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INSIDE

SPORTS Changes for Spartans on the diamond

NEWS Schools taking second look at drug education Page 3

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www.romeovillebugle.com

Happy Easter! From Voyager Media

Our Village, Our News

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

“I think we will still have to do a small RIF…Most of the teachers will get their jobs back and they should know it. And if they don’t know it, they should know it now.” Steve Quigley, school board president

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he plan to potentially lay off more than 400 teachers was shot down by the Valley View School District School Board last week, expecting the administration to come back with far fewer reductions as originally intended. The sometimes slippery slope of contractual obligations such as the Reduction in Force process paints a picture far worse than intended, explained School Board President Steve Quigley. At the past board meeting, held March 26, the administration called for the honorable dismissal of first-, second-, third-, fourth-, and fifth-year teachers

APRIL 5, 2012

Vol. 6 No. 38

for reduction-in-force reasons. The RIF process, or layoff process, is a common but complicated occurrence in school districts. The passage of Senate Bill 7 in June 2011 made the process even more cumbersome, said Quigley. In an analysis done by Attorneys and Counselors Franczek and Radelet, teacher layoffs must now be based primarily on performance ratings rather than seniority. The legislation extends honorable dismissal, reduction in force, and recall rights to probationary teachers, and introduces a new procedure for carrying out reductions in force and recall decisions effective for See RIF, page 10


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

News

Kaufman and his mom, Fran Benson.

Welcome Home Soldier Story/Photos By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Friends and family came out to welcome home Andrew Kaufman of the United States Army this Friday after he returned from serving seven years in the military. Kaufman, 32, was born in Joliet, Illinois, and attended Romeoville High School and graduated from Lemont High School. After graduating from Basic Training and Advanced Infantry training, he was assigned to the 3rd Infantry at Ft. Stewart, Georgia. Kaufman served a 15-month tour in Iraq from 2007-2008, and graduated from Airborne training school in 2010. He was honorably discharged on March 17, 2012 and plans to attend Lewis University to study Radiology Therapy. When asked what the best thing about being back was, Andrew’s answer was Chicago pizza.


THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

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Truth or DARE?

As traditional drug education struggles with funding and effectiveness, alternatives are being sought to stem the rise in addiction By Sherri Dauskurdas Staff Reporter

Heroin use is on the rise in the suburbs, particularly among young people. As access to the dangerously addictive drug continues to abound, educators and parents are beginning to question how much teens really know about drug use. Drug education typically begins in the younger grades, around fifth or sixth, hopefully when children are old enough to become aware of what drugs are, but before they are directly faced with the choice of using them. Historically, the drug education program of choice has been DARE, or Drug Abuse Resistance Education. It’s a program designed to give kids the skills they need to avoid involvement in drugs, gangs, and violence. Once implemented in 75 percent of our nation’s school districts and in more than 43 countries around the world, DARE is a police officer-led series of classroom lessons that teaches children how to resist peer pressure and live productive drug and violence-free lives. However, funding cuts have reduced the number of schools and communities offering the DARE program, and even where offered, some research is suggesting the message isn’t reaching the kids at the highest risk. In 1998 the DARE program failed to meet federal guidelines that they be both research-based and effective. To date they have not met those guidelines, thereby disqualifying the organization from receiving further federal grant money and making it harder for schools and towns to administer the program. Still the need for drug education persists, apparent in the rise of heroin arrests and overdoses in our communities. Will County officials report there were 30 heroin overdoses last year across 14 towns. DuPage reported 59 seizures and undercover purchases in 2011. Naperville alone had 47 heroin arrests last

year. With many believing that marijuana, Ecstasy, and other drugs are a gateway to heroin use, the need for education is greater than ever. According to Kathleen Burke, president of the Robert Crown Center for Health Education, one problem is the message kids receive about the consequences of drug use. “The war on drugs is often looked at from a legal standpoint,” she said. “Kids are introduced to the legal consequences, and they were taught what they drugs looked like, what they do to your heart rate—but when they looked around, they found those consequences weren’t happening to the people around them who were using the drug. It seemed irrelevant.” With all the information available on the Internet, young people are getting mixed messages about drugs, as the tolerance level for marijuana use has shifted, as has prescription drug use. The Robert Crown Center for Health Education in partnership with the Reed Hruby Foundation and the Illinois Consortium on Drug Policy at Roosevelt University is developing one of the world’s first heroin education and prevention programs. The goal of the program is to stop the growing trend of heroin abuse across America. Today,Robert Crown is teaching kids exactly what happens to the body, what addiction really is, and how to negotiate social acceptance among their peers. “Kids need to understand addiction, to know exactly what happens to their brain when the drug is taken,” she said.“They can understand that. Let’s teach them that addiction is both emotional and physical, that it’s more likely if there already is addiction in the family. These are things no one wants to talk about.” But, she said, it’s necessary if the message is going to get through. “DARE hasn’t proven effective, and I know they are re-vamping it, she said. “But kids are

skeptical. They don’t like to be lied to and that don’t like when we exaggerate. We are using too many messages that aren’t authentic.” A study of suburban young people using heroin, completed last year at the center, found that more than one third of the research sample began using heroin while they were in high school and were from all socioeconomic groups. It also showed a substantial lack of knowledge among users about the relationship between prescription pain pill abuse and heroin use. “The study shows a need for comprehensive drug education, which starts young and continues into high school,” Burke said.“But it’s not the same conversation, it builds. You have to address the changes they go through every year if you are going to really meet their needs for information. We have to help them learn more and know more.” Burke said the key points are still transitional times, such as the move from elementary to middle school, or from middle school to high school. These are the times when schedules are changing, routines are changing, friendships and interests are shifting, she said. In Plainfield Community Consolidated District 202, which serves more than 30,000 students across Will County, attitudes about drug education are beginning to change as well. One high school social worker, who asked to remain anonymous, said the school is beginning to “break the silence” when talking about drugs with teens. “In the past, we didn’t want to overeducate out student,” she said. “But when we are talking about heroin, we are talking about kids dying. It’s so dangerous, so available, so cheap, that we have to be more specific about the risks.” Additionally, the social worker attest, schools need to address student drug use with support programs rather than the common approach of removing

the child from the school environment entirely. Within District 202, kids who are using drugs or who are found in possession of drugs at school may be placed in the Catalyst program, which combines a consistent school environment with added counseling and group dynamics to address their addictions. “We have to address their belief system, address why they are tempted in the first place,” she said. Challenge them in small groups while keeping them in the school context. Schools are not the problem.The schools are the solution.” Parents are part of that solution as well, she added. And while there’s a natural tendency for teens to separate from parental

control, she said it is imperative that they stay involved. “We still need them to be our partners in this,” she said. One creative technique Burke would like to see utilized is to talk about drug use in forums outside health class. It’s more effective if it’s spread around, she said, and kids won’t be as likely to tune out. “Let’s discuss it in other areas of the curriculum—we can talk about addiction in science class. We can discuss the drug trade in social studies. Let’s get our coaches warning kids about pushing past their limits. It stops presenting drugs as a kids’ problem, and starts putting it where it belongs, as a societal See DARE, page 3


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Hopping down the bunny trail

Photos submitted

Residents came out to enjoy Breakfast with the Bunny Saturday at the Romeoville Recreation Center. Children were able to take their photo with Mr. or Mrs. Easter Bunny and participate in an Easter Egg Hunt.

