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INSIDE

NEWS

SPORTS Spartans are SPC champs

www.romeovillebugle.com

McMichael candidacy never an issue PAGE 13

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Our Community, Our News

FEBRUARY 14, 2013

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CATHOLIC COMMITMENT

Vol. 7 No. 32

nce struggling with several local grade schools closing their doors, Catholic education has bounced back in a big way. Using the theme ‘We Teach More,’ the Joliet Diocese has seen significant growth at more than 40 percent of its schools in the last year. Page 3


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

News

Teachers to review McMichael candidacy never questioned “This complaint had Valley View contract nothing to do with Steve By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Working without a contract since last summer, Valley View School District 365u teachers are expected to vote this month on a revised proposal. The majority of certified and classified members of the district voted down the first proposal, marking the first time members rejected a contract in nearly a decade. Both parties continued negotiations, with issues at heart for teachers revolving around salary, higher insurance premiums, and changes to the daily schedule. Teachers say the main issue with the contract was the fact that the salary schedule proposed would not offset the rise in insurance costs. In addition there were proposed

changes being made to daily schedules that members could not agree with. “We are in the process of finishing up reviewing the tentative agreements, getting it out to the members, scheduling information meetings and then taking it to a vote,” said Victoria Sutterlin, president of The Valley View Council, Local 604 of the American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO.“Throughout this entire process of negotiating a new contract, the teachers’ and support staff’s main focus continues to be educating the children as well as providing them with experiences and support that go beyond the classroom.” The teacher’s contract expired in August and members will continue to work off this contract until a new contract is approved.

Steve McMichael continues to vie for the Romeoville mayor spot, the question of his candidacy never an issue. The State Board of Elections held a hearing last week based on a complaint revolving around campaign disclosure rules filed by Trustee Ken Griffin, naming the Citizens for Steve McMichael, the Pro arena football team Chicago Slaughter, and Mongo McMichaels Restaurant.However, Steve McMichael, himself, was not included on the complaint. “This complaint had nothing to do with Steve. He was never accused of doing anything wrong and the question of his candidacy was never an issue,” said Lisa Raucci, McMichael’s attorney. Raucci said furthermore what was alleged in the complaint is not true. A number of items were alleged including the fact that the Chicago Slaughter was promoting McMichael. Raucci said McMichael had nothing to

McMichael

Noak

do with that and that was for the benefit of Slaughter.The value of an ad placed by the restaurant, which bears only his name, was questioned and the campaign staff was alleged to have filed paperwork incorrectly. “Part of the problem is Mr. Michael’s notoriety,” said Raucci. “Some people see an opportunity to put out a T-shirt and market it without conferring with him and decide to pursue this on their own.” The hearing was held to first determine if the complaint was filed on justifiable grounds. The matter will then go before the General Counsel of the Board of Elections whether or not they agree or disagree. If it’s determined that it was filed justifiably, it could require

(McMichael). He was never accused of doing anything wrong and the question of his candidacy was never an issue.” Lisa Raucci, McMichael’s attorney

a public hearing to hash out the details. It is the duty of the plaintiff to provide probable cause that it was not falsely filed and carries the burden of proof. Board of Elections procedures state in the matter of a first violation, if the complaint was upheld, a fine would be issued. McMichael is facing current Mayor John Noak in the upcoming election April 9. Former contender Fred Dewald recently dropped from the race for health reasons.


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Enrollment, stability on the rise at area Catholic schools By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

While a few years ago, communities saw a number of Catholic schools closing their doors, the Diocese of Joliet is following a trend of increased enrollment and with it, stability. The diocese covers Will, DuPage, Ford, Grundy, Iroquois, Kankakee and Kendall counties and includes 54 elementary schools, seven high schools and seven early childhood centers. More than 40 percent of the diocese’s schools have seen an enrollment increase during the past year, with some seeing a 12 to 18 percent increase. Poised to take its message out into the community, the diocese embarked on a marketing campaign that struck a chord, “We Teach More,” using the tagline to brand catholic schools as entities that incorporate faith with instruction, holding students to a higher standard both academically and spiritually. And their numbers back it up, said the Rev. John Belmonte, Superintendent. “We wanted to get the facts out there—we are proud of it,”

he said. The diocese boasts a 99 percent graduation rate, compared to 84 percent graduation rate at Illinois public schools; maintains an average score of 24 on the ACT, compared to the 20.9 overall average of Illinois schools; and reading scores rank in the 80 percentile, significantly higher than the 50 percentile national average; and in math, a 74 percentile average, compared to the national average of 50. In addition, “We Teach More,” can equate to the 400,000 hours of religious instruction per year, and what Belmonte says sets catholic schools apart helping students change the world is the 112,000 service hours provided by its high school students and the 64,000 service hours of its elementary students. “I believe in Catholic Education, because I see that our students do learn and achieve more,” Principal Kathy Lifka of St. Andrew the Apostle in Romeoville said. “We go beyond the textbooks to include discussions on faith, morality and ethics, something that is on the decline in our world today. We have small

classes so that teachers can treat your child or grandchild as an individual. I believe that we have the best teachers, not only because they are grounded in the Catholic faith, but because they are dedicated to developing the whole child.” Sister John Agnes, principal of St. Dominic in Bolingbrook, agreed about the role of Catholic education.“Saint Dominic School offers quality Catholic education that is inspired by faith and driven by excellence.” Another key factor playing into the increased enrollment is a focus on the Latino population, where Belmonte said the diocese saw a 20 percent. “The majority of our increases come from the Latino population which we targeted heavily,” said Belmonte. Belmonte said the fate for the diocese has flipped, no longer seeing losses, but gains. The success in large part is the attention to recruitment as well as retainment. “Gone are the days of presuming a Catholic family with eight kids are all going to enroll,” he said. “Families have choices, and we want to continue to

make our message clear.” Catholic Schools week was celebrated the last week of January throughout the nation with its theme “Catholic Schools –Raise the Standard.” U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski, D-Willow Springs, introduced a resolution in the U.S. House praising the outstanding work of Catholic schools. Lipinski’s resolution expresses support for “the vital contributions of the thousands of Catholic elementary and secondary schools in the United States” and “the key role they play in promoting and ensuring a brighter, stronger future for the nation.” Lipinski applauded the achievements made by Catholic school students and also called attention to the fact that “in northeastern Illinois, it is estimated that Catholic schools save taxpayers over $1 billion annually by lowering the number of students in overburdened public schools.’”

Belmonte said the diocese does not have the luxury of deficit spending and must produce a balanced budget each year, thus balancing tuition, parish support and fundraising efforts to cover its expenses. Catholic Schools Week allowed local parishes to celebrate their accomplishments, hosting a variety of activities including Math and Science competitions. Groups of grade levels were given challenges ranging from Index Card Sky-risers, Spaghetti Towers and Straw Bridges. In addition, throughout the week, Saint Dominic students challenged St. Andrew to a Souper Bowl. The two schools spent the week serving those in need by collecting more than 2,000 soup cans to be donated to the local food pantry. On the cover: Local Catholic schools, including St. Andrew in Romeoville, celebrated Catholic School Week in January with special events. Submitted photo


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

SUBMITTED PHOTO

This artist’s rendering depicts the new athletic center designed to be the anchor for redevelopment of Romeoville’s downtown area.

Work on new athletic center for downtown to begin soon By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

Work is set to begin next in March for the new athletic center, designed to be an anchor for the redevelopment of Romeoville’s downtown area. The 76,792-square-feet center is to include an indoor soccer field with cross-field capabilities, various athletic courts and several multi-purpose rooms. The concept plan approved by the board shows the first floor consisting of the indoor soccer field and two cross fields, a mezzanine level that will hold concessions, moveable spectator seating for 180 people and two multi-purpose rooms, and an alternate level will include two IHSA regulation basketball courts or four cross

courts; or four IHSA regulation volleyball courts. “The plan is very detailoriented, and I am sure we will be keeping costs in line,” said Trustee Sue Mickelvitz. The village believes the multipurpose center will attract various events such as boat shows or convention type events, and in turn bring the traffic to the area in search of revitalization for the past decade. The property, a section of 9.5 acres within the Spartan Square Development, was purchased by the village in 2008 and is bordered by Route 53 on the east,Townhall Drive on the west, Phelps Avenue on the north and Alexander Avenue on the south. Once completed, the village envisions a village square that will serve as a gathering place as well as space for future

community events. “Work has been fast and furious, and it is so nice to see people excited about the project,” said Trustee Dave Richards. As construction proceeds on the athletic center, plans continue for the existing retail center to be demolished once all leases have been honored. Phase one of the demolition was completed with the recent razing of the old Ace Hardware store. The Athletic and Event Center is anticipated to be completed in December. Noak noted the project is being funded using TIF (tax increment financing) funds from its downtown TIF district. Residents will soon be able to check for status updates on the downtown project on the village website, www.romeoville.org.

Bolingbrook man indicted for child pornography possession Will County State’s Attorney up to Judge Gerald Kinney on James Glasgow announces that Thursday. a Bolingbrook man has Vollmar was arrested been indicted on five at his residence after counts of possession of detectives executed child pornogrophy. a search warrant on Officers from State’s his apartment. The Attorney Glasgow’s High arrest was the result Technology Computer of a three-month Crimes Unit as well as investigation launched the Bolingbrook Police by the High Technology James Vollmar Department and the Crimes Unit into the U.S. Secret Service Computer distribution of child pornography Forensic Unit arrested James over the Internet. Detectives Vollmar, 31, of 117 Balmoral Drive took possession of Vollmar’s on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. Grand computer pursuant to the search Jury indictments were handed warrant.

