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Our Community, Our News

NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Vol. 7 No. 20

WILL COUNTY

Divided county Board approves budget Striking workers picketed just outside the County boardroom By laura KatausKas staff reporter Editor’s Note: Common Core Standards, Career and College Readiness, Measures of Academic Performance (MAP) testing, data-driven accountability—almost chanted like a mantra, these are the terms educators and parents are hearing on a daily basis when it comes to the business of educating students in Valley View School District 365u. In the final installment of a three-part look at how Valley View uses assessments, what parents need to know and what the ramifications are as a district, the Bugle Newspapers breaks down how assessment fits in with the district’s design for change holding the district, schools and its teachers accountable.

SEE GRADE • PAGE 8

By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

A divided Will County Board narrowly approved the 2013-14 budget at a Nov. 21 meeting that beforehand seemed like a high school basketball game. Striking Will County union workers took a few hours off from the picket lines they have been walking since Monday to set up a rally just outside and in the gallery of the Will County Boardroom. Although many had left by the time the County Board approved the $500 million total spending plan, their presence was felt in a few of the motions that preceded the tally. Board Member Chuck Maher, R-Naperville, suggested eliminating an $80,000 line item to hire an assistant chief of staff in the county executive’s office. Nick Palmer assumed the main job when Matt Ryan died of cancer three See BUDGET, page 3


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

News

Library district unveils strategic plan Planning process began by developing understanding of community’s perspectives through electronic survey By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

To plan for the future, Fountaindale Public Library officials are drafting a strategic plan, outlining the goals and direction of the library. This is part of a comprehensive planning process that began by developing an understanding of the community’s perspectives through the use of an electronic survey and by focus group sessions. “I think the most important thing that came out of our

strategic planning process is that we will have a roadmap that will help guide us over the next several years so that we can provide the best services for our community,” said Executive Director Paul Mills. Part of the process, the district assessed the current state of the library and identified several key strategic challenges facing including providing consistent, high-quality services during times of uncertain funding; demonstrating the library’s relevance and benefit to the community;empowering staff to

meet patron high-tech and hightouch expectations; integrating appropriate technologies into library services and products and providing digital media within an environment of legal and economic constraints. “We anticipate that funding over the next several years will be relatively flat and that we will need to live within those means,” said Mills. The draft plan contains the proposed mission, vision, planning assumptions, goals and objectives of the library for the next several years. The plan outlines major areas of focus, including its facilities, marketing, partnerships within the community, developing quality services, and engaging and empowering staff. The draft plan may be viewed at www.fountaindale.org.


News BUDGET Continued from page 1 years ago. That was defeated on a bipartisan 18-8 vote. But another move suggested by Board Member Mike Fricilone, R-Homer Glen, to use a little more than $4 million in RTA sales tax revenues to purchase the First Midwest Building for county use instead of using reserves. Fricilone said it would be good to have more in cash reserves, especially considering all the “green shirts” (union members) who had been in the audience. But opponents, all Democrats, believed it was better to keep on hand the RTA funds as the county looked to such projects as the Illiana Tollway and the Interstate 55/Weber Road interchange, the county’s portion of which is nearly $50 million. That measure failed with County Executive Larry Walsh having to break a 13-13 partisan tie. The vote on the full budget was approved 1412, with Republican Tom Weigel of New Lenox again crossing over the aisle to vote with the Democrats. At last month’s meeting,Weigel forced Walsh to break a tie when he said he would support including new construction in the county’s property tax request during the past year. He said the county had done so up until the last four or five years, and he saw no problem including it now. The $900,000 increase in the levy would amount to about an extra $3 of $4 each year in property taxes toward the county for owners of homes

valued at $200,000. During a lengthy public comment portion of the meeting, union officials and members urged the county to return to the bargaining table. Union members went on strike Nov. 18 after county officials said they had budged as much as they could on salaries and benefits during 15 months of negotiations. One of the main issues is the county changing from requiring employees to pay 1 to 2 percent of their salaries toward their health insurance to paying a portion of the premium of the plan they choose. Six Democrat Will County Board members reportedly were ready to not cross the union picket line Thursday, meaning they would miss voting on the county’s 2013-2014 budget. With a 13-13 split on the board as far as Republicans and Democrats, the missing Democrats would have allowed the Republicans to gain control of the final budget discussion. Figuring they had a better chance of getting the budget they wanted with all the Democrats there, AFSCME 1028 officials representing more than 1,000 county union employees decided instead to call off the strikers who had been at each entrance and exit to the Will County Office Building much of the time since the strike began Nov. 18 and call in the moms. AFSCME spokesman Anders Lindall said there would be no picket line before or during the Nov. 21 Will County Board meeting. Instead, the union offered“Moms for a Fair Contract” news conference outside the county office building before the county board meeting, followed

by public comment during the meeting by AFSCME 1028 President Dave Delrose. Of the press conference,Lindall said in a press release it would feature striking Will County employees who are mothers, many with their children and “colorful homemade signs. “Mothers in the county workforce will urge the politicians who control Will County to respect their service, compromise and settle a fair contract that restores county operations.” Asked if the press conference had anything to do with the six Democrats threatening to honor the picket line, Lindall said: “Our focus is on the moms delivering a strong message at the news conference, and

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013 3

our members and community supporters testifying during public comment. We will have a large presence, inside and out,

to urge all the politicians on the county board to compromise and reach a fair agreement, but we can do that without picketing.”


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

News

WILL COUNTY

Leaders urge parents to start drug talks at home Suburban counties like Will, DuPage, Lake are seeing record number of deaths and near fatal overdoses related to heroin By Suzanne Baker Enterprise reporter

At times, the words coming from the young woman’s lips were rushed as she nervously recalled her teen years. She had a lot of information to recount, and this was her first attempt at public speaking. Isabelle Triezenberg had her first drink of alcohol and first hit of marijuana at party when she 14 years old. Now 21, the young adult explained how in a matter of a few years she gradually spiraled out of control from good student, cheerleader and an athlete competing in track and crosscountry to a heroin addict who nearly died from an overdose.

Her story plays out every day throughout suburban communities. Although Triezenberg has been able to put her life back together with the help of Will County’s Drug Court, that often is not the case for others in Will County where heroin fatalities have risen in the past few years. Triezenberg’s account of tragedy, triumph and a work in progress was part of a “Heroin – What Parents and Students Need to Know”forum Nov. 20 hosted by local legislators and Will County leaders at Creekside Elementary School in Plainfield. Despite the rainy weather, a crowd filled the school’s media center to learn what parents, neighbors,

educators and the community can do to fight what has become an epidemic in Will County.

State task force State Rep. Natalie Manley, D-Joliet, said heroin use is no longer just an urban problem. Suburban counties like Will, DuPage and Lake are seeing a record number of deaths and near fatal overdoses related to heroin. “I’m afraid of what’s going on out there. We have a killer out there, and it doesn’t have a face,” Manley said. She urged parents, teachers and local officials as well as county and state leaders to band together. “We are stronger together than apart,” she added. To do her part, Manley joined with state Sen. Jennifer BertinoTarrant, D-Shorewood, in cosponsoring legislation passed by both houses and approved by the governor to create a Young Adults Heroin Use Task Force.The See HEROIN, page 5

AT A GLANCE

Will County communities where at least 1 heroin overdose was reported in 2013

Beecher Bolingbrook Braidwood Crete Homer Glen Lockport Joliet Naperville Minooka Plainfield Peotone Township Shorewood Wilmington


News Briefs HEROIN Continued from page 4 mission of the task force is to study the heroin use problem in high schools and suggest programs for high schools to use to address the problem. The group will send its findings and recommendations to the General Assembly and governor by June 30. Bertino-Tarrant said the task force needs to look at more than prevention, but also at intervening through programs such as Drug Court. “It is good to hear a success story. Isabelle is going to struggle the rest of her life,” she said. “Sometimes it takes tough love, like that provided by Drug Court. “We need to broaden this out to make this available statewide.”