DARE Continued from page 3 problem.” That, in a nutshell is the approach Burke and her colleagues are trying to translate into DuPage and

Will County schools. Already the Robert Crown Center is working on curriculum-based education at Neuqua Valley High School in Naperville, and is beginning to work with the Will County Superintendent’s office on programming for schools in this area. “It’s all about

communication,” said Burke. “You have to talk to the kids and offer real information about what the drugs do. But let’s keep it going by being available to hear those things you might not want to hear. That’s our strategy.” sdauskurdas@buglenewspapers.com


THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

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RC Hill School exterior part of TIF improvements By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

R.C. Hill Elementary School will begin to see its exterior get a face lift thanks to shared funds from the village. In November of 2010, the Valley View School District lent its support to the village of Romeoville to extend the Marquette Tax Increment Finance District expiration date from 2012 to 2024 because of the weak economy. The idea behind the TIF district is to incorporate improvements to the area to stabilize property values. The extension request required and received the necessary legislative approval. According to information from

assistant superintendent Gary Grizaffi, at that time the village had proposed shared benefits of the TIF extension which included $1 million in building and site improvements to R.C. Hill Elementary School. According to a plan submitted to the village, the proposal calls for reworking the parking lots and playground area. The plan shows that the current paved area northwest of the school would be converted into a playground. The existing playground and parking lot to the south of the building would all be made into parking space. One of the main reasons to focus on the parking is to improve the flow of the site as well as improve safety for students and

Submitted Photo

parents. “Anyone driving through there knows how congested the area can be. This will help alleviate

that problem,” said Mayor John Noak. “This is nice to see. We recently saw the use of TIF funds help with the renovation of the

library. Everything is starting to come together. Little by See RC HILL, page 10

ComEd teaming up with municipalities on improvements By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

After last year’s stormy summer, which left power outages across the area, CommonWealth Edison is looking to improve its service and is seeking the help of local municipalities. The village of Romeoville recently passed a resolution in support of improving municipal

coordination of emergency preparedness and response management with ComEd. According to Village Manager Steve Gulden,ComEd has worked closely and collaboratively with a team of management professionals to develop operating protocol that will better address coordination and communications issues. They are also looking to implement

specific improvements to their emergency preparedness and response management. “It would be an advantage to the residents of Romeoville, and we support the idea,” Gulden said. ComEd is also entertaining the possibility of setting up a command center to be used whenever a severe storm is expected to hit. Gulden said

residents would benefit from having ComEd teams in their own backyard at the ready to restore service. The village would offer the Romeoville Emergency Management Agency center to be used as a joint operations center for ComEd officials, village personnel, and police officers and fire fighters to work together in severe storm

situations. “We would be able to bring in our fire and police chiefs and have them sit in on the meetings,” Gulden said. “This would allow for communication in real time, making service to the village a priority. Having the center here would have ComEd covering our concerns.” sdauskurdas@buglenewspapers.com


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination. Roger Griffin, 20, 28 Harmony Lane, was arrested at 10:54 p.m. on March 19 and charged with aggravated battery on the 0-100 block of Weber Road.

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Gabriel Riolobos, 36, 408 Laurel Ave, Romeoville, was arrested at 9 a.m. on March 20 and charged with a traffic sign violation and no driver’s license near Belmont Avenue and Montrose Drive.

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Devetta Davis, 28, 111 Mississippi, Joliet, was arrested at 3:04 p.m. on March 20 and charged with retail theft, attempted obstruction, and possession of burglary tools near the 400 block of Weber Road.

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Alexandra Banks, 26, 325 Des Plaines, Joliet; Shalonda Johnson, 17, 622 Olive, Bolingbrook; and Prince Lewis, 26, 205 Union, Joliet, were arrested at 3:04 p.m. on March 20 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of Weber Road.

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Lamont Moore, 40, 416 Blair, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 7:17 p.m. on March 20 and charged with aggravated discharge of a firearm, aggravated assault and aggravated battery on the 200 block of Gordon.

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Eddine Curry, 38, 24035 Nightingale, Plainfield, was arrested at 7:17 p.m. on March 20 and charged with aggravated assault on the 200 block of Gordon Avenue.

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Sheri Lhotak, 42, 2058 Whitmore Drive, was arrested at 12:03 p.m. on March 23 and charged with driving with a suspended license near Weber Road and Taylor Road.

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Valerie Wojtecki, 25, 621 Lynn Ave., Romeoville, was arrested at 7:46 p.m. on March

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23 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, and an uninsured motor vehicle on the 1000 block of Romeo Road. Abraham Juarez-Olguia, 21, 4550 Rockwell Street, Chicago, was arrested at 1:09 a.m. on March 24 and charged

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with speeding, uninsured motor vehicle and no driver’s license on Dalhart and Corona. Pokosa, 29, 212 10 Dawn Jefferson, Lockport, was arrested at 9:06 p.m. on March 24 and charged with driving with a revoked license and the possession of controlled

substance near Kirman and Karen.

traffic violations near Route 53 and Alexander Circle.

Jose Mendoza, 22, 1035 N. Lawndale, Chicago, was arrested at 10:42 p.m. on March 24 and charged with driving with an uninsured motor vehicle, no driver’s license, failure to reduce speed, and

Brandon McCure, 25, 825 S. Cedar Road, New Lenox, was arrested at 6:10 p.m. on March 26 for driving with a suspended license and a traffic sign violation near Budler Road and Tuscany Lane.

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Forum Letter to the Editor

Renovations at the library At our monthly meeting this month, much was discussed. We do meet every third Monday of the month at the Romeoville White Oak Library. The front entrance of the above library should be ready about 0326-12.This will be impressive. The summer reading program for the children should be ready possibly by June 1. All children are encouraged to sign up. As a past employee of the library (children dept.) I sincerely recommend it. The Lockport White Oak Library bid will open 03-14-12, and will close 04-10-12 The Crest Hill White Oak Library bid will be open 04-0212, and close 04-25-12. The Romeoville Library has two flower gardens. They are beautiful to see when you are downstairs. There will be more news to follow on this nature gift that the library is fortunate

to have. In the future, the friends of the library will sponsor some events. As friends of the library, our mission and purpose is to help and support all three libraries’ endeavors. Our direction is to connect and encourage all patrons (young and old) to obtain any knowledge they need. The Village of Romeoville is continuing to grow in all aspects. We have new and old Romeoville. We are a great and informed village, with our three White Oak Libraries as a true asset. Again, our main purpose is to lift up everyone in the communities of the White Oak Libraries. This is to believe in their leaders and themselves. Our future generation (our children) need what we inspire. Shirlee J. Pergler Friend of the Library

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

Publisher & Editor Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor Matt Honold mhonold@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdas Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Debbie Lively Jonathan Samples Sports Reporters Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday sweditor@buglenewspapers.com

www.buglenewspapers.com Vice President of Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Production Manager Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Sales sales@buglenewspapers.com Voyager Media Group, Inc. P.O. Box 1613 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 3 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Schools

Being responsible in cyberspace The Internet is a “great educational tool and lots of fun, but make sure you’re using it responsibly.” That’s what Romeoville Police Officer Aaron Thompson told three groups of 4th and 5th graders at Irene King Elementary School Wednesday. “There are a lot of bad people out there who use the Internet,” he said. “Just because it’s on the Internet does not mean it’s safe.” Officer Thompson urged students to be very careful about using the Internet, especially Facebook. “Those of you who have a lot of friends… do you know every single one of your friends personally?” he asked. “If you don’t really know them, you don’t know what they’re capable of.” He also discussed the rapid growth of cyber bullying via e-mail, texting and a variety of other technology-based devices. “A lot of kids think it doesn’t count if you pick on someone by text or e-mail,” Officer Thompson

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Officer Aaron Thompson of the Romeoville Police Department talks about cyber bullying with 4th and 5th graders at Irene King Elementary School.

said. “But the consequences are the same. You can get in just as much trouble.” He told students they should never respond to a cyber bully emphasizing how important it is to tell their parents or a teacher about the bullying attempt. “Don’t take matters into your

own hands,” he said. “I know it’s tough to tell someone but bullies operate because they think you won’t tell anyone. “Listen to your teacher. Listen to your parents when it comes to these kinds of things,” he added. “They know what’s best for you.”

New vice president appointed at Lewis B r o t h e r James Gaffney, FSC, President of Lewis University, has announced the appointment of Len Bertolini to James Gaffney the position of Vice President for University Advancement, effective immediately. A resident of Naperville, Bertolini joined the Lewis staff in 2008 as Senior Development Officer for Major and Planned Gifts.  He is a graduate of Bradley University and holds a master’s degree in Management from Lewis. Bertolini had served as Interim Vice President of University Advancement for Lewis since

August of 2011. During that time, he has directed development of plans for a new capital campaign, launched “We Believe”—a newly-revitalized faculty and staff campaign – expanded alumni events, and managed other University Advancement initiatives.  Additional professional experience includes 11 years of development experience in area Catholic high schools, including four as Vice President for Institutional Advancement at De La Salle High School in Chicago, and three years in the same position at St. Viator High School in Arlington Heights. “We at Lewis University are very pleased that Len Bertolini has accepted the position of Vice President for University

Advancement, bringing experience in development and administration in Catholic education plus knowledge of the Chicagoland area,” said Brother James.  “His successful record, expertise and professionalism will prove to be highly valuable as Lewis continues to develop as one of the top regional Catholic universities in the Midwest.” Lewis University is a Catholic university offering distinctive undergraduate and graduate programs to nearly 6,500 traditional and adult students. Lewis offers multiple campus locations, online degree programs, and a variety of formats for a growing student population. Visit www.lewisu.edu for further information.