Vollmar’s bond was set at $50,000. He is scheduled to appear in court next on February 15 at 9 a.m. in Courtroom 405. The indictments are Class 2 felonies that carry a penalty of three to seven years in prison upon conviction. The Will County State’s Attorney’s Office reminds the public that indictments are not evidence of guilt. A defendant is presumed innocent and is entitled to a fair trial at which the government has the burden of proving guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.


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Feb. 15 Community Resource Fair open to all By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

In these difficult times, it’s hard to know where to turn for answers:“How do I cope with all this stress? What do I do about my financial problems? What’s happening to my child and how can I make things better?” The answers to these and many more questions will be available at a Community Resource Fair to be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 15 at the Romeoville Recreation Center, 900 W. Romeo Road. It is open to the general public, and admission is free. Childcare will be available for $1 per child. The annual event is cosponsored by the Valley View Community Unit School District

365U and Plainfield Community Consolidated School District 202. Originally, the event was geared toward further educating the school’s social workers. But since 2009, the fair has been open to the public, in hopes the community could benefit from the additional resources. “If you have ever had any fear or apprehension about seeking help, there is no need to worry, because our volunteers and vendors are all here for you,” said Brooks Middle School Social Worker, Mary Davis, a co-chair of the event. “You can visit with one provider, or you can visit with them all.” More than 130 agencies will

“This fair is a great way

to discover all of the tremendous opportunities available to residents in this area,” Alan Bank, fair co-chair

be on hand from Will, DuPage and Cook counties, ranging from hospitals and health centers to behavioral specialists, crisis and referral services, legal services, and counselors. “This fair is a great way to discover all of the tremendous opportunities available to residents in this area,” said Plainfield High School Central

Campus Social Worker, Alan Bank, one of the fair’s co-chairs. “There will be representatives that specialize in everything from health and financial issues to summer fun.” Scheduled to be at the fair are representatives of hospitals, park districts, libraries, colleges, afterschool care agencies, summer camps, and recreational facilities, as well as community agencies that specialize in such things as career counseling, financial counseling, chemical addiction, depression, homelessness, physical and mental health, home buying, and senior care. Several food pantries will also be represented. All attendees will receive the 2013 Community Resource

Fair Provider Guide, listing every provider at the fair with summaries of services and complete contact information. “You may not even need any services right now. But it would be wise to attend just to get some information in case you may need it someday,” Bank said. Guests need not be parents of children in either of the two sponsoring school districts to attend. Services for all ages will be available. Spanish language interpreters will be available. Questions about the Fair may be directed to the Resource Fair Voice Mail Hotline at 815886-7246. Dial extension 802 for English or extension 803 for Spanish.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Romeoville Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

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Edward Trinidad, 18, 320 Haller, was arrested at 9:57 p.m. Jan. 26 and charged with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

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Steven Hanuska, 30, 285 e. First St., Braidwood, was arrested at 2:28 a.m. Jan. 26 and charged with the possession of cannabis and paraphernalia and no registration light near Route 53 and Joliet Road.

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Rachel Hejka, 20, 1901 Arbor Fields Dr., Plainfield was arrested at 2:07 p.m. Jan. 28 and charged with retail theft on the 300 block of S. Weber Road.

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Renato Murillo, 33, 1005 N. Broadway, Joliet, was arrested at 7:21 p.m. Jan. 30 and charged with speeding, uninsured, and no driver’s license near Dalhart Avenue and Corona.

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A resident in the 400 block of Kingston Avenue reported a residential burglary at 6:24 p.m. Jan. 29. Cash and several pieces of jewelry were taken from the residence. Estimated amount of cash and the jewelry is $7,100.

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Eric N. Lazaro, 20, 1620 Daylily Drive, was arrested at 6:21 p.m. Jan. 31 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, uninsured and the illegal transport of alcohol near Normantown Road and Center Boulevard.

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Lorelei Schlueter, 20, 317 Fieldstone Court, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 3:37 p.m. Feb. 1 and charged with driving with a suspended license and too fast for conditions near Weber and Normantown Roads.

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Noe Lopez, 28, 111 Bernice, Bensenville, was arrested at 2:42 p.m. Feb. 1 and charged with driving without a driver’s license, uninsured and too fast for conditions near Route 53 and Chambers Drive.

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Melinda Dalan, 51, 807 Schock Drive, Joliet was arrested at 4:51 p.m. Feb. 1 and charged with retail theft on the

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300 block of S. Weber Road.

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Ruth Matchette-Tucker, 51, 717 Dexter Ave., was arrested at 8:18 p.m. Feb. 1 and charged with disorderly conduct (false 911 calls) on the 700 block of 700 block of Dexter Avenue.

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Alexis Kelly, 28, 15046 Lewis Drive, Lockport, was

arrested at 9:18 a.m. Feb. 2 and charged with no insurance or driver’s license, speeding, and an expired registration near Route 53 and Taylor Road.

Jacklyn Dover, 29, 6670 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, was arrested at 1:29 p.m. with retail theft on the 400 block of S. Weber Road.

Therese Marino, 39, 728 Delta, was arrested at 5:32 p.m. Feb. 3 and charged with battery on the 0-100 block on Alexander Drive.

A business in the 500 block of Anderson Drive reported a theft at 10:23 a.m. Feb. 4.Three empty trailers that were parked in the rear of the business were

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taken. Estimated value of the trailers is $52,000. Amanda Fitzgerald, 20, 521 Blackhawk St., Joliet, was arrested at 6:20 a.m. Feb. 5 and charged with no driver’s license and speeding near Dalhart Avenue and Corona.

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Letters to the Editor Studied candidates, still voting for Noak As I started writing this letter, I found myself with a bit of internal conflict. I firmly believe that John Noak is the best choice for mayor of Romeoville, and support him wholeheartedly. But quite frankly, I couldn’t clearly articulate why I didn’t support Steve McMichael. It just seemed shady that anyone, especially a formerly high-profile sports star, would move into a suburban community, and a few months later, decide he was running for mayor. So because I believe in being an informed voter, I decided to try and find out what McMichael feels his qualifications are, and what he plans to accomplish. I had a great deal of difficulty finding anything online. Most everything that I can find is him telling some media outlet how he wants to focus on the expansion of Rt. 53, and that the foreclosure rate in Romeoville is just too high. Oh, and don’t forget the “McMichael’s Bears teammates are in full support of his candidacy” comments.As if being a member of a national champion sports team somehow makes you qualified to run a village. As someone who lives in Romeoville, works in Romeoville, and sends my children to

school in Romeoville, I feel I have earned the right to ask my candidates “What have you done for me lately?” Mayor Noak and the current village council’s record speaks volumes toward their commitment to our village. There is clear progress in crime prevention, village development, attracting businesses, and fiscal responsibility. Home sales increased 29% between October 2011 and September 2012. Progress is being made on the new events and sports center in Spartan Square. Ninety new businesses in Romeoville in 2012 brought 800 jobs to the village. Oh, and don’t forget the $400K midyear budget surplus. I wanted to find substance in McMichael’s campaign. I wanted to read how his leadership of the village government would put Romeoville on a better path than we are now. Unfortunately, from what I can find, he seems to be more interested in reminding people that he “has no financial interest” in the local sports bar that bears (no pun intended!) his name, and that he was a member of the ‘85 Bears. I didn’t find what I was looking for in Steve McMichael. But I’m displaying my “Noak for Mayor” yard signs proudly. Lisa Salazar Romeoville

Dreams and wishes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had a dream. His dream did come true. I also have a dream and wish for myself and many people who believe in any church. This dream and wish of mine has kept me awake, and constantly reminds me of my mission and obligation to again write of the quote “faith can move mountains.” As a rule of thumb, no one should discuss politics or religion. There are many views on these subjects. I do agree. But, sometime someone needs to write or speak out about a need that is more important than self-opinion. I write about a church that is needed in our fast-growing village of Romeoville.The church that I write about was right behind my home since 1960.We moved in 1961.This same church was demolished because of the need of larger water retention and village growth.This hurt me and many others. Good Shepherd had many people of different faiths walk through the doors.This church had daily AA, Alanon, Alateen, Scouts, Dart Ball and more. People were helped.These programs are greatly needed. The Alanon program helped me and AA helped my husband. Our village has five vibrant

and wonderful churches.The past and current people of the church I was familiar with, I honor and applaud. Currently they have a church service in their pre-school.They also have a very caring pastor. Good Shepherd needs to be rebuilt.When I discussed this with some of the current members, they say the church is only a building. The world is destructive.A church reminds you of love, hope, peace and forgiveness. I constantly need to hear these words. Our village has many new (more to come) buildings. It demonstrates to all the surrounding communities that we all care about each other and our village. My dream and wish is like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to rebuild Good Shepherd.This would be a re-birth of a building that would stand erect for many years to come.This illustrates a community is dedicated to God and the future of all the residents. Shirlee J. Pergler Romeoville

Time to boycott When you enter the village of Romeoville on Joliet Road you will notice that from Route 53 to 135th Street there are five gas

stations — Citco, BP, Speedway, Shell and Mobil. All are mini marts where you can get gas, coffee, snacks and beers. Nothing really unique, but what is different about them is the price of their gas.The price of their gas seems to always be 15 to 20 cents higher than the gas prices on Weber Road, Lockport, Crest Hill or Joliet. Is it a special blend, a magic gas that makes your car go farther on a gallon of gas? No. It’s a group of gas station owners who set their prices higher than anywhere else in the area, knowing that you the customer will pay the price. See, most of you don’t shop around for cheaper prices or drive to Crest Hill or Joliet to get lower prices.They know that.They know that most of your won’t take the time, so you end up in their gas stations. And that’s why they keep getting away with the gas gouging.They know the Village of Romeoville and the attorney general’s office won’t do anything to them. That’s why it’s up to the customers to boycott these gas stations until they stop their outrageous acts and stop taking advantage of the people of Romeoville. Richard M. Strom Romeoville

