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Our Community, Our News

OCTOBER 31, 2013

Vol. 7 No. 16

rep. Manley, Valley View to host cyberbullying seminar According to data, 42% of kids have been bullied online

STORY BY LAURA KATAUSKAS | STAFF REPORTER

During the past year, Valley View has seen record number, 260, homeless families in its district alone

SEE THE FuLL SToRy oN PAGE 5

State Rep. Natalie Manley (D-Joliet) is teaming up with the Jamie McGee Elementary School’s Parent Teacher Organization and the Office of the Attorney General to host an Internet Safety and Cyber-bullying seminar at Jamie McGee Elementary School. According to data compiled by the Office of the Illinois Attorney General, 42% of kids have been bullied online and 25% of children have experienced this more than once. In 2009, the Office of the Attorney General commissioned a study on internet safety in Illinois specifically for children and the results showed that over 20% of children felt uncomfortable with something sent to them through an electronic communication. (Other fact: According to Consumer Reports, in 2011 over one million children reported cyber-bullying on Facebook alone.) See CYBER, page 26


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

News

Photo by LAURA KATAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

Kings Road connection to bridge.

Bridge project moves forward 95th Street bridge expansion has been in works for over 2 decades By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

More than two decades in the making and one of Will County’s largest projects, the 95th Street bridge expansion is well under way and hoped to be complete by the end of next year. Plans for the extension date back to the 1990s, and after numerous studies, town hall meetings with heated debate and a search for funds, the project that will extend 95th Street over the DuPage River, making a more direct connection between Boughton and Plainfield-Naperville Roads began this summer. Stage One is set to continue until the end of this month. Motorists have been using a detour since the village has closed Kings Road to accommodate the project that runs through a Bolingbrook

subdivision and across the bridge. The nearly $30 million project that essentially connects Bolingbrook to Naperville is being led by Will County, with support from both towns. Federal dollars, $12.8 million, account for half of the project, with Bolingbrook picking up $3.2 million of the cost, Naperville, $5.7 million and Will County, $8.2 million. Will County Engineer Jeff Ronaldson said the project has been split into two construction stages. Stage one includes the construction of the new roadway from Boughton Road to Knoch Knolls Road, including the DuPage River Bridge. The second stage, which will complete the improvements through the PlainfieldNaperville Road intersection, will begin in early 2014. Both stage one and stage two are

planned to be completed in late 2014. “Construction is going well and is on target,” said Ronaldson. Ronaldson said the extension would reduce the driving distance between the intersections of 95th Street/ Plainfield-Naperville Road and Boughton Road/Kings Road by approximately 1.1 miles. The roadway extension will stretch 95th Street from the existing terminus near Eagle Brook Lane (between the Kinloch and Timber Creek Subdivisions) to the southeast across the DuPage River by way of a new bridge and along the Kings Road corridor connecting into Boughton Road. The roadway will have two lanes in each direction that will be separated by a grass median. A 5-foot-wide sidewalk will be constructed on the northeast side of the roadway and a 10-foot-wide, two-way bicycle path will be constructed on the southwest side of the roadway.


News

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013 3

Village, local businesses help mentor BHS students Each host mentored several students during Community Mentoring Week More than three dozen Bolingbrook High School students got a glimpse of life after high school during Community Mentoring Week this week. The students visited local businesses, schools and village offices to shadow staff and learn about possible careers once they’ve finished their education. On Tuesday, Bolingbrook Adventist Hospital hosted 10 students interested in a medical career. Following a greeting by Human Resources Director Jerry Staley, Katie Brennan from the HR Department and Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer Jolene Albaugh, the hospital staged a nursing leader roundtable as well as conversations about lab work, patient registration, the operating room, respiratory care, intensive care and radiology. Students also went on a tour of the hospital. Bolingbrook Trustee Pat

Schanks and other village personnel met with students about police and fire responsibilities, the duties of the clerk’s office,how village activities such as summer concerts are planned and the functions of the finance, information technology, public works and community development departments. Each host mentored several students for the remainder of the morning. Other businesses and organizations that participated in mentoring week included the Bolingbrook Olive Garden, Family Image Hair Design, Keith McGill from Lewis University aviation, Brooks Middle School, Independence Elementary School,Valley View’s STEP,TimBar Packaging’s Design Center in Downers Grove, Office Max’ corporate offices in Naperville, and Wight and Company in Darien.