Submitted photo

Tibbott’s full-fledged hero Tibbott Elementary School maintenance supervisor Robert Wojcieszek frees a bird from a bush near the school’s bus-boarding area. The bird's leg had become entangled in some string. Robert’s efforts saved the bird which flew away to cheers from the children.


Calendar UPCOMING WILCO Nursing Assistant Basic Training Program. 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday and Wednesday,From June 5 to August 28 at Wilco Area Career Center, 500 Wilco Blvd, Romeoville. Prerequisites for the program are: Must be 16 years of age; speak the English language; and have a current AHA Healthcare Provider CPR Card. Course fee is $875 and payment must be made prior to attending the class. Register online at www.wilco.k12.il.us or in-person at 500 Wilco Blvd., Romeoville. Phone number is 815-838-6941.

ONGOING Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section. Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville. Contact Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ aol.com Managing Multiples. A support group open to couples that are still expecting, parents of multiples or even parents who have one or more children who just need to get their life in order. The group will meet the second Thursday of each month from 10 – 11:30 a.m. Participants are encouraged to bring their babies. Attending this group is free. For more information call (630) 527-5369. Breastfeeding support group. Led by a certified Lactation Counselor, meets on the first and third Wednesdays of the month from 11:30–noon (following CradleTalk).Join other breastfeeding moms for support and to have any questions answered. No registration required. For information and location, please call (630) 5273957. Nurturing Mom. A support group is a free support group for new moms or moms-to-be

who are experiencing emotional lows, depression, anxiety, fearful thoughts, difficulty sleeping, or other troubling behavior. Led by a licensed clinical psychologist and a therapist with extensive backgrounds in women’s services and postpartum depression, this support group meets weekly; on Thursdays from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Registration is suggested.To register for these classes, please call (630) 527-6363. Job/GED Classes. Education Service Network NFP Inc.’s Career Seekers GED/Workforce program, a program of the Regional Office of Education is located at 179 North Chicago St. Joliet, Illinois 60432. We offer GED classes/resume preparation/job placement for participants between the ages of 16 and 21. Classes meet Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon; Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. We also offer GED classes at our satellite site at the Friendship Centre at HighPoint, 175 South HighPoint Drive, Romeoville on Monday and Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information call 815-774-8902 or 815-7748922.

APRIL 5 Game Time. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Play your favorite board games, or learn a new one. For ages 6-12. No registration required.

APRIL 9 Magical Spring Break. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Bored during spring break? Experience a week of magic programs while school is out. Today’s topic is Stage Magic. Stop by the library or call 815886-2030 to sign up.

APRIL 10 Magical Spring Break. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Bored during spring break? Experience a week of magic programs while school is out. Today’s topic is Wizardry. Stop by the library or call 815-8862030 to sign up. Creative Kids Club. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Get ready to use all your creative talents as you learn the art of storytelling. For ages 8 and up. Stop by the library or call 815886-2030 to sign up. Teen Crafts: Flower Pens. 6:30-8 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Want to make a useful and cool project? Sign up at the reference desk for this Duct Tape Flower Pen workshop. For grades 7-12.

APRIL 11 Book discussion. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Library. Come to a lively discussion of the biography of Coco Chanel – “Sleeping with the Enemy: Coco Chanel’s Secret War” by Hal Vaughan. Pick up a copy

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 of the book at the Romeoville Reference Desk. Golden Agers Senior Dropin Day. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department, 900 W. Romeo Road, Romeoville. Get together with other active 50+ adults for a day of gaming and conversation. Games played include dominos, cards, and many other board games. Please bring a dish to pass. For more information call the Recreation Department at 815-886-6222. Magical Spring Break. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Bored during spring break? Experience a week of magic programs while school is out. Today’s topic is Super Science. Stop by the library or call 815886-2030 to sign up.

APRIL 12 Golden Age Club. Noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department, 900 W. Romeo Road. Members must be 50+ to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Stop in, join up, and make some new friends. Transportation is available to members by calling 815-886-6222 the day before a meeting or event.

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Magical Spring Break. 2-3 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Bored during spring break? Experience a week of magic programs while school is out. Today’s topic is Optical Illusions. Stop by the library or call 815886-2030 to sign up. Brick Building Club. 4-5 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Have fun building your own creations with LEGO bricks supplied by the library. Finished work will go on display until the next session, when the club meets again to start all over. For ages 6 and up. Refresh your skin and spirit for spring. 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Library. Come learn to create your own homemade beauty products for spring Mix up lotion, facial masks, and foot scrubs. All ingredients will be supplied, and participants can take their results home to use. For adults only. For more information, call 815-886-2030.

APRIL 13 CPR Heartsaver AED. 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Edward Hospital Education Center. Classroom-based, video-driven See CALENDAR, page 10


He said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” In the week to come, you might be called upon to tackle problems in unique ways.

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jokes in stride. In the week ahead, you will find that your business aspirations get a boost and the work you’ve done to improve your public image begins to pay off.

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 You

CALENDAR

can

enjoy

RC HILL

The April Fools’ joke

sentiments is notAvenue, on you. Someone mightrunning try to the street in will be on hand to answer p.m. at the Romeoville Library. without drowning in sentimentality. In the upcoming week, you persuade you to accept poor advice or a bad questions about the community Go back in time front of the school, last year. to the 1980s can keep your head above water and maintain situation in the week to come. The joke will be on that and to give tours of the Grand with retro Further improvements along the snacks and 80s harmony - as long as you don’t fall prey to a bidfrom for page person Continued from page 9 Continued 5 when you don’t fall for it. Ballroom, the pottery room, the music. Foryour street have been extended and grades 7-12. Stop by sympathy. business center, the pub, the included decorative fencing. the library or call 815-886-2030 Across Down library, the fitness center and Mike Lopez,director of facilities course by an AHA35Heartsaver little, we are starting to see the Swelled head 1 Burn led badly 36 “For Me and to sign up. 1 Nintendo Live to fight another Horns can My __” competitor 38 T-bone with a the pool. Free refreshments for the district, saidturn thisinto project of6 Basic Life Support instructor. improvements of our plan come The lightning day. You may fight through a few bad halos. Your loved ones might escape 37 Gives the nod 2 Start up the warm, red center bolt on Harry APRIL 18 will be provided by Costco would be completed in phases. Upon successful completion life.” days to get to the good onesto in the week ahead. your understanding off and on during the week 39 Postal sackful mountain 42 Colorful card Potter’s Your perception of what is right and wrong may be Wholesale, and $10 and $20 Currently, the school district is of all course requirements, Golden Agers Senior The new parking lots Your willdedication and passion, however, will to come. 40 Layered haircut 3 Italian violin game forehead, e.g. challenged by others. gift cards will be given for new working to secure several grants students received a course Drop-in Day. 11 a.m. to incorporate several green highlight and augment your essential harmony. 41 Crosstown bus maker 43 Lends a hand to 10 Squirrel away alternative 3 p.m. at the Romeoville 4 Chaney of horror memberships. for various elements of the completion card, valid for two features including bioswales and 44 Lecture rooms 14 “__ World”: 45 Auto finish 5 “Spring ahead” years. Register by calling Recreation Department, 900 possibly permeable pavement proposed improvements, such as 45 Abel’s630assassin ticklish protection hrs. Sometimes Push on thewater Household hazardous andpast storm 527-6363. that willhonesty improve storm water the bioswales 47 Jazzy horn Muppet’s 46 Height: Pref. W. Romeo Road, Romeoville. 6 Witch trials town as the best policy is just too honest. It pitfalls. Some people are never more 48 Lass awed by waste collection day. 8 work. Get together with other active quality in the area. “Sesame Street” 47 Chilly powder? 7 Whooping bird may be wise to play your cards close to your righteous than when they are in the wrong. By What the nose segment APRIL 14 the big city, a.m.8 Entirely to 3 p.m. in the48Spartan Inthe addition, benefits of be the TIF 50+ adults forInathe day of gaming While planstoare sticking not final, the guns in vest. coming week, you may feel pressured to your week ahead, you will knows 9 Kanga’s kid maybe 15 Woody Square parking lot, south of will allow the school district to Homes for Sale Tour. Noon and conversation. school investigating keep your head in Games the midst of family crisis. district is able to overcome adverse situations. 49 “Circle of 10 Vain walks 54 Bright Guthrie’s son Normantown Road and Route no longer have to repay $250,000 to 3 p.m. at Grand Haven Adult played include dominos, cards, the possibility of including Friends” writer 11 In the loop 55 Sis’s sib 16 Candy that 53, Romeoville. Drop off your Resort Community, 1520 North and many other board games. solar panels and wind turbines, remaining on a loan used for Binchy 12 Anglican parish 56 IM offerer comes in twos 50 Newspaper bye priest household hazardous waste the busstart barn Grand Haven Road, Romeoville. Please bring a dish to pass. In some for which instances,the a village granted relocating Make a fresh each from 58 He “runs 17 Winter lines? 13 Flames that items, including oil based 135th Street to the transportation TheOlympics Marketing Committee at For more information callis the permission within a special use pawn more powerful than a king. day. In the week ahead, make sure you through the 51 Seize (from) have cooled? Don’t let theat little things thatpermit. cause aggravation go to center. bed with unresolved arguments town ... in his paint/stain, the event Grand Haven Resort 815A combinationnever solar with gates Adult 52 Gathered, as Recreation Department 18 Box for used practiceoil, unwanted take control of your emotions in the week to come. brewing in the background. Someonestaff might hide nightgown” 20 Invoice fig. fallen leaves 19 Horse’s hair medication, used oil filters, paint Additional parking, Community in Romeoville 886-6222. panel and wind turbine, 20 feet Remain vigilante; money can slip away. their anger or pretend to accept your views. 63 Thomas __ 21 Place for inks or 53 Orleans’s river 24 Spice Girl valued at $250,000, will also be thinner, solvents, antifreeze, extends an invitation to all tall, would be placed at the front 54 Exchange Halliwell Edison oinks created when the Spartan Square drain cleaner, batteries, CFL adults who are house hunting to Pokemon Club. 4-5 p.m. of the building and would be 57 Ogle 64 Tater __: Ore-Ida 25 Ashram 22 Subtle vibes shopping plaza is revitalized. The bulbs, mercury, chemicals, and its23“Homes for Sale” tour. Maps used for educational purposes. 59 India Inc.? at the Romeoville Library. authority product One stalking 60 Gehrig who 26 Store posting site is currently used for staff pesticides. showing family andname This program is for tweens In keeping with its plans to Big tractor lions or the tigerssingle 65 played with Ruth 27 Craving redevelop the downtown area, overflow parking. town aged 9-12, and registration is 66 provided Movie house 28 It.’shomes continentwill be Credit card 30 Sch. in Big D APRIL 17 61 users suffix Rawregistration rocks the village instituted streetscape at29the table in the required. Stop by the library or may be 31 Commandment 67 Allergy trigger, 30 “Octopus’s improvements along Dalhart katauskas@buglenewspapers.com Grand Lodge. Resident greeters Teen Retro Night. 6:30-7:30 call 815-886-2030 to sign up. asked for them, count

