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ONLINE More news at buglenewspapers.com

NEWS Woodridge Police investigate shooting

SPORTS Lisle tops Westmont

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Our Community, Our News

OCTOBER 16, 2013

former NBa player talks drug prevention at North High

the tax and fee increases would cost the average homeowner approximately $74.55 more per year, with an additional $27.57 going to property taxes, $36.90 to water fees and $10.08 to stormwater fees each year.

See BUDGET, page 4

avERaGE BiMoNtHly watER Bill iN 2014

GENERal fuND EXPENsEs

$43.79 million

$42.57 million

$95.10

$43.57 million

esidents of Downers Grove can expect to pay more in property taxes, stormwater fees and water rates next year, according to the village’s 2014 proposed budget. General fund expenses will increase from $41.75 million in 2013 to $43.57 million in 2014 due to an uptick in the amount the village will pay into police and fire pensions, as well as additional spending on infrastructure improvements such as streets,

avERaGE BiMoNtHly watER Bill iN 2013

$41.75 million

STORY BY JONATHAN SAMPLES | STAFF REPORTER

By Jewell Washington For the Bugle

2013 2014

Downers Grove budget proposes property tax, fee increases $83.85

iNCoMiNG GENERal fuND

Vol. 5 No. 46

Downers Grove residents are taking strides to prevent drug use in their community. Thursday night hundreds of parents, students and community leaders gathered in the North High School auditorium to hear former basketball player Chris Herren speak about his rise to NBA stardom and his tragic defeat to drug addiction. Now 38, the former Nuggets and Celtics point guard said he started drinking alcohol and experimenting with cocaine and marijuana in high school. Herren went on to get drafted and play 70 games from 1999 to 2001 with Denver and Boston. However, drugs, stress and lack of selfesteem as a young athlete lead to a lengthy addiction to pharmaceuticals and heroine. “I had no idea that that decision back then, that one little yellow pill, was about See HERREN, page 2


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

HERREN Continued from page 1 to flip my world upside down and change my life forever,” he adamantly told the audience. Herren said he purchased his first Oxycodone pill in 1999 for $20. That first bad choice soon spiraled into a $25,000 monthly habit. Herren soon sacrificed his basketball career and relationships with family members to get high on heroin. He told the crowd that his dangerous, expensive drug habit also led to life on the street, an overdose, car accidents, police arrests, felony charges and suicidal thoughts. “I was bailed out of jail, but I didn’t call my mommy and daddy,” he said. “I didn’t call my family. I called the drug man in the parking lot because his heroin was so good it almost killed me.” Herren added that it took

losing everything, including moral support from his wife and three children, to push him to successfully complete drug rehabilitation. “Aug. 1, 2008 is my sobriety date,” Herren said. “I thank God everyday for that moment that put me to my knees. I am grateful for all my bad days because it gave me an opportunity to share this message.” Herren has shared his story for the last four years and said his goal is to help young people discover their worth and self-esteem. Robert Krause, 18, said Herren’s presentation was exactly what his community needed to learn about drug addiction. “It’s regular kids just like us that walk through the schools and the hallway,” Krause said. “A lot of my friends are in recovery. I’m in recovery and having that support, that’s what keeps us going and keeps us sober.” Manette Hanson is a member of Parent Cafe, a program and

News support group for parents that have children battling drugs and undergoing treatment. She has a son and daughter fighting addictions and said Herren’s presentation brought her tears of happiness. “Recovery brings intense compassion and the world needs more of that,” she said. Other parents added that Herren reminded them to focus on their children’s self-confidence early on, as well as their academic and athletic goals. “To just be proud of their hard work, being good in their own skin, reverse peer pressure —those are characteristics we’re working on as a family and that’s a very important message,” said Chris Rogers, who grew up with Herren. Rogers is now a dad, and he brought his sixth grade daughter to the event. Herren offered more help, namely through Project Purple, a non-profit that helps families talk about drug use, battle addiction and find treatment. “I truly believe in my heart that speaking to high school students is making a difference,” Herren said.

JEWELL WASHINGTON/FOR THE BUGLE

Herren speaks about his 11-year drug addiction at North High School in Downers Grove during Red Ribbon Week Thursday night.

The former NBA player spoke to more students Friday as a wrap up to Red Ribbon Week,

an alcohol, tobacco and drug prevention awareness campaign that takes place every October.


THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

CMaP votes against illiana Corridor By Nick Reiher Managing Editor Alex V. Hernandez Staff Reporter

The CMAP Board voted 10 to 4 Oct. 9 against amending its GO TO 2040 plan to include the Illiana corridor project, a nearly 50-mile road from Interstate 55 near Wilmington in Will County to Interstate 65 in Indiana. The project, supported by state officials in Indiana and Illinois, had been on the fast track until CMAP officials late last year chastised the Illinois Department of Transportation for leaving them out of the loop. Since then, CMAP staff have recommended rejecting the plan due to inconsistent financing and economic forecasts. Last week, however, CMAP’s Transportation Committee supported including the Illiana. The Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Committee, chaired by Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider, will have the final say at an Oct. 17 meeting. At issue is the possibility of being included in federal transportation funding. The Illiana has been proposed as a public-

those ‘noWhere land and ‘Wasteland’ comments just shoW an attitude of hoW [cmap] sees the southern area of the region. - JoHN GREuliNG, PREsiDENt of tHE will CouNty CENtER foR ECoNoMiC DEvEloPMENt

private partnership project, with the state helping a private investor with securing land and possibly low-cost loans. The CMAP board’s decision wasn’t a surprise, but its chairman’s comments startled some. “This plan is a political plan,” said CMAP Chair Gerald Bennett. “It was dropped on us by the governor and IDOT.” He told board members the days of political pressure being applied to the funding of transportation plans in the region were over, and that the both the integrity and the credibility of CMAP were at risk if the 2040 plan was amended to include the Illiana project. “I’m not going to back down to political pressure,” said Bennett. CMAP Board Member Elliott Hartstein agreed and said that the most urbanized

area of the region is on the North Side, not Will County. Bennett agreed, saying it made no sense to invest money in the Illiana project that could go to other CMAP transportation projects. He said the plan for a nearly 50mile highway stretching from Interstate 55 near Wilmington in Will County to Interstate 65 in Indiana is a “highway to nowhere land.” “I would hope we reject this,” said Hartstein. During the public comment portion of the meeting, John Greuling, President of the Will County Center for Economic Development, chastised Bennett for describing Will County as a “nowhere land.” Later in the meeting, Bennett apologized See CMAP VOTES, page 4

Downers Grove named to Green Fleet The village of Downers Grove has been selected as the 14th Government Green Fleet in North America. Each year the Government Green Fleet Award recognizes the top 100 fleets for their dedicated use of alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles.These awards are supported by the Clean Cities Coalition, which is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy. Downers Grove was the only community recognized in the Chicagoland area. Of the 176 units within the village’s fleet, including on and off road vehicles and equipment, 83 percent utilize some form of alternative fuel. These alternatives include Biodiesel (B-20), E-85 (Ethanol),

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), propane, solar power, and hybrid combinations. The village uses CNG fuel to power a wide range of vehicles including Honda Civics, pick-up trucks, cargo vans, police patrol vehicles and five-ton trucks. The village’s five-ton trucks were the first in the midwest to be powered by CNG. Using alternative fuels reduces the environmental impact of fleet operations and is more cost effective than traditional petroleum based products. For example, the per-gallon cost of gasoline equivalent for CNG is $.70. The Village’s fleet operations were also recognized for:

• Using solar power and used motor oil to heat the garage facility; • Retrofitting the entire fleet facility with energy-efficient fluorescent lighting; • Using nitrogen tire fills on all Village vehicles for improved gas mileage and longer tire life; • Adopting an anti-idling policy; and • Using in-cab warmers to reduce idling. Past awards include selection as an Illinois Green Fleet by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and the Clean Fuels Champion Award from the Chicago Area Clean Cities Coalition.

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woodridge police investigate shooting By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

A 42-year-old man was shot in the upper body Monday evening in the 3300 block of 83rd Street in Woodridge. The Woodridge Police Department responded to a report of shots fired at 10:48 p.m. Monday. When they arrived they discovered a man had suffered a gunshot wound to the upper body.This victim’s injuries were not considered life threatening, and he was transported to the hospital. “We’re looking into some things and, we have a number of leads we’re tracking down,” Woodridge Police Sgt.Tom Stefanson said. The Woodridge Police Department said this is an isolated incident and the public is not in any danger. As of Monday, there were no updates in the investigation. Police are currently investigating the incident and are asking anyone with information to call the Woodridge Police Department at 630-719-4733 or email crimetips@ vil.woodridge.il.us.

Correction: In a story about Downers Grove’s Chilympics event in the Oct. 9 issue of the Bugle, it stated the photo was courtesy of the Downers Grove Public Library. It should have read “courtesy of the Downers Grove Park District.”


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Downers Grove’s finest honored for performing life-saving measures By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

Several Downers Grove police officers were recognized Tuesday by the village and their department for going above and beyond the call of duty. Downers Grove Police Lt. Shanon Gillette presented seven police department personnel with a variety of awards during the Oct. 8 Village Board meeting. “We’re very privileged and proud to have Downers Grove’s finest protecting us and taking these kinds of actions as part of their daily job,” Downers Grove Mayor Martin Tully said. Officers Drew Barczak and Tom Powers, Sgt. Mike DeVries, and dispatcher Mike Chufo each earned the department’s life-saving award for the team effort they displayed in helping to stabilize a 62-year-old man who had suffered a heart attack in June of 2012. “According to fire department personnel, the life-saving

We’re very privileged and proud to have Downers Grove’s finest protecting us and taking these kinds of actions as part of their daily jobs. - Martin Tully, Mayor of Downers Grove

CPR instructions provided by dispatcher Chufo and the immediate actions of the officers saved the victims life,” Gillette said. Sgt. Rich Johnson was awarded the life-saving award for his role in stabilizing a driver who was unresponsive and not breathing during a May 2012 call. Officer Jeff Giermann was also awarded the lifesaving award for helping to talk a woman down from a fourth floor ledge who was threatening to commit suicide. Officer Jeff Mertz received the award of valor for his

involvement in subduing a man who threatened to jump from a bridge near Interstate 355 and Interstate 88. “I would like to personally thank all of you tonight,” Downers Grove Police Chief Robert Porter said. “You have saved several lives. Everyday I see the work our men do out in the field, and it’s truly humbling to be your chief.” In addition to the department awards, Porter presented Village Attorney Enza Petrarca with a surprise award for her work behind the scenes within the department.