Illustrated Opinions General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor sweditor@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Robin Ambrosia Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Sports Reporter Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

www.facebook.com/thebuglenewspapers www.twitter.com/buglenewspapers Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Schools

Defending champ Belser wins Valley View spelling title again Humphrey Middle School Spelling Bee, both qualified for eighth grader Kim Belser, who the Will County Spelling Bee at 6 represented Will County at p.m. March 7 at Lewis University. the Scripps-Howard National The Will County winner will Spelling Bee in Washington, advance to the National Spelling Bee. D.C. last year, will get Also qualifying for another shot at being county were Martinez Will County champion Middle School 8th this year after winning grader Rory Richards the Valley View School (4th place, missed District 365U Spelling “duenna” in 10th Bee. round), Jane Addams Kim Belser correctly Middle School 8th spelled “geode” in Kim Belser grader Edward the 17th round after Owusu (6th place, Lukancic Middle missed “prosaic” in 7th round), School eighth grader Elizabeth Zahorick misspelled “homburg” and Brooks Middle School in the 16th round. Humphrey 8th grader Malina Bun (7th sixth grader John Belser, Kim’s place, missed “hygiene” in 3rd brother, finished third, going out round. Kim Belser spelled 17 words on the word “sachem” in round correctly including hydraulic, 13. motif, caballero, Kim Belser and Zahorick, who biblical, finished 1-2 in last year’s VVSD roughhewn, stucco, kipper,

disparage, muslin, comportment, geranium, Diablo, taiga, pantheon, stoic and isobar. Zahorick spelled 15 words correctly including insurrection, pesto, apathy, vernacular, nether, ardent, perennial, origami, guru, philanthropy, adamant, stenographer, embarcadero, antipasto and asterisk. John Belser spelled 12 words correctly including souvenir, cravat, coloratura, sortie, zero, ravioli, implement, commodity, spritz, subsequent, animosity and junta. Humphrey seventh grader Erick Ramirez finished 5th (9th round, grotto). Lukancic’s Marcelle Bonny and Brooks’ Advai Podduturi tied for 8th. Jimel Rogers and Jayden Flores from Addams, Sebastian Reid of Brooks, Kaitlyn Jones of Lukancic and Meto Ajagu and Mia Alegado all tied for 10th.

McAsey opens Romeoville office State Rep. Emily McAsey announced she opened a new constituent service office at 209 W. Romeo Road in Romeoville. McAsey’s office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. McAsey also hosts satellite office hours at Lockport Central Square, located at 222 E. 9th St. in Lockport, on the first and third Friday of every month from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The 85th Representative District includes portions of Bolingbrook, Crest Hill, Lemont, Lockport, Romeoville, and Woodridge. To contact McAsey, residents may visit the constituent service office in Romeoville or call 815-372-0085. The office fax number is 815-372-0080.

Contact Megan Montgomery at chicagosleadingedge@gmail. com to register before March 1.

Author, radio host speaks on marriage Bolingbrook’s Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital, in conjunction with Living Water Community Church, will host a Dr. Gary Chapman marriage conference on March 16. Chapman, the author of The Five Love Languages, will speak on The Marriage You Always Wanted from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at the church, 190 Lily Cache Lane in Bolingbrook. The conference costs $85 per couple or $45 for an individual. Those interested can register at www.moodyconferences.com.

Lewis to host women’s aviation camp

Military News

A free interactive aviation camp will allow high school females to fly a flight simulator, discover aviation careers, learn about aerodynamics and preflight a Cessna 172, tour the Lewis University maintenance hangar with vintage airplanes, view the 737 cockpit, and experience the excitement of air racing. The Chicago’s Leading Edge Chapter of Women in Aviation, International hopes to inspire young high school females to develop an interest in aviation. The camp to be held from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 9 will be on the main campus of Lewis University in Romeoville. The camp will take place in the Harold White building.

• Army Staff Sgt.Albert Barnes has returned to the U.S. after being deployed overseas. Barnes is a supply sergeant assigned to the Fourth Airborne Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base ElmendorfRichardson. He has served in the military for eight years. He is the son of Albert Barnes Sr. of Ludington Circle, Romeoville. His wife, Laura, is the daughter of Peter and Carol Markowski of 58th Court, Cicero. • Air Force Airman Jacobo A. Ortiz graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio,Texas. Ortiz is the son of Erika and Max Ortiz of Ammaryllis Court, Romeoville. He is a 2012 graduate of Romeoville High School.


Calendar FEBRUARY 14 Preschool Playtime. 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Get ready for music, games and fun on Thursday mornings at the library. In the Activity Zone, we’ll play with big toys for big fun. Add imagination to Duplo blocks in the Construction Zone and build with our library blocks. Or shake and shimmy in the Music Zone, with a dance mix designed to get you moving. Drop in for your favorites, or come every week. For more information, call 815-886-2030 or visit www. whiteoaklibrary.org. Brick Building Club. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Have fun building your own creations at the library. We’ll supply the LEGO bricks, you supply the imagination. Your finished work will go on display until we meet again and create something new! Ages 6 to 12. Registration is requested, but drop-ins are welcome as space permits. For more information, call 815-886-2030 or visit www. whiteoaklibrary.org. Candy Heart Party at Romeoville. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Celebrate Valentine’s Day at the library We’ll be having fun with candy hearts. Play games, make crafts, eat snacks, and have conversations with these fun and famous candies. This program is for all ages. Registration is required and may be limited due to supplies. Social Networking Tools: Not Just for Teenagers Anymore at 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Have you heard about tweeting, friending and Skyping but do not know what all of it means? Join us for a program that will show you Twitter, Facebook, Skype and more social networking tools.We can help you decide if you want to use one or more of these tools to share information and stay connected to friends and family. This program is a presentation, and is not a hands on computer class. Registration is encouraged. Knitter’s Nest - Weekly Knitting and Crochet DropIn. 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300

West Briarcliff Road,Bolingbrook. Join us for a weekly morning drop in knitting and crochet group. For more information, call 630-759-2102 or visit www. fountaindale.org. Nifty @ Fifty. 10 to 11 a.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. This low impact cardio and resistance exercise class will incorporate functional moves so that you can keep your range of motion and reflexes sharper than ever! For adults, ages 50 and older. Be sure to bring a bottle of water. For more information, call 630-759-2102 or visit www.fountaindale.org. Lapsit Storytime. 6:30 to 7 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook.Ages 0 to 18 months with an adult. Our youngest patrons and their caregivers have a lot of fun together in the evening when they drop in for stories, songs, and activities. Art for thought. 4 to 4:45 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Grades 4 through 8. Who says history has to be boring?! Come learn about famous artists and various art styles throughout history. The program will start with a look at a famous artist in time or examining a particular style or medium. Then, we will work on a project based on what we learned. Basic Computing. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. If you’ve never used a computer before, or you just need a refresher, this class is for you. In this one time, two-hour class, you will learn computer terms and receive hands-on instruction. You will learn how to turn the computer on and off, operate the mouse, open and close programs and files, and save and print documents.

FEBRUARY 15 Friday Movie Matinee. 1 to

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

3 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Adults. We will be showcasing in no particular order, selections from AFI’s 100 Greatest Movie list or movies that have won academy awards. Stop in and enjoy the best Hollywood has to offer, from recent blockbusters to treasures past.

Super Science Lab. 3 to 3:45 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook.

Teen Movie Friday. 3 to 5 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Watch a movie in the Vortex with friends. All movies rated PG-13 and below. Contact the Vortex for movie title information at 630-685-4199.

Magic of the Spellbinder. 2 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Emphasizing the legacy of black magicians, Walter King, Jr., the Spellbinder, an artist of legerdemain, mixes grand illusions, magic, contemporary dance, and theater in a wizardly performance.

Pioneer PTO Fun Fair. 5 to 8 p.m. Visitors will be treated to a bounce house, face painting, and carnival games as well as pizza and cotton candy, plus a silent auction. Tickets will cost 50 cents each. An unlimited play wristband will be available for $10. Each child must have parent or other adult supervision. Information is available by calling 312-656-5859 or e-mailing Kristin.walters@pepsico.com.

FEBRUARY 16 Internet Level 1. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the White Oak Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville.. You may register with Adult Services Desk, Romeoville Branch Library, 815-886-2030 or you may now register online at www. whiteoaklibrary.org. Saturday Special: 1-2-3 Explore with Me. 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Open to all children ages 2 to 6 and caregivers. We have a lot of fun with stories, songs, and tactile activities. Grades K through 5. Saturday Special: SSLSuper Science Lab. 1:30 to 5 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Saturday

Special:

SSL-

X Meets Y Book Club. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook.

