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INSIDE

SPORTS Romeoville season ends in sectional

www.romeovillebugle.com

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NEWS Election protest against McMichael dismissed

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Our Community, Our News

FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Vol. 7 No. 34

BOLINGBROOKWIFEKILLER

PETERSON

SENTENCED

38 YEARS

WILLITSTICK? “Drew Peterson can still appeal, so this case may still be far from over. He can raise the issue of ineffective assistance of counsel, as well as the hearsay evidence on appeal.”

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

News

Peterson sentenced, but appeal still a possibility By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Fraught with speculation, numerous spectacles and a bizarre twist of events for its defense team, the trial of Drew Petersen, no less entertaining than a Lifetime movie made about his life, claimed national attention that continued while defense lawyers tried to appeal. Peterson’s defense team,which split after the guilty verdict in September, had attorney

Steve Greenberg fighting for a new trial, claiming attorney Joel Brodsky’s incompetence botched Peterson’s trial. But on Feb. 21, Will County Judge Edward Burmila put an end to one of the most bizarre and sensational cases in Will County history by denying a re-trial and subsequently sentencing Peterson to 38 years for killing his third wife, Kathleen Savio. Savio was found dead in a dry bathtub in 2004. Her death

was originally ruled accidental until new suspicions arose when Drew’s fourth wife, Stacy Peterson went missing in 2007. It was Attorney Harry Smith’s hearsay testimony that ultimately decided Peterson’s fate. It also was the main point of contention in the motion for a retrial, with Greenberg arguing that Brodsky should have never let him on the stand. Smith represented Savio in divorce proceedings against Drew Peterson, and was also consulted for Stacy Peterson, Drew’s fourth wife who has gone missing. Peterson was a suspect in Stacy’s disappearance, but her body was never found. During the Savio court trial, testimony included hearsay testimony from Smith that said she claimed Drew Peterson killed Savio. Smith testimony was allowed in the trial after the Legislature in 2008 passed what has become known as “Drew’s Law” to allow certain types of hearsay evidence. Though the case was based on circumstantial evidence and hearsay testimony, prosecutors brought more than

“Drew Peterson can still

appeal, so this case may still be far from over.” Huma Zia, legal analyst, Lewis University

30 witnesses to testify against Peterson attesting to his guilt. After 14 hours of deliberation, the jury found Peterson guilty of first-degree murder Despite what she called a “great job” by the State’s Attorney’s Office on the trial, as well as the motion for new trial, the case still has the possibility of continuing, said Huma Zia, JD, Director of Paralegal Studies at Lewis University. “Granting a new trial based upon ineffective assistance of counsel is rarely granted,” she said. And here, the fact that Drew Peterson had a team of attorneys other than his lead attorney, would make granting the motion for a new trial close to impossible. “But again, Drew Peterson can still appeal, so this case may still be far from over. He can raise the

issue of ineffective assistance of counsel, as well as the hearsay evidence on appeal.” There was an element of surprise at the guilty verdict handed down in September, Zia noted. “I am not sure if people were more shocked at the (use of) hearsay, or just shocked that he was convicted because there was so much publicity, including a movie on the case released even before the case was tried,” said Zia. “And Peterson’s own attitude, which at times was so brazen and some reports have suggested smug and condescending to the system, had people assuming that he would not be convicted.” Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow, surrounded by reporters and Savio’s family at a televised press conference after the sentencing, said it was fiveyear process pursuing a case people said he could never win. “People said we were crazy going after Peterson; that we wouldn’t get him in the house (jail)—we did, and we did it for 38 years,” Glasglow told reporters. The next morning after the sentence was given, Will County Sheriff’s Deputy Chief Brian Fink of the Adult Detention Facility said Peterson was transferred from there to Stateville Correctional Center in Crest Hill for processing. He later was transferred again to Pontiac Correctional Center, where he will spend the first few years of his prison sentence.


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Elections board throws out complaint against McMichael By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

After a hearing officer ruled a complaint against the Citizens for Steve McMichael campaign committee was unjustifiable, McMichael claims the move was politically engineered to smear his name. Yet Mayor John Noak and Trustee Ken Griffin, who filed the complaint, charge that McMichael is “doing it to himself,” by raising attention to the matter with a press conference and is calling on McMichael to debate the issues. The pair is deep in a head-tohead for the mayoral election to be decided April 9. The complaint had charged that necessary paperwork was not filed properly, and the value of contributions was questioned. McMichael’s attorney Lisa Raucci released a statement announcing that a representative of the Illinois State Board of Elections found all allegations as baseless and reiterated the charges were never leveled directly at McMichael. Capitalizing on the win, McMichael held a press

McMichael

Noak

conference to challenge why the complaint was ever filed. “I had to attain legal counsel for these frivolous charges,” said McMichael. “I guess this is politics as usual. When did that phrase become acceptable? This is political shenanigans—they are trying to get people to think I am a bad guy.” Griffin has since dropped the complaint. He said he originally filed the charges because he wanted to ensure that despite his super-star status, McMichael had to follow the rules. “His campaign manager ran for mayor in the last election, and her daughter is an attorney who specializes in election law, they should know the proper procedures,” said Griffin. “I dropped the charges because it was not worth it to continue on.”

McMichael called the whole process a means for bullying. “If this is happening to me, what else is going on in town? Who else is suffering,” said McMichael. Noak said, “Mr. McMichael has a pattern of picking side issues to focus on rather than any real issues which I would be happy to debate with him one on one. He likes to flop from one superficial issue to another.” McMichael did raise a few issues, calling attention to what he calls high property tax rates and escalating water bills. “The fact is that property taxes have leveled off on the municipal level and the vast majority of taxes come from the school district,” said Noak, who also pointed to a property tax rebate given to residents for the past two years. Noak also explained that the village passed a 10-year sustainability plan for its water system. The village passed the plan three years ago, setting a schedule of rate increases over time to allow for the future economy and had to institute the plan so the water system does not degrade.

Village settles police contract By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

After working without a contract for close to a year, the Romeoville Police Department and the village settled on a threeyear contract, representing a 2 percent increase in salary and no changes to health benefits. The contract is retroactive from May 2012 and will extend until April 30, 2015. “For the past eight to 10 months, we have been negotiating this contract with the union with a lot of give and take throughout the process,” said Village Manager Steve Gulden. Police Department employees will receive a 2 percent annual increase. No changes were made to health insurance without any

rate increase. However, further discussion will be ongoing regarding insurance at a later time. A health care committee is being formed with both employees and village staff to work on solutions to any health care issues. “Our contract talks have laid the groundwork for the future,” said Gulden. In addition, officers will have an option of working 12-hour shifts, allowing for an extra day off. Police Chief Mark Turvey said this is becoming the standard and is the norm for surrounding communities. The department will be evaluating the process and input a plan for the new shift.At the discretion of the chief, officers will be given either an 8-, 10-, or 12-hour shift.

“I thank the union for being willing to work with us and setting the ground work to help save on health care costs and in return they are allowed some new flexibility,” said Mayor John Noak. Village trustees echoed the mayor’s support of the union, acknowledging their willingness to work with the village on all matters. “We have a great relationship with all our unions and it is nice to see that we all have a common goal and that is what is best for the community,” said Trustee Dave Richards. “We may not agree on everything but we are willing to work to get there.” In other police news, Assistant Chief Steve Lucchesi was promoted to Deputy Chief.

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Bolingbrook teen arrested after entering school with gun Bolingbrook officers were able to locate Hughes at his residence at approximately 10:49 a.m. A former Bolingbrook High Feb. 20, and he was placed into School student is in custody custody without incident. AmessagefromSuperintendent after entering the school after James Mitchem was sent to all dismissal Tuesday, Feb. 19, with parents in the district through what police say resembled a its telephone message handgun. system ParentLink, Lt. Mike Rompa alerting them of the said Tyron Hughes, situation. 18, entered the “We continue to high school after work with our local law the students were enforcement officials released at 2:11 p.m. to ensure the safety of School Security and all students and staff. Bolingbrook Police Tyron Hughes This incident serves as Officers approached another reminder that all security Hughes, and he fled the area. measures must be taken very Rompa reported officers seriously, ” concluded Mitchem. attempted to locate Hughes Hughes was charged with throughout the evening unlawful use of a weapon, without success. Security and police reviewed the video aggravated battery, obstructing/ from the time of incident and resisting and criminal trespass. observed Hughes in a stairwell He was transported to the Will County Adult Detention Facility. displaying a handgun. By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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Edward Hospital to offer 3D mammography

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Tania Morales, 35, of Romeoville, prepares for her 3D mammography at Edward Hospital. Donna Dahlman, mammography technologist, performs the procedure, which has a higher cancer detection rate than conventional 2D mammography.