Pain and pleasure of Drug Court Even Triezenberg admits Drug Court is no cake walk. However, had it not been for the program, she likely would not be here today. Despite three months of sobriety and a stint in rehabilitation after her first arrest, Triezenberg had the urge for heroin again. “I told myself, ‘Just this one time,’” she said. That impulse nearly cost Triezenberg her life when she overdosed on heroin in July 2012 while sitting in a sibling’s car. She was lucky a passerby called emergency personnel when she was seen passed out in the car.“I thought it would never happen to me,”Triezenberg said. It was August 2012 when she entered Drug Court and was forced to change her life.“They’re a pain in the (butt) sometimes,” she said.“I still have my days, but now I know how to challenge myself to do what is right.” Triezenberg said people like Julie McCabe-Sterr, coordinator of the Will County Adult and Juvenile

Drug Courts, now are like family to her.  Sterr said the age of kids participating in drug court is becoming younger. She sees drug abusers as young as 12 and 13 years old. The rigorous regime requires drug testing, appearances before the judge, rehab, counseling, mental health assistance or whatever services necessary to help kids and adults kick their habits. While many contacts last 12-18 months, sometimes with heroin addicts the program lasts three years. “It is not a quick fix,” Sterr said.

Target heroin dealers Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow said so far this year, 31 fatalities were reported from heroin overdoses in the county and another seven are still under investigation. While that figure is less than the 53 reported last year, Glasgow said the county has a long road to forge before reducing that number. One big step is removing the local supply chain, which is what local law enforcement is doing. Glasgow said just five years ago, his office prosecuted 10 cases of heroin dealing in the county. Last year that number rose to 50. “If you’re dealing heroin in Will County, we’re going to find you and take you out,” Glasgow said. For those already hooked on heroin, Drug Court can be salvation. Glasgow said the program has a 90 percent success rate. Because heroin is so addictive, even Drug Court can’t help everyone. Glasgow said three kids died of overdoses while participating in the program.

Stop kids before they use Preventing children from ever trying heroin in the first place is imperative, according to

Joan Drummond Olson, interim director of the Robert Crown Center for Health Education. Olson said her organization was approached about the heroin issue by a benefactor whose grandchild had overdosed. The mission of the Robert Crown Center for Health Education has been to lead, educate and motivate kids toward healthy, happy and safe lives. While most people remember the RCC for its puberty talks, the center has expanded to include drug use and obesity. When asked why heroin use wasn’t part of the conversation, Olson said the RCC realized little research was available regarding use in the suburbs. Olson said heroin use traditionally has been an urban problem, so the RCC embarked on a study of the suburban side.

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013 5

Nov. 30 order deadline for BHS JROTC wreath fundraiser To honor fallen members of the military, Bolingbrook High School’s Air Force Junior ROTC program is taking part in the National Wreaths Across America program by sponsoring the sale of wreaths that will be placed on graves at Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery in Elwood on Dec. 14. Orders for the $15 wreaths must be placed and paid for by Nov. 30 if the donor has a specific gravesite on which the wreaths should be placed or by Dec. 1 if there are no placement instructions. Order forms are available by e-mailing bhs.afjrotc@ live.com, by calling 630-4509332, or by going to www.

WreathsAcrossAmerica.org. But it’s important to remember to use the BHS JROTC group number (ILROTC091) and location number (ILALNE) when ordering on-line. The BHS JROTC hopes to receive enough orders to place 200 wreaths. The program will use its portion of the fundraiser to purchase additional wreaths. Officials hope to place wreaths on all 32,000 graves at the cemetery.Similar ceremonies will take place on Dec. 14 (National Wreaths Across Amercia Day) at national cemeteries throughout the country.

Zumba classes serving as fundraiser for Brooks cheerleaders See BRIEFS, page 17


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Police Blotter

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BHS

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The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

1

Daniel Martinez, 24, 123 Galewood Drive was arrested at 12:05 p.m. Nov. 14 and charged with resisting a peace officer, following a traffic stop at Lily Cache Lane and Orchard Drive.

2

Robin Johnson, 22, 360 Stonegate Road, was arrested at 4:50 p.m. Nov. 14 and charged with violation of order of protection.

3

Kenneth Ratcliff, 45, 115 Somerset Lane,was arrested at 5:11 p.m. Nov. 15 and charged

with an in-state warrant on the 100 block of S. Bolingbrook Drive.

4

Bryan Orellana, 20, 281 S. Palmer Drive was arrested at 10:11 a.m. Nov. 15 and charged with an in-state warrant.

5

Richard Buhle, 29, 613 Greystone Lane, was arrested at 9:43 p.m. Nov. 15 and charged with DUI and improper lane usage, following a traffic stop at Bluebird Lane and Rebecca Drive.

6

John McEvoy, 33, 505 Preston Drive, was arrested at 2:37 a.m. Nov. 16 and charged with speeding and DUI,following a traffic stop at Boughton Road and Lyons Drive.

7

George Rose, 44, 35G Wildwood Lane, was

arrested at 10:07 p.m. Nov. 16 for disorderly conduct, driving on a suspended license and no insurance, following a traffic stop on Wildwood Court.

8

A 2013 Toyota Sienna was taken from the 300 block of S. Bolingbrook Drive between 2:50 and 3:05 p.m. Nov. 16. Keys were left in the unlocked vehicle.

9

Officers were called to Marquette Court for the report of a theft on Nov. 17. Several pieces of jewelry were taken from the residence. David Crothers, 19, 136 Jamestown Lane, was arrested at 9:48 p.m. Nov. 17 and charged with an in-state warrant.

10

11

Eric Tamosiunas, 41, 1442 Glenside Drive, was

arrested at 10:58 p.m. Nov. 17 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 300 block of W. Briarcliff Road. businesses on the 400 12 Two block of N. Bolingbrook Drive had glass doors broken by unknown subjects between 5:55 and 10:15 p.m. Nov. 17. A 2008 Volvo tractor was taken for the parking area on the 500 block of E. South Frontage Rd. between Nov. 15 and Nov. 18.

13

A 2007 Ford F-250 Supercab was taken from the parking lot on the 100 block of Remington Boulevard between Nov. 18 and 19.

14

A 1995 Chevy Lumina was taken from a driveway on the 500 block of Rockhurst Rd.

15

between 9:45 and 10:02 p.m. Vehicle was left running to warm up. Jason Janecek, 24, 559 Spruce Road, was arrested at 1:58 a.m. Nov. 20 and charged with an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop at Redwood Drive and Upton Drive.

16

Evan Woods, 24, 118 Grady Drive, was arrested at 1:51 a.m. Nov. 20 and charged with an in-state warrant.

17

Joseph Moreno, 20, 326 Huntington Way and Antonio Flores-Guillen, 23, 366 Tarrington Way, were both arrested at 7:44 p.m. Nov. 20 and charged with in-state warrants, following a traffic stop at Pinecrest Road and Faversham Drive.