FEBRUARY 17

FEBRUARY 18 Toddler Time. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the White Oak Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Toddler Time at Romeoville is designed to help children and their caregivers develop preliteracy skills through songs, stories and movement activities. This program is for children 3-35 months with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required. For information, call 815-886-2030 or visit www. whiteoaklibrary.org. Monday Kids Club. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Anything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art, history and more! This program is for children 5 to 12 years of age. The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot. This week we will be learning all about real-life unicorns: Narwhals! For more information, call 815-886-2030 or visit www. whiteoaklibrary.org. Friends of the Library Monthly Meeting. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown

9

Road, Romeoville. Join the Friends of the White Oak Library District for their monthly meeting. This dynamic group is always looking for interested community members to come and learn what the FOL are all about All Together Storytime.10: 30 to 11 a.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road,Bolingbrook. All ages preschoolers with an adult. We all have so much fun when we get together for songs, tales, and laughter. Documentaries:Celebrating Black History Month.12 to 8 p.m.. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Celebrate with a day of movies. Knitter’s & Crochet Nest Weekly Drop In Evening Session. 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Join us for a weekly evening knitting and crochet drop-in session. Experienced knitters and crocheters welcome. For more information, call 630-759-2102 or visit www.fountaindale.org. Diez deditos (Ten Little Fingers). 7 to 7:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road,Bolingbrook. Diez deditos is a bilingual storytime presented in both Spanish and English Diez deditos es una hora de cuento bilingue presentada en espanol e ingles. Sponsored by Target. For more information, call 630-759-2102 or visit www.fountaindale.org. Microsoft Excel. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Pubic Library, 300 West Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook.

FEBRUARY 19 Terrific T’s. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.Terrific T’s brings the See CALENDAR, page 21


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013


taKe 5 C ro s s w o rd P u z z l e

Across 1 Make even, in a way 8 Key rings? 15 More than concerned 16 When forging started 17 Juntas, e.g. 18 Discarded storage technology 19 Consider necessary 20 Round seed 21 Blew, so to speak 22 Moving experience? 24 Fine-grained soil 25 Othello game piece 28 Corpulent 29 Unfavorably influence 30 PIN holder’s record 31 Make fit 33 Suffix with nanny 36 Beyond unethical 39 “Bambi”

Down character 40 Wire function 41 Man cave channel of choice 42 Wile 44 __ vindice: Confederacy motto 45 Parker who played Daniel Boone 46 Underlying values 48 Like protozoa 50 Has a turn 51 Improved one’s record 52 Akkadian king who conquered Mesopotamia 56 Kitchen tools 58 “Olly olly oxen free!” 59 Dominions 60 Mess up, as a punch line 61 Lot 62 Slid (over)

1 Makes shake 2 Fonda role 3 Ranch brush 4 Long-odds bet 5 Amalgamate 6 Character flaw 7 Meas. of some field losses or gains 8 Sailing maneuvers 9 Code word? 10 “Psych!” 11 Eat at, as one’s conscience 12 Classroom response, at times 13 Pulitzer-winning writers Timothy and Jennifer 14 Times of prayer in the Divine Office 20 Tried to buy at auction 23 She played Elle in “Kill Bill” 24 Online convenience 25 Pulp figure 26 Tiny paper clip, e.g. 27 Settings for “Junkyard Wars” 29 Loyal to a fault 32 Zola portraitist 34 Droid downloads 35 Chain letters?

37 NYSE deals 38 Cites 43 Flipped 46 Vandalized, in a way 47 “Chestnuts roasting ...” cowriter 48 Like some forest ground 49 Neck line? 51 Cactus __: state bird of Arizona 53 Canter, for one 54 “Memories __”: Billy Crystal film 55 Requisite 57 “__ tu che macchiavi quell’anima”: Verdi lyric 58 Uses Trillian, briefly

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

H o ro s c o p e s If you want something, ask for it. In the week to come, you can get what you want if you remember to be diplomatic and go through the proper channels. Use patience to tackle jobs that have been neglected.

Practicality is not a pretense. You won’t shirk the necessities in the upcoming week. Heavy physical work will not deter you from your objective and you won’t mind getting your hands dirty.

When you miss someone, pick up the phone and call. During the week ahead, people will welcome contact and value your presence. Make headway with supportive relationships whenever possible.

In the week ahead, cultivate a positive attitude. Learning experiences can help you grow both mentally and spiritually. Some lessons seem like a test you forgot to study for, but others offer rewards.

Help your high expectations. Give everyone your best and the best will come back to you. Be sure to express appreciation for those who show unwavering endurance and loyalty in the upcoming week.

Generosity and an open spirit bring others closer, but beware of going overboard. You may experience guilt later this week if you overload credit cards. Clip coupons from the Sunday paper.

Words are so powerful that they can crush a heart or heal one. The week to come may offer you many opportunities to choose to do the right thing. Extra kindness even in an official capacity can be correct.

New friends are silver, but old friends are gold. Formalities won’t detract from truth. People who value you for your true merit will champion your causes and be a source of strength in the week ahead.

Be true to your word and to continuing good works. This week, you may have the opportunity to show your true merit, act on your instincts and to stand up for what you believe to be right.

You won’t be fired for being inspired. Show off your ideas and ingenuity. In the upcoming week, you will be able to take credit for creative ideas or diligent research that can secure your position.

Realign your rigidity. Bend with the winds of change this week. You may not be able to change the circumstances in your life, but you can make a conscious effort to change the way you face them.

To be understood, you must clarify. In the week ahead, you might find that explaining to others helps you understand yourself. Poet Robert Frost once said, “I’m not confused, I’m just well mixed.”

Tribune Media Services 2013

Sudoku

J umble

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers

Previous puzzle ’s answers Jumbles: • LURID • ITCHY • BEWARE • AROUND

Answer:

When the golfer described his incredible putt, it became -- A WORDY BIRDIE

11


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013


INSIDE: Boys basketball holds on for win over Plainfield South, page 14; Wrestling duo state bound, page 16

www.romeovillebugle.com

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

13

Spartans undefeated SPC champs By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Romeoville’s Angelica Osusky takes it inside on East’s Nina Maggio in Romeoville’s 60-50 win.

Last year Plainfield East beat Romeoville in the season finale, forcing the Spartans to share the Southwest Prairie Conference title with Oswego East. The Spartans wouldn’t let that happen again. Romeoville (25-3 overall, 14-0 in SPC) jumped out to a 17-7 lead after the first quarter and went on to win 60-50 Thursday, Feb. 7 in Romeoville. “It doesn’t get better than that,” Romeoville guard Abby Smith said.“We’ve been working for that since day one and to achieve that is amazing. We wanted to take it for ourselves and make sure nobody else came close.That was motivation through it all.” “It feels really good, especially with last year and everything,” Romeoville senior post Kiera Currie said. “We did finish out goals all the way and this year we proved that we could accomplish our goals. We just have to get back in the gym and get ready for regionals. It’s a really good feeling for us.” Romeoville entered the game

unbeaten in the SPC, while East had a single loss to the Spartans earlier in the season. Romeoville made it two in a row this time and went undefeated in the SPC season in the process. “It feels great,” Romeoville coach Julio Carrasco said. “I thought the girls played really well. I couldn’t be prouder of the girls. They really put in the time. They play the way Spartan basketball should be. I’m very excited for them. It’s an undefeated conference season and I believe only Minooka has done that a few years ago.” After playing five closely contested games with the Bengals (22-4, 12-2) the past two years, Romeovile was able to have control for much of the game. “The difference was our intensity,” Smith said. “Our motivation to win this game was big. East is a good team and we have played them so many times. We know each other pretty well, so our main thing was to get the ball to Kiera and get her shots inside and work as a team, that’s what we’re good See CHAMPS, page 19


14

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Sports

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Christian Diaz helped the Spartans beat Plainfield South Friday.

Big second quarter aids Romeoville By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

After a normal first quarter, Romeoville held a simple 15-11 lead in their Southwest Prairie Conference showdown with Plainfield South. It was the second quarter that made the game for the Spartans, as they opened the frame on a 16-0 run to go ahead 41-25, a

lead that was able to withstand a furious comeback by South, as the Spartans held on for a 64-63 win. “That was the best first half that we have played, probably all season,” Romeoville coach Jeff Bambule said. “Christian (Diaz) started it off getting to the basket and that made things happen and we hit some shots.” Diaz had half of his team-best 16 points in the second quarter while Jimmy Moon had a pair of three pointers, scoring six of his 11 in the frame. Bambule said he told the Spartans to be ready for a Plainfield South comeback. “Give them credit, we told our guys at halftime that South wasn’t going to lay down,” Bambule said. “They were just going to turn up the pressure

more.” The Cougars did, but Romeoville was able to handle it despite being banged up during the half. “We did a nice job and Christian and James (Boyd) were banged up and they gutted it out,” Bambule said. “We made enough plays to pull it out.” “(Christian) was hurt at the end of the game and he did a really good job of gutting it out and giving us a spark,” Moon said. “He is a great ballhandler. Everyone did a good job handling pressure and I am proud of our guys.” South’s Alonzo Garrett led the Cougar comeback, scoring 12 of his game-high 18 points after the break. See BIG, page 19


sPorts

7

chers n u r C er Numb 12

BOYS Points per game Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Matt Mooney, Notre Dame Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Nick Norton, Downers North Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook David McCoy, Niles West John Solari, Maine South Ryan Peter, JCA Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Darrin Myers, Minooka Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Jordan Cannon, Downers South Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South Marcus Fair, Plainfield North Duante Stephens, Notre Dame Corey Evers, Plainfield South David Robinson, Lockport Jake Hogen, Minooka Robert Mara, Downers South Frank Dounis, Maine South Joe Younan, Niles West Carl Terrell, Joliet West Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Justin Halloran, Notre Dame Brandon McCullum, Joliet West Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook Mitch Young, Plainfield Central

18.5 17.1 15.3 15.0 14.8 14.6 14.3 14.3 14.1 13.3 12.6 12.2 12.0 11.9 11.6 11.4 11.1 11.0 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 10.1 10.0 10.0 9.8 9.5 9.3 9.2