News Briefs Woodridge 2013 town meeting a success The village thanked all the taxing bodies and attendees that made this year’s Town Meeting a success. Over 100 visitors attended, with roughly half participating in break out discussion and providing valuable feedback during the priority setting discussion with the Village Board. Numerous compliments about services provided by Woodridge taxing bodies were shared during the discussions.

Hydrant Flushing Starts in Woodridge The village of Woodridge Public Works Department will

BUDGET Continued from page 1

CMAP VOTES Continued from page 3 for also calling Will County a “wasteland.” “I wanted them to hold off on their vote until they had a chance to come down and see what we’re talking about,” said Greuling. “But those ‘nowhere land and ‘wasteland’ comments just show an attitude of how [CMAP] sees the southern area of the region.” He also felt that CMAP and those from Will County had a discrepancy when it came to the kind of traffic that transportation projects should improve. He believes CMAP favors alleviating commuter traffic through already established urban areas, while the proponents of the Illiana project want to improve commercial and freight traffic in order to attract more economic development to the Will County area. “A truck bypass does not create jobs,” said Randy Blankenhorn, executive director for CMAP. “I don’t feel [the Illiana project] is what that region, which does

need economic development, needs.” Sean O’Shea, deputy chief of staff for Gov. Pat Quinn, was at the meeting and said that since the Illiana project would be a tollway, it could to generate revenue to offset its cost. CMAP wouldn’t call their vote to deny the Illiana project an “advisory vote,” but CMAP spokesperson Tom Garritano couldn’t give another name for it when asked by media at the press conference. CMAP board members voting for amending the 2040 plan to include the Illiana project were: Bolingbrook Mayor Roger Claar of Will County; Rick Reinbold of South Cook County; Ray Rupp Srch of DuPage County; and Tom Weisner of Kane County. Voting against the amendment were: Frank Beal of Chicago; Rita Athas of Chicago; Raul Raymundo of Chicago; Lisa Laws of Chicago; Pete Silvestri of Suburban Cook County; Gerald Bennett of South West Cook County; William Rodeghier of West Cook County; Al Larson of North West Cook County; Elliott Hartstein of Lake County; and Carolyn Schofield of McHenry County.

IDOT spokeswoman Jae Miller said they were disappointed with the outcome of the “advisory vote on an innovative project that will support both short- and long-term economic development and population growth throughout the entire region, state and Midwest.” She said the project is“strongly supported” by more than 40 communities, Will County, the governors of Illinois and Indiana, business owners, labor organizations and thousands of other stakeholders across two states. “The Illiana will create better ways to distribute the region’s goods; welcome new investment from businesses that depend on good transportation; make it easier, safer and more energy-and-time-efficient to travel throughout Illinois and Indiana; and create both short and long-term employment for thousands, all with low risk for taxpayers,” she added. “We will continue to work with the Metropolitan Planning Organization Policy Committee to ensure understanding of the huge economic, transportation and quality of life benefits of this project.”

sidewalks, and the stormwater and water systems. The proposed tax and fee increases would help general fund revenues keep pace with these additional expenses, according to Downers Grove Village Manager Dave Fieldman’s budget message. In 2013, the general fund brought in $42.57 million.That number would grow to $43.79 million in 2014. The general fund is the major operating fund for a majority of village services.The four major funding sources for the general fund are property tax, sales tax, utility tax and state income tax payments. “There are three components of revenues increases that would impact the typical home in FY14: property tax, water fees and stormwater,” Fieldman’s message stated. The tax and fee increases would cost the average homeowner approximately $74.55 more per year, with an additional $27.57 going to property taxes, $36.90 to water fees and $10.08 to stormwater fees. In 2013, a typical bimonthly water bill was $83.85 and the average monthly

be flushing fire hydrants that are located north of 75th Street beginning the week of Oct. 14. The flushing activities will take approximately three weeks to complete. Village hydrants are flushed on a regular basis in order to remove any accumulation of minerals and other deposits that exist in the watermain to improve the quality of water for the customers. In addition, the Public Works Department inspects all fire hydrants to make sure that they are working properly. Residents may temporarily experience some discolored water. If this should occur, simply run the cold water until the line clears. Signs will be posted in areas where hydrant flushing will take place. If you have any further questions please contact the Public Works Department at 630-719-4753.

stormwater fee was $8.40. The proposed 2014 budget would increase those fees to $95.10 and $9.24, respectively. The owner of a $300,000 home paid $520.20 to the village in property taxes in 2013, according to the 2014 budget message. The portion of the same homeowner’s property tax bill paid to the village would increase to $547.77 in 2014. The village property tax rate would increase from 0.520 in 2013 to 0.576 in 2014, equating to a 9.7 percent increase. The village recently released the 2014 proposed budget and related documents on its website and is currently in the middle of the approval process. The schedule for the budget includes coffee with the Village Council at 9 a.m. Oct. 18 at Fire Station #2, 5420 Main St., and a public hearing at 7 p.m. Nov. 5 at Village Hall, 801 Burlington Ave. The village began this process on Oct. 5 with the first of seven total budget meetings. The total 2014 budget is $111 million in revenues and $139 million in expenses. For more information on the proposed 2014 budget, visit www.downers.us/govt/villagebudget. jsamples@buglenewspapers.com


Calendar ONGOING Hayride Season is Here! Sept. 7 to Oct. 19 at Castaldo Park, Woodridge. Groups can reserve a fall hayride at Castaldo Park. The Hayride package includes: half-hour ride, hot dogs, chips and s’mores. Time slots are 4 to 6 p.m. or 6 to 8 p.m. A $50 initial payment is required at the time of registration and the balance is due 7 days prior to your date. Stop by the Woodridge Park District Community Center during business hours to reserve your hayride! Technology Tuesdays. 1 to 3 p.m. at the Westmont Public Library. Drop in for help with your basic technology questions. A team of librarians will be on hand to talk about everything from email to facebook to smart devices and apps. We’ll have tablets and computers on hand for you to use, but you are welcome to bring your own device. Third Thursday. 5–7 p.m. every third Thursday at the DuPage Children’s Museum. Third Thursdays are a special time once a month for families of children with autism spectrum disorder, visual, and mobility impairments to come play at the Museum. All activities are free with admission or membership. Great Decisions Foreign Policy Discussion Group. 9:30-11:30 a.m. every Monday at the Downers Grove Library. Topics for 2012 include: Middle East realignment, promoting democracy, Mexico, cybersecurity,exit forAfghanistan and Iraq, state of the oceans, Indonesia,and energy geopolitics. Registration is not required. Call Nancy Peraino at 630-968-8706 for more information. Families Anonymous meeting. 7:30 to 9 p.m. at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 4501 Main St., Downers Grove. Families Anonymous is a 12Step fellowship for families and friends of persons with destructive behavior, whether caused by drugs, alcohol, or related behavioral problems. Meetings are held weekly. Contact DownersFA@gmail.com if you have questions or call 630609-9971. Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings daily at the West Suburban Alano Club, 17 W. Quincy St., Westmont. Open speaker meetings at 7 p.m.

Saturdays and 10 a.m. Sundays, other meetings listed by day and hour on www.wsacaa. org. Memberships available: inquire at the Club. Baby andToddler Storytime. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays at the Westmont Library. Get ready for stories, songs, and interactive play.Young children and a caregiver can enjoy this weekly time together while nurturing a love of reading. For ages 0-3. Toddler & Me Playgroup. 10:45-11:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Westmont Library. Bring your young children to a special morning playtime in the library’s meeting room. Interact with other moms and caregivers while the kids play and eat snacks. Saturday morning storytime. 9:30-10 a.m. at the Downers Grove Library. Join in every Saturday morning for storytime filled with stories, songs, and fingerplays. This program is for children of all ages and their caregivers. Adult participation is an important part of this storytime. Job Club. Mondays from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Woodridge Library, 3 Plaza Drive,Woodridge. Job Club members learn to write résumés and cover letters,develop interviewing skills and find job leads. No sign-up, no fee, just drop in. For further information call 630-964-7899, email askus@ woodridgelibrary.org, or visit www.woodridgelibrary.org.

OCTOBER 18 A Spooktacular Halloween. 6 to 7:30 p.m. at McCollum park, 6801 S. main St., Downers Grove. Bring your entire family to McCollum Park for a spooktacular evening of mini pumpkin painting, trickor-treat mini golf and more ghoulish activities! Food and drink specials will be available at the concession stand. Don’t forget to wear your costumes and bring your camera! The fee for early registration is $10 and will be accepted through October 11. The registration fee after October 11 is $15. Onsite registration will also be available while supplies last, the fee is $15. For more information and to register today, visit dgparks.org or call (630) 963-1300. A Friendly Scarecrow Tale. 6 to 7:15 p.m. at Twin Lakes Woods. Walk with us on the Twin Lakes

trail for tale of“The Little Old Lady Who Wasn’t Afraid of Anything.” Come listen and you will hear... two shoes go clomp, clomp, two white gloves go clap, clap, one pair of pants go shake, shake, one shirt go wiggle, wiggle, and one, big, scary pumpkin face go BOO, BOO! After the story, we’ll gather around a warm, toasty fire for some festive fall refreshments and yummy s’mores. Be sure to bring your camera for a photo opportunity with a friendly scarecrow! Please register early as space is limited.