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foruM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

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Column

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

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Peace, Not Pieces, the Key to Happiness A week or so ago, I was washing dishes when a ceramic Northwestern stein I bought years ago fell off the windowsill right above the sink. I checked it over, and it was fine. So I put it right back up on the sill where it has sat for years. A couple days later, same thing. Except this time, it broke. Sometimes I have gotten the glue out and put stuff like that back together … several times. This time, without much thinking, I just threw it away. Later, I went on the ‘net pretty confident I could find another one. I couldn’t. And I started to feel kind of sad that a portion of my college life, one that I really hadn’t given much thought to in a while, was gone and likely was not going to be replaced. Then I saw the image on TV of a guy in Washington, Ill., who literally collapsed in tears when he saw the rubble that once was his home. After the shock of what he had seen wore off a bit, he said he was thankful none of his family was hurt among those ruins. I know I spend more time worrying about what I don’t have than being grateful for what I do have. And I bet you do, too. Worrying is different from preparing. Preparing means to take that worry, figure the best plans you can, and then relax and see what happens. I even reminded Jillian this morning what Mom says happens when she prepares: “Nothing!” Jillian said. So as you prepare this holiday season, do the best you can do have a great time, enjoying the family and many friends you have and the other blessings that we all too often forget about. Remember those who have less this year for one reason or another. Yeah, the economy

worryIng Is dIfferent from preparIng. preparIng means to take that worry, fIgure the best plans you can, and then relax and see what happens.

has come back a bit, but not everyone followed along. Only a few weeks ago, those people in Washington and some even closer to home, weren’t thinking they would be picking up what’s left of their lives from a rare November tornado. If you want to help them, here are just a few places taking donations: • PeopleFirstBank of Joliet established a benefit fund for tornado victims in Illinois. Donations may be made at both PeopleFirstBank locations, 3100 Theodore St. in Joliet and 1226 W. Jefferson St. in Shorewood. Checks can be made payable to “PeopleFirstBank for benefit of 11/17/13 Relief Fund.” Donations also can be mailed to PeopleFirstBank, 3100 Theodore St., Joliet, IL 60435. For more information, call the bank at (815) 207-6200. • The Three Rivers Association of Realtors (TRAR) is accepting donations for delivery to the Diamond, Coal City and Manhattan and other areas where there is need. Items can be dropped off from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at the TRAR Board Office, 303 Springfield Ave., Joliet. Items most in need include: non-perishable food items, bottled water, large garbage bags, toiletries, work gloves, bleach, buckets, sponges, mops, paper products and infant care items. • Thomas Nissan of Joliet is collecting canned food,

bottled, water, toilet paper and baby care products to give to tornado victims in Will County. Donations can be dropped off from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday or 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday at the dealership, 1427 N. Larkin Ave. • Aaron’s Furniture, 1418 W. Jefferson St., Joliet, is accepting donations from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday. For more information, call (815) 7440100. • A drop box was set up at the Joliet Park District’s Inwood Athletic Club, 3000 W. Jefferson St., Joliet. Items can be donated between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily. For more information, call (815) 7417275. In Shorewood, tornado collection boxes are available at: • Conrad’s Harley Davidson, 19356 NE Frontage Road, open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call (815) 7252000. • Remax Ultimate Professionals, 576 Brookforest Ave., open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Call (815) 725-4545. • Troy Fire Station 1, 700 Cottage Road. Do what you can. And please have a great Thanksgiving and a safe holiday season. Nick Reiher Managing Editor


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

GRADE Continued from page 1 School districts across the state face the ramifications of an accountability system deemed as admittedly ineffective while grappling with how to ingrain a new system of checks and balances that ensures students are successful. As Illinois revamps its educational system,school districts are expected to comply and Valley View is no exception, marking the premise for the district’s journey to a new view and its design for change.

Reason for Change Based on the federal government and the state’s belief that the bar has been set too low in education, based on international tests, with the U.S. falling behind, an initiative to increase rigor and develop systemic change through school districts has been in the works for the past few years, including the

Schools

likes of the adoption of Common falter when they go on to take an The overall ISAT scores show assessment that is more rigorous.” Valley View numbers below Core Standards in 2010. To remedy the situation, the state average. In reading, 57 Within education circles, it has beginning with the Spring 2013 percent of Valley View students are long been understood that there scores, the state increased scores considered meeting or exceeding has been a disconnect with the on the ISAT to align with the compared to the state average Illinois Student Achievement Test standard for the ACT, putting of 59. In math, Valley View is at and the PSAE, the pre-test given many students who once were 51 percent and the state is at 59 to junior high school students in percent. preparation of theACT test given Overall In Valley View, we don’t espouse to any for acceptance scores show excuses, we expect that when kids walks into college. Valley View through our buildings that they are going “There’s at 54 percent to be prepared to graduate, at number one, always been the and the state because we believe that they can ...” perception that average at 59 - Valley View School District 365u Superintendent James Mitchem when students percent. leave eighth However, grade there is other factors a much greater percentage of considered exceeding now in should play into consideration them meeting and exceeding the meeting category and those says Mitchem. state standards, but then there is meeting in the below or academic A newly revamped state report a significant drop off junior year warning category. now displays student academic when they take PSAE,” explains growth, indicating Valley View Valley View School District 365u is three points behind the state Superintendent James Mitchem. State Report Card average of 101 in math and is on “There is a perception that Such standardized test scores par with state average score of somehow kids got dumber as are part of the annual report card, 102. According to the Illinois State they progressed through high which was recently released. The Board of Education, education school when in reality the testing Illinois Report Card spells out experts believe this approach will mechanism is flawed and leads how well a district is performing improve understanding of student the public to believe kids know and is used as part of the state’s learning and provide a more more than they did and then they accountability system. nuanced accountability system that reflects progress as well as achievement. But that Student Academic Growth score is only being used on an advisory basis this year as is not being used as part of the state’s accountability system. “We have made growth in reading and are one point below the state in math and the comparison for the last three years would indicate that we are exhibiting the same growth patterns,” said Mitchem. “Clearly we are not proud but again you need to look at those numbers different than in the aggregate for a district such as ours.The greater the heterogeneity of the district the more difficult it becomes for a district to meet state standards in the aggregate— that is the whole notion of the achievement gap.” Mitchem contends that it becomes more challenging to close the achievement gap when dealing with every demographic measured by the state, including black, Hispanic and special needs, but says the district needs to do so without making any excuses. He says coming from a public perspective when you see the report card, you may think Valley View is performing lower than a neighboring district—but it’s all perception. He calls attention to the fact that school districts that are more affluent and have larger numbers of similar students tend to score higher. “For those districts in neighboring towns who on paper look like they are better

think about this–if we flipped our students would our students in that district automatically be high performing and would their students immediately be lowperforming in our district. I would tell you, unequivocally no.” “If you compare the same Valley View demographics to that of any other district we would be highly competitive...take scores from Hispanic to Hispanic, low income to low income, special needs to special needs, you get a whole different picture. We make no excuses in fighting this historical achievement gap—that is the whole reason the design for change was made to address—but it requires copious amounts of change and energy and the belief to the degree that it will affect the outcome of our kids so we can mirror those affluent districts.”