Edward Hospital now offers threedimensional (3D) mammography, also known as breast tomosynthesis, for breast cancer screening. 3D mammography looks and feels like a traditional mammogram. It takes a few seconds longer because multiple x-ray images of the breast are taken from a variety of angles to produce a series of one-millimeter thick slices that can be viewed as a 3D reconstruction of the breast. The 3D images are clearer and eliminate overlapping structures throughout the breast, which is not possible with traditional mammography. Radiologists can then individually review the slices that make up the entire 3D image, similar to turning the pages in a book. “We believe 3D mammography will benefit all screening and diagnostic mammography patients, and is especially valuable for women receiving a baseline screening, those who have dense breast tissue and/or women with a personal or family history of breast cancer,” says Darius Gilvydis, MD, Medical Director of Breast Imaging, Edward Hospital and a diagnostic radiologist with Naperville Radiologists. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women. The stage at which breast cancer is detected influences a woman’s chance of survival. If detected early, the five-year survival rate is 98 percent. For more information and to view a

Community Notes Southwest Community Concert Band to perform The Southwest Community Concert Band, directed by Ray Forlenza, will present two events: a Pops Concert and a Master Class for tuba and euphonium players. The free Pops Concert will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 3, at the First Church of the Nazarene, 12725 S. Bell Road, Lemont. During intermission, beverages and snacks can be purchased at the church’s Clay Cup. The featured guest is Northern Illinois University Director and Yamaha Tuba Artist Dr.Thomas Bough. Bough will be soloing on “Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms”. Tuba and euphonium Master Class participants will perform “Them Basses.” Selections also include music from “West Side Story”,

Broadway shows and “Lord of the Rings”, John Williams’“The Cowboys”, David Holsinger’s “Scootin’ on Hardrock”, and many other enjoyable tunes. The band is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council. The Southwest Community Concert Band was established in 1982 and celebrated their 30th anniversary last year. Rehearsals are 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at the First Church of the Nazarene, 12725 South Bell Road, Lemont, IL 60439. P.O Box 246, Lemont Illinois 60439-0246. Band voice mail (815) 773-4159. Website: www. swcommunityband.com E-mail info@swcommunityband.com

3D MAMMOGRAPHY • Has a significantly higher cancer detection rate, up to 20% percent than conventional 2D mammography. • Helps radiologists “see through” overlapping tissue which results in an up to 40% reduction in patients being called back for second look. • Has a faster turnaround time for results, which helps ease patient anxiety.

video about 3D mammography,visit www. edward.org/breastcenter. To schedule a 3D mammography appointment, call (630) 527-3200. Edward is one of about 20 hospitals or imaging facilities in the Chicago area designated a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology (ACR). The designation means Edward has met the requirements of the ACR’s mandatory mammography accreditation program and all of the ACR’s voluntary breast imaging accreditation programs, including stereotactic breast biopsy, breast ultrasound and ultrasoundguided breast biopsy. The Edward Breast Center offers a multidisciplinary team of highly skilled specialists who provide comprehensive care to patients with breast cancer,

named to the Southwest Prairie Conference All-Conference band. They are: Micaela Marasco – alto sax, Keith Jett – trumpet, AJ Snyder – euphonium, Kevin Silva – trumpet, Bethany Beggs – flute, Steven Vonderohe – percussion, Nicole Jeffrey – flute, Samantha Rickert – clarinet, Blake Lawson – trumpet, Brandon Lawson – trumpet, Alyssa Empinado – clarinet, Michael Corcoran – trombone, Duncan Goodman – flute, David Carpenter – oboe, Jill Crocker – bassoon, Joyce Kim – clarinet, Angelique Labis – clarinet, Lukas Gacek – alto sax, Michael Gonzalez – tenor sax, Christian Bonilla – trumpet, Ian Irvine – trombone, Brian Davis – bass trombone, Heather Docherty – euphonium, and Jacob Lee – tuba.

24 RHS band students make SPC All-Conference

NAMI family education course starting soon

A record 24 Romeoville High School musicians have been

NAMI Will Grundy will sponsor the NAMI Family to Family Education Program

• Uses a slight increase in radiation compared to 2D imaging, but is still well below established guidelines. And, in many instances, 3D mammography reduces the number of exposures the patient is subjected to because of its ability to separate out overlapping tissue. • Is appropriate and available for all screening and diagnostic patients. There are no requirements to be met, such as breast density or risk factors.

including initial screenings and diagnosis, progressive treatments, supportive counseling, complementary therapies, and a nurse navigator to guide patients along their journey. The Edward Breast Center is accredited by the American College of Surgeons, National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC). NAPBC is dedicated to improving the quality of care for patients with breast cancer and other diseases of the breast. It defines 27 breast program standards and 17 care components – from medical oncology consultation/treatment and surgical care to research, a survivorship program, and more – that collectively provide the most coordinated, comprehensive care for patients diagnosed with diseases of the breast.

specifically for families of Persons diagnosed with a mental illness. The 12-week series of classes will start in Joliet, February 28 through May 16th from 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., NAMI WILL GRUNDY office, 417 S.Taylor St. The course will cover information about schizophrenia, the mood disorders (bipolar disorder and major depression), panic disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder; coping skills such as handling crisis and relapse; basic information about medications; listening and communication techniques; problem-solving skills; recovery and rehabilitation; and self-care around worry and stress. The curriculum has been written by an experienced family member mental health professional and the course will be taught by NAMI-WILL GRUNDY family member volunteers who have taken intensive training as course instructors. “This course is a wonderful experience,” says Joyce

MacGirvin, a trained Family 2 Family teacher, “It balances basic Psycho-education and skill-training with emotional support, self-care and empowerment. We hope families with relatives who have a serious mental illness will take advantage of this unique opportunity.” The course is designed specifically for parents, siblings, spouses, teen-age and adult sons and daughters, partners, and significant others who are caregivers of person with severe and persistent mental illness. The course is not appropriate for individuals who themselves have a major mental illness. The NAMI Family –to-Family Education Course is free. For more information or to register, call NAMI Will-Grundy at 815731-9103.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination. JaJuan walker, 32, 3249 W. Potomac, Chicago, was arrested at 9:23 p.m. Feb. 2 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, uninsured and an expired registration near Rogers Road and Normantown Road.

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Scott Erickson, 19, 8620 W. Teal Lane, Wilmington, was arrested at 4:44 p.m. Feb. 6 and charged with the manufacture/ delivery of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia near Windcrest and Airport Road.

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Contreal Jenkins, 19, 2013 Tuscany Lane, was arrested at 4:55 p.m. Feb. 6 and charged with the possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia near Windcrest and Airport Road.

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Kara Kuschel, 18, 14620 Samuel Adams Drive, Plainfield was arrested at 4:55 p.m. Feb. 6 and charged with the possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia near Windcrest and Airport Road.

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Daniel Knudson, 19, 23804 W. Renwick Road, Plainfield, was arrested at 4:44 p.m. Feb. 6 and charged with the manufacture/delivery of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia near Windcrest and Airport Road.

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Jeffery Krapil, 22, 1044 Ashley Court, Lockport, was arrested at 1:49 a.m. Feb. 8 and charged with DUI, improper lane use, uninsured and failure to display near Southcreek Parkway and Taylor Road.

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Rachel Zeffield, 36, 607 Fenton, was arrested at 12:22 a.m. Feb. 12 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, no taillights and no registration light near Hudson and Veterans Parkway.

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A business in the 200 block of Roc Barr Drive reported a theft of concrete shoring parts that were in the parking lot of the business at 1:27 p.m. Feb. 12. Estimated cost of

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the concrete is $9,400.

Lakeview Drive and Weber Road.

Taylor Road and Troxel Avenue.

Frankie Castillo, 27, 13819 Campbridge Circle, was arrested at 1:48 a.m. Feb. 13 and charged with driving with a suspended license, uninsured and disobeying a traffic device near

Ricardo Rojas-Cruz, 21, 537 King Arthur Way, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 4:29 p.m. Feb. 14 and charged with driving with a suspended license, uninsured and speeding near

Jorge Palacios, 38, 1005 N. Broadway St., Joliet, was arrested at 9:52 a.m. Feb. 14 and charged with speeding and driving without a license near Route 53 and Taylor Road.

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Maricela Guillen, 22, 232 Beaconridge Drive, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 5:03 p.m. Feb. 18 and charged with failure to wear a seatbelt and driving without a driver’s license near Route 53 and Airport Road.

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ForuM Letters to the Éditor Changes for the better in Romeoville The Romeoville Village Board passed Resolution 121565 on September 5, 2012.That resolution covers the Phase II Civic Campus Project at Murphy Park, located on Montrose Drive and Route 53. I haved in Romeoville 51 years first on Dalhart and then on Montrose. I have seen a lot of changes in the area located at Montrose and Route 53. When I moved to Romeoville, the Village Hall, along with an open field, was located there. Over the years a lot of changes were made. The Village Hall has been torn down. We now have the Dr. McCartan War Memorial Park and Safety Town, which serves as a means to teach children basic safety. Now the village is going to add a pavilion and children’s playground. I urge everyone to go to the Village Hall and look at the design. You’ll be impressed. The Dr. McCartan War Memorial Park and Safety Town are beautiful and I am equally excited about the new pavilion and new children’s playground. These additions also increase everyones property values.