Rebounds per game Robert Mara, Downers South Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jean Pertrzak, Westmont Eddie Serrano, Notre Dame Devo Goodlow, Plainfield Central Ryan Peter, JCA Corey Evak, Plainfield North David McCoy, Niles West Josh Smith, Plainfield East David Robinson, Lockport John Solari, Maine South Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West Andre Hardy, Joliet West Matt Mooney, Notre Dame Brandon McCullum, Joliet West Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Mohammad Qureshi, Niles West Kevin Fervil, Plainfield East Dave Edwards, Downers North

10.3 9.7 9.2 8.9 8.0 7.8 7.2 7.1 6.7 6.5 6.4 6.2 6.1 6.0 6.0 5.9 5.8 5.7 5.3 5.0

Assists Caleb Demarigny, Maine South Frank Dounis, Maine South Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Donte Stephenson, Notre Dame Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Marcus Fair, Plainfield North Kris Pierce, Westmont Christian Diaz, Romeoville Danny Quinn, Maine South Ryan Peter, JCA C.J. Redmond, Bolingbrook Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Shakar Washington, JCA Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West

94 90 90 85 85 81 80 74 68 60 54 53 52 50 50 48

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Stats based on coach submissions. Don’t see yours? Send to staylor@buglenewspapers.com

Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Darrin Myers, Minooka John Solari, Maine South Isiah Webster, Plainfield North Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Keegan Tyrell, JCA Daniel LoGiuarto, Westmont Perry Jones, Minooka Carl Terrell, Joliet West Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook David McCoy, Niles West

45 45 43 42 42 41 40 40 40 36 36 34

Steals Donte Stephenson, Notre Dame Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central Kris Pierce, Westmont Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Ryan Peter, JCA C.J. Redmond, Bolingbrook Morris Dunnigan, Joliet West Caleb Demarigny, Maine South Ben Moore, Bolingbrook Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Brandon McCullum, Joliet West Perry Jones, Minooka Tray Simmons, Downers South Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook Carl Terrell, Joliet West Jean Pietrzak, Westmont Jordan Cannon, Downers South Daniel LoGiuarto, Westmont John Campbell, Lockport Christian Diaz, Romeoville Jake Hogen, Minooka Andrew Palucki, Maine South Frank Dounis, Maine South Danny Quinn, Maine South Keegan Tyrell, JCA Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Jake Nowak, Plainfield North James Boyd, Romeoville David McCoy, Niles West Shakar Washington, JCA Nick Norton, Downers North Darrin Myers, Minooka Jimmy Moon, Romeoville Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Daniel Dwyer, Westmont Joe Butler, Minooka

67 51 44 37 35 35 35 33 33 33 32 32 32 31 30 29 28 28 28 26 26 26 26 26 26 25 25 25 25 23 22 22 21 21 21 20 20 19

Field Goal % Miles Snowden, Plainfield South Shawn Goff, Plainfield South Romeo Magliore, Niles West Ben Moore, Bolingbrook John Solari, Maine South Kenny Williams, Bolingbrook Joe Younan, Niles West Nick Norton, Downers North George Sargeant, Maine South Logan Velasquez, Plainfield Central Greg Pietrzak, Westmont Kendall Guyton, Bolingbrook Kurt Palandech, Plainfield North Justin Windt, Plainfield Central Danny Quinn, Maine South Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East

.750 .640 .639 .628 .610 .606 .593 .571 .570 .560 .544 .544 .530 .530 .530 .525

Free throw % Jake Maestranzi, Notre Dame Scott McNellis, Downers South Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Ahmad Gibson, Niles West Shakar Washington, JCA

.930 .810 .800 .800 .788

Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Mitch Young, Plainfield Central Jimmy Moon, Romeoville Jaylon Richardson, Romeoville Ryan Modiest, Joliet West Rinas Barsketis, Downers North Derrick Lockhart, Lockport Perry Jones, Minooka David Robinson, Lockport Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South Robert Mara, Downers South Aaron Jordan, Plainfield East Nick Norton, Downers North Romeo Magliore, Niles West Alex Darville, Niles West Romeo Magliore, Niles West Corey Evers, Plainfield South Keith Craig, JCA Darrin Myers, Minooka

.768 .760 .760 .760 .760 .750 .750 .745 .742 .740 .740 .739 .739 .733 .727 .722 .720 .720 .712

3-pointers Ryan Peter, JCA Prentiss Nixon, Bolingbrook Jimmy Moon, Romeoville Ryan Modiest, Joliet West Jordan Cannon, Downers South Alonzo Garrett, Plainfield South Marcus Fair, Plainfield North Jake Hogen, Minooka Joe Younan, Niles West Rashad Steele, Romeoville Mitch Young, Plainfield Central Danny Spinuzza, Downers South Jalen Jackson, JCA Trevor Stumpe, Plainfield North Caleb Demarigny, Maine South Andrew Palucki, Maine South Jake Smith, Minooka Daniel Dwyer, Westmont Adam Holstine, Minooka Jake Nowak, Plainfield North Darrin Myers, Minooka Neal Tyrell, Minooka Carl Terrell, Joliet West Deivis Skirgalia, Downers North Curtis Harringron, Plainfield Central Corey Evers, Plainfield South Shakar Washington, JCA

55 43 37 34 34 32 32 31 30 30 30 28 28 27 26 24 22 22 21 21 20 20 20 19 19 17 17

GIRLS Points per game Liz Rehberger, Resurrection Carlie Corrigan, Plainfield North Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Kiera Currie, Romeoville Nikia Edom, Plainfield East Christen Prasse, Benet Jacqui Grant, Maine South Bernasia Fox, Joliet Central Sarah Costello, Downers North Faith Suggs, Plainfield East Emily Schramek, Benet Regan Carmichael, Maine South Larissa McLemen, Minooka Kaitlyn O’Boye, Plainfield North Naomi Mayes, Lockport Gabby Williams, Plainfield East Jaida Green, Downers North Emily Eshoo, Benet Angelica Osusky, Romeoville Abby Smith, Romeoville Kate Moriarty, Resurrection

18.6 18.6 17.8 16.5 16.4 16.2 15.8 14.8 13.8 13.6 13.3 13.2 12.4 12.3 12.2 11.9 11.9 11.3 11.2 11.2 10.9 9.9

See STATS, page 18

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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Sports

Ramos, Hardy off to state By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Romeoville senior Caleb Ramos has worked four years to earn a trip to the Illinois state wrestling tournament. Saturday at the Class 3A Moline Sectional, those four years of work came down to one six minute match. With the top four places advancing from the state meet Ramos, who lost to eventual champion Ryan Holzrichter of Plainfield Central in the second round at 132 pounds, faced Phyllip DeLoach of Alton in the wrestleback semifinals – the match that would determine if all his hard work had paid off. It did, as Ramos defeated DeLoach to seal his trek to the state meet, which takes place next weekend at Assembly Hall on the University of Illinois in Champaign. “There is a point when you realize that everything you have worked for doesn’t matter unless you win that match,” Ramos said. “It is not about records or who has how many wins, it is about who brings the fight to the match and I brought it. It feels great. Everything is coming together and I am feeling great for state.” Losing in the final match a year ago and not making state his first two seasons, Ramos has had his share of loss and heartbreak on the mat, but he said all that loss See STATE, page 18

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Caleb Ramos placed third at 132 pounds at the Moline Sectional.


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

17


18

Sports

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

STATS Continued from page 15 Anna Novak, Lockport Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Alyssa Ruehl, Resurrection Izzy GreenBlatt, Downers North Brianna Harris, Romeoville Mackenzie Duffy, Maine South Kelly Barzowski, Resurrection Nicole Pease, Plainfield Central

9.8 8.8 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.5 7.5

Rebounds per game Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Chavon Banks, Joliet Central Carlie Corrigan, Plainfield North Kiera Currie, Romeoville

11.6 9.7 9.3 9.1

STATE Continued from page 16 helped him put together the match he needed to advance this year. “Those losses, I kept coming back and learning from them,” he said. “Everybody is tough when they are winning and things are going their way, but it is so hard to come back, but that

Aaliyah Stepney, Joliet West Gabby Williams, Plainfield East Jacqui Grant, Maine South Chantell Mack, Joliet Central Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Valencia Chandler, Joliet West Larissa McLemen, Minooka Sarah Costello, Downers North Faith Suggs, Plainfield East Peyton Winters, Downers North Taylor Weck, Plainfield North Julia Easter, Niles West Vicky Orasco, Joliet West Abby Smith, Romeoville Christen Prasse, Benet Bailee McDaniel, Plainfield Central Jenny Spychala, Resurrection Gina Ramirez, Joliet Central

8.6 8.2 7.8 7.6 7.4 7.0 6.6 6.6 6.4 6.3 6.2 5.8 5.7 5.4 5.3 5.1 5.1 4.9

is what makes tough wrestlers and tough people in life. That is what I am doing, I come back from each loss stronger, but I don’t like losing. It hurts my soul when I lose, but every time, I just get hungrier and I get better at wrestling. I am a very technical wrestler and sometimes I think too much, but here I just believed in myself and let it flow.” Ramos is not the only Spartan senior headed to the state meet this senior.