Submitted Photo

As part of Community Mentoring Week, Bolingbrook High School student Tiara Walker helps Independence Elementary School kindergarten teacher Lisa Cipriano with a Readers Theatre activity.

Grant awarded to Guiding Light Counseling Services The Illinois Counseling Association Foundation announced the award of a 2013 Social Emphasis Grant to Guiding Light Counseling Services , a social service agency providing an array of counseling services in the Bolingbrook area. The $61,620 grant, awarded August 21, 2013, is to fund

counseling services for either underemployed or unemployed individuals and their immediate family members. The 2013 Social Emphasis Grant is to address (1) needs of returning Iraq or Afghanistan war veterans and their families; (2) children or adolescents at risk; or (3) the unemployed or underemployed.

GLC plans to provide the following for individuals who are otherwise unable to access mental health services: Individual and group counseling, GED programming, domestic violence services for victims and their families, mental health screenings, psychological evaluations, psychiatric services,

and job skills training for learning new skills or enhancing current skill sets to become more marketable. The aim is to provide services to those ignored by social service agencies due to lack of funding. ICAF funding for the program runs from September 2013 through August 2014, after which GLC hopes to

continue the program in some form. The agency is noted for its commitment to providing services for the Bolingbrook community; especially to those with Medicaid, no insurance, low income, or those otherwise unable to pay for needed mental health services.


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

News

obituary

Friends remember building official

By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

Will County Board Member Denise Winfrey said she’ll miss Mel Rull, not only as a comrade in working to improve the county’s infrastructure, but as a friend. “I’ve known Mel for a long time,” she said. “I’d stop by Milano Bakery every morning to get my coffee, and his daughter worked there. So I would see him a lot, and we would chat. He was a wonderful man.”

Rull’s daughter ultimately wound up marrying the boss, Mario DeBenedetti III. Rull, 83, died Oct. 21 following complications from pneumonia. He had been director of the Will County Public Building Commission for 21 years. The commission is responsible for financing largescale public works jobs, such as the expansion of the Will County Jail and the construction of the county’s juvenile jail on McDonough Street in Joliet. “It was supposed to be a

short-term job,” said County Board Republican Caucus Chair Jim Moustis, R-Frankfort, a member of the public building commission. “He had worked for the phone company. He was a great public employee. Very knowledgeable. “ Rull had been more visible during the past year as Will County worked with the City of Joliet on a wide-ranging capital plan that ultimately will include a new Laraway Road campus for the Sheriff’s Department and a new courthouse.

bigger difference you will make in someone’s life.” Jamie McGee 2nd grader Johnny Roussakis won the award in the Elementary School Category. Johnny“is extremely bright and talented,but you would not know it because he is very humble and makes sure attention is given to others,” according to the person who nominated him. “He leads by example, helps other students who are struggling, and makes sure they understand and are happy before he leaves them.” In the Middle School Category, Brooks 8th grader Piper Smith received the Character Counts award. A member of the National Junior Honor Society and numerous other organizations,

including Band, she “is a caring, compassionate leader who cares about everyone around her,” according to her nomination papers. Diamond Flourney, a Bolingbrook High School senior, is the High School Category recipient. “Diamond is a caring, smiling, beautiful young lady who deserves this wonderful recognition. Her positive attitude has influenced many other students,” her nominator said.“Any task given to Diamond is completed with a smile. She will be a success in anything she sets her mind to because of her personality, work ethic, and character.”

H e was wo n d erfu l . S o k n owl ed g e a bl e. We wi l l m is s t h at k n owl ed g e as we g o f o rwa r d wit h o u r c a pita l i m prove m en t pl a n s.

- Will County Board Member Denise Winfrey “Mel was a valuable partner in promoting projects that benefitted both the City of Joliet and the County of Will,” said Joliet City Manager Tom Thanas. Winfrey, as chair of the County Board’s Capital Improvements Committee for half a year, has had the chance to work closely with her old friend. “He was wonderful,” she said.

“So knowledgeable. We will miss that knowledge as we go forward with our capital improvement plans.” Visitation will be held from 3 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, at the Fred C. Dames Funeral Home, 3200 Black Road, Joliet. Services will be held 10 a.m. Friday, Oct. 25, at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1910 Black Road, Joliet.