No Child Left Behind fails The state’s accountability system is inevitably tied to funding and if a district continues to fail, dollars historically have been threatened to be cut but the likelihood is slim. Most often states are given an option to choose from a means to try to correct the deficiency by incorporating various programs, which comes in the form of Valley View’s new view. Yet the standards as defined by the No Child Left Behind Act has more than 50 percent of Illinois schools not meeting adequate yearly progress, said Mary Fergus of the Illinois State Board of Education, causing the state to offer a waiver to districts looking to get out from under the No Child Left Behind Act. Mitchem said the district is not ready to engage that waiver. “It’s like peeling that onion— there is far more than meets the eye and there are significant accountability factors attached to that waiver as well. I am aware of it but it is something that our district has not entertained as an option.” NCLB still applies in Illinois so Fergus said the state still has to ensure that schools are offering SES, or tutoring, and submitting school improvement plans, restructuring, etc. “We’re working with low performing districts in a number of ways; developing new systems of support via the Center for School Improvement. More are getting funding through federal School Improvement Grants,” said Fergus. “But note that when schools are failing, we are also not afraid to See GRADE, page 9


schools GRADE Continued from page 8 step in as we have done in two districts in Illinois in recent years such as North Chicago and East St. Louis.” Fergus continued to note that the state is moving forward with higher learning standards adopted in 2010, a new emphasis on measuring student growth, new comprehensive teacher evaluations, a new report card to offer more transparency and useful data for families and community members and more. When it comes to programming, Mitchem said the district is stringent upon only putting in place programs that are researchbased and statistically validated to work. Mitchem said the district holds schools accountable based on the growth model rather than the achievement model, suggesting that using achievement, the expectation that all students, not taking into account their cognitive ability, should all be in the same place at minimum proficiency. “I don’t perceive achievement as a realistic measurement to define a school’s or district’s worth. What is a more accurate assessment of a school’s worth would be growth and that requires some assessment tools that sets an appropriate goal for where you expect a student to be at the conclusion of learning, and you measure to the extent that you reach that goal. That goal should be for every single kid in your district and in your school.” Mitchem believes that there shouldn’t be a situation where students are not growing. “From the Valley View perspective, it is part of our system to ensure that we have frequent formative assessments in place that are designed to access our teaching to learn if we are effective and we should be able to make those adjustments in real time,” said Mitchem. Theoretically the district is mapping curriculum from the 12th grade backwards—so that the standard is set in kindergarten for what is needed to get students to graduation. “That is a significant change and a place where Valley View wasn’t two years ago,” said Mitchem. “All day kindergarten and the increase of rigor is all part of it; if we have all our student’s meeting minimum proficiency and they continue that through 12th grade, they should be ready for college without any intervention.That is our goal.Then we brake curriculum down day by

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

9

day, week by week; and teachers should be formatively assessing students almost on a daily basis. Assessment is what drives instruction.” “In Valley View, we don’t espouse to any excuses, we expect that when kids walks through our buildings that they are going to be prepared to graduate, at number one, because we believe that they can—which is a shift in the American education system—and two, because we have the capacity to do it, based on the efficacy of our teachers and systems. If we do this right, eventually that will happen,” continues Mitchem.

Evaluating teachers As Illinois follows new initiatives to strengthen its education system it is also taking into account, new,higher standards for teacher and principal preparation aimed at improving classroom instruction and educational leadership. In addition,the development of a new principal and teacher performance evaluation system that takes into account student academic growth is beginning to emerge. Mitchem reports that across the country as ranked by evaluation,93 percent of all administrators and teachers are considered excellent. “At Valley View, we have about 50 percent of our students that are classified as prepared when they leave here. But 93 percent of us are excellent, so the question becomes this. If 50 percent are meeting standards, and 93 percent of us are excellent, where would we say the problem lies? If it’s not us, what’s left, your children. We’ve said that, without saying it, for forever,” said Mitchem. “The trepidation lies in, not just for the teacher but myself included, how we rectify calling ourselves excellent in the face of mediocre results. How do we do that without excuses designed to buffer us from being held accountable for teaching all of our students.” And that he said is the whole crux of the district’s design for change—standards based reporting, 90/10 grading, doing away with compliance issues and excuses that a child didn’t participate or do home work so therefore if he or she fails, it isn’t the teacher’s fault.Those issues that get in the way of holding teachers and administrators accountable are finding their way out of the system, he said. In 2010, Gov. Pat Quinn signed the Performance Evaluation Reform Act (PERA), which requires all schools in Illinois to change how teachers’ and principals’

performance is measured. PERA requires districts to design and implementperformanceevaluation systems that assess teachers’ and principals’ professional skills as well as incorporate measures of student growth. In addition,student achievement will become a significant factor in every evaluation by the 2016-17 school year. However, Valley View has already begun to put some measures in place but is currently using the evaluation plan/tool that was negotiated during the previous contract that doesn’t include a student growth component. Therefore, the teachers are not directly being evaluated on how their students perform on an assessment at this time but stand to do so by 2016. “When the time comes to meet as a formal joint committee, this entire process will be a tremendous undertaking in trying to develop a plan that will be fair, objective, attainable and measurable in determining the performance of teachers,” said Union Representative Vickie Sutterlin. “Adding the student growth component to a teacher’s evaluation could have very adverse affects and all options need to be explored thoroughly.” She said although the idea of using data to determine whether or not the teacher was effective in his or her instruction seems philosophically logical, it doesn’t

take into account the different variables or possibilities that can be beyond the teacher’s control that can affect the outcome of a test that has nothing to do with whether or not the teacher was effective in his or her instruction. “It is my hope that the state will see the errors of their ways and make significant changes in their requirements before our district’s joint committee will have to tackle this huge task,” said Sutterlin. Mitchem said once assessment systems are fully aligned with common core, the concern over growth will diminish. “Because you are accessing kids in real time constantly and adjusting your delivery system to meet those needs of those kids, they should be growing,” said Mitchem. “This is where beliefs, history and norms and all those things come into play.” Under the new initiative, administrators, are being held the most accountable, with building principals now visiting classrooms to access good instructional classes based on a rubric, a set of standards set across the district. “If they don’t see that, then they have to have those non-threatening conversations with teachers in real-time so that it will affect a change…It is a huge shift,” said Mitchem.“… The other thing is we always accessed a student’s worth void student’s outcomes, which is a huge flaw in the system because

that is where we give ourselves the illusion that you are excellent even though our kids are failing. Then we had a grading system that supports that line of thinking because we can say, they didn’t do this or that and that’s why they are failing. In what world does that happen except in education?” Programs like Odyssey, various push in and pull out programs, formative assessments, and retakes, are all things designed to offset student failure in the district. “We have some teachers out there that are very effective at it. You look at their growth and they all made typical growth and some exceeded it. If you have teachers out there that can do it, then they all can do it. It becomes an issue of efficacy and effort. Because let’s face it, if we want the same results of an affluent, homogeneous district in our district, the effort we have to put forth is going to have to be significantly greater. But if a single teacher in a single classroom, expects to get that done by themselves, then shame on Valley View. There is no way we should put our educators in a position that they perceive that they are solely accountable that every kid should make typical growth with students from the 5th percentile to the 95th percent without significant supports from administrators and professional development,” concluded Mitchem.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

News

MAKE YOUR Holidays a time of promise for Sue Staehely By Clare Walters For the Bugle

It’s that time of year again. It’s the time of year when Shorewood resident Sue Staehely starts to feel the pressure of a promise she made to her son Mark before his death from a rare form of brain cancer in 2006. She promised him she would continue a tradition he began of providing toys to children who were hospitalized during the holidays. “Every year, I get a pain in my stomach around Dec. 1,” Staehely said. “I always say that I thought after Mark died, people would lose interest, but we’ve done wonderfully. We’ve been blessed.” In its 13th year, the Mark Staehely Toy Drive has provided toys to countless children. Mark, who was 12 years old and undergoing cancer treatments when he started the toy drive, sought to bring happiness to children who were dealing with the worst at what otherwise should be the most joyous time of year. “It meant so much to Mark,” Staehely said of distributing the toys. “No matter how sick he was the day before, the dayof—boy—he could take on the world.” This year, Staehely is expanding her efforts to provide toys to children at University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital in addition to her regular efforts at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago and Presence St. Joseph Medical Center in Joliet. “Comer has a great need, so I promised I’d send some there,” she said. “It’s a lot of work, but when you see what those toys mean to the kids at the hospital, it’s worth it. It means everything to them and their families.” Staehely said there’s extra