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013 dupageco.org or call (630) 4076700. Downtown Downers Grove Market. 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Main St. Train Station, south parking lot near Burlington Avenue in Downers Grove. French-style market featuring local vendors of produce, flowers, herbs, jewelry, crafts and more.

Hoop Fest 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament. 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Park District Recreation Center, 4500 Belmont Road. Get ready for your upcoming basketball season with this 3-on3 one-day tournament. Up to six players can sign up as a team and be placed onto grade-based teams. Awards are given to the champion of each division.Teams are guaranteed two games. Please call 630-960-7250 to register.

Westmont Coffee With Mayor. At Harvest Pancake House, 339 W. 63rd St. This event will follow a town hall meeting format and focus on the south side of the community. Maercker School District’s new Superintendent Dr. Jamie Reilly will be one of our featured guests and there will also be an update regarding southside economic development initiatives. Due to limited seating availability, attendees MUST RSVP to participate. Citizens can RSVP by sending an email to pmielcarski@ westmont.il.gov or calling 630981-6216.

Free Paint Collection, Carpet Recycling and Document Shredding Event. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Parking Lot DuPage County Administration Building, 421 County Farm Road, Wheaton. DuPage resident are invited to a recycling event. Latex or oil based paint, personal documents, and carpet/padding will be collected for recycling. For more information visit www.

Peacemaking After Deadly Conflict. 7 p.m.during Downers Grove Friends meeting, 5710 Lomond Ave., Downers Grove. David Zarembka, a graduate of Harvard University, Coordinator of the African Great Lakes Initiative, and author of A Peace of Africa, will speak to these questions: Are revenge, hatred, and another round of violence the only possibilities after

OCTOBER 19

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deadly conflict; Can healing and reconciliation between enemies occur? David has spent his adult life in Africa devoted to bringing peace to nations which have had deadly civil wars: Rwanda, Burundi, eastern Congo and Kenya. He will describe with compelling stories, how the Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) is used to bring all sides of a conflict back together.

OCTOBER 20 Trunk and Treat. 3 to 5 p.m. at Indian Boundary YMCA, 711 59th St., Downers Grove. The Early Learning Center Preschool at Indian Boundary YMCA is sponsoring this free Halloween celebration for ages 3 - 5 years old. Games, crafts, a bounce house and special surprises. Contact Linda at 630-929-2436 to reserve your spot. Brush Pickup - Southside Residents. Every single family home residence will have one brush pickup date in the spring and another brush pickup date in the fall. Single-family homes north of the railroad tracks should put out their brush on Sunday, June 9 for the spring pickup, and on Sunday, October 13 for the fall pickup. Single-family homes south of the railroad tracks should put out their brush on Sunday, June 16 for the spring pickup and on Sunday, October 20 for the fall pickup. Northside See CALENDAR, page 23


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Downers Grove, Westmont and Woodridge Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Downers Grove Esteban Mendoza, 47, 2320 S. 60th Court, Cicero, was arrested at 3:40 p.m. Oct. 4 on Ogden and Seeley for driving while license suspended, expired registration and speeding. Ronald A. Darrus, 56, 3940 Fairview Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 12:50 p.m. Oct. 5 at the residence for domestic battery. Padraic J. McGuire, 18, 830 Oxford St., Downers Grove, was arrested at 7:42 p.m. Oct. 6 on Forest and Franklin for driving while license suspended. Ji Zhang, 23, 3150 Finley, Downers Grove, was arrested at 9:45 p.m. Oct. 6 on Butterfield and Lloyd for no valid driver’s license. Babatunde A. Adegbemiro, 28, 1841 W. Touhy Ave., Chicago, was arrested at 11:15 p.m. Oct. 6 on Butterfield Road and Route 53 no valid driver’s license and no valid insurance. Zaigham A. Khan, 22, 758 Circle Drive, Roselle, was arrested at 9:56 a.m. Oct. 7 at the Downers Grove Police Department for disorderly conduct. Anisa J. Qeleshi, 22, 1421 S. Highland Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 3:10 p.m. Oct. 7 in the 2900 bock of Finley Road for retail theft. Dmitro Sofiychuk, 60, 8B Kingery Quarter, Willowbrook, was arrested at 4:25 a.m. Oct. 8 on 63rd and Main for no valid driver’s license. Charles J. Hammer, 40, 605 W. 65th St., Westmont, was arrested at 8:32 a.m. Oct. 8 at the Downers Grove Police Department for retail theft. Dawn M. Valles, 41, 4905 Belmont Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 3:14 p.m. Oct. 8 at the Downers Grove Police Department for attempting to file a false police report. Luis Garcia, 26, 3222 S. Gunderson Ave., Berwyn, was arrested at 3:19 p.m. Oct. 8 on Ogden Avenue and Downers Drive for driving while license suspended and speeding. Giovanni D. Donaldson, 24, 132 S. Canyon St., Bolingbrook, was arrested at 5 p.m. Oct. 8 on 63rd Street and Pershing for driving while license suspended and a warrant. Victor R. Conforti, 70, 260 W. 80th St.,

Police Blotter

Willowbrook, was arrested at 5:09 p.m. Oct. 8 on 75th Street and Lemont Road for battery. Joseph Daniel Grissom, 35, 3859 Douglas St., Downers Grove, was arrested at 6:15 p.m. Oct. 8 at 940 Warren for possession of a stolen motor vehicle. Charles E. Alexander, 45, 231 S. 21st Ave., Maywood, was arrested at 10:20 p.m. Oct. 8 in the 1500 block of 75th Street for no insurance, driving while license suspended and improperly displayed registration. Arielle J. Gonzalez, 20, 11521 Ridgewood Lane, Willowbrook, was arrested at 12:15 a.m. Oct. 9 on Ogden Avenue and Finley Road for suspended registration, no insurance and driving while license suspended. Mercedez Chic, 44, 334 S. Iowa Ave., Addison, was arrested at 4:59 p.m. Oct. 9 on Highland Avenue and 39th Street for no valid driver’s license. Gennifer N. Reynolds, 25, 2213 Prentiss Drive, Downers Grove, was arrested at 6:35 p.m. Oct. 9 in the 2000 block of Prentiss for driving while license suspended and no insurance. Tyler R. Ingles, 19, 1953 Wisconsin Ave., Downers Grove, was arrested at 8:30 p.m. Oct. 9 at the residence for driving while license suspended. Johnny C.Chamboullides,57,5500 Hillcrest Lane, Lisle, was arrested at 9:15 p.m. Oct. 9 in the 800 block of Burlington Avenue for no having a required cab company license. Laquantas D. Bodie, 39, 1525 Schoenherr Ave., Bolingbrook, was arrested at 10:24 a.m. Oct. 10 in the 1500 block of Ogden Avenue for failure to appear. Rashad S. Owens, 24, 458 Seneca Lane, Bolingbrook, was arrested at 1:51 p.m. Oct. 10 in the 1600 block of Ogden Avenue for no insurance, driving while licenses suspended, speeding and improper use of registration. Jourdan B.Wikowsky, 18, 3910 Williams St., Downers Grove, was arrested at 4:45 p.m. Oct. 10 at Dominick’s, 42 Ogden Ave., for retail theft.

Westmont

Sometime between 6 p.m. Sept. 29 and 6 a.m. Sept. 30, an unknown offender(s) slashed the tires of a vehicle parked in the 6700 block of Alpine Lane.Total damage is $300. At approximately 2:25 p.m. Sept. 30, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 3500 block of Midwest Road. Officers arrested Jonathan Engling, male, age 27, of 211 2nd Ave., Lombard, for driving with a suspended driver’s license. He was cited

for expired registration. He was released on his own recognizance.

operating an uninsured vehicle. He was released on his own recognizance.

At approximately 12:15 a.m. Oct. 1, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 700 block of West 63rd Street. Officers arrested Kayla Ewing, female, age 18, of 7725 Woodward Ave. #3B, Woodridge, for driving with a suspended driver’s license. She was cited for expired registration. She was released on his own recognizance.

At approximately 1:30 a.m. Oct. 6, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 0100 block of East Ogden Avenue. Officers arrested Oscar Padilla, male, age 47, of 2030 5602 Walnut Ave. #1B,Westmont, for driving with a suspended driver’s license. He was cited for speeding and suspended registration. He was released on his own recognizance.

At approximately 12:30 p.m. Oct. 1, officers responded to the 0100 block of West 63rd Street for a theft. Officers arrested Danguole Rakauskiene, female, age 49, of 6158 Knollway Drive #201, Willowbrook, for retail theft after she stole canned goods from a grocery store. She was released on her own recognizance. Sometime between 11:20 a.m. and 12:10 p.m. Oct. 2, an unknown offender(s) stole currency from a bag in the 900 block of Oakwood Drive.Total loss is $500.

Woodridge At approximately 12:55 a.m. Oct. 4, Maria Ramirez, 33, 2540 Waterbury Drive, was charged with endangering the life of a child, following an incident in the 2500 block of Waterbury Drive. A criminal damage to property occurred sometime between 6:30 and 7:50 p.m. Oct. 5 in the 1200 block of Hastings Road. Unknown person shot orange paintballs above the garage door of a residence, damaging the aluminum siding.

At approximately 12:40 a.m. Oct. 3, officers responded to the 100 block of West 65th Street for a suspicious vehicle. Officers arrested Franklin McKillian, male, age 45, of 6019 N. Fairfield Ave., Chicago, for possession of cannabis. He was released on his own recognizance.

A burglary from motor vehicle occurred sometime between 11 p.m. Oct. 5 and 9 a.m. Oct. 6, in the 8100 block of Norwood Court. Unknown person entered a parked vehicle and removed a wallet containing $100.

Sometime between 5:30 p.m. Oct. 2 and 6:10 a.m. Oct. 3, an unknown offender(s) entered a vehicle parked in the 300 block of West 60th Street and stole a GPS unit. Total loss is $110.