News Briefs Bolingbrook students honored with Character Counts Awards Three Valley View School District 365U students from Bolingbrook received 2013 Character Counts Coalition awards at Tuesday night’s Bolingbrook Village Board meeting. “Character Counts focuses on Six Pillars of Character: trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring and citizenship,” said Ron Oestreich who joined Kristine Wahlgren in representing the Bolingbrook/ Romeoville group at the presentation. “Good character is all about people. The more you practice good character the

BHS girls volleyball marathon to help fight pediatric brain cancer In an effort to raise money for pediatric cancer research at Lurie Children’s Hospital, Bolingbrook High School’s volleyball teams will stage a five-hour marathon on the court Saturday, Nov. 9. “Although survival rates for some childhood brain tumors have increased, survivors often suffer from lifelong side effects of radiation and chemotherapy,” said BHS freshman girls volleyball coach Matthew Patton, whose younger sister Casey, a Downers Grove South volleyball player at the time, was diagnosed with a brain tumor at the age of 16. “Brain tumors are the deadliest form of childhood illness; even

non-malignant brain tumors can kill children.” Casey went through surgery and weekly chemotherapy treatments in Children’s Memorial Hospital (now Ann and Robert H Lurie’s Children’s Hospital) for 13 months. At the age of 21, Casey relapsed and went through two months of proton radiation treatments at Boston’s Massachusetts General Hospital. During this time, the Patton family learned a lot about research in finding better treatments and cures for pediatric cancer and the critical need for funding. In order to help, they created Be the Cure®, raising money that goes directly to the Falk Brain Tumor Center at Lurie. Casey, now 23, will soon graduate from Illinois State University’s Mennonite College with her Bachelor of Science degree in nursing and is currently a student nursing intern at Lurie Children’s. The BHS volleyball marathon will run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Attendance and fundraising is voluntary. Girls who participate must purchase a Be the Cure® T-shirt for $7 unless they raise $50 in which case the T-shirts are free. Families are encouraged to join in the fun with their daughters. Food will be provided so the participants can keep up their energy while they play. Community donations and T-shirt purchases ($15 each in sizes small to extra large) may be made through Coach Patton at See NEWS BRIEFS, page 10


COVER STORY

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013 5

Caring for the homeless in Will County Organizations such as Community Service Council of Northern Will County are consistently provide housing workshops

they may be eligible, such as financial counseling and health care availability. “The beauty of this event is that every need is sought to be covered from personal hygiene By Laura Katauskas Regional Office of Education products to doctor and dental Staff Reporter is working hard to prepare checkups to hair cuts and the schools to deal with the food pantry,” said Bochnak. On any given night, there are situation and bring awareness Bochnak also reports they close to 400 homeless in Will to how to help students and see so many success stories County alone. Factor in the their families. In Valley View, from its homeless students, “hidden homeless,” and that additional counselors are being despite their plight, working number can quadruple. trained to meet the needs of the and achieving to create a new Homelessness is not tied increased number of homeless chapter in their lives. to the inner city and urban families who might otherwise “We need to watch out for environment, it stretches to fall through the cracks. these families and help them every corner of the community, “It may be difficult, but we succeed,” said Bochnak. as the economy, domestic are doing our best to work with The school district is looking violence, for donations of substance coats and gift cards, “It may be difficult, but we are abuse and especially gas gift doing our best to work with others traumas cards. Sometimes these kids and make sure they hit people of a tank of gas graduate. Education is key to every race means having the and every transportation to get breaking the cycle of poverty.” background. to funds they need. - Michelle Bochnak, community outreach C a l l i n g coordinator for the Valley View School District attention to How to help or the matter, get help a homeless Support Day was held Oct. 26 these kids and make sure they at the Romeoville Recreation graduate. Education is key to Organizations such as the Center, providing services for breaking the cycle of poverty,” Community Service Council those desperately in need. of Northern Will County are said Bochnak. “It’s a bigger issue than Earning their trust also is key, consistently providing housing people realize—the way the she says. workshops and offer assistance economy is, for those living on “We have it stenciled on our to those in a housing crisis. the brink, one small thing can walls here: ‘First comes the “I will say … there are more push them over the edge,” said heart, then the mind,’” said homeless people in the area Michelle Bochnak, community Bochnak.“If a child doesn’t feel than people realize,” said Carol outreach coordinator for the safe or they are hungry, how Penning, board member for the Valley View School District. can they learn? That’s what it CSC. “Everyone does their best During the past year, Valley all comes down to. They need to help those in need out of View has seen a record number, to know that there are a lot of their difficult situation.” The CSC is a Will County 260, homeless families in its people here who care about Stabilization district alone. And throughout them. And we will make it Neighborhood Program Partner and in addition Will County, school districts happen.” have identified 1,359 homeless By state law, school districts to working with clients who students. are required to provide are in danger of losing their Getting started in a new transportation for every homes or apartments, the school year can be stressful for student who needs it, which group helps educate on proper both children and parents, but can become a complicated budgeting processes to help them prevent occurrences of those stresses are intensified process. for families forced from their “A student may have lived in a negative financial situation. homes by economic hardship. Bolingbrook, but now is staying The CSC also collaborates with Helping to ease some of the with his or her aunt in Chicago. other United Way agencies and stresses on these families is We go get them,” said Bochnak. other social service agencies the goal of the Support Day for The Support Day, sponsored to ensure people are able to Families in Transition. by the Will County Regional receive any other help that may “The impact of homelessness Office of Education and be available to them. The CSC is huge—school is the most Regional Superintendent is located at 440 Quadrangle stable place they have,” said of Schools Shawn Walsh, in Drive, Suite C, Bolingbrook, Bochnak. “Most of them are cooperation with the Du Page and can be reached at 630-759going from couch to couch County Area Project (DuCap), 9494. The closest shelter is run with different relatives, maybe DuPage Township and Valley catching a night’s sleep in View School District 365U, is by Catholic Charities and is a hotel for one night, or the designed to meet a variety of located at 611 E. Cass St., Joliet. others in the car.” the families’ needs, acquainting The Daybreak Center operates In addition, the Will County them with services for which 24 hours a day, 365 days a