SUDOKU

Garden” singer Ringo 33 Talk show guest’s blatant promotion

RIF

often 68 Passover dinner

briefly 32 Hubbub 62 Society page 33 Painting word reproduction based on straight©2012 seniority number of RIF notices. It does 34 Schoolboy TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.is unless an alternative method not mean the entire department 35 Slippery fish

established. Continued from page P r e 1v i o u s p u z This z l e ’ sequence s a n s w eofr shonorable dismissal list must be distributed the 2011-12 school year. to the applicable bargaining According to the review, representative at least 75 the legislation creates four calendar days before the end specific tasks that districts of the school term, however must complete when making teachers can be moved from one reduction in force and recall group to another until 45 days decisions, categorizing teachers before the end of the school based on legal qualifications and term. job descriptions and different What this change essentially groupings based primarily on does is contractually obligate the performance evaluation ratings. district to RIF a larger number School districts must of teachers. Quigley explained determine the sequence of that, by contract, a pink slip dismissal within each grouping, must be sent to everyone in that with the first grouping’s category. sequence based on the district’s The district is looking to discretion,the second grouping’s revamp its driver’s education sequence based on performance department, which may require evaluation ratings, and the third the district to lay off personnel, and fourth groupings’ sequences contributing to the larger TOP POP ALBUMS March 18 through March 24 TITLE

Up All Night 21 Greatest Hits Wrecking Ball Passion: White Flag Whitney: The Greatest Hits Take Care Now 41:That’s What I Call Music

Making Mirrors Some Nights

and asked them to revisit the name on the list. proposal. In 2009, the school district would be laid off, but the Currently negotiating a sent 136 RIF notices to first– majority of teachers would contract with the union, Quigley year teachers, predicting that receive a pink slip in order to said the board has met with the more than two–thirds would be reach the teachers that may union and is working on an recalled once the totals were need to be laid off. agreed proposal and is confident in on voluntary resignations, Coupled with the change in a solution will be forthcoming. involuntary transfers and other driver’s education are lower However, he also said that some vacancies.The district eventually enrollment projections for next layoffs would be inevitable. rehired all but seven. year, leading to the proposal “We chose not to do it that In 2010, the school district by administration to make the day, enrollment is still down,” recalled all but five of 157 Valley Previous puzzle ’s answers notifications. said Quigley.“I think we will still View School District 365U However, Executive Director have to do a small RIF…Most of teachers who received pink of Human Resources Sharon the teachers will get their jobs slips in April of that same year. Hawks indicated that of the back and they should know it. Last year, no teachers were 400 or more teachers to be sent And if they don’t know it, they sent RIF notices because the notices, all but approximately should know it now.” number of retirees made up for Previous puzzle ’s answers 40 would be rehired. Teachers are recalled one the loss in enrollment. Met with considerable protest person at a time inJumbles: order of A decision regarding reduction from representatives of the seniority, meaning • HOUSE that the in force is expected at the next • TROTH • BEAVER • SINGLE teacher’s union, who came out in Valley View Human Answer: Resources school board meeting on April full force to share their concerns, Department must wait forsiblings a 16. When the opened the shoe repair shop, they the school board opted to reject response from one became individual -- “SOLE” BROTHERS the administration’s proposal before moving on to the next katauskas@buglenewspapers.com TOP DVD RENTALS March 18 through March 24

TOP COUNTRY ALBUMS March 18 through March 24 ARTIST

One Direction Adele Guns n’ Roses Bruce Springsteen Passion Whitney Houston Drake Various artists Gotye Fun.

TITLE

Tailgates & Tanlines My Kinda Party Own the Night Chief The Band Perry Footloose Halfway to Heaven Four the Record Spring Break 4... Suntan City

Family Man

ARTIST

Luke Bryan Jason Aldean Lady Antebellum Eric Church the Band Perry Soundtrack Brantley Gilbert Miranda Lambert Luke Bryan Shooter Jennings

TITLE

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Tower Heist Jack and Jill The Muppets The Adventures of Tintin Footloose Young Adult Happy Feet 2 The Three Musketeers In Time

LABEL

Columbia Pictures Universal Pictures Columbia Tristar Walt Disney Pictures Paramount Pictures Paramount Pictures Paramount Pictures Warner Bros. Summit Entertainment 20th Century Fox


Take 5

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

H o ro s c o p e s

Across

1 Burn badly 6 The lightning bolt on Harry Potter’s forehead, e.g. 10 Squirrel away 14 “__ World”: ticklish Muppet’s “Sesame Street” segment 15 Woody Guthrie’s son 16 Candy that comes in twos 17 Winter Olympics event with gates 20 Invoice fig. 21 Place for inks or oinks 22 Subtle vibes 23 One stalking lions or tigers 28 It.’s continent 29 Raw rocks 30 “Octopus’s Garden” singer Ringo 33 Talk show guest’s blatant promotion

35 Swelled head 38 T-bone with a warm, red center 42 Colorful card game 43 Lends a hand to 44 Lecture rooms 45 Abel’s assassin 47 Jazzy horn 48 Lass awed by the big city, maybe 54 Bright 55 Sis’s sib 56 IM offerer 58 He “runs through the town ... in his nightgown” 63 Thomas __ Edison 64 Tater __: Ore-Ida product 65 Big tractor name 66 Movie house suffix 67 Allergy trigger, often 68 Passover dinner

Down

1 Nintendo competitor 2 Start up the mountain 3 Italian violin maker 4 Chaney of horror 5 “Spring ahead” hrs. 6 Witch trials town 7 Whooping bird 8 Entirely 9 Kanga’s kid 10 Vain walks 11 In the loop 12 Anglican parish priest 13 Flames that have cooled? 18 Box for practice 19 Horse’s hair 24 Spice Girl Halliwell 25 Ashram authority 26 Store posting 27 Craving 30 Sch. in Big D 31 Commandment count 32 Hubbub 33 Painting reproduction 34 Schoolboy 35 Slippery fish

36 “For Me and My __” 37 Gives the nod 39 Postal sackful 40 Layered haircut 41 Crosstown bus alternative 45 Auto finish protection 46 Height: Pref. 47 Chilly powder? 48 What the nose knows 49 “Circle of Friends” writer Binchy 50 Newspaper bye lines? 51 Seize (from) 52 Gathered, as fallen leaves 53 Orleans’s river 54 Exchange 57 Ogle 59 India Inc.? 60 Gehrig who played with Ruth 61 Credit card users may be asked for them, briefly 62 Society page word

You can’t just say you are free of prejudices, you must be free of them. During the first half of the week, you may be challenged by others to perform at the optimum and criticized if you aren’t politically correct.