Thank you Mayor Noak and Village Trustees. Keep up the good work. Jerry L. Capps Romeoville

Please help out our best friends On behalf of our forgotten and neglected animals, I feel a need to write a plea on their behalf.They are loyal and deserve our trust. At two Romeoville open house functions, I had the privilege to meet and talk to two dedicated lovers of animals. Their names, hopefully, are Brian and Megan.These two people and others sponsor homeless pets.They are the “stepping stones” to bringing an animal into a living and caring home. This is fostering. At the present time, different people have taken them in temporarily. Romeoville does have kennel — that is not a home. The Romeoville Humane Society needs a building (home) for these forgotten animals.These same people, who have discussed this with See LETTERS, page 8

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Schools

Valley View to eliminate summer program busing By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

Due to a financial loss for last year for Valley View School District’s Summer Learning Experience program, transportation will no longer be offered and program fees will see an increase. Transportation for the 2012 SLE program experienced a net loss of slightly more than $30,000, with the average cost per student for transportation coming to $91.38, nearly $35 more than the average cost for the school year. With an average of only four

LETTERS Continued from page 7 me, would be willing to paint, clean, do cleaning — so they can find a home for the pets. They do this to promote their cause.These same people that

students per route, the district felt it was no longer prudent to offer transportation. Last year, the program experienced a total financial loss of nearly $148,000. To help offset costs for the 2013 program, the district is increasing fees by $10 to $110 per week per student. Out of district students would be charged a $125 per week per student. Assistant Supt.Venus Smith said at $440 a month, the program still remains a viable financial option for parents as opposed to the average estimated cost of $650 per month for summer day camps in the area. In addition, to be able to offer

the program to all students including those with disabilities, one of the SLE sites will switch from Beverly Skoff to R.C. Hill Elementary School in Romeoville. R.C. Hill houses Autism, Cross Cat and low incidence programs throughout the regular school year as well as the bilingual education program. Ward Elementary School will be used as an additional SLE site in an effort to better serve the needs of the Bolingbrook students who live on the East Side. Opening this site is contingent on an enrollment minimum of 156 students. The Pioneer site will remain, covering the West

Side of Bolingbrook. The SLE program was created last year to decrease the learning loss experienced during the summer months in hopes of closing a gap in learning that is seen as detrimental to the district’s students. A committee examined various best practices, researching other programs in other districts and developed a unique program with its day-long approach and balance of both core and enrichment classes. The program is open to all students and those students who appear to be suffering from an achievement gap will be

are connected to the Humane Society have displayed integrity and perseverance. I personally have a (partnership) pet dog name Cody. I am Grandma to him. He is a blue-eyed Siberian husky.As animals do, they take away the loneliness.They also teach us true friendship and loyalty. My son inherited Cody

when his girlfriend of five years died.This dog is the glue that holds him together. Animals help in time of need. Dogs are trained to help the blind, police and service people all over the world. A building can be a home. It is a sense of belonging and this does matter. It is a place to go.

Hopefully, with this writing, and dreams of many, we can secure a home (building) for Romeoville pets, wounded and homeless warriors, caring church people. This would be a true legacy to leave for the next Romeoville generation. Shirlee J. Pergler Romeoville

encouraged to attend. The SLE will mirror what is happening during the regular school year, designed to help combat summer learning loss. The program include exciting hands-on materials and techniques, and the “best-ofthe-best” certified teachers will provide age-appropriate reading and math skills enhancement in special slots throughout the day, teaching core classes. In addition, students also will participate in a wide variety of summer fun activities that have educational merit including projects about space or fairy tales for example.


Calendar FEBRUARY 28 Preschool Playtime. 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Get ready for music, games and fun on Thursday mornings at the library. In the Activity Zone, we’ll play with big toys for big fun. Add imagination to Duplo blocks in the Construction Zone and build with our library blocks. Or shake and shimmy in the Music Zone, with a dance mix designed to get you moving. Drop in for your favorites, or come every week. For more information, call 815-886-2030 or visit www.whiteoaklibrary.org. Brick Building Club. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Have fun building your own creations at the library. We’ll supply the LEGO bricks, you supply the imagination. Your finished work will go on display until we meet again and create something new! Ages 6 to 12. Registration is requested, but drop-ins are welcome as space permits. For more information, call 815-886-2030 or visit www. whiteoaklibrary.org. Knitter’s Nest - Weekly Knitting and Crochet DropIn. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road,Bolingbrook. Join us for a weekly morning drop in knitting and crochet group. For more information, call 630-759-2102 or visit www. fountaindale.org. Lapsit Storytime. 6:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public

Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook.Ages 0 to 18 months with an adult. Our youngest patrons and their caregivers have a lot of fun together in the evening when they drop in for stories, songs, and activities. Teen Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Improve your creative writing skills with teen author Megg Jensen. Bring in samples of your work to share with the group.

MARCH 1 Teen Movie Friday. 3 to 5 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Watch a movie in the Vortex with friends. All movies rated PG-13 and below. Contact the Vortex for movie title information at 630-685-4199.

MARCH 2 Microsoft Publisher 2010 Level 1. 11a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Basic computer, keyboard, and mouse skills are required to get the most out of this class! Learn to create signs, fliers, brochures and other documents with an emphasis on adding pictures and other graphical elements. We will show you how to Open, Close, Save, and Print files in Publisher, as well as how to format and edit your documents! Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets in the Computer Lab.

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Monday Kids Club. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. nything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art, history and more! This program is for children 5 to 9 years of age. The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot. This week we will read Dinosaur Bones by Bob Barnum and making our own dinosaur fossils.

Basic Computing. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook.

MARCH 4

Knitter’s & Crochet Nest Weekly Drop In Evening Session. 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road,Bolingbrook. Join us for a weekly evening knitting and crochet drop-in session. Experienced knitters and crocheters welcome. For more information, call 630-7592102 or visit www.fountaindale. org.

Toddler Time. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Toddler Time at Romeoville is designed to help children and their caregivers develop pre-literacy skills through songs, stories and movement activities. This program is for children 3-35 months with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required.

Diez deditos (Ten Little Fingers). 7 to 7:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road,Bolingbrook. Diez deditos is a bilingual storytime presented in both Spanish and English Diez deditos es una hora de cuento bilingue presentada en espanol e ingles. Sponsored by Target. For more information, call 630-759-2102 or visit www.fountaindale.org.

Microsoft Publisher 2010 Level 1. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Basic computer, keyboard, and mouse skills are required to get the most out of this class! Learn to create signs, fliers, brochures and other documents with an emphasis on adding pictures and other graphical elements. We will show you how to Open, Close, Save, and Print files in Publisher, as well as how to format and edit your documents! Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets in the Computer Lab.

Friends of Fountiandale Semi-Annual Book Sale. 9:30 a.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Semi-annual book sale of the Friends of Fountaindale. Saturday Special: Boo! Ha! Ha! Club: Franny K. Stein— Mad Scientist. 1:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. At this special club you’ll play games, share jokes, and discover books that will make you laugh! Today’s topic is Franny K. Stein, Mad Scientist.

MARCH 3 Friends of Fountiandale Semi-Annual Book Sale. 9:30 a.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Semi-annual book sale of the Friends of Fountaindale.

MARCH 5

Terrific T’s. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Terrific T’s brings the stories, activities and learning fun of storytime to a slightly younger audience. This program is for children ages 2 and 3 with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required.

See CALENDAR, page 10


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

CALENDAR Continued from page 9 Tween Scene: Video Gaming 4 to 5 p. You may have video games at home, but it’s WAY more fun to challenge your friends. Play games like Mario Kart, Mario Party and Wii Sports on a big screen. For children 6 and up. Registration is required. Contact the Children’s Services Department for more information. m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Pajama Jam. 6 to 6:45 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. All ages – wear your pajamas and get ready for awesome stories and FUN! Registration is required. Teen Advisory Group. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. We want you! Do you want to have a say in what goes on in the library? What should we be buying? What programs do you want to have at Romeoville? Please come and let us know. We will have snacks and soda and

will also be playing awesome games. This is for grades 7-12. Please register at reference desk or call 815-886-2030. Microsoft Excel. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. This one time, twohour class will teach the basics of the Excel spreadsheet program. In this introductory class you will learn how to create, navigate and format a worksheet. Teen Gaming Club. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Interested in gaming? Try our gaming club where we’ll provide access toPS3, Xbox 360, and Wii video game equipment. Club members are welcome to bring in their own games, Rated T and below, and controllers.

MARCH 6 Storytime. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Storytime at Romeoville involves stories, songs and projects designed to teach important early learning skills.This program is for children ages 3 to 6 and will run for six weeks. Registration is required.

News Storytime. 1:30 to 2 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Storytime at Romeoville involves stories, songs and projects designed to teach important early learning skills.This program is for children ages 3 to 6 and will run for six weeks. Registration is required. Energy Efficiency Program for Homeowners. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Come and learn how to save energy for your home with the help of Energy Impact Illinois! Energy Impact Illinois’s goal is to demonstrate that each of us has the power to reduce our energy consumption to make our homes, neighborhoods, our city and the world a better place—immediately. (http:// energyimpactillinois.org/ residential/). Brandon Pettigrew, a representative of this organization, will be here to talk to homeowners about how they can save money on energy.

MARCH 13 Bolingbrook Women’s Club. 7:30 p.m. in the Nest at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook. At this event, participants can socialize and learn about the club’s activities. The Principal and Assistant Principal from John R. Tibbott Elementary School will be the guest speakers. The club is a non-profit organization

involved in the community through fund-raising events. For more information call Laura Voss at (630) 429-5727 or visit http://bolingbrookwomensclub. blogspot.com

ONGOING Teen blind date with a book. At the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. During the month of February, head to the Vortex and check out one of the books in our Blind Date with a Book display. They will be wrapped up in brown paper so you won’t know the title until you get home. It could be fiction or non-fiction, funny or sad. Inside each book will be a “Rate Your Blind Date” form. Fill this out and return to the Vortex to be entered into a drawing for a prize by 8:30 p.m. on February 28. Golden Age Club. Thursdays noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Members must be 50 years and up to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Transportation is available by calling the Recreation Department at 815-886-6222 at least 24 hours before the event. For more information about the club, call Noel Maldonado at the Recreation Center. Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village,

17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Bolingbrook Machine Knitting Club. All skill levels are welcome to begin or further their knowledge of knitting with a machine. The group meets the last Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. There is no charge to attend this group. They meet in the community room of Bolingbrook Fire Station 4, 1111 W. Boughton Road. Please park on the west side of the building. For more information, contact Rose at 630 739-2784 or Sharon at 630 471-9650. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section.Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville. Contact Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ aol.com Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www. niafg.org for more information. LARGE FOOD PANTRY!!!