HOW TO HELP New, unwrapped toys for children from newborn to 18 years old can be dropped off by Dec. 14 at the Troy Fire Protection District Station No. 1, or any of the D’Arcy Motors dealerships

pressure to make this year’s toy drive a success because of how late Thanksgiving falls in the month. “What I’ve learned over the past years is people don’t shop until after Thanksgiving,” she said. “I had to push the deadline back, and it puts the pressure on me to get it done in time (for Christmas).” The toy drive doesn’t have any corporate sponsors and relies on the goodwill of the community for toy donations. “It solely depends on the people in the community,” Staehely said. “It’s a true labor of love. It’s what Christmas is all about.” New, unwrapped toys for children from newborn to 18 years old can be dropped off by Dec. 14 at the Troy Fire Protection District Station No. 1, 700 Cottage/Route 59, or any of the D’Arcy Motors dealerships—2861 W. Jefferson St., 2022 Essington Road and 2521 W. Jefferson St. Monetary donations are also accepted. Checks can be made payable to the Mark Staehely Toy Drive and mailed to 21005 Ron Lee Drive, Shorewood, 60404. Monetary donations are used to purchase gift cards for the teenagers. For more information or questions, contact Staehely at 815-741-8750 or Roger Damyen at 815-823-5130.


taKe 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Protocol 7 Dupe 14 Where seals are their least graceful 15 Script used to transcribe foreign words into Japanese 16 Low-tech calculator 17 Modeling job? 18 Drop shots, in badminton 19 Nearsighted one 20 Was into 21 Low 22 “Daniel Deronda” (1876) was her last novel 24 Regatta racer 26 Osiris’ sis 28 Speculate 30 Choir section 31 Wielding absolute power 33 Legal extremes? 35 He plays Andy Bernard on “The Office” 36 Tool that’s swung

Down 40 Letters in a prof’s email address 41 City where the first koala sanctuary opened 42 Term paper abbr. 45 Wild outing 47 14-time A.L. AllStar 48 Collection of plates 50 Isn’t industrious 52 Tag for some asis mdse. 53 Legend site 54 Get one’s goat, e.g. 56 It was once called Mission San Antonio de Valero 58 Underwater escape mechanism 60 Stories on stands 61 Enhances 62 Slim and trim 63 Ritual candelabrum 64 Cutie pies

1 Farm stand spot 2 Neutral 3 Flatter in a cajoling way 4 Pool convenience 5 Taken 6 Some investments, briefly 7 Writer who said “All literature is gossip” 8 Perched on 9 Campaign hot button 10 Word with jack or box 11 Settled 12 Cancels 13 Part of some golfers’ pre-shot routines 15 It has an allwhite scale 19 They show a lot of leg 23 Chem test paper? 25 Fruit named for a Turkish town 27 Maker of small suits 29 A pitcher may appear in it 32 Unlike spring

chickens 34 Porter’s “__ Girls” 36 Stationery shade 37 Algebraic uncertainty 38 Unfathomable size 39 Wooer’s buy 41 Tolerates 42 Penn movie with a Seussian title 43 Cubism pioneer Georges 44 Call into question 46 Statue base 49 Straphanger 51 21-gun salute, e.g. 55 Actress Merrill of “Operation Petticoat” 57 Bank security 59 Bit of blogger shorthand 60 It may be tapped off

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013 11

Horoscopes Power up to pass over pitfalls. Your executive abilities may come in handy in the week ahead. Loved ones might be too busy to give you attention when you need it, but you’re big enough to overlook it.

Passing the buck could cost you some dough. Don’t expect other people to take care of your work or other tasks in the week ahead. You could be careless, especially if money is involved.

One and one is two. You can balance the books with the best of them and excel at organization. A special someone may not be willing to give you the benefit of the doubt this week, so don’t push your luck.

Money is like water and will drain away if there’s a hole in the container. Keep a sharp eye on small expenses in the week ahead. You can coast on your reputation as a team player at work or in your career.

Color your world. Get out the crayons so you aren’t tempted to delve into gray areas this week. Rather than imagining the worst that can happen, focus on the best that can happen and stick to it.

Fuzzy thinking fouls up the data feed. During the upcoming week, you might imagine things are one way when they are the other way. Concentrate on being accurate and pay attention to small details.

Fault finding fuels feuds. In the week ahead, remain cool as a cucumber and ignore the nagging desire to pick apart a relationship. You might even take criticism from others to heart when it isn’t deserved.

Picky people might hide their picks. You should be sensitive to nuances, but not so sensitive that you imagine the worst. Count your change twice when shopping, especially in the first half of the week.

You can’t be an ace when you’re lost in space. Focus on enhancing your reputation in public in the week ahead and find ways to demonstrate that you’re true blue with family and loved ones.

You can climb your way to the top on the shoulders of those willing to offer support. In the week ahead, you should be circumspect about saying something that could be misunderstood or misinterpreted.

Vagueness causes dissension. Avoid making promises in the first part of the week when people can be hard to pin down and money can evaporate. Guard against the impulse to shop until you drop.

You can only please some of the people some of the time. This week, you may find yourself trying to please everyone and end up not pleasing anyone, including yourself. Stay true blue to yourself.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2013

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • USURP • APPLY • POWDER • BEHELD

Answer:

What the clerk got when she decorated the gift package -- “WRAPPED” UP IN IT


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Bugle Kids


Go to www.buglenewspapers.com for fall stats and for fantasy football head to head column

www.bolingbrookbugle.com

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

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ALL SET Plainfield North’s Federico is Voyager Player of the Year

By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

The setter position in volleyball, particularly in a 5-1 system, is a unique position. Not only are you in charge of setting up your teammates for a kill in every rotation, you also need to be able to dig, block and offer a threat to throw down or tip a kill yourself. Plainfield North’s Kate Federico mastered many of those skills, finishing the season with 1,090 assists, 183 digs, 116 kills and 68 aces. For her accomplishments, Federico has been named the 2013 Voyager Media Girls Volleyball Player of the Year. “Our coaches always tell us if we’re not good at one skill we have to become better at a different skill,” she said. “I’m not that tall so I’m not that strong of a blocker. So, I have to become a great defensive player and be able to pick up tips. I work on my jump a lot so I am able to hit or tip on the second ball. Last year I head a little bit in club, but other than that I’ve always ran a 5-1. Federico is known for her ability to throw down a kill at any point during a match but the kill she had against Naperville North in a sectional semifinal proved just how dangerous she was from anywhere on the court. “There was that one ball where I hit from the back row,” Federico said of the play.“I liked that.”