Communication conquers discord. Information is something you can distribute, but communication is getting through. There may be days in the week ahead when you can sidestep a serious misunderstanding.

Think like Einstein. He said, “We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” In the week to come, you might be called upon to tackle problems in unique ways.

Take April Fools’ Day jokes in stride. In the week ahead, you will find that your business aspirations get a boost and the work you’ve done to improve your public image begins to pay off.

You can enjoy sentiments without drowning in sentimentality. In the upcoming week, you can keep your head above water and maintain harmony - as long as you don’t fall prey to a bid for your sympathy.

The April Fools’ joke is not on you. Someone might try to persuade you to accept poor advice or a bad situation in the week to come. The joke will be on that person when you don’t fall for it.

Live to fight another day. You may fight through a few bad days to get to the good ones in the week ahead. Your perception of what is right and wrong may be challenged by others.

Horns can turn into halos. Your loved ones might escape your understanding off and on during the week to come. Your dedication and passion, however, will highlight and augment your essential harmony.

Sometimes honesty as the best policy is just too honest. It may be wise to play your cards close to your vest. In the coming week, you may feel pressured to keep your head in the midst of family crisis.

Push on past the pitfalls. Some people are never more righteous than when they are in the wrong. By sticking to your guns in the week ahead, you will be able to overcome adverse situations.

In some instances, a pawn is more powerful than a king. Don’t let the little things that cause aggravation take control of your emotions in the week to come. Remain vigilante; money can slip away.

Make a fresh start each day. In the week ahead, make sure you never go to bed with unresolved arguments brewing in the background. Someone might hide their anger or pretend to accept your views.

SUDOKU

©2012 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • HOUSE • TROTH • BEAVER • SINGLE

Answer:

When the siblings opened the shoe repair shop, they became -- “SOLE” BROTHERS

11


12

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Spikers looking to keep it going, page 14; Romeoville softball looking for strong season with veterans, page 15

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

13

Changes abound for baseball program By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

There are a lot of changes this year for Romeoville. Gone are a large group of seniors from last year and head coach Tony Smith. In is new coach Dave Haskins.

BASEBALL Haskins was a head coach at St. Charles East for two years and at Prairie Ridge for two years. “We’re young,” Haskins said. “We’re working on changing the mindset and hitting philosophy a little bit. Timely hitting and defense is what we’re working on. We have a little different strategy than we did in the past.There’s a lot of energy and enthusiasm. “We have to build up the program. We have to teach them accountability and know the expectations of what it takes to play at a state championship level. We’re focusing on doing the right things on and off the field. We have to change the expectations. I’m excited to see the improvement of the program.” Leading the change will be seniors Jim Rooks (pitcher), Matt Venn (catcher) and Vidal Gonzalez (infield). “With the new coach and being a senior, I can already tell the difference between this year and last year,” Rooks said. “The progress of working in the sophomores and juniors has been big. After I leave these juniors are going to know what to do. I know we have the commitment to do good things and see what happens.” Brian Hurley, Michael Torres and Brandon Lisak are among the up and comers from the lower levels. “We’re extremely young,” Haskins said. “We opened the

season starting one sophomore and five juniors. They are going to learn and work really hard with the commitment.” Rooks will be the No. 1 man on the mound after a strong 2011 season with an ERA below three. Thomas Goodyear and Matt Esquivel are also expected to contribute on the mound. “I want to follow up after last season,” Rooks said. “I don’t want to have that great junior season and tank my senior year. I’m really looking to come out strong. I want to be on the top of my game and set an example for the kids at Romeoville.” Rooks has put in the work in the offseason to make sure he continues his improvement from the 2011 season. “I pretty much worked on my consistency on my off speed pitch with my curveball,” Rooks said. “I’m looking for more velocity with my fastball. Last year I was hitting 89, maybe. This year I’m trying to get over 90.” The philosophical changes for the Spartans revolve more around a small ball approach. “We have to hit the ball the other way, it’s a big thing we’re believing in,” Haskins said. “We can’t just go up there and think about getting a hit. The most important thing is moving the runner along or bringing him in. I believe in our pitching and our defense. We’re taking a lot of pride in that. We’re focusing on defense, pitching and timely hitting.” Romeoville opened the season with a 4-2 loss to Lincoln-Way Central on a pair of hits from Mitch Zack and Torres and RBI from Venn and Lisak. Rooks struck out nine and had a four hitter in a 3-1 win over Streamwood as Venn hit two homers. Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

See CHANGES, page 17

Jim Rooks is the No. 1 pitcher for the Spartans.


14

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Sports

Spikers look for more success By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

Last year Romeoville nearly put itself on the map, taking Plainfield North to three games in a regional semifinal. This year the Spartans are back for more.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL “Our seniors are hungry,” Romeoville coach Deb Fehrenbacher said. “Tying for third in the conference last year wasn’t good enough for them. We want better than that’s their goal. We will go from there. With having a JV program, I’m able to pull up seniors and we have nine seniors possibly and everyone has experience. It’s going to be an interesting ride.” “I think we can keep it going,” Romeoville senior Spencer Moser said. “There are eight seniors on the team and we are ready to stand strong. All the schools we can think of lost their top players. We’re ready to show everyone who Romeoville is.” Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

See SPIKERS, page 17

Spencer Moser is a four-year player for Romeoville.


Sports

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

15

High hopes for veteran Spartans By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

This is the season Romeoville has built up for. With several three year starters in the lineup, 2012 looks promising for the Spartans.

SOFTBALL “We have to get the job done,” Romeoville senior catcher Hattie Holland said. “We have a lot of stuff to pick up from last year. Our goal is to get our job done to make our last year memorable.” “We have higher expectations, but the thing we want is to compete in every game,” Romeoville coach Christina Douglas said. “Hopefully the outcome is a win. I think our pitching is going to be decent and we have an aggressive offense this year to get some of those conference wins we need. I think if we come in and think

that we can compete, we will have a better chance to.” Last year started off memorable with an 8-1 record to open the season, but the team struggled the second half of the season. “We have to keep out competition level up,” Romeoville senior Michelle Spillman said. “We can’t look back, we just have to keep moving forward.” “We’re going to keep our hot streak going the whole season, not just the start of the season,” Holland added. “We have the skills, we just need the confidence. Keeping our heads up is one thing we’re going to be a lot better at this year.” The Spartans feel they let some games get away in the conference season last year and hope they can turn that around this year and finish with a winning record in the strong Southwest Prairie Conference. Scott Taylor/Bugle staff

See HOPES, page 16

Melissa Guzior returns as one of the main pitchers for Romeoville.


16

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

HOPES Continued from page 15

BASEBALL 1. Joliet Catholic 2. Downers South 3. Plainfield North 4. Lockport 5. Maine South 6. Minooka 7. Niles West

SOFTBALL 1. Benet 2. Downers North 3. Lockport 4. Plainfield Central 5. Minooka 6. Downers South 7. Plainfield East

GIRLS SOCCER 1. Downers South 2. Plainfield North 3. Plainfield Central 4. Lockport 5. Maine South 6. Plainfield South 7. Bolingbrook

BOYS VOLLEYBALL 1. Downers North 2. Benet 3. Plainfield North 4. Downers South 5. Minooka 6. Maine South 7. Romeoville

BOYS TRACK 1. Plainfield South 2. Minooka 3. Maine South 4. Niles West 5. Plainfield North 6. Joliet West 7. Benet

GIRLS TRACK 1. Downers South 2. Plainfield North 3. Downers North 4. Bolingbrook 5. Lockport 6. Niles West 7. Maine South Rankings are compiled by Mark Gregory and Scott Taylor.