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across

Down

1 Word on a red octagon 5 Tree-trunk greenery 9 Channel covering Capitol Hill 14 Coif makeup 15 Queen Boleyn 16 Partner of well 17 Partner of willing 18 Like tilted ltrs. 19 Moderated, with “down” 20 Hullabaloo over a sudden policy reversal? 23 Ball supporter 24 Little mischiefmakers 25 Legendary Chicago cow owner 29 Attack from above 31 __ Grande 32 Co. bigwig 33 Sign of table tennis tendonitis? 37 Bushy coif 40 Half of a double play

41 Inventor’s germ 42 Bit of applause for an equestrian event? 47 Big thing at McDonalds? 48 Samaritan’s offer 49 Game one 53 Meditation instruction 55 Crossword hint 57 Inventor Whitney 58 Cry of frustration about a Hostess cake? 61 Montezuma, e.g. 64 Snug ... bug in ___ 65 “Exodus” author 66 Musical pace 67 Easy pace 68 Waiter’s handout 69 Cuts and pastes, say 70 Iowa State’s city 71 Stage accessory

1 Great Pyramid passages 2 One of two Commandments holders 3 More greasy 4 Make ready, briefly 5 Letter carriers 6 Winning 7 Velcro alternatives 8 Note to __ 9 Book of available products 10 Hillside 11 Exemplar of neatness 12 Hail, to Maria 13 Composer Rorem 21 Fido’s poodle amie 22 Pork cut 26 Military sch. 27 Actress Russo 28 Class using mats 30 For each one 31 Campus military gp. 34 __ Samaritan 35 Little Lab 36 Organ whistle

37 High point 38 Source of linen 39 Yummy but fattening 43 Parti-colored cats 44 Bank’s claim 45 Sprawls, as by the pool 46 Take down __: humble 50 Less remote 51 Cause of odd weather 52 Equips for use 54 Highly capable 55 PC data disk 56 Gem grader’s aid 59 Festive event 60 Trash destination 61 Ended a fast 62 Alphabet ender in England 63 1979 Pa. meltdown site

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

H o ro s c o p e s When you don’t have a box in the first place, it’s easy to think outside of it. Freedom from possessions or commitments may give you a more lofty view of the world and increased objectivity this week.

Your companions don’t necessarily need advice. They might merely need someone to listen and hold their hand. During the upcoming week, your sympathy and kindness receive plenty of notice.

If you can’t give your best, don’t give anything. You may be somewhat discouraged in the week ahead when others don’t show the expected level of enthusiasm. Appreciation may be delayed.

By all means, mean what you say. Making a commitment in the week ahead may mean that you will be bound by rules and must take on additional obligations. Remain budget-conscious in the week ahead.

You are too determined to be defeated. If you are happy with your work, your work will make you happy. Remain doggedly on the job in the upcoming week, even if doing so requires extra organizational skills.

Being strong means you have the ability to lift others up, not put them down. Loved ones might be more affectionate in the week ahead, so it is up to you to be supportive and sensitive to their needs.

The ties that bind need to be more tightly bound. In the week to come, what you are looking for arrives when you aren’t looking for it at all. Don’t mistake familiarity or a sense of security for true love.

There is a reason a candle can only be lit on one end. It is necessary to have a stable base to hold you up when passions are burning. You may be called upon to follow through on commitments this week.

What you seek is seeking you. While the squeaky wheel gets the grease, the ones that don’t squeak are doing fine. Remember to express gratitude to those who are reliable in the week ahead.

Do less and produce more this week. Getting organized can make the difference that prevents you from working overtime and gets you home in time for dinner. Find time to demonstrate your affection.

Cash in by being caring and ready to compromise. Take pride in your ability to follow through on duties and commitments. You can be trusted to keep your word when partners are in a bind.

Your smile can change the world. Just don’t let the world change your smile. News and media sources may focus on depressing news, but you shouldn’t let it dampen your high spirits in the week ahead.

Sudoku

J umble

Tribune Media Services 2013

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • AWFUL • REARM • TANGLE • LEEWAY

Answer:

When she had lunch with the champion swimmer, she thought he was -- “ALL WET”

11


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Romeoville Rampage women’s hockey team to host Wounded Warriors, page 14; Youth served in hoops, page 17

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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Spartan run ends in sectional By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

An amazing season for Romeoville came to an end Tuesday, Feb. 19, with a 5928 loss to Bolingbrook in an Oswego Sectional semifinal. The Spartans (27-4) fell 85-33 two years ago to Bolingbrook in a regional final, but this time, their defense was up to the challenge, as many of the Raiders’ points came on second opportunities. “I thought we did great on defense,” Romeoville coach Julio Carrasco stated. “If we would have kept our average (on offense), the score would have been 59-54. We couldn’t knock down open shots, either. We had open looks and missed them. Rebounding was a big key, and they are strong.We also couldn’t get the ball into Kiera (Currie). There wasn’t much good today.” “We were supposed to box out more and get our butts into them,” Romeoville senior guard Abby Smith said. “But 59 points is really good against Bolingbrook. I wish we could’ve been better offensively, but that’s just something we had to work through.” See ENDS, page 16

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Angelica Osusky and the Spartans fell to Valley View District rival Bolingbrook last week.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Sports

Romeoville Rampage to host Wounded Warriors The USA Wounded Warriors standing team will be at Canlan Ice Sports for a friendly hockey game on Friday, February 15, 2013. Puck drop will be at 3 PM. Admission to the game is free and Rampage is inviting all to come out and support these heroes. The Rampage Women’s Hockey Team announced today that Connie’s pizza will be providing the post game meal when they host the USA Wounded Warriors.The Warriors are in town for the Hockey City Classic. “Connie’s is a great organization and has always been a big supporter of our fundraisers” said Maria Lizotte, team director of Rampage, “We cannot thank them enough for helping us to make this event special for these heroes.” If you are interested in participating in the game, a

limited number of skater spots are available. Pleasvisit www. rampagehockey.org for more information. Rampage have also announced today the date for their fourth annual Rampage Saves Night fundraiser featuring a hockey game against the Joliet Fire Department on Saturday, March 23, 2013 at 8:30 PM at Canlan Ice Sports, located in Romeoville, IL. The event will kick off at 7:00 PM with a family fun skate. “We look forward to putting on this fundraiser every year;” said Maria Lizotte, director of Rampage hockey, “It is a great opportunity for us to give back to our communities through a game we love.” Funds raised will benefit the American Parkinson’s Disease Association – Midwest Chapter, Pink Heals of Joliet and Girls in the Game. For more information on the

fundraiser or to make a donation, please check our website at w w w. r a m p a g e h o c k e y. o r g or contact Brandi Luecke at goaliezams@gmail.com.

IESA Wrestling Twenty-eight Valley View School District 365U middle school wrestlers qualified for the Illinois Elementary School Association’s sectionals next weekend at Lukancic Middle School will strong regional performances. First place regional performances were turned in by Nicholas Torres (70 pounds), Adrian Martinez (85 pounds), Pocholo Jubas (112 pounds), Steve Montenez (155 pounds) and Christian Wagner (167 pounds) of Lukancic; Ahkreem Collins (119 pounds) of Brooks; See HOST, page 16


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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ENDS Continued from page 13 “I’m glad we held them to 59 points,” Romeoville guard Angelica Osusky said.“Our main focus was our defense, because defense wins games. We just tried coming out and doing what we knew how to do on defense. They are a great team, so we just had to try to stop them.” While the defense was strong, the offense struggled to get into

a rhythm the whole game. “They had phenomenal defense tonight, like they do always,” Osusky added. “I hope the underclassmen learn from this and work hard for next year.” “Offensively in the first quarter, we couldn’t get into anything,” Carrasco said. “Our screens weren’t being set right; our guards couldn’t get past half court at times. When we did get past half court, our timing wasn’t right on our offense.” A big part of the struggle was

Sports the tight defense that the Raiders are known for and helped them win the sectional title. “I think it was definitely the pressure defense,” Currie said. “We’re not used to that. I think it’s something that we will all need to learn.” “That was probably the hardest that I have been guarded,” Smith said. “They are a good defensive team, and they knew that and we knew that coming in.” Romeoville was able to hang with its Valley View rivals for much of the game, as it trailed just 18-7 after the first quarter and 36-17 at the half. The lead was down to 36-22 early in the third quarter, but a secondchance three-pointer broke the Spartans’ back and a 9-0 run to end the quarter put Bolingbrook up 48-24. “I think we came out pretty strong, and we showed them that we are a good team,” Currie said. “I think we did a good job being prepared for them. We were in the gym every day working hard, getting ready for this game. We ended the season on a good note.” Despite the loss, the Spartans

will remember all of their success throughout the year, which included winning their own Thanksgiving tournament, an outright Southwest Prairie Conference title and a regional championship. “I’m very proud of the girls,” Carrasco said. “One game does not kill off the season. The season was phenomenal. The girls played great. They fought the whole time, every single minute. I’m very proud of every single one of them.” “I still we had a great season, going 27-4,” Osusky said. “That’s a big accomplishment for us, because freshman year, they won like six or seven games. Sophomore year, we won some more, and last year we were coconference champs, and this year was pretty good. It stinks ending on this kind of loss, but we just have to go and work hard in the offseason.” It was the third straight year the Spartans won at least 20 games, after going several years without double-digit wins in a season. “It feels good that we’ve been getting better and better each

year,” Currie said. “We got our goals all the way to a regional title, which is great to leave our school with. We have a really good group of girls.” “Freshman year, you would never think we would be conference champs, let alone regional champs,” Smith said. “This program has come a long way, and I hope that it continues to. Every team wants to go farther and farther, and we didn’t get as far as we wanted to, but it was better than losing the first game of regionals.” Now the Spartans will have to reload after losing their entire starting lineup, including three players who have played four years of varsity basketball and another with three years’ experience. “We’re losing eight seniors, and that is a scary thing,” Carrasco said. “Our point guard, our center, you name it, we’re losing it. It’s going to be a shame to see these girls go. I’m hoping those seniors really set the tone for what it is to be a Spartan, and that is to work hard in the offseason.”