Jade Anthony, Plainfield Central Jenna Martin, Benet Nikia Edom, Plainfield East

4.8 4.7 4.5

Assists Kelly Barzowski, Resurrection Abby Smith, Romeoville Sydney Lilly, Minooka Sarah Costello, Downers North Angelica Osusky, Romeoville Regan Carmichael, Maine South Christen Prasse, Benet Gina Mathews, Plainfield East Brianna Harris, Romeoville Kathleen Doyle, Benet Nikia Edom, Plainfield East

158 135 95 65 65 63 56 56 55 51 49

Steals Abby Smith, Romeoville

90

At 120 pounds, Naquan Hardy will be joining Ramos at the state meet. Hardy’s trek through the sectional wasn’t as dramatic as Ramos’, as he defeated BradleyBourbonnais’ Jim Knapp and Shayne Oster of Lockport in his first two matches, locking up his place at state, as he advanced to face Joliet Central’s Trayvon Zabala in the title match. Hardy kept the match close through the first two periods,

Liz Rehberger, Resurrection Sarah Costello, Downers North Nicole Ekhomu, JCA Angelica Osusky, Romeoville Kelly Barzowski, Resurrection Kiera Currie, Romeoville Destiny Hollins, Lockport Nikia Edom, Plainfield East Kathleen Doyle, Benet Nina Maggio, Plainfield East Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Brianna Harris, Romeoville Anna Novak, Lockport Christen Prasse, Benet

79 74 65 63 58 57 56 53 52 48 47 47 46 45

Field Goal % Paige Kooi, Lockport Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA Peyton Winters, Downers North

.540 .510 .500

but in the third Zabala, who has a 43-0 record this year, turned it on and defeated Hardy 17-3. “I think he is the best wrestler at this weight class in the state,” Hardy said. “He doesn’t get the credit he deserves (Zabala is ranked third my illinoismatmen. com), but in my eyes he is the best. He is in better shape than me, so I have to go back and get my cardio up. I am going to work hard and maybe I will see him next week and if I do, the match will be different. I am not saying he will win or I will win, it will just be different. I will go hard at it. I know I was better than what I showed, so it is a motivation. Sophomore Evan Stingily also

Daniella Cortez, Plainfield Central Kate Moriarty, Resurrection Liz Rehberger, Resurrection

.500 .470 .470

Free Throw % Jenae Rowe, Joliet West Emily Eshoo, Benet Emily Schramek, Benet Liz Rehberger, Resurrection Erin Heide, Minooka Kiera Currie, Romeoville Nikia Edom, Plainfield East Christen Prasse, Benet Alexis Pease, Plainfield Central Faith Suggs, Plainfield East Anna Novak, Lockport Angelica Osusky, Romeoville Nicole Pease, Plainfield Central

.880 .880 .860 .800 .780 .769 .730 .730 .720 .710 .720 .707 .690

advanced to the sectional meet, but lost in his first two matches and was eliminated. All in all, Romeoville coach Bill Normand is happy with the sectional outcome. “I am very happy for both of them,” he said. “Caleb had a heartbreaker last year and put the time in and had a great offseason and had a great year and he came through. And Naquan had that football injury last year that kept him out and he battled back and had a great season. I am speechless how happy I am for those two kids. They put the time in and they deserve it.” mark@buglenewspapers.com


Sports BIG Continued from page 14 “Garrett hit some tough shots,” Bambule said. “I’m sure he was open a few times, but he hit some tough shots.” Most of his shots, especially

CHAMPS Continued from page 13 at.” “I think our coach did a really good job of motivating us and getting us pumped up,” Currie said.“We were really pumped up and were ready for this. I think we proved a point and showed we really wanted it.” The Spartans led 32-24 at the half, but the Bengals rallied

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

19

the one that cut the score to one point in the final seconds were heavily contested. “They hit some tough shots,” Moon said. “We played good defense, so give them credit for getting back in the game.” All the while the Cougars made their comeback, Moon said he was not going to allow his

team to fold under the pressure of the lead slipping away. “I was picked as captain so it is my job to be a leader out there and I have to keep my head up and make sure the other guys keep their heads up,” Moon said. “If we keep our heads up, who knows what can happen in the playoffs. If we keep shooting

well and play good defense, we can compete with anybody.” No matter what happens from here on out, Bambule said he was happy for the Spartans were able to hold on the win they worked so hard for. “The bottom line is they are great kids,” Bambule said. “We have been through our struggles

and I am just glad we are able to get a payoff for the kind of kids that they are. People want to judge them on the scoreboard because that is the way society is. But, they are great kids and I am glad they got a payoff. “They wanted it and went out and got it.”

to make it 36-33 in the third quarter. However, the Spartans scored the final 11 points of the quarter to take a 47-33 lead and the lead remained in double digits the rest of the game. “We made sure we were consistent and kept the lead,” Currie said. “Even when we did get down, we didn’t let it affect our game, we kept pushing hard.” “The first half was kind of shaky, but in the second half

they were switching things up and I had the opportunity to take it,” said Romeoville’s Angelica Osusky, who scored 13 of her 15 points in the middle two quarters.“Then I could pass it out to the outside for shots. We were really connecting and were pumped for this game. We didn’t want to share again.” Currie led Romeoville with 21 points and Smith tallied 13. Faith Suggs led the Bengals with 13. The celebration for

Romeoville was short lived as it played a Lemont Regional semifinal game Wednesday with the possibility of a fourth game this year with Plainfield East. It would be the seventh meeting in the past two years and both teams have won three times. The Spartans have won the past two, which should give them some added confidence. “It’s the rubber match I guess,” Carrasco said. “We’ve each won three times in the past six games in the last two years. Now we

have to see who is going to win the rubber match. I hope the girls are ready.” “We have the confidence, but we have to go in with the mentality that we are 0-0,” Osusky said. “It’s going to be all fresh because you are one and done now. We have to put this win behind us and go out with a bang. They are a great team but I’m glad we did what we did tonight and we’re able to pull it out.”

mark@buglenewspapers.com

staylor@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

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www.buglenewspapers.com/basketball

Two convincing wins put Dons back on track By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

Senior Night last Friday at Notre Dame turned out to be the right prescription for a Dons’ squad that’s endured injuries to Matt Mooney and Justin Halloran in recent weeks, coupled with suffering back-to-back losses the previous weekend. Seniors Danny Lazarra and Billy Hirsch were in the starting lineup for the Dons Friday, and they made significant contributions in Notre Dame’s 77-50 ESCC victory over Joliet Catholic Academy. Lazarra scored five straight points, including a three-point play, in the second quarter, which put the Dons in front, 15-7. Hirsch topped Notre Dame scorers with 12 points—all coming in the second half on three-pointers. He sank consecutive treys early in the third period that capped an 8-2 run and provided the Dons with a 40-24 lead. “The seniors got a ton of playing time, which they deserved,” said Notre Dame coach Tom Les. “There are a lot of good guys playing well. “In the first half I thought we were a little sluggish, and a lot of it was because they were playing good defense. They caused us a little confusion offensively. In the second half, I think we got some better ball movement. We got some easy looks and the basket got a little bigger and we made a few.” Pat Dillon’s trifecta in the fourth quarter—the Dons netted eight treys during the second half—gave Notre Dame its biggest lead of the game at 6735. All told, Notre Dame had 11 three-pointers on the night. Halloran (three treys) and Eddie Serrano scored 11 apiece, while Serrano snapped down eight rebounds. Lazarra and Duante Stephens each finished with eight. Stephens added four rebounds, four assists and three steals, and Jake Maestranzi collected five assists and five rebounds. “We really needed this to get our momentum going towards the tournament,” said Halloran, who’s back at full strength after

missing six games in December and January with a fractured knuckle on his right index finger. “Hopefully we can continue building on this.When we’re full strength, we’re really good. We really think that we’re one of the top teams in the state.” The Dons are the No. 2 seed in the Glenbrook North sectional and will be at the Glenbrook South regional later this month. Maine South got the top sectional seed. “We were really hurting after this past weekend,” said Mooney, who returned to action for the first time since hurting his back in a 47-42 loss to Carmel Feb. 1. The injury forced Mooney to miss Notre Dame’s game the next day, which Loyola won, 63-54, while hosting the War on the Shore Shootout. “We knew that we fell short,” he said. “We didn’t get the No. 1 seed in the sectional, but we know we deserved it and we’re going to keep fighting.” Mooney said his back is “hurting a little bit,” but he plans on playing through it. “Hopefully it’ll work itself out,” he said. “He was not moving like he normally does,” Les added. “Hopefully tomorrow he’ll feel better and next week.” Les’ “tomorrow” reference was to the Dons’ 75-44 triumph over Providence St. Mel on Saturday night—their 20th victory of the season. Mooney had 21 points and Halloran scored 15 points for Notre Dame (20-4, 5-2), which led comfortably throughout following a 23-8 first quarter. Stephens had 10 and Serrano eight. Les said the team’s mindset after dropping two in a row for the first time this season was positive. “Everybody was disappointed,” he said, “but the one thing about our guys, they weren’t pointing fingers. They were all, ‘What else could I do (to have won)?’ And that’s the approach I want to take. We played a game-and-a-half without one of our best players (Mooney). Guys stepped up, but we really didn’t close the deal.” mike@buglenewspapers.com

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Notre Dame’s Duante Stephens scored eight points, with four assists, four rebounds and three steals.

PLAYER OF THE WEEK Nominees Ahmad Gibson, Niles West 24 points in win over GBS

Last week’s results Abby Smith Romeoville

Aaron Jordan Plainfield East

Scott McNellis Downers South

Jasmine Lumpkin JCA

Frank Dounis, Maine South 19 pts in 13th straight win Jasmine Lumpkin, JCA 24 points, 17 rebs vs. Mac Kiera Currie, Romeoville 21 points in win vs. Plain. East Go to buglenewspapers.com to vote for your winner!