“We want to have a winning record,” Spillman said.“We don’t want to lose to some of the teams we lost to last year that we shouldn’t have.” “Nothing is easy in our conference,”Douglas said.“We’re trying to get a couple more wins than we had last year. We’re hoping that our experience can take them farther than in the past. I think this is a special group and there is no drama.” This year’s team has a strong offense, led by the likes of

sPorts Holland, Spillman, Abby Smith, Melissa Guzior and Cece and Briana Floyd. “We lost five girls I think, but our team is very close,” Holland said. “We help each other out and there is no drama. We’re really close so we know how to pick each other up and keep us going.” “We should have a good hitting lineup,” Spillman said. “We do have some power hitters in our lineup. Our defense so far is looking pretty solid. It hurts to lose Jamie (Shawmeker) because she was our No. 1 home run hitter, but I think we’re going to have more people fill in.” “Jamie is going to be a big

loss,” Douglas said. “But we are returning our MVP, Abby Smith, who hit .541 last year. I look for some of these seniors to step it up offensively.” It is also nice to have the same battery for the third straight year as Holland will be catching for fellow seniors Guzior and Elaina Caron. “It’s a good dynamic,” Guzior said. “We all go together really well. We’re friends and we’re teammates, so it works. We need to stay strong and step up every game.” Romeoville opened the season with a 10-0 win over

Thornwood. Guzior pitched a gem, allowing one hit while striking out 11. Abby Smith and Taylor Chazinski led the ay offensively. Guzior added another shutout in a 3-0 win over Bloom. Caron was 2-for-3 with a pair of runs, while Holland and Raven Lemon each had a double. Romeoville (3-1) defeated Mt. Assisi 11-1 as Caron picked up the win on the mound. Smith was 4-for-4 at the plate, while Holland had a double and two RBI and Ceara Floyd had a pair of doubles and three RBI. staylor@buglenewspapers.com

Vote for the...

ATHLETE OFTHE MONTH VOTE ONLINE!

Monay Crawford, Maine East -Voyager Media All-Star MVP

Morgan Tuck, Bolingbrook -Female hoops player of the year

Sidney Prasse, Benet -First team All-Area, 14.9 ppg

Marlon Johnson, Joliet West -Voyager Media All-Star MVP

Vicky Vodicka, Romeoville -Three goals in season-opener

Ed Presniakovas, Plainfield South -Male hoops player of the year

Vote

for your winner for the Athlete of the Month for March online at www.buglenewspapers.com up until April 16. The winner will be announced in the April 18/19 issue.


Sports SPIKERS Continued from page 14 That loss to North, as well as finishing in a tie for third place in the Southwest Prairie Conference (North won) has fueled the Spartans this year. “Our three-set loss last year was horrible,” Moser stated. “We need this to no end. We showed everyone last year that we can do it. We want to keep everything going and settle for third place. We want to beat Plainfield North and Neuqua Valley and go somewhere.” To win the conference title

CHANGES Continued from page 11 In a 1-0 loss to Lincoln-Way East, Brian Hurley pitched a complete game, allowing only two hits.

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

17

this year, Romeoville has to get by the Tigers and Minooka, as well as not take the other teams lightly. “Minooka is always tough, so last year when we beat them at their home, that was huge,” Fehrenbacher said. “They had finished third (in state) the year before. Plainfield North is always tough.We just can’t take anybody lightly.” “No matter what you have to be there,” Moser said.“Your head has to be there and nowhere else. That’s where we come along.We don’t want to settle for third. We want to be No. 1.” “Last year we got third in conference,” Romeoville senior

Jacob Richard said. “The seniors this year are hungry. We’re not going to settle for third or even second. We want to win. Every night we have to bring it all, practice and games.” This year’s team will look different from last year though as the Spartans will be without four year players Nick Oderio and Wayne Fitts. “It is very weird walking into tryouts and not seeing Nick or Wayne on the floor,” Romeoville coach Deb Fehrenbacher said. “They played for me for four years. We’re still trying to figure out who is going to step up, but so far I’ve had some kids step up and be leaders. Spencer Moser

is a four-year varsity player and helps out the younger levels and is a leader on the floor. Jacob Richard was on varsity last year as well and has taken the leadership role. I’ve got four returning seniors and the other two are Jon Jelic and Josh Lewis.” “Yea we’re not 6-7 and still growing like Nick the stick, but we all have our own thing,” Moser said.“We all have our own little perfections. Our setters this year aren’t as experienced, but we can make them work. We had a lot of drama last year and hopefully that is gone.” Ethan Hanahan and Ryan Dinado are expected to be the

setters this year. “Passing in always key, especially with the boys,” Fehrenbacher said. “They tend to be more focused on the aggression of hitting rather than the finesse of passing. So, passing will be the key. I have no doubt that these boys can swing.” Romeoville defeated Joliet Central 25-20, 25-21 in early season action. Jelic had eight blocks and six kills to lead the way. Moser added three aces and six blocks, Javi Capetillo recorded six blocks and four kills and Ethan Hanahan added 15 assists.

“I’m never concerned about the first month,” Haskins said. “We’re going to learn our weaknesses and our strengths. We’re going to be ready to play our best baseball hopefully in May.We get to host a sectional for the first time in program history,

it would be more important if we were in it.” The Spartans defeated Harlan 7-3 and lost to Addison Trail 12-5 before beating Morgan Park 1-0. Brian Hurley struck out 11, while allowing two hits. Vidal Gonzalez scored on a

throwing error. Will Herkel pitched a two hitter in a 1-0 loss to Oak Forest. Gonzalez had two hits in the loss. Venn had a grand slam in Romeoville’s (4-5) 16-3 win over Chicago Brooks.

GIRLS TRACK

staylor@buglenewspapers.com

Romeoville placed first at the Stagg Invite Saturday. Winners were Skyler Brandlin in the long jump (15-7.75) and Shannon Hensley in the shot put (37-8.5). staylor@buglenewspapers.com


18

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

www.buglenewspapers.com/madness

Gladstone, Kentucky winners STANDINGS Edward Gladstone 105 Scott Taylor 101 Katie Hartanovich 98 Chris Askew 98 Briana Wilder 98 Joe Sparaciao 90 Dan Leach 88 Gary Taylor 79 Marge Taylor 77 Tom Harper 77 Brian Dudczyk 76 Dave Hartanovich 74 Brian Dunn 73 Note: Bold not eligible for top prizes By Scott Taylor Sports Reporter

Congratulations to Edward Gladstone of Romeoville for winning the 2012 Voyager Media Madness contest. Gladstone picked Kentucky to win it all and finished with 105 points. For his efforts he is the winner of the $100 grand prize. I finished in second place with 101 points, but am not eligible for a cash prize. That makes it a big tie for second place, with Plainfield’s Brianna Widler and Katie Hartanovich

Ohio State (2)

(1) Kentucky (2) Kansas

(1) Kentucky Champion (1) Kentucky (4) Louisville and Westmont’s Chris Askew, all of who picked Kentucky as well. Each contestant will win $25. To claim your prize please go to the Voyager Media Office at 23856 Andrew Road in Plainfield. A photo ID is required to prove you are at least 18 years of age. As for the NCAA championship, John Calipari finally broke through and won the NCAA title. This Kentucky team has been dominant throughout the season. The Wildcats lost just two games all year, despite playing a lot of younger players. They stormed through the

Kansas (2) tournament, never really being in danger of losing, except for a brief moment against Louisville. The question now that will be brought up and already has been is if Kentucky winning the championship with oneand-done players is bad for the game. I personally think it is. While Kentucky fans will be just concerned about the title (as any team would), I feel it hurts the integrity of the game. In essence, you can go out and get the top three one-and-done players every year, and compete for a title, while the other teams

have to fight each other for a few other top talents. Some will say there is nothing wrong with this, especially if he is recruiting players the right way. However, others will argue that this is making a mockery out of the system of having to wait for the pros for a year. Calipari doesn’t even have to do much of the recruiting anymore. He can tell the players that he has a proven track record of sending off top 10 draft picks after the year and competing for championships every year. Granted, he has had the perfect

storm this year; something he was missing all the way back to his Memphis days. They had a dominant gamechanging big man, which was the difference. The young team played defense unlike many other freshmen and sophomores. They also shot free throws and the three-point shot better than the past few years. In the end, it doesn’t mean this will happen every year, but the blueprint is made, so the Wildcats could get all the top players in the future. staylor@buglenewspapers.com


