad at you for not doing more. If you want an instant barometer of how emotionally well your coworkers are, simply pay attention to their capacity for appreciation.You’ll have a better assessment of their general mental health than most sophisticated psychological instruments. If you believe that just doing good work will result in workplace appreciation, you’ll be sorely disappointed. If gratitude is important to you, you will have to make what you are doing obvious to all. For instance, if you are giving your customers a break on fees, tell them and tell them more

than once. If you are staying late and missing your child’s soccer game, tell your coworker. If you had to rearrange your family’s vacation schedule, make sure your boss is crystal clear about the inconvenience. Going the extra mile once in awhile (and making sure people realize this is a blue-moon event) will get you gratitude. Being silent and long-suffering will just get you resentment. People simply are too busy at your workplace to slow down long enough to consider that you are doing them a favor. Most folks easily will take what you do for granted unless you are articulate and force them to be aware that you going out of your way for them. Most of us really don’t like feeling dependent, and when you help others at work, you bring up their dependency. You may be shocked to find others

may even have amnesia about all the times you helped them, but this is pretty normal. Being aware of being helped makes people feel weak. Of course, your problem isn’t helping other people avoid their issues with vulnerability. Your problem is getting a well deserved “thank you.” The only way you’ll consistently receive appreciation is to make people around you conscious of exactly what you have done for them. You can always be gracious about the favors you do. Letting your coworker, boss or customer know you think highly of them, and thus you are doing a favor, is effective. They will get to feel special and you will get to feel appreciation!

The last word(s) Q. People in my workplace seem increasingly irritable. Is it

something I’m doing? A. Probably not. The most effective theory for other people’s behavior is that it is never about you. You’ll see a lot more about your workplace if you don’t take everything personally.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Moving forward after a divorce Dear Dave, My divorce will be final in a month, and I’ll have $100,000 when everything is over. I will also have $8,000 in credit card debt, and I’m currently unemployed. Do you have any suggestions to help me move forward? Meryl Dear Meryl, The first thing I want you to do is raise your right hand and promise never to use credit cards again. Then, if you still have any of those awful things, I want you to cut them

up and close out the accounts. The next step is for you to find some kind of income, whether it’s a regular job or just something part-time to get money rolling in on a regular basis. Your credit card debt is a small part of your financial picture right now. I think I’d go ahead and pay off the cards. That way, you’ll be debt-free and still have $92,000 in the bank. But here’s the key. You have to live like that money doesn’t exist. Use just enough to get yourself settled, and go make some money so you can eat and

keep the lights on. A year from now, when you’re past some of this stuff emotionally and looking toward a new future, that money will still be sitting there. As long as you have this mentality, you’ll come through this mess stronger and in good financial shape. God bless you, Meryl! —Dave

Should she have skin in the game? Dear Dave, My daughter has the opportunity to take a trip with her eighth-grade class. The cost is $650. Do you think she

should have to contribute to the cost of the trip, or should I cover it all? Colleen Dear Colleen, This is a really good question. When it came to making these kinds of decisions at our house, we’d take a look at whether the kid was behaving, getting good grades and stuff like that. It can be a challenge at that age, I know. But if they were living like responsible young people, we would pay for this sort of thing as a reward. Still, at that age a kid should definitely have some skin in game. If you can pay for this without breaking the

bank, and she’s fulfilling her responsibilities as a good kid, it would be a good idea to make her come up with her own spending money for the trip. You don’t want her to grow a sense of entitlement, and doing this would force her to work and save a little bit to make this thing happen! —Dave * Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1572 Lavender Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single family.). On the 22nd day of May, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. MARIO PULLIAM; TACHON L. PULLIAM; MARIO PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; TACHON PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; THE WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 6092 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1585 Amaryllis Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Residence). On the 22nd day of May, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. MARICHELLE A. SANTILLANA aka MARICHELLE SANTILLANA, ALREX B. UY and FIRST AMERICAN BANK Defendant.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1912 Tuscany Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 (Condo/Townhouse). On the 29th day of May, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor by merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff V. Rosalba Guerrero a/k/a Rosalva Cabrero a/k/a Rosalba Flores; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 12 CH 249 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Case No. 10 CH 2339 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact:

For Information Please Contact: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-12700 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 5/2, 5/9, 5/16