31% 50%

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Health & Fitness

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

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A healthy heart, a happy Valentine’s Day that too much cholesterol is bad for us, but why? Because high cholesterol can cause the ebruary...the month of buildup of a fatty substance love and romance. As called “plaque” within the we ladies look forward walls of the arteries.These to spending February 14th with fatty deposits cause the inside our loved ones and relishing of arteries to narrow resulting all things related to the heart, in a decrease of blood flow let’s remind ourselves through them.Think to take good care of of a kitchen pipe our own hearts. Heart becoming clogged disease has long been over time. Since blood considered a disease supplies oxygen to of men, but it is the our bodies, when number one killer the arteries become of women as well as narrowed then men in the United the amount of oxygen States. While the risk of Medical Memo supplied to the heart may be reduced.This heart disease increases lack of oxygen can with age, women of all cause chest pain and eventually ages should seriously consider a heart attack. A heart attack making the appropriate lifestyle is your heart crying out for decisions and do everything they can to reach their dreams. oxygen. Let’s begin with the basics. Luckily, there are things that What is heart disease? There can be done to reduce the risk are blood vessels, called the of this happening.We cannot coronary arteries, that supply change our family history but we can change our lifestyle blood to the heart.The most and fortunately that can make common cause of heart disease a difference.A woman’s risk is disease of these very arteries, of heart disease is higher if appropriately called coronary artery disease. We all know she is over age 55, has a family

history of heart disease or heart attack, high total cholesterol or LDL, has medical problems such as high blood pressure or diabetes, or has certain lifestyle characteristics such as cigarette smoking, lack of regular exercise, or obesity.The more items on this list a woman has, the higher her risk of heart disease. What can be done? First, stay physicially active. We’ve heard it all before. But it is worth reading it again. Exercise helps maintain a healthy weight, controls blood pressure, and improves cholesterol levels. It can increase good cholesterol levels (HDL) and decrease bad cholesterol levels (LDL).The goal is to be physically active at least 30 minutes a day most days of the week. Do it for yourself, your family, and all of those people that care about you. Second, stop smoking.The sooner you quit, the greater you reduce your chance of developing heart disease.Third, maintain a healthy weight.This benefits much more than your heart. And lastly, try to reduce cholesterol levels by exercising, reducing saturated fat in the

diet (avoid processed food!), and eating more fiber such as beans, oatmeal, popcorn, and nuts. If diet and exercise do not work, there are medications that can reduce cholesterol levels and help reduce your risk of heart disease.This does, of course, mean you will have to see your doctor and have your cholesterol checked. Symptoms of heart disease in women can differ from men and sadly many heart attacks of women can be ignored because of this. Some women will have chest pain, with or without nausea. If the following symptoms last more than 5 minutes, call an ambulance or go to the hospital: sudden, intense pressure or pain in the chest; shortness of breath; chest pain that spreads to the shoulders, neck or arms; or feelings of light-headedness, fainting, sweating or nausea. If you experience any of these symptoms, take an aspirin, lie down and breathe slowly while you are waiting for the ambulance to arrive.This can help decrease or limit the damage to your heart muscle.

Doctor’s Rx: Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States. Heart disease is often caused by narrowing of the arteries that supply oxygen to the heart muscle which limits the amount of oxygen to the heart and can cause chest pain or a heart attack. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is the best thing women (and men) can do to reduce their risk.This includes increasing physical activity, quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight and reducing cholesterol levels. Remember, symptoms of heart attacks in women can be different from men, so be aware of what those symptoms are and have a plan for dealing with them in an emergency.

CALENDAR

patrons and their caregivers have a lot of fun together in the evening when they drop in for stories, songs, and activities.

watercolor pencil drawings. The basic elements of form, color, technique and design will be explained as the class progresses to more complex subjects.

gathers for a storytime filled with fun, stories, songs, and laughter.

By Dr. Kristia Patsavas Guest columnist

F

and get ready for awesome stories and FUN. Registration is required.

Continued from page 9 stories, activities and learning fun of storytime to a slightly younger audience. This program is for children ages 2 and 3 with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required. www.whiteoaklibrary.org. Internet Level 1. 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the White Oak Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville.You may register with Adult Services Desk, Romeoville Branch Library, 815-886-2030 or you may now register online at www.whiteoaklibrary.org. Tween Scene. 4 to 5 p.m. at the White Oak Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Do you enjoy hanging out at the library? Well, come to Tween Scene.Each session we’ll have fun things to do like games, science, anime, manga, and crafts. Pajama Jam. 6 to 6:45 p.m. at the White Oak Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. All ages – wear your pajamas

Zombie Vs. Unicorn. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the White Oak Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. We will tackle that age-old epic question of who really is the coolest creature? Yes--we are talking Zombie VS Unicorn and there is no end to the debate. Tonight it ends and a victor is crowned.We will be play Zombie and Unicorn Games and of course will have themed food. So get your debate on. Register as space will be limited. Lapsit Storytime. 9:45 to 10:15 a.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Ages 0 to 18 months with an adult. Our youngest patrons and their caregivers have a lot of fun together in the evening when they drop in for stories, songs, and activities. Lapsit Storytime. 10:30 to 11: a.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook.Ages 0 to 18 months with an adult. Our youngest

Let’s Create. 4:15 to 5 p.m.at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Grades 2 through 5. Getting Started on the Internet. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Getting Started on the Internet. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Teen Gaming Club. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Watercolor Pencil Drawing. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. Adults. Watercolor pencils combine drawing and painting. Learn how to create art by brushing water over the

Family storytime. 7 to 7:30 p.m. at the Fountaindale Public Library, 300 W. Briarcliff Road, Bolingbrook. The whole family

Dr. Kristia Patsavas, MD is a physician specializing in Obstetrics and Gynecology and is based in Park Ridge, Illinois. The advice contained in this column is for information purposes only. Readers should consult with their own physician to evaluate any illness or medical condition. Dr. Patsavas accepts new patients. Call 847-825-7030 or go to www. associatesinobgyn.net to schedule an appointment.

FEBRUARY 20 Storytime. 10:30 to 11 a.m. the White Oak Library, 201 W. Normantown Road, Romeoville. Storytime at Romeoville involves stories; songs and projects designed to teach important


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Real Estate & Business

Making mistake is not the same thing as being wrong Q. I know I misunderstood something one of my employees said and overreacted.We used to have a great relationship. Now he hardly looks at me. I really don’t want to have to admit I was wrong? How can I fix the relationship and still keep my pride? A. You can fix the relationship if you can realize that making a mistake is not the same as being wrong. If you believe that your entire being can be made wrong because you are a human being who

learns through errors, then you’ll be unable to problem solve because you are too stuck in embarrassment. We will all make mistakes in and out of our workplace. If we strive to achieve great goals, we’ll also make grand mistakes not merely small mistakes. Every mistake gives us a chance to start again more intelligently. My clients tell me that using the language I teach them is a great asset in fixing mistakes. For instance, if you talk

to employees about realizing that you may not have listened to them thoroughly, you are not admitting there is something horribly wrong with you. Most of us on a bad day have been less than perfect listeners. Consider the possibility that, instead of limiting yourself categories like right and wrong, you could use categories like effective and ineffective. If you evaluate your behavior based on whether it works or doesn’t work, there is no global assessment of your soul going on. Reality is a great teacher to

all of us in the workplace. We come to a job in our twenties with a lot of theories. We try out our theories and, if we’re wise, notice that some theories don’t seem to be effective. As the boss, you’re in a position to be a powerful role model to your team. What you do will speak much more loudly than what you say. If you can acknowledge that you didn’t listen well and overreacted, then your employees have the room to also admit and fix problems. There have been multiple studies on the concept of a

“learning organization.” The idea can be summed up like this: If people feel free to make mistakes, admit errors and learn, the entire organization makes more money. Productivity really is based on our capacity to see what doesn’t work, not be bogged down in being upset about that, and figuring out a better way. American business in particular has prided itself on innovation on novel problem solving. Ask yourself how you or your team can engage in creativity if you are too embarrassed to admit what doesn’t work?

Base term life insurance amount on income level Dear Dave, I’m looking at buying term life insurance. Currently, I’m in medical school doing my last year of residency and making $35,000 a year.Should I base the amount of insurance coverage on what I’m making now or what I’ll make when I’ve finished medical school? Amanda

Dear Amanda, In most cases, I advise basing the amount of life insurance coverage on the income you’re earning at the moment. After all, that’s the amount your family is used to living on, right? However, if you’re finishing up your medical degree this year, it’s a virtual certainty you’ll earn lots more in

2014. You could easily go from making $35,000 to $135,000. I recommend that people buy term life insurance coverage of about 10 to 12 times their annual income. Considering your situation, I’d say you could afford to buy a little potential. Instead of basing it on your current $35,000 income and buying

a policy in the $350,000 to $400,000 range, you might double that amount. It will still be really cheap coverage as long as you’re in decent health. And once you’re making doctor money you can adjust the amount of coverage according to what you actually make. Good luck, Amanda! —Dave


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Extended hours for primary voting Will County Clerk Nancy Schultz Voots announced that her office, 302 N. Chicago St., Joliet, will offer extended hours for voting. The Consolidated and Special Primary Election will be held Feb. 26. In order to be eligible to vote, you must live in either the 2nd Congressional District or Homer Township. Early Voting will be available from Feb. 11 through Feb. 23. Regular office hours will be Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Saturday from 9 a.m. until noon. In addition, the office will have extended hours, which are listed below, to accommodate voters: Tuesday, Feb. 12, from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. (Lincoln’s Birthday) Friday, Feb. 15, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, from 8 a.m. until noon. Monday, Feb. 18, from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. (President’s Day) For more information, visit www.thewillcountyclerk.com or call 815-740-4632 or 815-7746367.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 606 Cedar Court Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Home). On the 6th day of March, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff V. Pamela L. Ditko a/k/a Pamela Lynn Ditko DDS a/k/a Pamela Lynn Ditko; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 3140 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-00856 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/7, 2/14, 2/21