HOST

registered by Abraham Watson (80) and Orlando Ortiz (145) of Brooks; Dashaun Mallory (215) of Humphrey; Bradley Ramos (90) of Martinez; and Mathew Crafton (126), Andres Jara (167) and Jamari Butler (275) of Lukancic. Taking third were River Kowal (75), Kevin Joy (100), Larri Learnahan (112), and Nathaniel Santos (135) of Lukancic and

Justin Suits (119) and Isaac Castillo (215) of Martinez; and Rylan Lane (105) and Christian Morales (275) of Brooks. Fourth place regional qualifiers were Ethan O’Brien (85) and Michael Cusimano (145) of Humphrey, Damion Gather (126) of Brooks, Bryce Wilson (167) of Jane Addams and Brandon Puhr (155) of Martinez.

Continued from page 14 Robert Goodwin (135 pounds) of Humphrey; and Ian Bazan (275 pounds) of Jane Addams. Second place finishes were

staylor@buglenewspapers.com


Sports

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Has the girls game passed by the refs?

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Abby Smith is fouled in the sectional opening game against Bolingbrook.

I have always been a die-hard sports fan, so soon after my ability to play the game failed me and before my job to write about it started, I spent years officiating the games I love. Baseball was, and is, my first love and I have umpired the longest and at the highest levels of any sports I have done, but basketball is second. I only tell you this, because my background as an official plays into the way I watch a game as a fan or a reporter. I know my share about positioning and hustle and when an official has control of a game or not. All that being said, I began to notice a trend about a year or two ago and this year it is the worst it has been. When it comes to girls basketball, the game has past by most of those officiating it. What do I mean by this? Well, girls basketball was once a slow, fundamental based, half court style of basketball that didn’t require officials to break a sweat going up and down the floor. Now, that has all changed. The girls game – at some levels – has caught up with the guys game in terms of pace and athleticism. I see officials all the time that simply cannot keep up with the girl as she goes for a fast break layup, so that leaves the offensive and defensive player at the rim with the ref lagging behind at the foul line trying to make a call. We are blessed in this area to have talented teams like JCA, Romeoville and Plainfield East that have the talent and skill to play an up-tempo game and I have watched officials blow calls in all of their games this season because of it. But one game in particular last week forced me to finally hit the keyboard on this subject. The second match-up of the year between Bolingbrook and Homewood-Flossmoor, two of the area’s more athletic girls basketball teams, saw several blown calls – all because the

game moved too fast for the officials. On several occasions, girls were called for a travel when they caught the ball and set their feet for a shot – a move often used in the guys game with no penalty. Same with girls using a jump stop in the lane on the way up for a layup. Officials allow this move in the guys game, but not in the girls. Why is that? I have only two reasons I can think of. One is because officials go into guys games under the assumption that the players are athletic enough to properly execute these moves without being in violation of the rules. When officials see the girls, they assume the opposite and don’t give them that benefit of the doubt. Either that, or the officials that assignors put on girls games are just really bad and need to be officiating below the varsity level. For years, the girls game has been a place aging officials

have been sent to die. I am going to assume it’s the first one and these officials simply need to come to the conclusion that many girls in today’s game are athletes. This is not the girls basketball that they were brought up watching and they have to be re-educated, re-trained or sent packing. I ask any reader to go out and watch players like Bolingbrook’s Kennedy Cattenhead or Aysia Bugg, JCA’s Nicole Ekhomu or Jasmine Lumpkin or Plainfield East’s Faith Suggs and tell me they are not athletic enough to play the game on the same level as the guys. The officials should be able to call it based on the rule – not their perception of if a girl can make that move or not. Either the officials that call the games or the assignors that schedule them have to be held to blame for this – take your pick. Me, I blame both and call a double technical. Let’s get them all out and start over. mark@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

BOYS Points per game Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West 17.4 Jean Pietrzak, Westmont 17.3 Jalen Heath, Joliet Central 16.1 Sean O’Mara, Benet 16.0 Nick Norton, Downers North 15.7 Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East 15.7 Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North 15.3 Matt Mooney, Notre Dame 15.0 David McCoy, Niles West 14.0 Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook 14.0 Ben Moore, Bolingbrook 13.9 John Solari, Maine South 13.3 Jonah Coble, Joliet Central 13.2 Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South 13.0 Ryan Peter, JCA 12.6 Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central12.6 Darrin Myers, Minooka 12.4 Pat McInerney, Benet 12.0 Joe Younan, Niles West 12.0 Jordan Cannon, Downers South 11.6 Marcus Fair, Plainfield North 11.3 Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook 11.0 Rebounds per game Robert Mara, Downers South 10.3 Pat McInerney, Benet 10.0 Ben Moore, Bolingbrook 9.7 Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central9.6 Jean Pertrzak, Westmont 8.8 Eddie Serrano, Notre Dame 8.0 Sean O’Mara, Benet 8.0 Devo Goodlow, Plainfield Central 7.6 Corey Evak, Plainfield North 7.5 Ryan Peter, JCA 6.9 David McCoy, Niles West 6.5 John Solari, Maine South 6.4

Jalen Heath, Joliet Central 6.4 Matt Mooney, Notre Dame 6.0 Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North 5.9 Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West 5.9 Miles Snowden, Plainfield South 5.9 Brandon McCullum, Joliet West 5.8 Josh Smith, Plainfield East 5.7 David Robinson, Lockport 5.7 Mohammad Qureshi, Niles West 5.6 Nick Norton, Downers North 5.6 Andre Hardy, Joliet West 5.3 Jonah Coble, Joliet Central 5.3 Assists Kris Pierce, Westmont 125 Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central115 Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame 112 Donte Stephenson, Notre Dame 112 Frank Dounis, Maine South 97 Caleb Demarigny, Maine South 94 Perry Jones, Minooka 90 Marcus Fair, Plainfield North 89 Pat McInerney, Benet 85 Ahmad Gibson, Niles West 83 Danny Spinuzza, Downers South 81 Christian Diaz, Romeoville 76 Matt Mooney, Notre Dame 72 C.J. Redmond, Bolingbrook 68 Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West 66 Daniel LoGiuarto, Westmont 66 Ben Moore, Bolingbrook 62 Roger Tating, Plainfield East 62 Danny Quinn, Maine South 61 Sean O’Mara, Benet 60 Steals Donte Stephenson, Notre Dame 85 Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame 65 John Campbell, Lockport 52 Kris Pierce, Westmont 50 Ben Moore, Bolingbrook 49

sPorts

Danny Spinuzza, Downers South 44 Jean Pietrzak, Westmont 43 Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West 43 Carl Terrell, Joliet West 42 Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook 41 Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central41 Perry Jones, Minooka 40 Daniel LoGiuarto, Westmont 40 C.J. Redmond, Bolingbrook 39 Brandon McCullum, Joliet West 39 Ryan Peter, JCA 39 Daniel Dwyer, Westmont 38 Corey Evers, Plainfield South 37 Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North 40 Grover Anderson, Lockport 34 Carl Terrell, Joliet West 33 Caleb Demarigny, Maine South 33 Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook 33 Jake Hogen, Minooka 33 Nick Norton, Downers North 33 Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central 31 Tray Simmons, Downers South 30 Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East 30 Roger Tating, Plainfield East 30 Christian Diaz, Romeoville 30 Field Goal % Rimas Barsketis, Downers North Romeo Magliore, Niles West John Solari, Maine South Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Joe Younan, Niles West Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Shawn Goff, Plainfield South Nick Norton, Downers North George Sargeant, Maine South Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Eddie Serrano, Notre Dame Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook

.643 .620 .600 .598 .593 .580 .570 .564 .560 .550 .550 .550 .544

Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central.540 Danny Quinn, Maine South .540 Justin Windt, Plainfield Central .530 Free throw % Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame .900 Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North .820 Scott McNellis, Downers South .810 Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East .798 Shakar Washington, JCA .797 Perry Jones, Minooka .778 Mitch Young, Plainfield Central .760 Jimmy Moon, Romeoville .760 Jaylon Richardson, Romeoville .760 Donte Stephenson, Notre Dame .760 Rinas Barsketis, Downers North .750 Derrick Lockhart, Lockport .750 Ahmad Gibson, Niles West .750 Nick Norton, Downers North .747 Alex Darville, Niles West .746 Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook .740 Robert Mara, Downers South .740 Romeo Magliore, Niles West .733 Keith Craig, JCA .732 3-pointers Ryan Peter, JCA 60 Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East 59 Joe Younan, Niles West 52 Ryan Modiest, Joliet West 51 Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook 50 Nick Novak, Plainfield East 45 Mitch Young, Plainfield Central 45 Jimmy Moon, Romeoville 45 Daniel Dwyer, Westmont 37 Jake Hogen, Minooka 36 Marcus Fair, Plainfield North 36 Rashad Steele, Romeoville 36 Jordan Cannon, Downers South 34 Jalen Jackson, JCA 32 Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South 32