Being able to do a lot of different things well is still only a part of the job though for a setter. It is also important to spread the ball around to different hitters, something Federico had a knack for. “Getting everyone involved is definitely a key point in volleyball,” Federico said.“If you just set one person, the other team is going to figure that out and start blocking the one person.” With her success on the court, it is difficult to see what she has had to overcome off of it. Federico’s mom, Christine Rehor Federico, died two years ago after a battle with myelodysplastic syndrome. Rehor Federico was a standout at Downers Grove North and Illinois State. However, that has made Federico stonger. “It has impacted me a lot,” Federico said. “Everything I do now has a purpose. My purpose now is to make her proud in everything I do. So I’m doing everything I can.” Her hard work has paid off with player of the year awards, which makes it even more gratifying for her. “It means a lot to me,” Federico said. “I’m kind of at a loss for words. Being a player of the year or having any great title like that means a lot because I know that my mom is proud and everyone is proud. It is something that I have been working hard for and See ALL-AREA, page 14

Scott Taylor/Bugle Staff

Plainfield North’s Kate Federico is the Voyager Media Player of the Year.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

ALL-AREA Continued from page 13 to get an achievement like that is great.” Federico will now move on to the college level, where she hopes to play right away and continue to follow in her mother’s footsteps. She recently signed to play at Clemson University in South

Carolina. “I’m hoping to start,” Federico said. “When I went there I wasn’t too sure about it. But I ended up falling in love with the campus. The coaching staff there is great. The coach (Jolene Jordan Hoover) played with my mom, so there is a connection there.” The rest of the members of the 2013 Voyager Media All-Area team are:

MARY HELEN BEACOM A sophomore, Beacom settled into her role during her second year as a varsity starter with Downers North. The

Sports Trojans’ setter finished with totals of 751 assists, 199 digs, 29 aces and 25 kills while helping her club go 23-15 and reach the sectional semifinals. “She is a great competitor with a high motor, constantly working very hard in every rep of every drill in practice,” Downers North coach Mark Wasik said. “She made great strides with her decision-making this year, running our offense with good efficiency.” 

SKYLER DAY She posted 248 kills, 23 blocks and 27 aces this season for Minooka. “Skyler came back from the off-season a more complete and self-

confident player,” said Minooka coach Chris Hoeschler.“She was always a strong attacker, but she was definitely a dominant attacker who had the ability to take over a match.  Her ball control and serve receive were also much improved.  In fact, she was just as valuable passing the ball as she was attacking it.”

RACHAEL FARA A commit to Northwestern, the junior posted 235 kills and 132 blocks to lead Benet in both, as well as leading the team in hitting and kill percentage. “As a blocker, Rachael is one of the most dominant we’ve had at Benet and she’s become our go-to player on offense,” said Benet coach Brad Baker. “When she connects she’s virtually unstoppable. Rachael has gotten better in every aspect of the game, and with her experience she has a great ability to read plays.”

HANNAH FARLEY The junior outside hitter was a leader for Maine East, which enjoyed a resurgence this season,

winning 17 games. Farley had 212 kills, 167 digs and recorded a serving efficiency of 97.6 percent. “She really stepped up through her work ethic at practice and games and taking on extra responsibility and duties,” Maine East coach Anne Bezek said. “She improved so much this year versus last year. She’s a great hitter and developed a lot of shots.”

KRISSA GEARRING Bolingbrook senior outside hitter and captain was a four-year varsity starter. She was all tournament at Waubonsie Valley and United Township tournaments as well as SWSC ALL Conference and team MVP. She posted 420 kills, 37 aces and 472 total points scored this season. “She was named one of the sun times top 50 volleyball players in the state, I am nominating her See ALL-AREA, page 15


sPorts All-AREA Continued from page 14 for all state,” said Bolingbrook coach Andrea Bercot.

ELIZABETH HYLAND Plainfield Central junior totaled 303 kills, 47 blocks, 20 aces and 144 digs for the Wildcats. She has verbally committed to Lewis University. “Elizabeth worked extremely hard this season to become a leader on the court,” Plainfield Central coach Erik Vogt said. “In our biggest matches she played her best. You couldn’t ask for a better player to coach. Elizabeth is going to be a dominate player in our region next year.”

ALLIE LINDROTH A sophomore from Plainfield North, Lindroth took her game to the next level in her second varsity season. She tallied 247

kills, 209 digs, 38 blocks and 22 aces.

KATHERINE MAHLKE The recent University of Michigan signee and fouryear starter compiled 313 kills, 35 blocks for points and 215 digs as a right-side hitter for Downers North. Named to the Waubonsie Valley and Autumnfest alltournament teams, the 6-2 Mahlke also was listed among the top seniors nationally by prepvolleyball.com—No. 68 out of 150. “Katherine put this team on her back and was a great role model for a young team,” Downers North coach Mark Wasik said.“I am looking forward to her continued growth at Michigan because as dominant as she was in high school, she still has a high ceiling when it comes to maximizing her potential.”

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

15

KATHERINE MILES T h o u g h listed as a middle hitter, the senior played multiple positions— including setter—this season for Maine South, which won their first regional title since 2007. “She played in every match, but depending on how healthy our team was really determined where she played,” Maine South coach Peter King said. “She started the season playing middle and setter, then had her fair share of swing from the outside.” Miles ended up with 207 assists, 163 kills, 53 combined blocks and 21 aces.

MARY MURPHY JCA’s 5-foot, 10-inch junior setter posted 555 assists, 121 kills, 180 digs, 21 blocks this season. She tallied 154 service points including 42 aces. “Mary brings excellent See ALL-AREA, page 16

SOCIAL

HUB

Q & A with local athletes

Dakota Vostry, Romeoville

@DVostry10 Voyager Media

Voyager Sport

@Voyager Sport

How many followers do you have? About 400 I think What do you use Twitter for? Checking up with friends normally How often are you on Twitter? Normally three times a day. I tweet a lot. I think I have 25,000 tweets. Who do you like to follow? There are some accounts with pictures that I like to follow. They tweet out some funny stuff.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Sports ALL-AREA

this year.

JULIA SHEMITIS

The 5-9 senior outside hitter posted 232 kills, 27 aces, 126 knowledge of the game to the service points, 170 digs and 19 court and knows how to lead blocks this season for JCA. by her actions,” said coach Chris She was All-ESCC and was AllScheibe. Tournament at Autumnfest. For her career, she tallied 427 KAYLA PFEIFFER kills, 88 aces, 356 service points, Senior setter for Lockport, 422 digs and 28 blocks. she has signed with Jacksonville “Julia lives and breathes St University in Alabama. This volleyball. She would so season, she posted 244 Kills for whatever it takes to win,” a .285 hitting percentage, 250 Scheibe said. “She is the only assists and 209 digs.  senior on this team who plays “Kayla is a three-year starter all six positions and she has had on varsity, and has shown great the weight of the world on her leadership in the role of setter shoulders and has dealt with and captain,” said Lockport it beautifully. Any coach would coach Erika Lange. “She is a love to have Julia on his or her smooth and naturally athletic team because she not only has player, who is also a humble fantastic talent but the heart and committed student athlete.  and desire many athletes lack.” Jacksonville State University is ASHLEY SHOOK lucky to have signed her.” A freshman from Plainfield OLIVIA RUSEK Central, Shook did a little bit of Regarded as one of the top everything. She finished with outside hitters in the Central 145 kills, 59 blocks, 39 aces, 71 Suburban League—if not the digs and 255 assists. best—Rusek, who committed to “Watching Ashley play Miami of Ohio during her junior volleyball you would swear she year, finished her four-year is a junior or senior,” Vogt said. varsity career as Niles West’s all- “Standing 6’1, Ashley is the time kills leader with 1,009. The complete package as a setter. Wolves advanced to sectionals She is a big, physical blocker each of the past two seasons with no fear of any hitter. She with Rusek leading the charge. is developing quickly into one “She is a leader on and off the of the best setters in the 2017 floor as well as a CSL Scholar,” class. Plainfield Central was 12Niles West coach Stacy Metoyer 20 a year before Ashley came said. “She is one of the most and we finished with a record passionate players that has of 18-19. Ashley is a big reason come through the program and Plainfield Central is back on the she will be missed dearly.” rise.” Continued from page 15

DAKOTA SANTORE Plainfield North senior was the leading hitter on the regional champs. A four-year varsity player, Santore finished with 325 kills, 228 digs, 27 blocks and 44 aces. She was an all-tournament selection in three tournaments

STEPHANIE SINNAPPAN Senior posted 909 assists and 194 digs on the season as the Benet setter. She is committed to the University of Chicago “Stephanie ran a 5-1 one this

year and was the quarterback of our team,” Baker said. “She plays the position that has the chance to make the biggest difference on a team because she touched the ball on every play.  All elite teams have elite level setters and Stephanie played at an extremely high level of us.  She was also a very diverse player as she had almost a 100 kills on the years and was one of the best blocking setters in the state.”  