At approximately 5:54 p.m. Oct. 7, Michelle Livorsi, 33, 1734 Windward Ave., Naperville, was charged with retail theft after removing various items of clothing from Maurice’s, 1001 75th St.

At approximately 6:40 p.m. Oct. 3, officers responded to the 200 block of North Cass Avenue for a disturbance. Officers arrested W. Christopher Evinger, male, age 47, of 236 N. Cass Ave.,Westmont, for criminal damage to property after he damaged a vehicle. He was released on his own recognizance. Total damage is $300.

At approximately 6:28 p.m. Oct. 7,Andrew Evett, 25, 4338 Prospect Ave., Downers Grove, was charged with battery, following a disturbance in the 2000 block of 75th Street.

At approximately 8:30 p.m. Oct. 3, officers responded to the 600 block of Westmont Drive for a battery. Officers arrested Timothy Vancil, male, age 41, of 703 Edison Ave., Aurora, for battery after he grabbed a coworker by the neck. He was released on his own recognizance. Sometime between 9 p.m. Oct. 2 and 8 a.m. Oct. 3, an unknown offender(s) entered an unlocked vehicle parked in the 1700 block of 35th Street and stole currency and clothing.Total loss is $100. Sometime between 5 p.m. Oct. 2 and 7:45 p.m. Oct. 3, an unknown offender(s) stole a bicycle in the 5500 block of King Arthur Court.Total loss is $400. At approximately 10:15 a.m. Oct. 5, officers conducted a traffic stop in the 500 block of West 63rd Street. Officers arrested Raul Sorbun, male, age 22, of 2030 Birch Lane, Park Ridge, for driving with a suspended driver’s license. He was cited for expired registration, suspended registration, and

At approximately 10:30 p.m. Oct. 7, George Katerinis,24,1501 Concord Drive,Downers Grove, was charged with possession of cannabis, following a traffic stop in the 7400 block of Woodward Avenue. At approximately 12:25 p.m. Oct. 9, Tracy Scanlon, 31, 6901 Red Bud Lane, Woodridge, was charged with retail theft after removing items of clothing from Kohl’s, 1001 75th St. A burglary from motor vehicle occurred sometime between 9 p.m. Oct. 9 and 6:18 a.m. Oct 10 in the 7600 block of Walnut. Unknown person removed various items from a parked vehicle. A burglary from motor vehicle occurred sometime overnight Oct. 10 in the 7600 block of Dalewood Parkway. Unknown person entered a parked vehicle and removed a GPS unit. A criminal trespass to vehicle occurred sometime overnight Oct. 10 in the 2800 block of Crabtree. Unknown person made entry into a parked vehicle but did not remove anything.


ForuM Our View

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

7

CMAP’s Bennett a Nowhere Man I was stunned when I first heard what the chairman of a regional planning board had to say about Will County, calling it a “wasteland” and “Nowhere Land” during a recent public meeting on the Illiana Tollway. Then, I kind of chuckled a bit. Gerald Bennett is chairman of the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, one of the groups that gets to weigh in on whether the Illiana should be included in the region’s federal funding plans. He’s probably one of those Chicago guys, I thought, like I used to be:Thinks everything south of Division Street is “southern Illinois” and west of 45 just isn’t worth worrying about. Then I looked up Bennett’s bio on the CMAP website: “Serving his seventh term as Mayor of the City of Palos Hills, Gerald Bennett has been an outspoken advocate for uniting cities and villages. He founded and continues to serve as the President of the Southwest Conference of Mayors. He was a co-founder and serves as

Chairman of the Board of the Southwest Central Dispatch (an intergovernmental police and fire 911 service). Bennett has served as past Chair of the Metropolitan Mayors Caucus and is currently a member of the Mayors Caucus Executive Committee. He has also served as the President of the Illinois Municipal League and was the co-chair of the Mayors Caucus 2016 Olympic Regional Coordinating Committee.As the representative from Southwest Cook County, Bennett holds the position of Chair of the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning and its Executive Committee.A businessman for 40 years, Bennett is President of Bennett Dental Labs, Inc., in Palos Hills. He attended Lewis University and the University of Illinois at Chicago.” Lewis University. Let’s see, last I checked, that’s in that vast wasteland of Will County. Palos isn’t so far off from “Nowhere Land,” either.And surely as President of the Illinois Municipal League, Bennett must

Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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have ventured through other parts of the state settled after Lewis and Clark took off. I also would think a “strong advocate of cities and villages” would be more well-rounded and take into account the possibility another east-west route through an already busy intersection of two crosscountry interstates just might help.Although one then would have to know that I-80 isn’t a Bingo number. Bennett and another CMAP board member also charge this whole Illiana thing is political, “dropped on us by the governor and IDOT.” Which governor, Mr. Bennett? The one in Illinois or the one in Indiana? This is a two-state project aimed at alleviating traffic congestion in the Chicago region, albeit the southern end of the spectrum. “A truck bypass does not create jobs,” Randy Blankenhorn, executive director for CMAP, bloviated at the meeting.“I don’t feel [the Illiana project] is what that region, which does need

cmap officials have staunchly stuck to their parochial Ways of protecting funds for their oWn projects With little regard for an area for Which they have little regard.

economic development, needs.” Does chronic congestion create jobs? If you were a businessman or woman whose job depended on delivering on time, would you want to be stuck in traffic constantly? Or would you want the opportunity to deliver your goods on time, even if it cost you $30 for the privilege of using the Illiana? Speaking of cost, no one at CMAP is saying much about the Illiana being a public-private partnership between the two states and a private investor. If there are no interested investors (and it appears there are), then the project doesn’t go forward. Yet CMAP officials have staunchly stuck to their

Illustrated Opinions

parochial ways of protecting funds for their own projects with little regard for an area for which they have little regard. Regardless of the “real” vote, which takes place at the Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Committee’s Oct. 17 meeting, I do hope Bennett and other CMAP members take up John Greuling, president and CEO of the Will County Center for Economic Development, on his offer to visit Will County. But a word of caution:Take off the blinders first. Nick Reiher is managing editor of the Bugle, Enterprise, Sentinel Newspapers.


8

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Schools

O’Neill science teacher named state finalist for Presidential Award Whether she is writing a grant to have a wind turbine installed on the school’s roof, organizing the school’s handson Chemistry Day or bringing a group of students to compete in a weekend engineering challenge, O’Neill Middle School science teacher Meg Van Dyke never stops seeking out ways to inspire her students to appreciate science “I love instilling a love of science in young people, whether that is in my classroom, working with my engineering students or with my Energy Kids who teach fourth graders about types of energy and energy conservation,” Van Dyke said. Van Dyke’s passion, commitment and dedication have led to her being named one of just three state-level science finalists for this year’s Presidential Awards for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching Program, the nation’s highest honor for teachers of mathematics and science. “As a lifelong learner, Dr. Van Dyke inspires her students and colleagues to explore and argue scientific thought, and to participate within a high-quality instructional program that is informed by content knowledge and enhances student learning,” District 58 Superintendent Kari Cremascoli said. “She demonstrates a commitment to advocating for the needs of students and is an inspiration to her students, her colleagues and our community. “In these regards and many more, Dr. Van Dyke serves as a model for her colleagues, an inspiration to our community, and a leader in the improvement of mathematics and science education.” Van Dyke, who holds a doctorate in educational technology, spends her summers teaching, learning and conducting research at Argonne National Laboratory. She is passionate about science education and committed to finding creative ways to teach her students about concepts. Van Dyke founded the O’Neill Energy Kids Club, which visits District 58 elementary schools to talk about energy

conservation and brings along a special bicycle that lights up light bulbs. The students find out how hard they have to pedal in order to light up a regular light bulb versus a Compact Flourescent Light Bulb. She organizes an Energy Day and a Chemistry Day each year, during which students have a chance to view and try numerous hands-on experiments and demonstrations. She also regularly takes groups of students to engineering and science competitions, such as a bridge-busting competition at University of Illinois and the Fluid Power Challenge sponsored by the National Fluid Power Association. More than anything, Van Dyke hopes to inspire her students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math. She also is committed to seeking out additional funding sources to enhance her students’ classroom experience. Over the past several years, she has applied for and won more than $37,000 in grants for O’Neill from a variety of sources, including BP, the District 58 Education Foundation, and the Kinder Morgan Foundation. With the $10,000 BP grant, O’Neill launched its Energy

PHOTO COURTESY OF DISTRICT 58

O’Niell Middle School science teacher Meg Van Dyke was named one of three statelevel science finalists for this year’s Presidential Awards for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching Programs.

graph data in real time. Each fall as part of World Water Monitoring Day, the students bring these devices each fall to Barth Pond on 55th Street to take water quality measurements. A Kinder Morgan grant Van Dyke earned in 2009 enabled O’Neill to

She demonstrATES a commitment to advocating for the needs of students and is an inspiration to her students, her colleagues and our community. - Kari Cremascoli, Superintendent of District 58

Kids Club and Compact Flourescent Light bulb fundraiser program, and purchased two Vernier Lab Quest handheld scientific computing devices. A grant from the District 58 Education Foundation enabled the school to purchase several sets of experimental probes to measure conditions such as temperature, pH and motion, which hook into the Vernier devices and allow the students to collect, manipulate and

purchase about 10 more Vernier devices and several more sets of probes.Van Dyke received a Kinder Morgan grant in 2011 to have a wind turbine installed on the school’s roof, and in 2012 to purchase iPads for hands-on activities and lessons. “It is an honor to be a state finalist for the PAEMST, but any accolades I may receive are the direct reflection of all the teachers who have helped me throughout my journey of convincing

middle school students that being a scientist or engineer is something they should strongly consider as a path in life. Or, if nothing else, appreciate the wonder of science and all that it brings to make society better,” said Van Dyke, who also was named the 2013 Teacher of the Year by the Downers Grove Elementary Education Association. All state-level PAEMST finalists will be honored at an awards luncheon during the Illinois Science Education Conference Oct. 25. However, Van Dyke will be unable to attend, as she will be bringing a group of students to an engineering competition that same day. As a state-level finalist, Van Dyke is a candidate for the state’s single science Presidential Award, and her application has been forwarded for judging at the national level. Teachers selected as Presidential Award Finalists will be notified officially by the White House sometime late spring or early summer 2014. Each National Presidential Awardee will receive $10,000 and an all-expense-paid trip for two to Washington, D.C., where Presidential Awardees will be honored in a variety of recognition events.