year and provides emergency housing, and supportive services to individuals and families who are homeless. Catholic Charities’ Daybreak Center provides more than 28,000 nights of shelter each year to men, women and children. Some participants in the program are in need of short-term housing, as a result of a situational crisis. Others need support services as they

work to reestablish permanent housing. New places like Aunt Martha’s in Joliet have recently opened to help house older teens as well. Township resources may also be available to those in need and is suggested place to contact for assistance. For those looking to help,each See HOMELESS, page 10


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

Police Blotter

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

12 24

1

Atlas Murphy, 64, 219 Blackberry Drive, was arrested at 1:13 p.m. Oct. 5 and charged with failure to signal, two counts of DUI and illegal transportation of alcohol, following a traffic stop on the 200 block of Blackberry Drive.

10 19

4

3 15

14 28 16

2

James Wilcher, 23, 21 Elm Court, was arrested at 3:18 a.m. Oct. 15 and charged with battery, criminal trespass to residence and disorderly conduct.

11

1

22 BHS

8

3

Delaine Terry, 47, 859 Summit Lane, was arrested at 2:15 a.m. Oct. 17 and charged with hit and run, failure to notify damage, no insurance and driving on a suspended license, following a traffic stop on the 400 block of W. Boughton Road.

9

23

25

7

26 17

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13

4

Angela Dicharia,33,312 Short Street, Lisle, was arrested at 12:10 a.m. Oct. 17 and charged with traffic sign violation, DUI and possession of cannabis, following a traffic stop at Falconridge Way and Janes Avenue.

5

Keith Rhodes, 43, 188 N. Schmidt Road, was arrested at 11:06 p.m. Oct. 17 and charged with an in-state warrant.

6

Gilberto Zavala, 19, 160 Malibu Drive, was arrested at 10:50 p.m. Oct. 17 and charged with unlawful possession of firearm and no FOID card.

7

Cesar Arguello, 21, 411 Gainsborough Court, was arrested at 10:50 p.m. Oct. 17 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 100 block Malibu Drive.

8

Judith Newman, 43, 222 W. 4th St., DePue and Paul Gorisek, 1213 LaHarpe St. Lasalle, were both arrested at 12:48 p.m. Oct. 17 and charged with possession of controlled substance on the 100 block of Remington Boulevard.