Real Estate & Business

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

19

The real cost of providing health care This has been a hot business and personal finance topic lately,especially in the wake of “The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”, better known as “Obamacare”, current Supreme Court hearings regarding the Act’s constitutionality, and this being an election year. I’d put the healthcare costs debate into four categories – medical providers, insurance companies, the legal system, and last but not least… the government. Although each could be a whole article or book, I’ll go easy on the former three here, and to paraphrase Dave Ramsey, punch the latter right in the face. Many people think medical providers are highly paid. In some cases this may be true, but as usual, I have a personal story. A few months ago I had an outpatient procedure that took two preparatory office visits, a two and a half hour surgery plus

prep and recovery time, and two follow-up visits. The highly educated and skilled surgeon billed insurance approximately $5,900. The insurance company disallowed over $4,700 because they can, and the medical providers take it because two-thirds of patients without insurance don’t pay. Insurance only paid $1,100 and my portion is $121 after meeting my deductible with other medical bills. For three hours of that surgeon’s time, minus paying his staff, overhead, malpractice insurance, legal fees, etc., that’s not overpaid in my opinion. I mentioned that insurance companies dictate payments to medical providers, similarly to federal Medicare and state Medicaid. Another major concern is increasing premiums. As the insured population becomes older and sicker, costs increase. Therefore premiums also increase. Currently when someone has a personal Medicare supplemental insurance policy, which is already structured by the government, they can

change companies to get into a new “pool” of policyholders and save premiums. With Medicare, which is partially funded with a mandatory payroll tax on employees and employers, coverage is required, premiums are withheld from Social Security, and the program is administered by the federal government and subsidized with federal general revenues. There is no opt-out, premiums continue to rise, and the trust funds continue to deplete. That’s how our government-run system works so far. The legal system has been scrutinized as a cause for high healthcare costs including malpractice insurance premiums. In 2005, law professors from Duke Law School published an article titled “Judicial Hellholes: Medical Malpractice Claims, Verdicts and the Doctor Exodus in Illinois”. More recently, in August 2010, the AMA released a study analyzing survey responses from over 5,800 physicians that 42 percent are sued at some point in their career, including 6 of 10 who practice until age 55 or older.

Inspire generosity in co-workers Q. By nature I’m a rather envious person. When I notice coworkers g e t t i n g advantages I don’t, I tend to obsess. I find my coworkers are tight-lipped and often unhelpful. How can I get more support from my work team? A. You’ll get more support from your work team if you do the opposite of what your envy would motivate you to do. When we are envious, we find it so painful to see anyone getting what we don’t have that we give little or no support to our coworkers. Our coworkers will return the favor and have no interest in helping us. The attitude of envy whispers to us that we should make sure we never open any doors of opportunity for anyone else because we’ll find it painful to

watch others thrive. If we never benefit anyone in our workplace, we guarantee long-term pain for ourselves because we have no support network that wants to see us succeed. The opposite of envy is the attitude that you should always leave people you work with in a better position every time they deal with you. In every meeting, conversation or phone call, ask yourself what you can offer that would make the other person’s job easier. Most people are naturally quite grateful when you help them. You don’t have to use any manipulative tool to trick them into supporting you, just that good old-fashioned “you fill their bucket, they fill yours.” Your coworkers are motivated to do what they perceive will make their work life better. If you are a consistent source of ideas, resources and referrals, they will need you to do well so you are around to help them. At first, you may find it

nearly physically painful and the opposite of your “normal” instincts to be helpful to your coworkers. Your team may even view your change of attitude with suspicion. However, with every conversation you’ll find it easier to listen for how you can provide a benefit to the person in front of you. As you see your help returned, you’ll be motivated to be an even better resource to your team. We often hear in popular psychology that we should listen to our “gut instincts,” but there are times our gut will lead us astray. You can’t be both a force for preventing your coworkers from getting goodies while you get goodies for yourself. The workplace is a big enough space for everyone to win if you make sure your envy isn’t running your decisions. Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday.

By specialty, general surgery and obstetrician-gynecology tops the list at 69 percent. Over half of OB-GYNs surveyed were sued twice or more in their careers. However, a Chicago area medical malpractice lawyer disputes the connection to healthcare costs stating that the “Congressional Budget Office reports that medical malpractice amounts to less than two percent of overall healthcare spending.” Unless something changes, the above-referenced Act is fully effective in 2014. Businesses and individuals will be required to have health insurance or be fined by the IRS. Meanwhile, the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee warned that as many

as 16,500 new IRS auditors and investigators, or a 17 percent increase in IRS workforce could be needed to administer and enforce the new health insurance rules. I don’t have the answers, but when you get behind a political candidate this year because of what he or she is going to provide for you, consider what it’s going to cost you, and your children, your children’s children, etc. God Bless America, please! Mike Reid, the self-proclaimed “Money Maverick” is a Registered CPA, a fulltime Advertising Consultant for Bugle Newspapers and Voyager Media Group, and an independent contractor with various entities in the Chicago area, Central, and Southern Illinois.


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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

Travel

Changes spice up northern Europe While the countries of southern Europe struggle with financial instability, those living in northern Europe are in stronger shape, thanks to their ability to produce more while consuming less. It remains to be seen to what degree they will continue to bail out their less fiscally responsible neighbors. But one thing’s certain:Travelers to Germany, Switzerland, and Scandinavia will encounter their share of renovations, red tape, and reinvigorated neighborhoods and sights this year. Berlin remains one of Europe’s most exciting and affordable capitals. The city has been busy updating and expanding several communist sights, including the Berlin Wall Memorial, the DDR Museum, with a quirky collection of communist-era artifacts, and the new but underwhelming Stasi Museum, featuring exhibits on East Germany’s state security service. Unfortunately, visitors to the Reichstag - Germany’s inspirational parliament building - must now make an online reservation in advance to tour its impressive glass dome (www. bundestag.de). If it’s not too crowded, you may be able to get in without a reservation, though it’s unlikely. In Munich, the Lenbachhaus, featuring early Modernist art, and the Halls of the Nibelungen at the Residenz remain closed for renovation and are projected to reopen in 2013. In Wurzburg, the opulent chapel at the Residenz is undergoing restoration and should open to visitors in mid2012, while St. Kilian’s Cathedral will be closed for renovation until the end of the year. The classy horse races near BadenBaden have resumed, with three sessions happening in May,

August, and October. Several new walking tour offerings can help spice up your German adventure. In Rothenburg, the country’s best-preserved medieval walled town, you can now do a walking-tour double feature. Start by strolling the town on the Executioner’s Tour, a macabre hour with Georg Lehle costumed as a 14th-century executioner, then follow it up with the long-recommended Night Watchman’s Tour, accompanied by gritty tales of old-time Rothenburg. If you’re saddled with a long wait at Frankfurt’s airport, the Frankfurt Layover Tour offers a unique way to kill time. Offered by Frankfurt on Foot, the tour lasts at least three hours but can be tailored to your interests and time, and includes pick-up and drop-off at the airport. Changes are also afoot in Switzerland, Germany’s neighbor to the south. In the Swiss capital of Bern, the bears are back. Two years ago, Finn (a male from Finland) and Bjork (a female from Denmark) moved into Bern’s terraced Bear Park and got busy; soon afterward they welcomed female cubs Ursina and Berna. In Lausanne, the Olympic Museum will be closed for renovation until late 2013.During this time, you can still enjoy the park and see the Olympic flame. A temporary floating exhibit, moored just across the street from the park, will feature a taste of the museum’s collection. Considering how hot the Mediterranean region is in the summer, vacationing in Nordic

Submitted Photo

Copenhagen’s Kodbyen district is home to a number of trendy eateries, including BioMio, a fresh and 100-percent organic take on a traditional cafeteria, located in the old Bosch building.