taKe 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Place for an old school tie? 11 Data of concern to privacy advocates: Abbr. 15 “My Word Is My Bond” autobiographer 16 __ skirt 17 Ready for anything 18 “Being __: A Puppeteer’s Journey”: 2011 documentary 19 Hit home? 20 Post 22 Odist’s contraction 23 Goes downhill fast 26 Scorn 28 O leaguemate 31 Major ending? 33 Tyrolean songs 34 Area of concern for FEMA 37 Li-ion cousin 38 Model Heidi who appeared on “Ugly Betty” 39 Army leader’s

Down nickname 41 Newsman’s asset? 42 Rialto sections 44 Philadelphia’s “P” and Denver’s “D,” e.g. 46 Suspects 48 Test tube fluids 49 Divided terr. 50 Garment looked after by Alfred 52 Fax button 54 Biker’s hazard 55 Shapeless thing 57 Maples in ‘90s tabloid news 61 Rock ‘n’ roll middle name 63 Stretching out 66 Bum 67 Put great faith in 68 Strategic river of 1914 69 One to horse around with?

1 Immortal archer 2 Singer Basil with the #1 hit “Mickey” 3 Hymn starter 4 Iberian infants 5 Complained underfoot? 6 Sacred syllables 7 Garage alternative 8 Device with a warp beam and heddles 9 Metiers 10 Like varnished wood 11 Tongue twister pronoun 12 Breakaway hit? 13 Iditarod terminus 14 Bureau where stats abound 21 L.L. Bean’s first name 24 Chichén __ 25 Attack in a big way 27 Patsy’s “Ab Fab” pal 28 Boston attraction with a

permanent Space Race exhibit 29 Extinct carnivore whose name means “different lizard” 30 1967 Neil Diamond hit 32 Town north of Shannon Airport 35 Signs 36 Beethoven’s “some” 40 Raison d’__ 43 Short piece 45 Not natural 47 Persian Gulf fleet 51 Property manager’s sign 53 Factoid 56 Weighted weapon 58 2012 TV Land Awards host 59 Hot stuff 60 Youngest Bront’ 62 “Weekend Edition” airer 64 Tip for a writer? 65 Become more solid

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Horoscopes You could need to see an optometrist because you may mistake the carrot for the stick. In the week ahead, you should avoid giving in to temptations or making changes on the spur of the moment.

Consider what’s best for everyone before you take action in the upcoming week. A generous spirit will act as a shield against competitors and offers an ambitious partner necessary assistance.

You are as good as you think you are. At the same time, your confidence about your abilities might lead you to be overly generous or careless with cash in the week to come. Spread good will but not money.

Rise above petty issues or irrational fears. You could yoyo between optimism and pessimism. Put on your thinking cap later this week to make a wise decision that will have a long-range positive effect.

You might not be a ballerina but you should still stay on your toes. Your ability to act with a creative flair is enhanced in the week ahead. Write down inspirations and ideas, as they may be useful in the future.

Secrecy and trust can work together. Prove your worth to allies by remaining discreet. Sometime after the middle of the week is the best time to launch key strategies and make your move for career success.

Truth and honesty will take you far in the upcoming week. Activities within the community may bring satisfaction. Be cautious about spending, but don’t be bashful about displaying your talents.

Don’t fall prey to unfounded fears. You may worry that too many ears are connected to too many mouths. Put important plans into motion later in the week, when your confidence is at a higher point.

Carry on and carry through on contracts, promises and agreements in the week ahead. Your bank account can move into the black if you play your cards right. New contacts upgrade your social life.

Make yourself into a money magnet. You could be intuitively at the right place at the right time to score big time in the world of commerce if you don’t take unnecessary risks in the week ahead.

Ignore unsubstantiated feelings of discomfort or worry. You could seem too high strung or changeful to others in the upcoming week. Find some quiet time to meditate and return to your solid center.

Look for opportunities to upgrade your public image in the coming week. To do this, concentrate on developing viable and worthy goals rather than trying to be a shrewd business person.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Media Services 2013

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • DEITY • PUPPY • OPIATE • NAUSEA

Answer:

How the active toddlers left Mom -TIED UP IN “NOTS”

9


10

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Several area girls golfers qualify for sectionals, page 12; Benet boys golf wins regional title, page 13

www.buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

11

Lisle tops Westmont in Interstate 8 battle By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

Lisle was off school Friday prior to its Interstate Eight Small Division game with Westmont at Benedictine University in Lisle and coach Dan Sanko said it showed despite the Lions getting the 21-0 win. “We were off school today and we played like we were off school today,” Sanko said. “And that is no excuse. We have to come out and play a little cleaner than we did. I was not happy with the way we came out and I let them know that at half. Not that it did any good because we came right out and fumbled the ball out of the half but I am happy that we finished and got the shutout.” Lisle (4-3, 3-2) intercepted Westmont (1-6, 1-4) quarterback Tim Doll three times in the first half, but only held a 14-0 advantage at the break. “We had three turnovers in the first half and we only had 14 points to show for it and only one touchdown came off the turnover. We have to take advantage of this,” Sanko said. “This is a game we should have won, but they played well against some teams that we haven’t done so well against and this is a regular rivalry, so you can throw things out the window.” The win earned Lisle the “Old PlankTrophy,”the traveling trophy is named after Old Plank Road, now Ogden Avenue, which is the main road running between the neighboring communities. It was started in 2006 when Westmont rejoined the I-8 Small. Lisle holds a 6-2 advantage in the series. Lisle won the game with sophomore quarterback Alec VanVolkenburg at the helm, replacing the injured Griffin Huba. “He hurt (his shoulder) against

Wilmington last week,” Sanko said about Huba. “At first we thought it was a rotator cuff, but it’s not that. He just has to heal. We need to get him healthy.” For the most part, Lisle rode senior Cliff Krause, who rushed for 131 yards and had three total touchdowns. VanVolkenburg did get his highlight in the third quarter, when he hit Krause for a 70-yard pitch and catch TD to put Lisle up 21-0. “The ball wasn’t supposed to go to him,” Sanko joked of VanVolkenburg’s read. “He made a helluva throw, but the first read is the out for the first down which was wide open. But he threw the ball in a perfect spot and Cliff was on tonight and had a helluva game.” It was the first time the rivals have faced off since Westmont hired veteran coach Otto Zeman, who is known for his spread offense. Sanko said, however, the offense is not as big of a shock as it was when Zeman ran it at Riverside-Brookfield. “They are running what everyone else in the conference runs” Sanko said.“It is a hybrid of all the different stuff, but for the most part we have seen it.” Westmont was also playing with key players out or hobbled, impacting the execution of the offense. “We really got banged up last week against Dwight,” Zeman said.“Daniel LoGiurato can’t run. Greg Pietrzak his ankles were bad and we shouldn’t have played him, but we had no receivers. We had a couple of kids who I think got concussions tonight, so they will be out probably the rest of the year. We have to try and put the pieces together and keep fighting.That is what it’s all about.” Follow Mark @2Mark_My_Words mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Lisle sophomore quarterback Alec VanVolkenburg hands off to senior running back Kevin Coppin in the Lions’ 21-0 win over Westmont Friday.


12

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Sports

Tom qualifies for sectionals in varsity debut By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

If you look on line at the Downers Grove South varsity girls golf roster, you won’t find the name of Emily Tom on the list. That is because until the IHSA Class AA Lemont Regional at Broken Arrow Golf Club in Lockport, the sophomore had not played a varsity match. And, while the online roster may not change to reflect Tom’s performance, her name is now on a new list – that of sectional qualifiers. Tom carded a 99 and made the cut by one shot to advance, joining a group of two other Mustangs and a pair of Downers North golfers. “I just played my own game and tried to be in my own mind,” she said. “I played JV all season and I played really well

at conference and this is my first varsity match of the year and was daunting.” Tom equaled the score of Kelly Pringle, the lone senior to advance from either Downers Grove school. “I had a streak of good rounds and today was kind of a bomb,” Pringle said. “I tried my best. On a couple holes I had a hard time.” Pringle is just happy to have another chance to put up a score she is happy with. “I thought it was my last round, but I am happy it is not,” she said. The top score for South was carded by junior Taylor Troha, who shot a 97. “I didn’t do as good as I wanted, but it was pretty good,” Troha said. “The greens were tough today.” A pair of Downers Grove North sophomores, Courtney Katz and Gracie Holler advanced to the sectional round, also shooting 97s. “I did really well today, I thought the course was pretty easy,” Holler said. “My goal was to break 100 and I did with the 97. I have been shooting in the 100s all season and this is my best round. The mental aspect of game was good for me today.” While the score was one of Holler’s best, Katz had hopes for a lower score. “This is not one of my better scores,” Katz said. “During the season, I was shooting around an 86. I thought it was a tricky course.” Team-wise, the teams finished tied for fifth-place in the regional with a team score of 397. •At the Neuqua Valley Regional, a pair of Benet Academy golfers advanced to the sectional round. Freshman Isabella Abdullah carded an 80 to advance, while

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Downers North sophomore Courtney Katz shot a 97 at the Lemont Regional at Broken Arrow Golf Club to advance to sectionals.

junior Gretchen shot a 92.