Darrin Myers, Minooka Deivis Skirgalia, Downers North

31 31

Points per game Carlie Corrigan, Plainfield North Liz Rehberger, Resurrection Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Christen Prasse, Benet Kiera Currie, Romeoville Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Nikia Edom, Plainfield East Jacqui Grant, Maine South Bernasia Fox, Joliet Central Emily Schramek, Benet Faith Suggs, Plainfield East Sarah Costello, Downers North Larissa McLemen, Minooka Regan Carmichael, Maine South Gabby Williams, Plainfield East Naomi Mayes, Lockport Kaitlyn O’Boye, Plainfield North Abby Smith, Romeoville Angelica Osusky, Romeoville Emily Eshoo, Benet Jaida Green, Downers North Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Anna Novak, Lockport Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Alyssa Ruehl, Resurrection Izzy GreenBlatt, Downers North Brianna Harris, Romeoville Kelly Barzowski, Resurrection Nicole Pease, Plainfield Central Hailey Schoneman, Maine South Izzy Greenblatt, Downers North Mackenzie Duffy, Maine South Monica Barefield, Joliet West

18.7 18.6 17.3 16.8 16.2 16.1 15.7 14.6 13.8 13.6 13.4 13.3 12.3 12.1 11.5 11.3 10.9 10.9 10.8 10.7 10.6 9.9 9.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.8 7.5 7.5 7.4 7.3 7.3 7.2

GIRLS


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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Johnson holds off teammate to win Daytona By Reid Spencer NASCAR Wire Service

Jimmie Johnson sped away from the field after a restart with six laps left in Sunday’s Daytona 500 and held off a charging Dale Earnhardt Jr. to win the 55th running of the Great American Race at Daytona International Speedway. The victory was the 61st of Johnson’s career in his 400th start in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series and his second win in NASCAR’s most prestigious race. Earnhardt finished second for the third time in the last four Daytona 500s. Mark Martin ran third, followed by defending series champion Brad Keselowski and Ryan Newman. Greg Biffle ran sixth and Regan Smith seventh. Polesitter Danica Patrick came home eighth, the best-ever finish by a woman in the Daytona 500. With tandem racing all but absent in the points race for the new Gen-6 race cars, passing was difficult and track position paramount. “You can’t ride and wait for things to happen,” Johnson said. “You have to race all day long and fight for track position. This race car, this Lowe’s Chevrolet was so good. (Crew chief) Chad Knaus and all of Hendrick Motorsports had me a fast car, and I could really stay up front all day long. I had a lot of confidence in the final few laps leading the train, (because) I knew just how fast the car was.” Earnhardt got a strong push from Martin on the last lap, but couldn’t catch Johnson off the final corner. “I couldn’t have done much without Mark helping me here at

the end,” said Earnhardt, who was fourth at the white flag. “I was hoping he was thinking what I was thinking as we come off of Turn 2 on that last lap. I felt like we needed to make the move a little earlier than off (Turn) 4. “I kept backing up, backing up, trying not to let guys get racing behind us too much. If somebody ducked out of line a couple rows behind Mark, I was going to have a gap, (and) me and Mark could take off, not get hung up with those guys. Once we come off of 2, mashed the gas, got a run on Danica, side-drafted her a little bit. “I don’t know why them guys didn’t pull down in front of me besides Jimmie, but we got through 3 and 4 with a pretty good run. Once we come to Turn 4, we kind of run out of steam, didn’t have enough to get a run on Jimmie.” After a restart on Lap 182, following the fifth caution of the race for Jeff Burton’s hard contact with the outside wall at the entrance to the tri-oval, Keselowski and Johnson ran side-by-side at the front of the pack, trading the lead as their respective lanes gained momentum. A caution for debris on Lap 192 set up the six-lap dash to the finish with Johnson in the lead in the outside lane. Patrick made history when she led the field to green from the pole position. On Lap 90, she reached another milestone. Surging to the lead after a restart, she paced the field on Laps 90 and 91, and, in doing so, became the first female driver to lead a lap in the Daytona 500 and the first female to lead a green-flag Lap in the Cup series.

Jerry Markland/Getty Images

Jimmie Johnson celebrates after winning the 2013 Daytona 500.

WEEKLY RACING UPDATE ADVOCARE 500 MARCH 3, noon, FOX Phoenix International Speedway

JOLIET TICKETS ON SALE NOW Tickets for Chicagoland Speedway’s 2013 season, including the start of the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup, are on sale now. From now through April 1, fans have the opportunity to get the best race admission ticket prices of the season.Tickets can be purchased online at www. ChicagolandSpeedway.com or by phone at 888629-RACE. Off the track, Chicagoland Speedway is introducing the new Pit and Infield Fan Zone Experience, which is available for single-day or weekend purchase. The Pit and Infield Fan Zone Experience features an Infield Fan Zone with music and entertainment, pre-race concert access, NASCAR personality Q-and-A sessions, tech inspection viewing areas, an up-close look at driver introductions and on Sunday.

STANDINGS 2012 Sprint Cup Series 1) Jimmie Johnson 47 2) Dale Earnhardt, Jr. -5 3) Mark Martin -6 4) Brad Keselowski -6 5) Ryan Newman -7 6) Greg Biffle -9 7) Danica Patrick -10 8) Michael McDowell -12 9) J.J. Yeley -13 10) Clint Bowyer -13 11) Ricky Stenhouse, Jr. -15 12) Aric Almirola -16

2013 Nationwide Series 1) Sam Hornish, Jr. . 2) Alex Bowman 3) Parker Kligerman 4) Brian Scott 5) Justin Allgaier

42 -1 -2 -3 -4

2013 Daytona 500 finishers 1) Jimmie Johnson 2) Dale Earnhardt Jr. 3) Mark Martin 4) Brad Keselowski 5) Ryan Newman 6) Greg Biffle 7) Regan Smith 8) Danica Patrick 9) Michael McDowell 10) J.J. Yeley 11) Clint Bowyer 12) Ricky Stenhouse Jr. 13) Aric Almirola 14) Denny Hamlin 15) Bobby Labonte 16) David Reutimann 17) Dave Blaney 18) Marcos Ambrose 19) Joey Logano 20) Jeff Gordon


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

56

www.buglenewspapers.com/basketball

Raiders take home sectional title By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

For the ninth straight season the Bolingbrook girls basketball team won a sectional title and despite having an almost brand new team and no McDonald’s All-Americans, coach Tony Smith felt this year was no different. “All of them feel good,” Smith said.“I have seen talented teams get beat and I have seen less talented teams have a bad year. These kids have worked hard and I love them to death, but I am proud of all the groups. In high school girls basketball you go through so much anything can take you off course, but every year, these girls stay on course.” Smith did acknowledge the steps this year’s group has taken to win a sectional and that it wasn’t quite as easy as years past. “We had some pretty good talent before where it was given,” Smith said.“These kids here have really stepped up to the plate and are getting it done. They are becoming all area and all state kids right before our eyes. They are growing up fast.” The Raiders claimed this year’s title with a 56-38 win over Neuqua Valley to claim the Class 4A Oswego Sectional title. Senior Kennedy Cattenhead tallied 21 points to pace the Raiders. The game was tied at 8-8 after one quarter and the Raiders went on a 15-5 run to open the second quarter, which included an 11-0 run that extended a 1413 lead to 25-14. Kristen Moore added 14 points, while Amarah Coleman added nine against her old team. “It was different,” Coleman said of playing against the Wildcats, who she and Shay Robinson played for a year ago. “It really gave me the push to play hard and show them this is the better team. I wanted to prove a point, but play as a team and that is what we did and we got it done.” The Raiders were without leading scorer Aysia Bugg, who

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Amarah Coleman scored nine points for Bolingbrook against her former team, Neuqua Valley.

injured her ankle a few seconds into the second half of the Bolingbrook’s 59-28 win over Valley View School District 365U rivals Romeoville in the sectional opener. “These kids work hard,” Smith said. “It is nice to see other kids able to step up and do work.” Coleman tallied 14 to lead the deep Raider team that saw six

Bolingbrook players scored at least seven points. The Raiders got out to a hot start, grabbing a 13-3 lead out of the gate. The lead swelled to 18-7 after a quarter, but Bolingbrook coach Anthony Smith was far from happy with his team’s shot selection. Between quarters, he strongly encouraged the Raiders

team to attack the basket. “We just had to play our game and attack the basket instead of settling,” Coleman said. “We just had to stay patient, not rush the shots, attack the basket, draw the foul and keep it going.” Bolingbrook ran that lead up to 36-17 at half and 48-24 after three, mostly by heeding Smith’s demand to get the ball in the

paint and convert easy baskets. Moore and Robinson added eight points for the Raiders, while Cattenhead, Bugg and Lexi Smith each had seven. Bolingbrook held Romeoville leading scorer Kiera Currie, a senior who played at Bolingbrook her freshman year, to seven points. mark@buglenewspapers.com