9

Isabel Gomez, 54, 18 S Raynor Ave., Joliet, was arrested at 7:49 a.m. Oct. 18 and charged with an in-state warrant, driving on a suspended license and disobeying a police officer, following a traffic stop on the 800 block of Remington Boulevard.

Michael Martin, 38, 907 Wescott Road, was arrested at 2:16 a.m. Oct. 18 and charged with no insurance, DUI, improper lane usage and improper turn at intersection, following a traffic stop at Bolingbrook Drive and Concord Lane.

10

Bianca Sharp, 24, 260 Plainview Drive, was arrested at 7:31 p.m. Oct. 18 and charged with an in-state warrant, failure to signal and no valid driver’s license, following a traffic stop at Lily Cache Lane and Plainview Drive.

11

Robin Johnson, 22, 360 Stonegate Road, was arrested at 7:48 p.m. Oct. 18 and charged with retail theft at Meijer, 755 E. Boughton Road.

12

A 2012 Wabash trailer was taken from a parking lot on the 1000 block of Windham Pkwy between Sept. 24 and Oct. 19.

13

Ronald Buckner, 25, 325 Ozark Drive, was arrested at 4:17 p.m. Oct. 19 and charged with assault after a call to the 300 block of N. Schmidt Road.

14

Christian Mendoza, 33, 411 Providence Court, was arrested at 9 p.m. Oct. 19 and charged with resisting a peace officer, possession of alcohol and disorderly conduct, following a call to the 300 block of Rockhurst Road of a suspicious subject near the victim’s vehicle.

15

Victoria Squire, 25, 7234 Park Ave., Summit, was arrested at 10:26 p.m. Oct. 19 and charged with an equipment violation, driving on a suspended license no insurance and an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop on the 200 block of S. Bolingbrook Drive.

16

Osmar Ruiz, 27, 234 S. Cranberry Lane,was arrested at 7:50 a.m. Oct. 19 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 400 block of Devonshire Drive.

17

Randall Miller, 25, 218 Eagle Court was arrested at 1:35 a.m. Oct. 19 and charged with an in-state warrant.

18

Matthew Carver, 21, 216 Malibu Drive, was arrested at 3:24 a.m. Oct. 20 and charged with DUI and driving without lights, following a traffic stop at

19

Nassau Avenue and Pinecrest Road. Anthony Brown, 37, 2144 S. Lawndale Drive, Chicago, was arrested at 2:29 a.m. Oct. 20 and charged with possession of cannabis and resisting a peace officer, following a traffic stop on the 100 block of E. North Frontage Road.

20

Officers were called to the 304 building of Woodcreek Drive for the report of a residence burglary. A window was found open and a TV was taken between Oct. 18 and Oct. 21.

21

Trenton Smith, 22, 327 Blackfoot Drive was arrested at 11:46 p.m. Oct. 21 and charged with an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop at Lily Cache Lane and Creekside Drive.

22

Lorenz Brown, 27, 527 W. 14th Place, Chicago, was arrested at 1:10 p.m. Oct. 21 and charged with possession of cannabis, driving on a suspended license, and improper lighting, following a traffic stop on the 300 block of S. Bolingbrook Drive.

23

Johnathan Mason, 24, 580 Sharon Way, was arrested at 11:45 p.m. Oct. 22 and charged with theft of services after taking a cab to residence and not paying the services.

24

Jalill Hudson, 18, 30G Wildwood Lane was arrested at 12:09 a.m. Oct. 23 and charged with an in-state warrant on the 500 block S. Bolingbrook Drive.

25

Raymond Simmons, 19, 129 Somerset Lane, was arrested at 12:59 a.m. Oct. 23 and charged with resisting a peace officer, after a call to the residence for a domestic disturbance.

26

Christopher Boss, 20, 431 Seminole Lane, was arrested at 7:05 p.m. Oct. 23 and charged with criminal damage to property after damaging a front door.

27

Leantoine Williams, 19, 610 Preston Drive, was arrested at 4:10 p.m. Oct. 23 and charged with possession of stolen property and burglary, after a call for a suspicious subject in a garage on the 100 block of Monticello Drive.

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ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

News

Thinking outside the box with interactive learning in Bolingbrook schools

Submitted Photos

Submitted Photos

Bolingbrook High School U.S. History teacher Ken Kulawiak directs an “immigrant” to the literacy testing area during an Ellis Island simulation designed to show students what many immigrants in the late 1890s and early 1900s faced when they came to America.