Schramko

As a team the Redwings were fifth with a 360. Naperville North won with a 310, while Waubonsie Valley (330) and Naperville Central (353) also advanced. •In Class A, Lisle was second as a team, advancing to sectionals with a 457. The Lions were paced by junior Mary Sullivan, who shot a 106. Lisle competed with only the four required players needed to qualify as a team, as

sophomore Bella Daly (119), junior Alexis Gustas (115) and junior Melanie Beidelman (117) all scored. Westmont placed seventh in the regional with a team score of 558, but sophomore Sarah Bayne shot a 106 and advanced as an individual. •No Downers Grove North or South golfers advanced to the state meet.As of press time, Lisle, Westmont and Benet scores were not reported. mark@buglenewspapers.com


Sports

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

13

Surging Redwings take regional crown By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

Regardless of the sport, teams always strive to be playing their best when the postseason rolls around. Benet’s boys golf team is doing just that. The Redwings advanced as a team to this weekend’s state tournament in Bloomington. Benet carded a 311 to capture third behind Hinsdale Central (300) and Wheaton Warrenville South (309). George Carroll paced the Redwings with a 78. Ben Johnson and Matt Rogers each scored with an 80, while JJ VanEekeren shot an 83. Frank Ferconio shot an 85. Benet also received strong efforts throughout their lineup while winning the Hinsdale South regional, held at Prairie Bluffs Golf Course in Lockport.

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Alex Bassetto shot a 75 for Benet at the Hinsdale South Regional Oct. 8. The Redwings took home the team title at Prairie Bluffs Golf Course.

Five of Benet’s six competitors shot 77 or better, including VanEekeren, whose 72 tied him with a Naperville Central golfer for the third best individual round of the day. “I had a couple of better rounds during the summer, but it’s good to be getting it back during the height of the season,” said VanEekeren, who shot a 35 on the front nine and a 37 on the back. “All the holes were playing pretty easy; they’re not that long and they’re all pretty open. I made a few mistakes on some holes, and other holes I capitalized on my opportunities.” Team-wise, Benet edged Naperville North by two strokes (297-299). It’s the Redwings’ first regional title since 2008, but the victory also is noteworthy because the See CROWN, page 15


14

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Sports Voyager Media Insight

Club or school soccer? Athletes faced with a choice By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

In recent years there have been multiple sports where schools have lost high school athletes to club teams. However, that trend seems to be ever increasing in soccer, especially on the boys’ side with the growth of the Chicago Fire Academy. There are several teams in the Voyager Media Coverage area who have this issue currently. “In my hallways right now, I have three players that I know of now that are currently playing with the Fire,” Downers North coach Brian Gervase said.“We’re dealing with it. It is what it is. One of the players played for us last year as a junior; he’s a goalie and then he left, and as a senior he’s playing club.” “This year we lost three kids to club soccer,” said Plainfield East coach Walter Flores, who had three sophomores choose club.“We are hoping to get all of them back this year. This speaks a lot about the growing passion for soccer in the area. As much as you don’t like to see it, as a coach you have to respect every parent/student decision. In our case, we have some young talent that opted to play high school

and their decision is paying off as they have been able to get exposure and experience.” Romeoville, a program coming off a sectional final appearance, is in the same shape. “There are two kids that are in the hallways right now that are freshmen that are playing club,” Romeoville coach Nick Cirrincione said. “Their thought process is that is they aren’t playing varsity, they will stay with the club until they are mature enough to play high school. The problem with that is, you don’t get them their freshman or sophomore year.” Coaches understand why players would choose to play club over their high school team, but they don’t necessarily agree with it. “I respect every kids’ decision to play club over high school soccer,” Flores said.“I also believe that the high school years are a memorable experience in your lifetime and they should be able to maximize the experience by playing a sport they excel in, building strong bonds with teammates and constructing relationships for life.” “It is hard not to go to the Academy if they are paying for you,” Cirrincione stated.“You are playing for free and traveling all

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Plainfield North’s Austin Collier chose to play for the Tigers this year after playing club last season.

over the Midwest. It is hard to argue with it. It has gotten worse over the last few years and I don’t know if it will change.” While club soccer has developed an extra edge competitively, there is still plenty

of talent at the high school level and that talent is still being found by colleges. “It is unfortunate because tons of kids still get recruited by playing high school soccer,” Bolingbrook coach Jamie

Clemmons said.“If you are a good high school player, you will get recruited, you don’t have to only play club. Now, it is going to be the teams that are always good See SOCCER, page 15


Sports CROWN Continued from page 12 Huskies were the 2012 Class 3A state runners-up and placed in top 10 at state in 2011 and 2010. “Certainly from top to bottom this is one of our best efforts,” Benet coach Dan Nagis said. “We played really well at the beginning of the year, then school began and other things were occurring and we kind of leveled off, but now we’ve kind of got our act together again. I’m pleased.” Senior Ferconio carded a 74 (38-36) and sophomore Alex Bassetto, the team’s No. 1 golfer, added a 75 (38-37). “I’ve been struggling a lot early on, but I’m starting to bring it around when it matters,” Ferconio said. “This course is pretty wide open and

SOCCER Continued from page 14 programs with the good records and go deep in the playoffs that are going to get the scouts out.” “Everybody is looking for an edge,” Maine East coach Vic Dipriso said. “How can my kid get a scholarship? I think it’s unrealistic that some club programs do what they do and cut down high school programs. They put the kids in middle and they put down high school soccer. I think it’s unfair to all the high school coaches. I know how much time I put in during the season. You have to give mutual respect for each other not put down what the other is doing.” One of the issues with club ball is that some players aren’t ready to compete at that level and high school might be a better place to gain experience. “I can see the whole club thing from both sides,” Gervase said. “The hardest part is that some of the kids are getting caught in a trap of really being, I think, sold a bad bill of goods.The kid that’s not playing goalie for us this year, he’s a very good player, and I think he will play at the next level; there’s no doubt about it, and I’m sure the club experience he’s getting is fantastic. But at the same time high school is a place where kids learn more than just

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

15

short, so I had a lot of drivers and wedges and it gave me opportunities for birdie and two-putt pars.” VanEekeren said Tuesday’s performance illustrates the Redwings’ depth. “We’re a really deep team,” he said. “Obviously Alex helped out a lot. It’s nice to have (it) where if a No. 1 or a No. 2 doesn’t shoot well, our (five) or our six can come in with a good score.” Johnson finished with a 76, Rogers turned in a 77 and Carroll had an 80 for the Redwings, who advanced to the Oct. 14 Naperville Central Sectional at Springbrook Golf Course. “Our strength recently is our depth, one through six,” Nagis said.“Any one of those (players) can count for us and can go low for us. Today was certainly an indication of that. We just hope the guys bring their game like

they did today next Monday.” •His teammates call Downers South junior Joe Vath “Fairway Joe” due to his consistency down the middle of the fairway. “I’m not the longest hitter, but I like to think I hit it pretty straight,” said Vath, a junior who set the pace for the Mustangs Tuesday with team-best 75 (38-37). Vath’s round earned him an individual berth at the Naperville Central sectional, but he won’t be the only Mustang going to Springbrook. DGS has a total of four sectional-bound competitors as three Mustangs qualified following a playoff that featured seven golfers vying for six spots. Seniors Jack Korzon and John Franklin, along with sophomore Trent Caraher, each won their playoffs and shot 78s. “This is a very tough regional,” said DGS first-year coach Terry

Tiesman, whose Mustangs placed sixth (309) out of 10 teams. “We had four advance and not advance as a team. Good for those other teams, but I think our team score today is very good.” No. 1 golfer, senior Mark Kasanoff, just missed the playoff round after shooting a 79. “Mark has been very steady,” Tiesman said. “He really carries himself in a very even keel manner, which is what you want in a golfer. He’s certainly been a leader for us.” Both Korzon (74) and Caraher (76) advanced to the state meet as two of the top 10 golfers in the sectional. •Lisle resident Michael Doherty, a senior and a twotime state qualifier, will be making a bid for his third trip downstate with the Huskies next Monday at the Naperville Central sectional. Doherty fired a 73 to lead

the second-place Huskies on Tuesday. He and five other teammates turned in rounds of 79 or better. Doherty’s total was the fourth best individual score of the tournament. •Downers North failed to advance anyone out of the York Regional. They took sixth place with a 331. Hinsdale Central won with a 283. The sectional cut for individuals was 78. •Neither Lisle nor Westmont advanced to sectionals as a team at their respective Class 2A and 1A regionals on Tuesday, nor did any golfer from either school advance individually. The Lions were eighth out of 10 teams at the St. Rita regional at Meadows Golf Club, Blue Island. Meanwhile, the Sentinels also took eighth out of 14 teams (394) at the Westminster Christian regional, held at the Golf Club of Illinois in Algonquin.

about soccer.” While some schools have faced the loss of players to club teams, Maine East has been able to keep its top players, including Rami Dajani, a graduate last year who is now at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. “Fortunately we have not lost any players to club teams,” Dipriso said.“There were players who could have come out for the high school team (at Maine East) that never did, but not many. Maybe one or two through the years. Once we’ve had a player on the team, we’ve never really lost one. I emphasize the high

school experience and playing for your team. what that could bring to you.The last eight years been pretty successful so I think that sells the program. We’ve won 16 tourneys since 2006; having a program like that sells itself. “Rami was pressured to join a club team and never did (during the season).I definitely think club ball helped him but high school had just as much influence on him as club ball did.” Plainfield North has been a team faced with losing players to clubs, but got one back this year in Austin Collier.

“All the seniors were saying how much it would help if I came this year,” Collier said. “This was their last year and they wanted to win something. I finally gave in.The Academy, I’m sure you get better, but this is 10 times more fun. I’ve had more fun this year. I’m competing. I’m playing with my friends. I’m so happy with my decision.” “The academies are tough to beat,” Plainfield North coach Jim O’Hara said. “I mean can I offer them free stuff? No I can’t. But I think there is something about playing for your high school. There is a bond that you build.