LINDSEY VISVARDIS The junior libero paced Lockport with 400 digs and a 2.05 passing average. “As a junior libero, Lindsey consistently demonstrates an amazing volleyball IQ,” Lange said. “She understands the flow of the game and how to read hitters, and she plays with the tenacious attitude that characterizes truly great defensive specialists.  Without her passing average or her digs our offense could not have found as much success as it did.”    

MACKENZI WELSH The Plainfield East sophomore was tough for defenses to stop, finishing with 303 kills. Also had 49 block kills and 173 digs. Had 19 kills in a match twice during the season. “MacKenzi Welsh has been a vital part of our varsity team since last season,” Plainfield East coach Emily Tonon said. “As a second year starter on varsity, she stepped into a big role as an outside hitter for us this year. Her drive and motivation along with her love for the sport have helped her become the player that she is today.”

CAROLINE WOLF Senior libero posted 562 digs this season, which is the most all-time in Benet history, more than 150 more than the next player and is committed to Wake Forest. “Caroline is our emotional leader both on and off the court,” Baker said. “She’s in charge of our defense. She’s outstanding on serve-receive and she gets her teammates extra swings because she can get to balls other liberos can’t get to. “Caroline has worked hard to improve every aspect of her game and she’s developed into one of the top liberos in the state.”   Mark Gregory and Mike Sandrolini contributed


Real Estate & Business

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

17

How to cut unproductive conversations short Q. I’m a results-oriented guy, and I have often been told I’m intimidating or bossy. I try to ask what people think we should do, but it takes forever for them to come up with a plan. Is there a way to get people to take action without being accused of being bossy? A. Yes, if you use advanced paraphrasing skills, you’ll be able to lead other people to the conclusion you’ve already drawn. Start by rephrasing the goal you believe the group or the individual has - e.g., “It sounds like we want to finalize the 2014 budget.”Then state more than one way to arrive at this goal. “Did the group want to approve the numbers on the agenda or add a category before we approve it?” People experience us as “bossy”

when we get busy telling them what to do. If it appears we are simply listening well and feeding back what we are hearing, people find us a pleasure to work with. If instead of using paraphrasing, you appeared to be controlling the group - e.g., “Obviously we need to finalize the budget today. If you want to add something do it now and then let’s approve the numbers and move on with our day” - you’ll get a bad reaction to your method, not your suggestion. Most of us spend a fair amount of time in our offices these days feeling overworked, overwhelmed and invisible. We can end up meandering

through our meetings and goal setting because we have too much data to shift through to see a conclusion. Don’t take it for granted that you obviously have the talent to pierce the complexity of your workplace and distill all this data into an action plan. When you do this feat of problem solving, people around you may feel inadequate. If you can make them think that your conclusion was actually their idea, they get to feel competent and motivated rather than embarrassed that they didn’t think of your plan. A certain amount of humility is required to not take immediate credit for your exceptional problem solving and goal setting skills. Then again, it will not go unnoticed that when you are involved in any project, the productivity soars. You’ll be sought out, promoted and given the best projects

Tips for Surviving Christmas financially 1. It’s not an emergency. Christmas is not an emergency, it happens every year. Don’t use this as an excuse to overspend and buy things you can’t afford. 2. Make a Holiday Budget. Make a list of everyone you are buying a gift for, and put a dollar amount by every name. Total it at the bottom. This is your Christmas budget. You can also check out

www.mychristmasbudget. com, a free online budgeting tool to help you easily keep the holidays from wrecking your finances. 3. Pay cash. Put the total from your budget in an envelope, and when the cash is gone stop spending. This will help keep you on budget because if you overspend on Aunt Sue, Uncle Harry won’t get a gift! 4. Avoid debt. If you’re running

BRIEFS

Library Holiday Closings in November

Continued from page 5

The Fountaindale Public Library will be closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday, November 28 and Friday, November 29.  The library will re-open at 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 30.

Bolingbrook High School’s cheerleading team is offering community members the opportunity to get fit and help the team at the same time. The cheerleaders are sponsoring Zumba classes during December at Brooks. The $5 per class cost will go directly to the cheerleading team. The 6 to 7 p.m. classes on Dec. 5, 12 and 19 will be taught by a certified Zumba instructor.

DuPage Township wins top honors DuPage Township won top honors in a number of categories at the 2013 Township Official of Illinois 106th Annual Conference recently. The township received

a little short on cash, talk to your family about spending expectations. Draw names, set price limits or get creative.Whatever you do, don’t go into debt. It’s not worth it! *Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four NewYork Times best-selling books:Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Ramsey on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

recognition for Best Website, including the 2013 Message of the Year award for overall excellence for their website, social media presence, newsletter, and programs such as “Summer Bridge.” “We are honored to be recognized by our peers for our efforts to effectively communicate to our constituents about township services and issues,” said Bill Mayer, DuPage Township Supervisor. “These awards represent the hard work and determination of our entire township board, staff, and volunteers to serve our residents well.”

People experience us as “bossy” when we get busy telling them what to do. If it appears we are simply listening well and feeding back what we are hearing, people find us a pleasure to work with.

because results happen when you’re around. You will also rarely have to fight to get anything done or hear the word “bossy” when people describe you. Instead you’ll hear the word “effective,” and you’ll be able to sit back while others implement your good ideas. The last word(s) Q. I have a coworker who seems to thinks he has no limits to what he can do. He brags, fails, and brags some more. People seem very impressed when they first meet him. Will his behavior ever catch up to him? A. Yes, as Albert Einstein (who

reportedly was a very smart guy) once said, “The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits.” Stupid people always end up falling up a cliff of their own making. (Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s“Workplace Guru”each Monday morning.She’s the author of“Interpersonal Edge:Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything”(Hay House, 2006).You can contact Dr.Skube at www.interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah,WA 98027.Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 369 Foster Way Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (Single Family). On the 12th day of December, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificateholders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2006-HE9 Plaintiff V. Jocelyn Russo; Sarah C. Russo aka Sarah Russo; Lakewood Ridge Homeowners Association; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Nelson E. Russo; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 3597 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax)

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 256 FOX BEND CIRCLE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (BROWN ALUM. SINGLE FAMILY 2 STORY W/ 3 CAR ATTACHED GARAGE). On the 12th day of December, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., S/B/M CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, S/B/M TO CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff V. LANCE E. PHILLIPS, AND THERESA M. PHILLIPS Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 4509 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 373,528.31 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/14, 11/21, 11/28

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 19R Fernwood Dr. Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Condominium Unit). On the 19th day of December, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: PNC MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff V. DAVID VELASCO and PINE MEADOW 2 CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION a/k/a PINE MEADOWS II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION a/k/a PINE MEADOW II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 3140 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g) (4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