Europe has become a hit in July and August. As usual, the biggest changes are taking place in the capital cities. In Denmark, Copenhagen’s Meatpacking District, Kodbyen, is one of the city’s most upand-coming destinations for restaurants and nightlife. Located behind the main train station, the neighborhood is filled with trendy galleries and eateries that mingle with surviving offices and warehouses for the local meatpacking industry. In Oslo, Norway, damaged buildings in the Grunerlokka neighborhood now bear a poignant tribute to the events of July 22, 2011 - when an antiimmigration lunatic killed eight people in the city with a car bomb before shooting and killing 69 more at a Labor Party summer camp. Permanent memorials will

eventually be built at the sites of the tragedies. In 2014, the Swedish capital of Stockholm will welcome a new commuter rail line that’s being built beneath its main train station (until then, expect lots of construction). The city is also welcoming a new breed of tourist: fans of Stieg Larsson’s punked-out computer hacker heroine, Lisbeth Salander, and jaded journalist hero, Mikael Blomkvist. Set in Stockholm and shot here, the Hollywood version of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” is making the cityscape more recognizable. Just south of the Old Town, the Sodermalm neighborhood is the primary setting of the books. It’s here that fans will find Kvarnen, an oldstyle pub in which Lisbeth hangs out with an all-girl punk band,

and the Mellqvist cafe, where the love-struck Lisbeth sees Mikael kiss his mistress. Fans can also visit the City of Stockholm Museum, which displays Larsson artifacts,features a reconstruction of Mikael’s office at Millennium magazine, and offers Millennium walking tours in English. Despite a few hassles, northern Europe remains one of the easiest places to travel, whether it’s a spring fling to Germany, an alpine adventure in the Swiss Alps, or a summertime swing through Scandinavia.

(Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.) (c)2012 RICK STEVES


THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1489 CALENDULA COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (WHITE ALUMINUM TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME TWO CAR ATTACHED GARAGE). On the 18th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: U.S. BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER FOR PARK NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff V. CARLOS F ESCOBAR AND NORMA LUCIO Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 4023 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 204,891.67 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 511 N. Frieh Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 18th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: PNC Bank, National Association Plaintiff V. Michael G. Haile; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 5925 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-32567 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 41 Freesia Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single family). On the 18th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff V. STACIE K. HAYNES; RILEY T. HAYNES; WESPARK MASTER ASSOCIATION; WESPARK DETACHED TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION A/K/A WESPARK DETACHED TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 2183 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 70 Kenilworth Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single family). On the 18th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE (NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE), IN TRUST FOR REGISTERED HOLDERS OF VCM TRUST SERIES 2009-2 Plaintiff V. TONY L. DIGGS; NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION; MARQUETTE’S CROSSING EAST HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; Defendant. Case No. 06 CH 3360 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

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IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, TRUSTEE FOR THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF DECEMBER 1, 2006 SECURITIZED ASSET BACKED RECEIVABLES LLC TRUST 2006-WM4 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WM4 Plaintiff, -v.MARIO GALVEZ, et al Defendants, 1 : 10 CV 8309 JUDGE MATTHEW F. KENNELLY NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER’S SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 14, 2011, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, Special Commissioner appointed herein, will at 1:00 PM on April 20, 2012, at the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street front door entrance JOLIET, IL, 60431, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Commonly known as 222 NIPPERT AVENUE, Romeoville, IL 60446 Property Index No. 04-04-110-020. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $158,687.32 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: BURKE COSTANZA & CARBERRY LLP , 9191 BROADWAY, Merrillville, IN 46410, (219) 769-1313 FAX #: 219-769-6806. Please refer to file number 14374.5644. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. BURKE COSTANZA & CARBERRY LLP 9191 BROADWAY Merrillville, IN 46410 (219) 769-1313 Attorney File No.: 14374.5644 Case # 1 : 10 CV 8309 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I420942 Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12


22

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 620 HUDSON AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (FRAME SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE DETACHED 2 CAR). On the 18th day of April, 2012, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff V. CHRISTINE AND EDWARD VONDRAS Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 1769 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 170,517.09 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5


THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

23


24

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012


LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 25 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PNC Bank, National Association Plaintiff,

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP Plaintiff,

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

THE

U.S. BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER FOR PARK NATIONAL BANK Plaintiff, vs. CARLOS F ESCOBAR AND NORMA LUCIO Defendant. No. 10 CH 4023 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 9th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: PARCEL 1: LOT 34 IN WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 2, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 16, 1998 AS DOCUMENT NO R98-123087, ALL IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.PARCEL 2: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 OVER THE COMMON AREAS AS DEFINED IN PLAT OF WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 2 AFORESAID, RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO R98-123087 AND RECORDED WESPARK DECLARATIONS. Commonly known as: 1489 CALENDULA COURT ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: WHITE ALUMINUM TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME TWO CAR ATTACHED GARAGE P.I.N.: 11-04-07-206-108 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 204,891.67 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

vs. Michael G. Haile; et. al. Defendant. No. 10 CH 5925 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 4th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 181, IN MARQUETTE’S ESTATES - PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 11, 2003 AS DOCUMENT R2003084680 AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED APRIL 20, 2004 AS DOCUMENT R200467439, EXCEPTING THERE FROM THE PARCEL DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 181; THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 120.00 FEET; THENCE ALONG A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 1080.00 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 06 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST, 34.99 FEET, A DISTANCE OF 35.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 84 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 120.00 FEET; THENCE ALONG A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, HAVING A RADIUS OF 960.00 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING NORTH 06 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST, 30.49 FEET, A DISTANCE OF 30.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 511 N. Frieh Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 02-32-309-013 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-32567 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

vs. STACIE K. HAYNES; RILEY T. HAYNES; WESPARK MASTER ASSOCIATION; WESPARK DETACHED TOWNHOME ASSOCIATION A/K/A WESPARK DETACHED TOWNHOUSE ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 10 CH 2183 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 12th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: PARCEL 1: LOT 276 IN WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 1, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JANUARY 13, 1998, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R98-003865, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLNOIS. PARCEL 2: A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL ONE OVER THE COMMON AREAS AS DEFINED IN PLAT OF WESPARK SUBDIVISION UNIT 1 AFORESAID RECORDED AS DOCUMENT R98-003865, AND RECORDED WESPARK DECLARATIONS. Commonly known as: 41 Freesia Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single family P.I.N.: 04-07-208-043 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE (NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE), IN TRUST FOR REGISTERED HOLDERS OF VCM TRUST SERIES 2009-2 Plaintiff, vs. TONY L. DIGGS; NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION; MARQUETTE’S CROSSING EAST HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; Defendant. No. 06 CH 3360 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 12th day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 131, IN MARQUETTE’S CROSSING EAST, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 1, 2002 AS DOCUMENT NO. R2002-073954 AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED OCTOBER 8, 2002 AS DOCUMENT NO. R2002-167720, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 70 Kenilworth Avenue Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single family P.I.N.: 04-07-112-022 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTINE AND EDWARD VONDRAS Defendant. No. 11 CH 1769 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 3rd day of January, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 18th day of April, 2012, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 11, IN BLOCK 7, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 1, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 33 AND IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 34, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN DUPAGE TOWNSHIP, INCLUDING A PORTION OF ROGERS’ SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 23, 1958, AS DOCUMENT NO. 851430, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 620 HUDSON AVENUE ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: FRAME SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE DETACHED 2 CAR P.I.N.: 12-02-33-206-033 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 170,517.09 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g) (5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5

Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5


26

THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS EASTERN DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, TRUSTEE FOR THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF DECEMBER 1, 2006 SECURITIZED ASSET BACKED RECEIVABLES LLC TRUST 2006-WM4 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WM4 Plaintiff, -v.MARIO GALVEZ, et al Defendants, 1 : 10 CV 8309 JUDGE MATTHEW F. KENNELLY NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSIONER’S SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on June 14, 2011, an agent of The Judicial Sales Corporation, Special Commissioner appointed herein, will at 1:00 PM on April 20, 2012, at the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street front door entrance JOLIET, IL, 60431, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 27, IN BLOCK 9, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 13, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 4, IN TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH AND IN RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 4, 1967, AS DOCUMENT NO. R67-10856, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as 222 NIPPERT AVENUE, Romeoville, IL 60446 Property Index No. 04-04-110-020. The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The judgment amount was $158,687.32 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: BURKE COSTANZA & CARBERRY LLP , 9191 BROADWAY, Merrillville, IN 46410, (219) 769-1313 FAX #: 219-769-6806. Please refer to file number 14374.5644. THE JUDICIAL SALES CORPORATION One South Wacker Drive, 24th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4650 (312) 236-SALE You can also visit The Judicial Sales Corporation at www.tjsc.com for a 7 day status report of pending sales. BURKE COSTANZA & CARBERRY LLP 9191 BROADWAY Merrillville, IN 46410 (219) 769-1313 Attorney File No.: 14374.5644 Case # 1 : 10 CV 8309 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I420942 Published 3/22, 3/29, 4/5, 4/12


THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012

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THE BUGLE APRIL 5, 2012


Romeoville Bugle 4-5-12  

Romeoville Bugle 4-5-12

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