These are kids you go to school with and live around. From what (Austin) tells me, he is loving it.” Now Collier is recruiting his classmates who play club to join him next year. “We’re getting about four Academy players next year,” Collier said.“They aren’t playing with the Academy next year, they are playing with us. They all go here now. I’ve begged them to come out and finally they came to one of our games and they said that we were good, so they are all for sure coming.”

mike@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory and Mike Sandrolini contributed


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buglenewspapers.com/football

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

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Raiders host Griffins with SWSC title on the line By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

It has been the case in most of the past few seasons that the game between Lincoln-Way East and Bolingbrook plays heavily into deciding who wins the SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue Division title. That is the case again Friday night when the Raiders (7-0, 5-0) host the Griffins (6-1, 4-1) with a 7:30 p.m. kickoff. Lincoln-Way East comes into the game with a 5-3 advantage in the series, which dates back to 2006. The Griffins have also claimed the last three consecutive games, including handing Bolingbrook its only loss during its 13-1 state championship season. This season, East comes in with one loss at the hands of Homewood-Flossmoor. Bolingbrook defeated H-F 31-24 in overtime last week to remain undefeated overall and have the upperhand in the SWSC. It also earned Bolingbrook the first-ever Alec Anderson Trophy. In the game, the Raiders allowed more points to the Vikings than they had all season coming into the game. Led by Parrker Westphal, Tuf Borland, Micah Dew-Treadway and Jacob Huff, the Bolingbrook defense has been stingy this season, allowing an average of 7.6 points per game. Lincoln-Way East has averaged 30.3 points per contest this season, scoring more than 20 points in every conference game thus far.

The Lincoln-Way East offense is captained by quarterback Jordan Wirtz, while Paul Gossage ia his prime receiver. The Bolingbrook offense has Quincy Woods back under center and has the running attack of Jaden Huff and Mike Valentine. • At halftime of the contest, Bolingbrook will honor the 1993 team that advanced to the IHSA State Championship. The game lost 7-0 to Belvidere. It marked only the sixth time the Raiders qualified for the IHSA Playoffs. It was the second year of a 21year streak of qualifying for the playoffs that continues today as one of the longest streaks in the state. With seven wins this season, the Raiders have qualified for the post season for the 22nd year. Follow @2Mark_My_Words mark@buglenewspapers.com

62

The number of consecutive CSL South wins for Maine South.

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Tuf Borland (32) and Bolingbrook will look to win at least a share of the SWSC Friday night.


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Business & Real Estate

How to make more hours in a day Q. We were downsized during the recession and have been short staffed every since. I keep getting asked to do more with less, and I’m pulling my hair out. Is there any way to make more time in a day? A.Yes, despite popular opinion you can make more time by doing three tasks: -Stop wasting time on activities that are not critical. -Negotiate with your boss about what will not get done. -”Waste” time on the front end to negotiate long-term solutions that fix repetitive problems. Start by keeping an activity log of how you spent Monday through Friday.Yes, this will take a little more time. However, as with a diet journal, when you review your log at the end of the week, you’ll notice where you spend time on office “junk food.”

As you review your log, highlight the time wasters. People who don’t get to the point, meetings you didn’t need to attend, or traveling for a personal meeting when a phone call would work. Make a list of the “fat” in your journal and how you can permanently cut it out of your week.You’ll find you immediately create more hours in your week. Next, schedule a sit down with your boss to negotiate your impossible list of responsibilities. Rank the list in order of priority as you believe he or she would do. Roughly estimate how long each task takes and highlight the tasks that will currently not be accomplished. Ask your boss to review your list and weigh in on what gets dropped. Notice that I’m not recommending you work longer hours, pretend you are Superman, or whine about your

workload.You are realistically collaborating with your boss so that it is his or her choice how you spend your time.You are not allowing your manager to continue to operate under the delusion that you have unlimited time. Realize that if you don’t do a calm and practical negotiation, your boss may truly not be aware of how much he or she has given you to do.Your meeting with him or her may be the first time your manager sees your job through your eyes. The last technique is the one I find that most of my clients have never used in their workplace. Most people believe it is a “waste” of time to spend more time on the front end solving a repetitive problem. However, the truth is that if you

spend 20 minutes making sure you never have that problem again, you have just saved yourself years of time.

remember why you used to enjoy your job.

Let’s say you have a coworker who always miscalculates the budget for your department.You can imagine how much time you and your coworkers will spend trying to fix these repetitive errors. Yes, none of us likes conflict. However, the time you take to make sure the budget is accurate means all those future minutes end up back in your pocket. When you have problemsolving conversations, make sure you approach your coworker as an ally to solve “the problem.” Be very careful that you don’t treat your coworker as if he is “the problem.” People who feel blamed are completely uninterested in being part of permanent solutions. The bottom line is that you don’t need to be magical to create more hours in a day. You do need to do the right things and not just do things right. If you sit back and use your good judgment and interpersonal skills to carve out how you spend your time, you’ll

Q. I’m leaving my job for a great position. My boss has been a completely jerk and I’d love to tell both him and human resources off before I leave. Since I won’t have to deal with him anymore once I take my new job, is there any big downside to this?

The last word(s)

A.Yes, unless you expect your boss and former company to move to another planet, no industry is big enough for you to tell people off on the way out the door. Focus on celebrating your future not getting even with your past.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

How much term do I need? Dear Dave, Should term life insurance be purchased based on your current earnings or future, projected earnings? Dan Dear Dan, I usually recommend people have 10 to 12 times their current annual income in a good, level term life insurance policy. However, if you have a solid reason to project your income jumping significantly in the near future, there’s nothing wrong with basing your amount of life insurance coverage on that figure—as long as you can afford it. Now, when I say a solid reason, I’m not talking about having an attitude of,“I’m smart. So, I’m going to make tons more money

soon.”That’s ego, not reason. But if you’re in a residency finishing your medical degree, you can realistically look at making $40,000 to $50,000 for another year or two then making the jump to $200,000.That’s the kind of logical thinking and planning I’m talking about. In that scenario, a huge jump in income is almost assured.There’s nothing wrong with going ahead and getting more coverage. The purpose of life insurance is to take care of your family if something unexpected should happen to you.You don’t want to go nuts and buy too much unnecessarily, but you should have enough to ensure that they’re well taken care of when you’re not around. —Dave


THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. PLAINTIFF VS RICHARD CAPPETTA AKA RICHARD A CAPPETTA ; WINSTON HILLS NO. 1 ASSOCIATION; DEFENDANTS 11 CH 005889 6403 DEAN DRIVE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on January 8, 2013, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on November 19, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 08-23-103-004 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 6403 DEAN DRIVE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A TWO CAR ATTACHED GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $284,290.49. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1125550 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I564138 Published 10/9, 10/16, 10/23

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP PLAINTIFF VS CLEMENTE ALCANTARA; WATERBURY CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; BLANCA IRIS JIMENEZ; DEFENDANTS 09 CH 5993 2409 SPRING STREET APT 4801 WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on July 20, 2010, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on November 21, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 08-36-109-145 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2409 SPRING STREET APT 4801 WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 Description of Improvements: PER TITLE REPORT BRICK 4 OR MORE UNIT NO GARAGE The Judgment amount was $82,920.01. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g) (4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce. com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA0929039 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I564786 Published 10/9, 10/16, 10/23

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS 2012 CH 001669 JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. PLAINTIFF Vs. Beverly A. Diehl; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 8/16/2013, John Zaruba, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois will on 11/19/13 at the hour of 10:00AM at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office 501 North County Farm Road Wheaton, IL 60187, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 08-24-307-065 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 25 Wintergreen Court Woodridge, IL 60517 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-09352. I565069 Published 10/9, 10/16, 10/23

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. ROSA M. DE ALBA and WOODRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION #6, Defendants. 11-CH-5808 Property Address: 2192 Country Club Dr. Woodridge, IL 60517 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of the above Court entered on April 9, 2012 in the aboveentitled cause, the Sheriff of DuPage County will at 10:00 a.m., on November 14, 2013, in the Main Lobby at the DuPage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Permanent Index Number: 08-25-419-060 Commonly known as: 2192 Country Club Dr., Woodridge, IL 60517 The real estate is improved with a condominium unit. The Judgment amount is $109,336.32 Sale terms: 10% due by cash or certified funds at the time of the Sale and the balance is due within 24 hours of the Sale. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, and is offered for Sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to the Plaintiff. The Sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information contact Plaintiff’s Attorney: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, 111 E. Main St., Decatur, Illinois 62523 (217) 422-1719. The purchaser of a condominium unit at a judicial foreclosure sale, other than a mortgage, who takes possession of a condominium unit pursuant to a court order or a purchase who acquires title from a mortgage shall have the duty to pay the proportionate share, if any, of the common expenses for the unit which would have become due in the absence of any assessment acceleration during the 6 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the collection of assessments, and which remain unpaid by the owner during whose possession the assessments accrued. If the outstanding assessments are paid at any time during any action to enforce the collection of assessments, the purchaser shall have no obligation to pay any assessments which accrued before he or she acquired title. If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g-l) IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (c) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Note: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that the Law Firm of Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I563394 Published 10/2, 10/9, 10/16