For Information Please Contact:

Published 11/14, 11/21, 11/28

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax)

Published 11/21, 11/28, 12/5

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 209 CHASE COURT BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (FRAME SINGLE FAMILY WITH ATTACHED 2 CAR). On the 12th day of December, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BEAR STEARNS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-FR1 Plaintiff V. LOIS WAMPLER Defendant. Case No. 09 CH 6592 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 187,148.54 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 11/14, 11/21, 11/28


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LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF BEAR STEARNS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES I LLC, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-FR1 Plaintiff, vs. LOIS WAMPLER Defendant. No. 09 CH 6592 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 7th day of September, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 12th day of December, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 15 CINNAMON CREEK UNIT 1A, LOT 17, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JUNE 12, 1975 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R75-14237 IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 209 CHASE COURT BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: FRAME SINGLE FAMILY WITH ATTACHED 2 CAR P.I.N.: 12-02-10-414-010

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., S/B/M CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, S/B/M TO CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. LANCE E. PHILLIPS, AND THERESA M. PHILLIPS Defendant. No. 10 CH 4509 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 9th day of July, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 12th day of December, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 77 IN CREEKSIDE OF REMINGTON UNIT 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED JANUARY 5, 1995, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R95-889, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 256 FOX BEND CIRCLE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: BROWN ALUM. SINGLE FAMILY 2 STORY W/ 3 CAR ATTACHED GARAGE P.I.N.: 12-02-16-301-001

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 187,148.54 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 373,528.31 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 11/14, 11/21, 11/28

Published 11/14, 11/21, 11/28

U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Certificateholders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I LLC, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-HE9 Plaintiff, vs. Jocelyn Russo; Sarah C. Russo aka Sarah Russo; Lakewood Ridge Homeowners Association; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Nelson E. Russo; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. No. 12 CH 3597 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 16th day of January, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 12th day of December, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 223 IN LAKEWOOD RIDGE UNIT 2, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER AND SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 28, 2002 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2002-140198, IN THE VILLAGE OF BOLINGBROOK, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 369 Foster Way Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family P.I.N.: 02-09-310-008-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 foreclosurenotice@fal-illinois.com 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/14, 11/21, 11/28

PNC MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. DAVID VELASCO and PINE MEADOW 2 CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION a/k/a PINE MEADOWS II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION a/k/a PINE MEADOW II CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. No. 10 CH 3140 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 19th day of July, 2010, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 19th day of December, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: Unit 2-4-3, in Pine Meadow Condominiums No. 2, as delineated on Survey of certain Lots or parts thereof in Pine Meadow, a Subdivision in the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 15, in Township 37 North, and in Range 10 East of the Third Principal Meridian according to the Plat recorded September 10, 1971, as Document No. R71-21842, which Survey is attached as Exhibit A to Declaration of Condominiums made by Kaufman and Broad Homes, Incorporated, an Illinois Corporation, recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Will County, Illinois as Document No. R74-2040, as amended from time to time; together with an undivided percentage interest in said Parcel (excepting from said Parcel all the property and space comprising all the units thereof as defined and set forth in said Declaration and Survey), in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 19R Fernwood Dr. Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Condominium Unit P.I.N.: 12-02-15-218-002-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 11/21, 11/28, 12/5

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food

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FOTOLIA.COM

Sweet-tart Granny Smith apples add a healthy touch of sweetness.

Easy sweet potato and apple gratin makes a spectacular holiday side dish Yes, a perfectly roasted turkey is the unchallenged star of the Thanksgiving table, just as that same beautiful roast - or a ham, or a bone-in pork loin, or a prime rib of beef - makes the necessarily spectacular centerpiece for any of the holiday meals to come. But, just as the star of a great screen or stage production often shines even brighter w h e n surrounded b y outstanding supporting p l aye r s , so does a festive entree become all the more memorable accompanied by beautiful and delicious side dishes. In my experience, accompaniments are often the last choices home cooks make when planning their seasonal entertaining. With that in mind, I’d like to share with you one of my all-time favorites: Sweet Potato and Apple Gratin. Not only does it taste delicious and look beautiful with any gala main dish, but it’s also very simple to make - and even more so because you can find all the ingredients easily, as well as do much of the preparation ahead of time. Sweet potatoes are a popular holiday side for good reason. When cooked, they have an earthy-sweet flavor that makes a perfect complement to roast poultry or meat. As a bonus, their deep, bright golden-orange color naturally decorates any table where they are served. Too often, people default to cooking their sweet potatoes with an old-fashioned marshmallow topping. While I recognize that a touch of sweetness can heighten the tuber’s flavor, I prefer to go a

IF YOU LIKE, ADD YOUR OWN TOUCHES. FOR SLIGHTLY SWEETER RESULTS, INCLUDE A FEW SPOONFULS OF DARK BROWN SUGAR OR MAPLE SYRUP WITH THE CREAM, FOR EXAMPLE. more natural route. That’s why I like to pair them with sweettart Granny Smith apples, an easy-to-find variety that’s also a standby of the season. Add a touch of sweet spices, a little bit of butter and cream and golden breadcrumbs, and you have a pleasingly well-balanced combination of tastes and textures that everyone will love throughout the coming monthplus of parties. You’ll also be surprised how simple this dish is to make in advance. You can saute the apples and layer them in the baking dish with the sliced sweet potatoes and cream as early as the morning of your special meal.Then, simply cover the dish with foil and keep it in the refrigerator. About an hour and a quarter before serving time, start baking the gratin; then, add the breadcrumbs and last dotting of butter and complete the baking a few minutes before dinner is served. If you like, add your own touches. For slightly sweeter results, include a few spoonfuls of dark brown sugar or maple syrup with the cream, for example. Or add some chopped walnuts or pecans to the breadcrumbs; or replace the crumbs with crushed gingersnap cookies. Just hold the marshmallows! (c) 2013 WOLFGANG PUCK WORLDWIDE, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

SWEE T PO TATO AND APPLE GRATIN Serves 8 to 12 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus extra for greasing 1 pound organic Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, quartered, and cut into 1/4-inch slices 1-1/2 pounds orange-fleshed sweet potatoes, peeled and cut crosswise into thin slices 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon Dash of freshly grated nutmeg 1-1/4 cups heavy cream, half-and-half, or milk 1/2 cup fresh brioche crumbs or challah crumbs

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. In a 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. Add the apples and saute, stirring frequently, until they begin to turn golden, 6 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile, put the sweet potatoes in a mediumsized mixing bowl. Add the salt, pepper, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour in the cream, half-and-half, or milk and toss the sweet potatoes to coat them evenly. Grease a deep 10-inch gratin dish with some butter. Evenly spread half of the sweet potato mixture on the bottom, overlapping the slices as neatly as possible. Spread the sauteed apples evenly over the potatoes, and then top them with a neat, evenly

overlapped layer of the remaining potatoes, drizzling with any cream, half-and-half, or milk left in the bowl. Cover the dish with aluminum foil and bake in the preheated oven until the potatoes are tender enough to be easily pierced with the tip of a sharp knife, about 1 hour. Remove the dish from the oven. Raise the temperature to 500 degrees F. Carefully remove the foil from the dish. Sprinkle the brioche or challah crumbs evenly over the top and dot with the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter. Return the dish to the oven and bake until the crumbs have browned, about 5 minutes, watching carefully to prevent burning. Remove from the oven and serve.


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THE BUGLE NOVEMBER 28, 2013


Bolingbrook 11-28-13