U.S. Rep. Bill Foster makes a point during a discussion with an honors language arts class at Lukancic Middle School in Romeoville. The Congressman spent time in Valley View School District 365U Friday participating in Career Day at Wood View School in Bolingbrook, meeting with Superintendent James Mitchem and touring Lukancic with Principal Trish Rollerson.

Local girl competes for the Miss Pre-Teen Chicago title Raven Robinson of Bolingbrook was recently selected to participate in the 2014 Miss Pre-Teen Chicago pageant competition. Raven learned of her acceptance into this year’s competition when the pageant announced their selections following

interviewing in the local Chicago area. Raven submitted an application and took part in an interview session that was conducted by this year’s Chicago Pageant Coordinator. Raven will be competing, for her share of thousands of dollars in prizes and specialty

gifts that will be distributed to contestants. Raven will be competing in the Miss Pre-Teen division, one of four divisions that will have young ladies ages of 7 and 19 competing in modeling routines, which include casual wear and formal wear. Most important, Raven

will display her personality and interviewing skills while interviewing with this year’s Chicago judging panel. Personality is the number one aspect that each contestant is judged on during all phases of competition. If Raven were to win the title of Miss Pre-Teen Chicago, she would represent Chicago and the surrounding communities at the National Competition See PRE-TEEN, page 26


Calendar NOVEMBER 2

NOVEMBER 5

Hot Chocolate Fun Run/ Walk. 9:30 a.m. at St. Andrew School, 505 Kingston Drive, Romeoville. Bring the whole family out to the 1.7-mile Run/ Walk at St. Andrew School. Strollers and wagons are welcome. Free hot chocolate to all race participants. Concessions will be available after race. To register: Inperson at the Parish Office, 430 Glen, Romeoville, Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. On-line at http:// www.active.com/event_detail. cfm?event_id=2116325. Sameday registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Registration Fees: Adults (18+) $20; Children (under 18) $15; Family (immediate) $60. For more information, contact Albert Lopez at 708-769-5790.

Microsoft Excel 2010 Level 1.2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. If you are interested in learning a computer program that will assist you with the creation of spreadsheets, this class is for you. Edit and format your data, using spreadsheets created from scratch or using handy templates that do most of the work for you.  This particular class will require basic computer, keyboard and mouse skills, and previous experience or exposure to Microsoft Office products can be helpful. Please register. Our class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab. Contact: Adult Services desk  at 815886-2030 or askalibrarian@ whiteoaklibrary.org.

27th Annual Holiday Craft Show. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Annerino Community Center, Bolingbrook. Admission is free and strollers are welcome. Interested in being a crafter/ vendor, call 630-739-1300 or visit www.bolingbrookparks. org. Romeoville YOC Costume Ball. 7 to 9 p.m. at the Friendship Center. The Romeoville Youth Outreach Commission is hosting the third annual Costume Ball for ages 21 and over only. Events include a costume contest, DJ, dancing, heavy appetizers, beverages, 50/50 raffle, Chinese raffle, and photographer. All proceeds will go to the Youth Outreach Commission scholarship fund. Purchase tickets for $20 per person at the Recreation Center, Village Hall, HighPoint, or DuCap before or at the door. For more information, call the Recreation Department at 815886-6222.

NOVEMBER 6 Valley View Town Hall Meeting. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. VVSD Administration Center, 755 Dalhart, Romeoville. Open Q & A session hosted by VVSD Superintendent Dr. James Mitchem.

the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Celebrate Superstar Saturday at the Romeoville Branch! Each month we’ll play super-fun games and make super-cool crafts in honor of our superstar book character of the month. This program is most appropriate for children ages 3-6 accompanied with a parent. Registration is required.   Contact: Children’s Services Desk  at 815-886-2030 or rtracy@whiteoaklibrary.org.

NOVEMBER 11 Bolingbrook Veteran’s Day Ceremony. 11 a.m. Town Center Veterans Memorial, 375 W. Briarcliff, Bolingbrook. Romeoville Veteran’s Day Ceremony. 10 a.m. at the Edward “Doc” McCartan Veteran’s Memorial Garden. For more information, call Village Hall at 815-886-7200.