Real Estate & Business

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

21

The workplace rewards smart work, not hard work Q. I try very hard to be a perfectionist at work. I work long hours, double check everything I do, and stress out to make sure any project I do is top notch. I’m still getting passed over for promotions and not getting much of a raise each year. How can I get rewarded for my hard work? A. The workplace doesn’t reward hard work. The workplace rewards smart work. If you want to get the goodies at work, you’ve got to stop working hard and start working smart. Smart work is the work that accomplishes two objectives: 1) Fix the icebergs sinking

the ship of your organization. A lot of employees spend all their time obsessing about arranging the deck furniture and no time fixing problems sinking productivity and profitability in their company. 2) Contribute to the emotional agenda of your boss and management. Companies will hire employees who can remember what they are told, but companies only promote the people who can see key problems and think creatively about how to fix them. Ask and your boss will tell you that he or she adores the employee that doesn’t just bring a problem but brings them the

solution instead. Your boss is the person directly responsible for whether you get rewarded at work. If you do not know his or her emotional goals, and do not help achieve them, you can work like a dog and get very little. Emotional goals for your manager are irrational objectives that he or she may be unconscious about wanting or would never admit to. Emotional needs of managers can include avoiding being seen as stupid, being admired, or getting to be right. If you can help your manager get these goals, you’ll be rewarded. If you interfere with your boss getting these goals, you’ll get nothing. As loyal readers of my column have learned, the heart will win

over the head nine times out of 10 in the workplace. If you want leverage at work, you have to learn the skills to identify and support the emotional goals of your manager. Many clients I work with over Skype get so upset about their manager’s irrationality that I can barely follow their body language. These clients feel it is wrong and unfair that they have to know and support their boss’s emotional agenda.You can be in a constant war against the power of emotions, or you can work with emotions in your workplace and achieve your personal goals. There is no sign the workplace is going to become a less complicated environment to navigate. If you can learn how

to keep your eyes on the dual lighthouses of fixing pivotal problems and appealing to the heart, you will thrive during these intensely stressful times.

Last word(s) Q. My manager keeps bringing up my past mistakes.Will he ever get over it, move on and give me a clean slate. A. Yes, but it is up to you to show him that your history will not repeat. Daneen Skube, Ph.D., coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com.

Credit card churning a bad way to earn airline miles Dear Dave, What do you think about the practice of credit card churning? Ethan Dear Ethan, I think it’s a pretty dumb idea. The concept is to run up the balance on one card as high as you can, then flip the balance from card to card in order to get perks like airline miles. But if you want to go through all the trouble and hassle over such a small amount of money, be my guest. I’ve met thousands of millionaires, and none of them have ever credited their success to credit card churning. Think about it: With all the time you’d spend, and risk you’re taking on a scheme like that, you could actually have made some money. If you want success, Ethan, you have to mimic what successful people do. This means living on a detailed plan, saving, and investing! —Dave

Don’t move the money

Dear Dave, Both of our daughters will start college next year. We have $25,000 set aside for each in their custodial accounts, but my financial advisor says we should take the money out because it will keep them from being awarded as much in scholarships and other assistance. What do you think? John Dear John, I disagree. It’s like saying you should quit your job to get food stamps.You guys obviously aren’t poor, and any financial advisor who says you need to fake being poor in order to get help is not a person whose advice I want to follow. When your kids apply for scholarships and assistance, your entire financial picture will be assessed. More funding goes to

kids from poor families than rich ones, but that’s only fair. Chances are, you fall somewhere in the upper-middle portion of the scale. But no, I wouldn’t move the money or try to hide it. It’s just not honest to try and act like you’re

poor when you’re not. I don’t believe in that kind of stuff. —Dave Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More

Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @ DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1610 Rose Lane, Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Residence). On the 20th day of March, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: EVERBANK, Plaintiff V. PATRICIA HERNANDEZ and THE WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION, Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 1183 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/21, 2/28, 3/7

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 746 Hillcrest Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single family home). On the 27th day of March, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC Plaintiff V. NICHOLAS G. PERRITANO; HEATHER PERRITANO A/K/A HEATHER L. PERRITANO Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 3503 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/28, 3/7, 3/14

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1974 WEST COBBLESTONE ROAD ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 (FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR GARAGE). On the 27th day of March, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff V. LISA BARNABY Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 7974 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 190,739.26 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/28, 3/7, 3/14

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 216 South Oak Creek Lane, Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single family residence). On the 27th day of March, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A Plaintiff V. MOHAMMAD A. RAZZAK; AHMED U. SYEDA; CREEKSIDE AT ROMEOVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 838 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/28, 3/7, 3/14


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

23


24

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Across 1 Word on a red octagon 5 Tree-trunk greenery 9 Channel covering Capitol Hill 14 Coif makeup 15 Queen Boleyn 16 Partner of well 17 Partner of willing 18 Like tilted ltrs. 19 Moderated, with “down” 20 Hullabaloo over a sudden policy reversal? 23 Ball supporter 24 Little mischiefmakers 25 Legendary Chicago cow owner 29 Attack from above 31 __ Grande 32 Co. bigwig 33 Sign of table tennis tendonitis? 37 Bushy coif 40 Half of a double play

Down 41 Inventor’s germ 42 Bit of applause for an equestrian event? 47 Big thing at McDonalds? 48 Samaritan’s offer 49 Game one 53 Meditation instruction 55 Crossword hint 57 Inventor Whitney 58 Cry of frustration about a Hostess cake? 61 Montezuma, e.g. 64 Snug ... bug in ___ 65 “Exodus” author 66 Musical pace 67 Easy pace 68 Waiter’s handout 69 Cuts and pastes, say 70 Iowa State’s city 71 Stage accessory

1 Great Pyramid passages 2 One of two Commandments holders 3 More greasy 4 Make ready, briefly 5 Letter carriers 6 Winning 7 Velcro alternatives 8 Note to __ 9 Book of available products 10 Hillside 11 Exemplar of neatness 12 Hail, to Maria 13 Composer Rorem 21 Fido’s poodle amie 22 Pork cut 26 Military sch. 27 Actress Russo 28 Class using mats 30 For each one 31 Campus military gp. 34 __ Samaritan 35 Little Lab 36 Organ whistle

37 High point 38 Source of linen 39 Yummy but fattening 43 Parti-colored cats 44 Bank’s claim 45 Sprawls, as by the pool 46 Take down __: humble 50 Less remote 51 Cause of odd weather 52 Equips for use 54 Highly capable 55 PC data disk 56 Gem grader’s aid 59 Festive event 60 Trash destination 61 Ended a fast 62 Alphabet ender in England 63 1979 Pa. meltdown site

ahead when others don’t show the expected level of enthusiasm. Appreciation may be delayed.

be bound by rules and must take on additional obligations. Remain budget-conscious in the week ahead.

You are too determined to be defeated. If you are happy with your work, your work will make you happy. Remain doggedly on the job in the upcoming week, even if doing so requires extra organizational skills.

Being strong means you have the ability to lift others up, not put them down. Loved ones might be more affectionate in the week ahead, so it is up to you to be supportive and sensitive to their needs.

The ties that bind need to be more tightly bound. In the week to come, what you are looking for arrives when you aren’t looking for it at all. Don’t mistake familiarity or a sense of security for true love.

There is a reason a candle can only be lit on one end. It is necessary to have a stable base to hold you up when passions are burning. You may be called upon to follow through on commitments this week.

What you seek is seeking you. While the squeaky wheel gets the grease, the ones that don’t squeak are doing fine. Remember to express gratitude to those who are reliable in the week ahead.

Do less and produce more this week. Getting organized can make the difference that prevents you from working overtime and gets you home in time for dinner. Find time to demonstrate your affection.

Cash in by being caring and ready to compromise. Take pride in your ability to follow through on duties and commitments. You can be trusted to keep your word when partners are in a bind.

Your smile can change the world. Just don’t let the world change your smile. News and media sources may focus on depressing news, but you shouldn’t let it dampen your high spirits in the week ahead.