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. ROSA M. DE ALBA and WOODRIDGE COUNTRY CLUB CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION #6, Defendants. 11-CH-5808 Property Address: 2192 Country Club Dr. Woodridge, IL 60517 PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of the above Court entered on April 9, 2012 in the aboveentitled cause, the Sheriff of DuPage County will at 10:00 a.m., on November 14, 2013, in the Main Lobby at the DuPage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: Unit 4G in Building 26 together with its undivided percentage interest in the common elements in Woodridge Country Club Condominium No. 6 as delineated and defined in the Declaration recorded as Document Number R79-17267, as amended from time to time, in the South 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 25, Township 38 North, Range 10, East of the Third Principal Meridian, in DuPage County, Illinois. Permanent Index Number: 08-25-419-060 Commonly known as: 2192 Country Club Dr., Woodridge, IL 60517 The real estate is improved with a condominium unit. The Judgment amount is $109,336.32 Sale terms: 10% due by cash or certified funds at the time of the Sale and the balance is due within 24 hours of the Sale. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, and is offered for Sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to the Plaintiff. The Sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. For information contact Plaintiff’s Attorney: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC, 111 E. Main St., Decatur, Illinois 62523 (217) 422-1719. The purchaser of a condominium unit at a judicial foreclosure sale, other than a mortgage, who takes possession of a condominium unit pursuant to a court order or a purchase who acquires title from a mortgage shall have the duty to pay the proportionate share, if any, of the common expenses for the unit which would have become due in the absence of any assessment acceleration during the 6 months immediately preceding institution of an action to enforce the collection of assessments, and which remain unpaid by the owner during whose possession the assessments accrued. If the outstanding assessments are paid at any time during any action to enforce the collection of assessments, the purchaser shall have no obligation to pay any assessments which accrued before he or she acquired title. If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g-l) IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (c) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Note: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act you are advised that the Law Firm of Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. I563394 Published 10/2, 10/9, 10/16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP PLAINTIFF VS CLEMENTE ALCANTARA; WATERBURY CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION; UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON RECORD CLAIMANTS ; BLANCA IRIS JIMENEZ; DEFENDANTS 09 CH 5993 2409 SPRING STREET APT 4801 WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on July 20, 2010, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on November 21, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: UNIT 4801 IN WATERBURY CONDOMINIUMS, AS DELINEATED ON SURVEY OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED REAL ESTATE: LOTS 24 THROUGH 50, BOTH INCLUSIVE, IN ECHO POINT, PARCEL “C”, UNIT ONE, A RESUBDIVISION OF PART OF LOT 8 IN ECHO POINT, PARCEL “C”, UNIT ONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS; WHICH SURVEY IS ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT “A” TO THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED AS DOCUMENT NO. R79-57993, TOGETHER WITH THE UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT TO SAID UNITS. SITUATED IN THE VILLAGE OF WOODRIDGE, COUNTY OF DUPAGE IN THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 08-36-109-145 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2409 SPRING STREET APT 4801 WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 Description of Improvements: PER TITLE REPORT BRICK 4 OR MORE UNIT NO GARAGE The Judgment amount was $82,920.01. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.attypierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA0929039 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I564786 Published 10/9, 10/16, 10/23

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS 2012 CH 001669 JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. PLAINTIFF Vs. Beverly A. Diehl; et. al. DEFENDANTS NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 8/16/2013, John Zaruba, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois will on 11/19/13 at the hour of 10:00AM at Dupage County Sheriff’s Office 501 North County Farm Road Wheaton, IL 60187, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 63 IN WOODRIDGE CENTER UNIT FOUR, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTH WEST 1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 18, 1973 AS DOCUMENT R73-35722, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. PIN 08-24-307-065 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 25 Wintergreen Court Woodridge, IL 60517 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twentyfour (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-12-09352. I565069

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. PLAINTIFF VS RICHARD CAPPETTA AKA RICHARD A CAPPETTA ; WINSTON HILLS NO. 1 ASSOCIATION; DEFENDANTS 11 CH 005889 6403 DEAN DRIVE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on January 8, 2013, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF in DU PAGE County, Illinois, will on November 19, 2013, in 501 North County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, at 10:00 AM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DU PAGE, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: LOT 19 IN BLOCK 7 IN WINSTON HILLS ONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PARTS OF SECTION 14 AND 23, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE RECORDER’S OFFICE OF DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, NOVEMBER 20, 1963 AS DOCUMENT R63-42591. TAX NO. 08-23-103-004 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 6403 DEAN DRIVE WOODRIDGE, IL 60517 Description of Improvements: ONE STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH A TWO CAR ATTACHED GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $284,290.49. Sale Terms: This is an “AS IS” sale for “CASH”. The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 151701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.attypierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff’s Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 3722060. Please refer to file #PA1125550 Plaintiff’s attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale.

Published 10/9, 10/16, 10/23

I564138 Published 10/9, 10/16, 10/23


Seniors

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

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RETIRE SMART By Jill Schlesinger | Tribune Content Agency

After years of political fighting, a Supreme Court decision and lots of confusion, the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA or “Obamacare”) kicked off on October 1. The government has established the website Healthcare.gov to manage all aspects of the ACA, but if you need a cheat sheet, here are some of the most frequently asked questions: Q. What do I need to do? A. If you are an uninsured U.S. citizen or legal resident, you must be enrolled in qualifying health coverage in 2014 or face a penalty. Qualifying coverage includes: employer-provided insurance; government programs like Medicare, Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP); COBRA; privately purchased insurance; or coverage you purchase in a state or federal marketplace. Q. What are “exchanges” or “marketplaces”? A. On October 1, online health insurance marketplaces (also known as “exchanges”) launched

CALENDAR Continued from page 5 Residents - Put out brush on June 9 & Oct. 13 Southside Residents Put out brush on June 16 & Oct. 20 This program is for singlefamily residential properties only. Collection is not provided for business, commercial, multiunits or other income properties. Brush should be cut to four-foot lengths and either stacked neatly on the parkway with the thick ends closest to the street.

OCTOBER 22 Divergent Trivia for Teens. 6 p.m. at the Downers Grove Public Library, 1050 Curtiss St. Test your knowledge of Divergent and Insurgent and compete to win copies of the

so that individuals without insurance as well as small businesses with up to 50 employees could shop for insurance coverage. State and federal governments are not providing the coverage,rather they are aggregating the information for consumers through one platform - the marketplace. It’s like using Travelocity to understand the cost of various airlines flying to your desired destination, rather than visiting each airline’s website. Costs of coverage vary by type of coverage, state of residence, age and family situation. Q. What are the penalties for NOT having coverage? A. For each household, the greater of: - 2014: $95 per uninsured adult and $47.50 per uninsured child, capped at $285 per household, OR 1 percent of household income. - 2015: $325 per uninsured adult and $162.50 per child, capped at $975 per household, OR 2 percent of household income. - 2016: $695 per uninsured adult and $347.50 per child, capped at $2,085 per

third book, Allegiant, and tickets to meet author Veronica Roth! Pizza provided.

OCTOBER 24 Citizenship 101: How our Local Libraries Work. 7 p.m. at the Woodridge Public Library, 3 Plaza Drive.The League of Women Voters of Downers Grove/ Woodridge/Lisle is sponsoring this public information meeting. Across the country, libraries are changing with the times. What is happening in our local libraries? How are our taxes being spent, and decisions made? How can citizens be more involved? The speakers will be Rick Ashton, Director, Downers Grove Public Library; Shannon Halikias, Administrator, Lisle Library District; and Susan McNeil-Marshall, Administrator, Woodridge Public Library.

household, OR 2.5 percent of household income. Q. Are there exemptions from penalties? A. Yes, for economic hardship,religious objections, American Indians, those without coverage for less than 3 months, undocumented immigrants and incarcerated individuals. Q. Will Uncle Sam help financially? A. Yes. Beginning in 2014, there will be tax credits for individuals and families making between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty level, who purchase insurance through the

Dewey Jones and the Chicago Defender. 7 p.m. at the Woodridge Public Library, 3 Plaza Drive. Dewey Jones II will discuss the work his father did for the Chicago Defender during the 1920s and 30s. Among other things, he published a poetry column with contributors such as Gwendolyn Brooks and Langston Hughes. His father was also connected to Roosevelt’s Black Cabinet and Hull House. Jones II recently edited and published a manuscript his father wrote in the 1930s, Dark Days: A Tale of Love along the Color Line, which he will also discuss.

marketplaces and who are ineligible for coverage through an employer or a government plan. For a family of four, credits are available for incomes of $23,550 up to $94,200. Q. How will ACA change health benefits and coverage? A. In the following ways: - Eventual elimination of lifetime and annual limits on coverage. - Elimination of pre-existing condition exclusions by 2014. - Requirement to extend dependent coverage to age 26. - Insurers will not be

allowed to charge women or persons with medical problems higher rates. - Premiums of older individuals can’t be more than 3X as expensive as those of younger people. - Coverage will be portable, even if you leave a job. - Limit any waiting periods for coverage to 90 days. (Jill Schlesinger, CFP, is the Emmynominated, Senior Business Analyst for CBS News. A former options trader and CIO of an investment advisory firm, Jill covers the economy, markets, investing and anything else with a dollar sign on TV, radio (including her nationally syndicated radio show), the web and her blog, “Jill on Money.” She welcomes comments and questions at askjill@jillonmoney.com.)

OCTOBER 25-26

$7 evening session/$5 afternoon session. Hawthorne Hill Woods will be transformed into a thrill of scary scenes, complete with ghosts, ghouls, and all sorts of creatures that slither and groan. The Saturday afternoon session will be more suitable for children 9 and under and the faint of heart (parental discretion). All participants will be taken to the haunted forest on hayrides.Parking is available on Carleton Drive, at Village Hall and at the Woodridge Public Library. Drop off/pick-up location is on the west end of the Community Center parking lot. For more information call the Park District at (630)353-3300.Visa and Mastercard are accepted.

Haunted Forest Walk. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 1to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Woodridge Community Center. Age: 9 and up or at parent’s discretion Fee:

Main Street Cemetery at Night for Families. 7 to 8 p.m. at the Main Street Cemetery. Join the Downers Grove Park

District Museum in a tour of Historic Main Street Cemetery… at night! Take time to explore the graveyard and enjoy stories and little known facts about the people buried in the Main Street Cemetery. Families will also have the opportunity to take part in a hands-on activity. The fee is $25 per resident household and $38 per non-resident household. Please register one adult and then list the names and ages of your household members who will attend. For more information, call (630) 963-1309.

OCTOBER 25 ‘Young Frankenstein’ at Tivoli Theatre. Midnight at Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland Ave., Downers Grove. $5 admission. Those in costume receive a free small popcorn. Doors opens at 11:30 p.m.


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 16, 2013

Downers Grove 10-16-13  

Downers Grove 10-16-13

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