NOVEMBER 13

Bolingbrook Women’s Club Monthly Meeting. 7:30 p.m. at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, West Wing 2001 Rodeo Drive. All area women are welcome How Will the Affordable to participate and socialize Care Act Affect You? 6:30 and learn about the club and to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville their activities. November Branch Library, 201 West meeting will be a craft night. Normantown Road, Romeoville.  For information email Laura Join Western & Southern Life’s at: laura_schuurman@hotmail. Steve Bozinovich to find out com how the new health insurance laws will affect individuals, Wine Tasting Event. 6:30 families and those who already to 9 p.m. at At’s a Nice Pizza, have insurance. Bozinovich 334 Independence Boulevard, will also discuss the different Romeoville. Sponsored by Lou’s plans that are offered and the Styling Place and At’s a Nice pros vs. cons of each. Contact: Pizza. Experience domestic Adult Services desk  at 815- wines from California, Oregon, 886-2030 or  askalibrarian@ and international wines from whiteoaklibrary.org. Spain, Italy, Argentina, Chile, South Africa, and New Zealand. NOVEMBER 9 To complement your palette Superstar Saturday at warm appetizers, cheese and Romeoville. 1 to 2 p.m. at chocolates will be served.

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013 Cost is $25; $30 at the door. To purchase tickets, call 815-8862076 or 815-258-0855. In the spirit of the holiday season, please bring one new toy or gift card for a boy or girl. Valley View WorkshopMiddle Schools. 6:30 p.m. “Giving Parents the Tools to Support Their Child’s Learning” at Martinez Middle School, Romeoville and Jane Addams Middle School, Bolingbrook. Workshops in your neighborhood that will give you an opportunity to understand how changing expectations impact your child and how you can best support your child’s success. What do teaching and learning look like in my child’s classroom? What major shifts in learning and assessment are occurring? How can I best support my child’s learning and understand his/ her progress? Spanish language interpreters will be available at all Community Forums and School Workshops.

NOVEMBER 14 March of Dimes Suburban Signature Chef’s Auction. 6 to 9 p.m. at the Bolingbrook Golf Club, 2001 Rodeo Drive, Bolingbrook. Senator Pat McGuire cordially invites you to attend this event to celebrate 75 years of life-changing work. This event is your opportunity to support the March of Dimes’ mission while bidding on vacation, dining and entertainment packages. Tickets: $75 per person, $750 for table of ten. Call 815-6008087 or visit http://www. marchofdimes.com/illinois Valley View WorkshopElementary Schools. 7 p.m. Skoff Elementary School, Romeoville. Workshops in your neighborhood that will

9

give you an opportunity to understand how changing expectations impact your child and how you can best support your child’s success. What do teaching and learning look like in my child’s classroom? What major shifts in learning and assessment are occurring? How can I best support my child’s learning and understand his/ her progress? Spanish language interpreters will be available at all Community Forums and School Workshops.

NOVEMBER 16 Symphony in Lights. 3 p.m. at the Promenade, Bolingbrook. The fun-filled day will have crafts for the kids, ice sculptures, hay rides and more. Kids can visit with Santa from 3 to 6 p.m. The tree lighting ceremony begins at 6:30 p.m. immediately followed by the first Symphony in Lights show. The first 300 people to bring a non-perishable food donation or cash donation will get a goodie bag. One per person must be present, while supplies last. Food/cash donations will benefit Power Connections.

NOVEMBER 17 Midwest Indoor Sprint Triathlon. At the Bolingbrook Recreation and Aquatic Complex. Distance of the event is completely up to you. It’s all about how much ground and water you can cover in the allotted time. Participants will swim for 10 minutes, cycle for 15 minutes and run for 15 minutes. This Indoor Sprint Triathlon is part of the Midwest Indoor Sprint Triathlon Series (MIST) with Arlington Heights, Bartlett, Bolingbrook, Elk Grove, Lemont, Oak Brook, South Barrington and Streamwood park districts. Fee is $40; $35 See CALENDAR, page 20


10

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

News

Artists prepare for National Art exhibit opening National Arts Program has provided $2,400 for prizes, also added another $1,000 grant this year Just about a year ago,Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital Emergency Department nurse Roselle Talag came across a brochure about the National Arts Program® exhibit being run by Adventist Midwest Health. Still applying for a nursing position with the organization at the time, the Woodridge resident was sorry to hear she could not exhibit in the show, since it was only open to hospital employees. But following her hiring, she remembered the exhibit. “I’ve been waiting for the announcement on this year’s National Arts Program, and it just so happens that it will take place at Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital,”Talag said.“It just makes