Sudoku

J umble

Tribune Media Services 2013

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Jumbles: • AWFUL • REARM • TANGLE • LEEWAY

Answer:

When she had lunch with the champion swimmer, she thought he was -- “ALL WET”

TOP POP ALBUMS February 10 through February 16 TITLE

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ARTIST

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TITLE Resident Evil: Retribution

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Dredd Premium Rush Taken 2 Seven Psychopaths Paranormal Activity 4 The Perks of Being a Wallflower The Imposter Looper Flight

Lionsgate Sony Pictures 20th Century Fox CBS Films Paramount Pictures Lionsgate Indomina Group TriStar Pictures Paramount Pictures


LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013 25 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. Bank, National Association, as Trustee for C-BASS Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007SP2 PLAINTIFF VS Rickie D. Whitten a/k/a Rickie Whitten, Honeytree Townhouse Improvement Association, Village of Romeoville; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants, DEFENDANT(S) 09CH115 NOTICE OF PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: Rickie D. Whitten a/k/a Rickie Whitten, Honeytree Townhouse Improvement Association, Village of Romeoville; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS ; defendants, that this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, asking for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: Unit 1-6-5 in Honeytree Subdivision Unit 1 Being A Subdivision of Part of The Northwest quarter of section 27, Township 37 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, According to the plat thereof recorded July 11, 1972, As Document number R72-19368, and Certificate of correction recorded October 31, 1972 as document number R72-31828, In Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 210 Elmwood Rd, Romeoville, IL 60446 and which said mortgage was made by, Rickie Whitten, An Unmarried man; Mortgagor(s), to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Fremont Investment & loan; Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Document No. R 2003072974; and for other relief. UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this County, 14 W. Jefferson St., Suite 212, Joliet, IL 60432 on or before March 25, 2013 A JUDGMENT OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED IN THE COMPLAINT. RANDALL S. MILLER & ASSOCIATES, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 120 North LaSalle Street, Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60602 Phone: (312) 239-3432 Fax: (312) 284-4820 Attorney No: 6291914 File No: 11IL01646-1 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that this firm may be deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT. By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit Court, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation on October 24, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. at the Will County Court, Annex 3rd Floor (Arbitration Center) 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to pre-screen you for a potential mortgage modification. YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIAITION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR MEDIAITON WILL BE TERMINATED.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS EVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. PATRICIA HERNANDEZ and THE WESGLEN MASTER ASSOCIATION, Defendant. No. 12 CH 1183 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 1st day of August, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 20th day of March, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: Lot 143 in Wesglen Subdivision Neighborhood 3 Unit 1, being a Subdivision part of the West 1/2 of Section 7, Township 36 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded December 8, 1999 as Document Number R99-150029, in Will County, Illinois Commonly known as: 1610 Rose Lane, Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Residence P.I.N.: 11-04-07-101-059-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/21, 2/28, 3/7

I507048 Published 2/21, 2/28, 3/7

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, vs. LISA BARNABY Defendant. No. 10 CH 7974 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 17th day of September, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 27th day of March, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: UNIT 3532303 IN POINTE AT FIELDSTONE CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED ON A PLAT OF SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND: VARIOUS LOTS IN PASQUINELLI POINTE AT FIELDSTONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT OF SUBDIVISION RECORDED NOVEMBER 14, 2003 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2003284928 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS; WHICH SURVEY IS ATTTACHED AS EXHIBIT “A” TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED AUGUST 10, 2004 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2004-147578, AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME; TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS. Commonly known as: 1974 WEST COBBLESTONE ROAD ROMEOVILLE, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: FRAME TOWNHOUSE ATTACHED 2 CAR GARAGE P.I.N.: 06-03-13-102-020-1003 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 190,739.26 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/28, 3/7, 3/14

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A Plaintiff, vs. MOHAMMAD A. RAZZAK; AHMED U. SYEDA; CREEKSIDE AT ROMEOVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. No. 11 CH 838 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 4th day of October, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 27th day of March, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: UNIT 3321104 TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS IN CREEKSIDE OF ROMEOVILLE CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED AND DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. R2005182333, AS AMENDED, IN PARTS OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 216 South Oak Creek Lane, Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single family residence P.I.N.: 04-07-404-033-1004 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/28, 3/7, 3/14

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC Plaintiff, vs. NICHOLAS G. PERRITANO; HEATHER PERRITANO A/K/A HEATHER L. PERRITANO Defendant. No. 11 CH 3503 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 4th day of October, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 27th day of March, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 27 IN BLOCK 7 IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NUMBER 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 28, 1960, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER 906786, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 746 Hillcrest Drive, Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single family home P.I.N.: 12-02-28-407-021-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/28, 3/7, 3/14


26

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY JOLIET, ILLINOIS GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, PLAINTIFF vs. DAWN M. LAWSON; HONEYTREE IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS 13 CH 63 PUBLICATION NOTICE The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you, DAWN M. LAWSON; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendants in the above entitled suit, that the said suit has been commenced in the Circuit Court of the 12th Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois by the plaintiff against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain mortgage conveying the premises described as follows to wit: PARCEL 1 : UNIT 1-43-1, IN HONEYTREE SUBDIVISION UNIT 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 27, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JULY 11, 1972, AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-19368 AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED OCTOBER 31, 1972, AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-31828. PARCEL 2 : EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR THE BENEFIT OF PARCEL 1 AS SET FORTH AND DEFINED IN DOCUMENT NUMBER R72-37074 COMMON ADDRESS:15 Honeybear Lane, Romeoville, Illinois 60446 P.I.N.: (12)02-27-106-027 and which said mortgage was signed by DAWN M. LAWSON, mortgagors, to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, as a nominee for America’s Wholesale Lender, as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County as Document No. R2005087022; and for such other relief prayed; that summons was duly issued out of the Circuit Court of Will County against you as provided by law, and that the said suit is now pending. NOW THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU, the said above defendants, file your answer to the Complaint in said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of this Court in Will County at Will County Court House 14 West Jefferson Street, Joliet, IL 60432 on or before the April 1, 2013, default may be entered against you at any time after that day and a judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said complaint. Circuit Clerk Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 12 4447 I509901 Pubished 2/28, 3/7, 3/14

Food This side dish so classic that its new again By Wolfgang Puck Tribune Media Services

Anyone who loves good food wants it to look good, too. After all, as I often like to tell people, we eat with our eyes before we eat with our mouths. Let’s face it, though, too many vegetable side dishes look more than a little bit unexciting, like nothing our eyes would want to eat. Think of those sad little broccoli florets sitting there on the plate, or that scoop of spinach leaves, or those steamed baby carrots. They’re colorful, yes. But tempting? Of course, there are many ways to make vegetable sides look more enticing. Some of the simpler options include adding garnishes that contrast beautifully with the featured ingredient while also adding sparks of flavor - sun-dried tomatoes, for example, or toasted almond slices, a drizzle of pesto or just a sprinkling of minced fresh herbs. Asian cooks certainly know how beautiful it looks and delicious it tastes when you attractively cut up a medley of vegetables and stir-fry them together. And you can always slice or chop vegetables and combine them with a starchy side, creating a colorful tangle of pasta or a confetti-like rice or quinoa pilaf. But there’s more you can do by actually transforming See CLASSIC, page 27


Food

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

CLASSIC

THREE-COLORED VEGETABLE LOAF (Serves 8) 5 ounces unsalted butter 2 pounds organic carrots, peeled and cut into 1/4-inchthick slices 1/4 pound organic button mushrooms, wiped clean with a damp paper towel, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices 1/2 pound organic baby spinach leaves, rinsed and patted dry with paper towels 5 large cage-free eggs 4 ounces shredded Swiss cheese 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Melt 2 ounces of the butter in a saute pan over mediumlow heat. Add the carrots and saute, stirring frequently, until tender, 7 to 10 minutes. Empty them from the pan to a cutting board, chop coarsely, and then transfer to a large mixing bowl and set aside. In the same pan, melt 1 ounce of the butter over high heat. Add the mushrooms and saute, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. Empty them onto the

cutting board, chop coarsely, and add to the carrots. Melt 1 ounce more butter over high heat.Add the spinach and saute, stirring constantly, until wilted and any excess moisture has evaporated, 2 to 3 minutes. Chop coarsely and transfer to a separate bowl. When the spinach has cooled, add 1 egg and stir thoroughly with a fork. In another bowl, beat the remaining 4 eggs. Stir in the Swiss cheese. Add the egg-andcheese mixture to the carrots and mushrooms, season to taste with salt and pepper, and stir thoroughly. Position an oven rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Line the bottom of an 8-1/2 by 4-1/2 by 2-1/2-inch loaf pan with parchment paper. Butter the pan and the parchment paper with 1 tablespoon of the remaining butter. In the bottom of the pan, spread half of the carrot mixture. Add all of the spinach mixture,

spreading it evenly; then, top with the remaining carrot mixture. With the remaining butter, coat 1 side of a piece of parchment paper cut to fit the top of the pan, and place the paper buttered side down on top of the final carrot layer. Place the loaf pan inside a baking dish with high sides. Into the dish, pour enough hot water to come halfway up the side of the loaf pan. Pull out the oven rack, place the baking dish with the loaf pan on the rack, and carefully slide the rack into the oven. Bake until a knife inserted into the center of the vegetable loaf comes out clean, about 1-1/4 hours, checking and adding more hot water to the baking dish if necessary. Carefully slide out the oven rack and lift out the baking dish. Remove the loaf pan. Peel off the top piece of parchment paper. Run a thin, sharp knife around the insides of the loaf pan to loosen the loaf. Invert a serving platter over

27

Continued from page 26

TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

This colorful vegetable loaf features carrots, mushrooms and spinach with touches of egg and cheese.

the loaf pan. Holding the pan and platter tightly together with potholders, invert them. Then, place on a work surface and carefully lift off the loaf pan. Peel off the remaining parchment paper. With a sharp knife, cut the vegetable loaf crosswise into slices.

the vegetables into something new: pureeing them, layering them, and then baking them in a loaf shape that, when sliced, presents a beautiful, delicious rainbow of contrasting colors and flavors. That’s what I’ve been doing for years with my Three-Colored Vegetable Loaf. It combines chopped and cooked carrots, mushrooms, and spinach, lightly bound with touches of egg and cheese, to make a bright rainbow of a side dish that goes wonderfully with roast, grilled, broiled, or sauteed meats, poultry, or seafood. Such dishes are classics of the French repertoire. And I think it’s time for them to make a comeback. Impressive though this side is to serve, you’ll find it surprisingly easy to put together, and much of the work - cooking and pureeing the vegetables, all the way up to layering them in the pan before baking - can be done up to several hours in advance.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Romeovile 2-28-13  

Romeovile 2-28-13

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