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 346 Richfield Trail Romeoville, IL 60446 (Single Family Home). On the 6th day of March, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff V. Nicholas Filips a/k/a Nicholas R. Filips; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 1124 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-33723 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/7, 2/14, 2/21

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 439 Montrose Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (Residential). On the 6th day of March, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: OneWest Bank, FSB (d/b/a Financial Freedom, a division of OneWest Bank, FSB) Plaintiff V. John D. Wallace; et. al. Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 5142 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g) (4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-32775 PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 2/7, 2/14, 2/21 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 746 South Shannon Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 (single family). On the 27th day of February, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: RBS CITIZENS, N.A., SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO CCO MORTGAGE CORP. Plaintiff V. RANFERI MONTES; FRANCISCO MONTES; LAKEWOOD FALLS PHASE 7 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 2753 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 1/31, 2/7, 2/14


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013


THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

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26 THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

ROMEOVILLE

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS )

THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE” W10-4609 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION Bank of America, N.A.; Plaintiff, VS. Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Roberta Head; Candice A. Young; Parkside Condominium Association; The Wesglen Master Association; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Candice A. Young, if any; Unknown Owners and Non Record Claimants; Defendants. 10 CH 7815 Judge Richard Siegel Courtroom 129 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given to you: -Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Roberta Head -Unknown Owners and Non Record Claimants that Plaintiff has commenced this case in the Circuit Court of Will County against you and other defendants, for foreclosure of a certain Mortgage lien recorded against the premises described as follows: UNIT NUMBER 650 IN PARKSIDE CONDOMINIUM, AS DELINEATED ON A PLAT OF SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF LAND: PARTS OF LOTS IN WESGLEN SUBDIVISIONS, BEING SUBDIVISIONS OF PARTS OF THE WEST 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS WHICH PLAT OF SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT “D” TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED OCTOBER 21, 1999, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R99-128921, AS AMENDED FROM TIME TO TIME, TOGETHER WITH ITS UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS. C/K/A: 1524 Azalea Circle, Romeoville, IL 60446 PIN: 11-04-07-104-133-1002 said Mortgage was given by Candice A. Young and Roberta Head, Mortgagor(s), to Bank of America, N.A., Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois, as Document No. R2009015345. YOU MAY STILL BE ABLE TO SAVE YOUR HOME. DO NOT IGNORE THIS DOCUMENT. By order of the Chief Judge of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit Court, this case is set for Mandatory Mediation on February 7, 2013 at 01:00 PM at the Will County Court, Annex 3rd Floor (Arbitration Center) 57 N. Ottawa Street, Joliet, Illinois. A lender representative will be present along with a court appointed mediator to discuss options that you may have and to pre-screen you for a potential mortgage modification. YOU MUST APPEAR ON THE MEDIAITION DATE GIVEN OR YOUR MEDIAITON WILL BE TERMINATED. UNLESS YOU file your appearance or otherwise file your answer in this case in the Office of the Circuit Clerk of Will County, Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, Joliet IL 60432 on or before March 11, 2013, A JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE OR DECREE BY DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU FOR THE RELIEF ASKED FOR IN THE PLAINTIFF’S COMPLAINT. Russell C. Wirbicki (6186310) The Wirbicki Law Group LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 33 W. Monroe St., Suite 1140 Chicago, IL 60603 Phone: 312-360-9455 Fax: 312-572-7823 W10-4609

) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

RBS CITIZENS, N.A., SUCCESSOR INTEREST TO CCO MORTGAGE CORP. Plaintiff,

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff,

IN

vs. RANFERI MONTES; FRANCISCO MONTES; LAKEWOOD FALLS PHASE 7 HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS Defendant. No. 11 CH 2753 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 30th day of August, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 27th day of February, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 517 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 7C BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST ¼ OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 26, 2002 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2002138021, EXCEPT THAT PART DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 517; THENCE SOUTH 06 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST, 108.61 FEET; THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST, 53.82 FEET; THENCE NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST, 109.69 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG A CURVE NON-TANGENT TO THE LAST DESCRIBED LINE BEING CONCAVE SOUTHERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 55.00 FEET AND A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 88 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 26.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 746 South Shannon Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: single family P.I.N.: 04-18-409-066 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 1/31, 2/7, 2/14

vs. Nicholas Filips a/k/a Nicholas R. Filips; et. al. Defendant. No. 12 CH 1124 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 19th day of September, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 6th day of March, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 44 IN LAKEWOOD FALLS UNIT 5 POD 22, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 36 NORTH, RANGE 9, EAST TO THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED OCTOBER 12, 1999 AS DOCUMENT R99124554 EXCEPT THAT PART DESCRIBED AND FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID LOT 44; THENCE SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 32.2 SECONDS WEST, 107.17 FEET; THENCE NORTH 68 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST. 30.76 FEET; THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST, 42.69 FEET; THENCE NORTH 53 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST, 111.68 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG A CURVE NON TANGENT TO THE LAST DESCRIBED LINE BEING CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 60.00 FEET AND CHORD BEARING OF SOUTH 48 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 25.55 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 346 Richfield Trail Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 06-03-12-411-036 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-10-33723 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/7, 2/14, 2/21

) SS. COUNTY OF WILL ) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, vs. Pamela L. Ditko a/k/a Pamela Lynn Ditko DDS a/k/a Pamela Lynn Ditko; et. al. Defendant. No. 11 CH 3140 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 19th day of September, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 6th day of March, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 3-21-3 (EXCEPT THE WEST 15.15 FEET) AND THE WEST 10.15 FEET OF LOT 3-21-2 IN HONEYTREE SUBDIVISION UNIT THREE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 29, 1973 AS DOCUMENT NO. R73-26480. PARCEL II: EASEMENTS FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS APPURTENANT TO PARCEL I AS SET FORTH IN DECLARATION OF EASEMENTS, RESTRICTION, COVENANTS AND CONDITIONS RECORDED DECEMBER 21, 1972 AS DOCUMENT NO. R72-37074, AS AMENDED, ALL IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 606 Cedar Court Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Single Family Home P.I.N.: 02-27-117-012 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-00856 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/7, 2/14, 2/21

) SS. COUNTY OF WILL ) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS OneWest Bank, FSB (d/b/a Financial Freedom, a division of OneWest Bank, FSB) Plaintiff, vs. John D. Wallace; et. al. Defendant. No. 11 CH 5142 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 19th day of September, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 6th day of March, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 1, IN BLOCK 2, IN HAMPTON PARK SUBDIVISION NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE EAST HALF OF SECTION 33 AND THE WEST HALF OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RAGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 439 Montrose Drive Romeoville, IL 60446 Description of Improvements: Residential P.I.N.: 02-33-401-001 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Codilis & Associates, P.C. 15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 630-794-5300 630-794-9090 fax 14-11-32775 PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 2/7, 2/14, 2/21

I494970 Published 2/7, 2/14, 2/21


News

THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

27

Stepping up for cancer research with St. Baldrick’s By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

Towns and residents all over the area are gearing up to go bald. In an event, the St. Baldrick’s fundraiser, which spans across 50 states and 20 countries, local communities and countless volunteers are shaving their heads in solidarity for children with cancer. Gordon Biersch at The Promenade Bolingbrook kicked off the fundraising season for St. Baldrick’s Bolingbrook 4 Kids Jan. 29 with a beer tapping event, raising $2,500. St. Baldrick’s is the world’s largest volunteer-driven fundraising event for childhood cancer research. Organizers ask that people throw vanity out the window and dare them to experience the “brilliance of being bald while raising funds for life-saving research.” Being a shavee raises awareness—a bald head, a display of solidarity with children who have cancer who aren’t able to choose how to

SUBMITTTED PHOTO

Daniel is a local survivor of childhood cancer who was helped through the efforts of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation.

style their hair because they lost it to chemotherapy. Each year, teams from throughout the area come together for their event; Bolingbrook 4 Kids to be held this

year, March 16 at the Bolingbrook Golf Club. Registration begins at 5:30 p.m., opening ceremonies start at 6:30 p.m. with shaving starting at 7:15 p.m. Funds will be raised by volunteers

from Bolingbrook, Plainfield, Romeoville and surrounding areas who shave their heads through sales of food and drink purchases, raffle tickets and a silent auction. The event will honor numerous children with cancer along with their families. Families that have lost their children to cancer will also be present and honored. The St. Baldrick’s Foundation makes grants to research institutions to find new cures for childhood cancer, and to find treatments to ensure a better quality of life for patients and survivors. The Foundation funds research projects conducted by established pediatric cancer experts, as well as younger professionals who will be the experts of tomorrow.  Funds also enable hundreds of local institutions to participate in national pediatric cancer clinical trials, offering the best available care for every child. The event has collectively raised more than $69 million in the past 10 years to be dedicated

to cancer research. It is the world’s largest such fundraiser and is only second in the amount of donations to the U.S. government. The “Bolingbrook 4 Kids” event is among the top 25 largest St. Baldrick’s events, ranking 25 out of 1,100 events worldwide in 2012. The event has been hosted since 2007 annually by the Bolingbrook Police and Fire Departments andThe Promenade Bolingbrook. Entertainment will be provided by Music Mania, The Weber Irish Dancers and The Bolingbrook Fire Honor Guard Pipes and Drums. Food sponsors include Promenade Bolingbrook Restaurants including Bar Louie, BD Mongolian Grill, Francesca’s, Gordon Biersch, and Go Roma. For more information, register or donate, visit www.Stbaldricks. org and search for Bolingbrook under events. To stay updated, check Facebook at https://www. facebook.com/#!/stbaldricks. bolingbrook.


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THE BUGLE FEBRUARY 14, 2013

Romeoville 2-14-13  

Romeoville 2-14-13

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