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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 12TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT WILL COUNTY - JOLIET, ILLINOIS U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking association, as successorin-interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in its capacity as Receiver for Park National Bank, Plaintiff, Vs. NWC RENWICK & WEBER LLC, an Illinois limited liability company; MATTESON LINCOLN LLC, an Illinois limited liability company; MICHAEL H. ROSE; RENWICK ROMEOVILLE ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS; and NONRECORD CLAIMANTS. Defendants, 13-CH-01142 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: UNKNOWN OWNERS and NONRECORD CLAIMANTS That this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to-wit: PARCEL 1: LOTS 7 AND 9 AND OUTLOTS A, B, & C IN ROSE SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MARCH 9, 2005 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2005-040528 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 2: LOT 1 AND OUTLOT A IN ROSE RESUBDIVISION, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 1 THROUGH 4 (BOTH INCLUSIVE) ALONG WITH PART OF OUTLOT A, IN ROSE SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED NOVEMBER 1, 2005 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2005-191530 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PARCEL 3: LOT 6A IN ROSE RESUBDIVISION #2, BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 5 & 6 IN ROSE SUBDIVISION, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 28, 2007 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2007-129690 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: NWC of Renwick & Weber Roads, Romeoville, IL and which said Mortgage was made by: NWC Renwick & Weber LLC and Matteson Lincoln LLC, the Mortgagor(s), to U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking association, as successorin-interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in its capacity as Receiver for Park National Bank, as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Doc. No. R2005145342, as modified by that certain Partial Release that was duly recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Doc. No. R2010124810; and for other relief; that summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending. NOW, THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this Court, Pamela McGuire Will County Clerk 57 N. Ottawa Street Joliet, IL 60432 on or before May 20, 2013, A DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU AT ANY TIME AFTER THAT DAY AND A JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PRAYER OF SAID COMPLAINT. Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP 525 W. Monroe Street Chicago, IL 60661-3693 (312) 902-5309 (phone) / (312) 902-1061 (fax) Attention: Paul T. Musser

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY - JOLIET, ILLINOIS 13 CH 01149 PNC Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank as Trustee u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120; PNC Bank, National Association; Unknown Beneficiaries of Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120; Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants DEFENDANTS NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: Unknown Beneficiaries of Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120 Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants That this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to-wit: LOT 35 IN BLOCK 6 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NUMBER 3 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF SECTION 33 AND WEST 1/2 OF SECTION 34 IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 430 Holden Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 and which said Mortgage was made by: Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association f/k/a LaSalle National Bank as Trustee u/t/a dated April 20, 1982 a/k/a Trust No. 106120 the Mortgagor(s), to National City Mortgage Services Co., as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Document No. 00435233 Re-recorded R2013025096; and for other relief; that summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending. NOW, THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this Court, Pamela J. McGuire Clerk of the Court 57 N. Ottawa Street Joliet, IL 60432 on or before June 3, 2013, A DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU AT ANY TIME AFTER THAT DAY AND A JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PRAYER OF SAID COMPLAINT. CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 DuPage # 15170 Winnebago # 531 Our File No. 14-12-27166 NOTE: This law firm is deemed to be a debt collector.

I525013 Published 4/18, 4/25, 5/2

PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff,

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

MARICHELLE A. SANTILLANA aka MARICHELLE SANTILLANA, ALREX B. UY and FIRST AMERICAN BANK Defendant. No. 12 CH 249

MARIO PULLIAM; TACHON L. PULLIAM; MARIO PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; TACHON PULLIAM, AS TRUSTEE OF THE PULLIAM FAMILY 2003 TRUST, U/D/T DATED MARCH 24, 2003; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; THE WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 10 CH 6092

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 21st day of November, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 22nd day of May, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: All that certain parcel of land situated in the County of Will and State of Illinois, being known and designated as Lot 985, in Wesglen Subdivision Neighborhood 8, a Subdivision of part of the Southwest _ of Section 7, Township 36 North, Range 10 East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded April 11, 2001, as Document Number 2001-41426, in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 1585 Amaryllis Dr., Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Residence P.I.N.: 11-04-07-314-011-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 8th day of November, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 22nd day of May, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 979 IN WESGLEN SUBDIVISION NEIGHBORHOOD 8 A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 7 TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 11 2001 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R200141426 IN WILL COUNTY ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1572 Lavender Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single family. P.I.N.: 04-07-314-032 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 4/25, 5/2, 5/9

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as successor by merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, vs. Rosalba Guerrero a/k/a Rosalva Cabrero a/k/a Rosalba Flores; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 2339 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 14th day of November, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 29th day of May, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 206 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 24, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999 AS DOCUMENT R99124552, AND AMENDMENTS THERETO, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 1912 Tuscany Lane Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Condo/Townhouse P.I.N.: 03-12-305-013 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-12700 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 5/2, 5/9, 5/16

I528130 Published 5/2, 5/9, 5/16


News BRIEFS Continued from page 5

Lipinski’s Cybersecurity Enhancement Act passes U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski (IL-3) announced that the House has overwhelmingly passed the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2013 (H.R. 756) by a vote of 402-16. This bipartisan bill, introduced by Rep. Lipinski and Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), will increase the security of federal networks and information systems, improve the transfer of cybersecurity technologies to the marketplace, train a cybersecurity workforce, and coordinate and prioritize federal cybersecurity research and development efforts. This legislation, which passed the House twice in previous Congresses, will: · Improve coordination in government, providing for a strategic plan to assess the cybersecurity risk and guide the overall direction of federal cyber research and development. · Update the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) responsibilities to develop security standards to harden our federal networks and

processes for agencies to follow. · Establish a federaluniversity-private-sector task force to coordinate research and development, improve training of cyber professionals. · Continue muchneeded cybersecurity research and development programs at the National Science Foundation and NIST. “All three times this legislation has passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, which is a testament to the importance of the bill and to the quality of work that has gone into it,” Rep. Lipinski said.“Because of the rising threats and the fact that Mr. McCaul and I have worked hard to improve the chances of passage in the Senate, I am very hopeful that we will finally see this piece of the cybersecurity puzzle get put into place during this congress.”

Romeoville business recognized for success Automated Design Corporation in Romeoville was recently recognized by the Small Business Administration (SBA) for their success in exporting. Representatives from the SBA and Illinois Small Business Development Centers attended a special event at the company.

Obituary Brett McDonald Beavers Beavers, Brett McDonald (“Beaves”“B-Man”) age 32, passed into the loving arms of our Lord on April 23, 2013 surrounded by his loving family. Brett was born in Farmer City, Ill., and later moved to Tampa, Fla., where he graduated from Gaither High School. He honorably served his country as a Mortuary Affairs Specialists in the United States Army with tours of duty in Iraq and New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. Survived by his loving parents John (Patricia) Beavers, Paula Dufault (late Steve), two sons Seth (8)

and Maddox (4), brother and best friend Derek Beavers, Grandparents Eugene and Helen Cox, Grandmother Marjorie (late Royce Kent) Beavers and many aunts, uncles, and cousins. Brett loved spending time with his boys playing sports and attending their baseball games. He enjoyed relaxing on the beach, outdoor barbeques and fishing. He was an avid fan of the Tampa Bay Rays, Chicago Blackhawks and Chicago Cubs. He was loved by many and will be sorely missed. He was taken far too soon. A memorial service will be held at a later date in Tampa, Florida.

“The Village of Romeoville would like to congratulate Automated Design Corporation on their success in exporting. Their success epitomizes true entrepreneurial spirit...and we are proud to have them right here in our community,” said Mayor John Noak. Automated Design Corporation has been in business since 1986 and has utilized a variety of free resources available to small businesses through the SBA. Automated Design Corp. designs and manufactures custom automation equipment and industrial controls for a variety of industries. ADC is also a world leader in research and development testing for sports equipment.

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Bridge inspections on I-80 The Illinois Department of Transportation announces that, weather permitting, routine bridge inspections on Interstate 80, over the DesPlaines River in Joliet, were scheduled to begin Monday, April 29. The inspections will require daily lane closures in the area located 1.7 miles east of Larkin Avenue.The lane closures will be set and removed daily. In order to minimize the impact to traffic, the closures are scheduled during off-peak travel hours from Monday through Thursday. The inspections, required by the Federal Highway Administration, will begin on the westbound I-80 bridge

and switch to the eastbound bridge on approximately May 6. A minimum of two lanes will remain open while the inspections are taking place. The inspections are anticipated to be completed by Friday, May 10. Drivers are urged to pay close attention to the signs in the work zones, obey the posted speed limits, and be on the alert for workers and equipment. Find details on other construction projects in IDOT’s District 1 at www.dot.state. il.us. Updates on the impacts to traffic are available at www. travelmidwest.com.


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THE BUGLE MAY 2, 2013

Romeoville 5-2-13  

Romeoville 5-2-13