NEWS BRIEFS Continued from page 4 PattonMD@vvsd.org. Checks can be made out to Casey Patton/Be the Cure. All proceeds will go directly to cancer research at the hospital. For the Pattons’ story and

me even more excited, since I’m working at the hospital now.” Talag has entered two acrylic paintings in this year’s second annual exhibit, which will open Nov. 6 and remain on display at Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital, 500 Remington Blvd. in Bolingbrook, until Jan. 5, 2014. Her husband has also entered two photography pieces. It’s the first time either of them have been exhibited anywhere. So far, she hasn’t told her coworkers, excited to hold a little secret about her participation. “The fact that I have shared something that’s a part of me, the painting that I’m doing … it makes me happy already,” she said.

T-shirt information, go to www. be-the-cure.com.

Boardman Cemetery open on Halloween night The Bolingbrook Historic Preservation will be holding an

The fact that I have shared something that’s a part of me, the painting that I’m doing … it makes me happy already.

As it did last year, the National Arts Program has provided $2,400 for prizes, and this year added another $1,000 grant to assist with exhibit costs, said Sue Kett, who heads Adventist Midwest Health’s Healing Arts Program. “We are so thrilled with the National Arts Program’s generous support of our exhibit,” Kett said. “Because of them, we can display so many fine works by our employees and their families, as well as our hospital volunteers.” For this year’s exhibit a reception and awards presentation will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 6 at Adventist Bolingbrook Hospital. Prizes will be awarded in three adult artist categories – amateur, intermediate and professional artists – as well as youth and teen artists. There will also be a Best of Show awarded.

While the show is in Bolingbrook, it is open to all employees across Adventist Midwest Health. Elvyna Walker, a medical secretary in the Donor Center at Adventist Hinsdale Hospital, is participating for the second year. Last year, the Bolingbrook resident entered paintings. This year, she has decided to submit two wood burning pictures. “I got a wood-burning kit when I was a kid for Christmas years ago,” Walker said. “It’s something that I play around with every once in a while.”

Walker is glad the exhibit has returned. It gives the hospital’s artists not only an opportunity to display their own works, but to appreciate the works submitted by co-workers. “I’ve worked here for 25 years, and you see people displaying things you had no idea they could do,” she said. “It helps build a kind of a community and it makes people bond a little better.” More on the National Arts Program exhibit can be found at www.keepingyouwell.com.

open house from 5 to 9 p.m. Oct. 31 at Boardman Cemetery, located north of Royce Road on Paxson Drive in the Heritage Creek Subdivision. Information will be available about the early settlers from the area at each grave. All ghosts, goblins, and other trick or treaters, who are accompanied

by an adult, are welcome. Admission is free. Hot chocolate, donated by McDonalds, will be available. The commission will be unveiling the restored Seth and Mary Jane Wescott headstone. In addition, three new memorial plaques will be ready for viewing, including Harry Boardman,

Elizabeth Cleavand, and Thomas Standish. Jim Stenhouse and a group of re-enactors will perform at 7 and 8 p.m. Debra Dudek with the Fountaindale Public Library will have a display available to share with the public in attendance. For more information, call 630226-8411.

- Bolingbrook Hospital Emergency Department nurse Roselle Talag

HOMELESS Continued from page 5 organization accepts donations of food, clothing and monetary contributions. (See sidebar for contact information). For instance, Catholic Charities accepts “Gifts from the Heart.” Donate $140 to cover a week of shelter for a homeless person. The group reports it costs only $20 per day to provide warm, hospitable shelter to a homeless person. $20 will buy fresh produce and milk for a family in need. $35 will buy toiletries and cleaning products for a lowincome senior. More than 7,000 low-income seniors get help and hope from Catholic Charities. Many of them, mostly women, struggle with day-today expenses like rent and food. Items such as, Kleenex,

Community Outreach VVSD Community Outreach Coordinator 815-886-2700 Township Offices DuPage - 630-759-1317 Joliet - 815-726-4781 Lockport - 815-838-0380 Plainfield - 815-436-8308 Will - 708-258-0980

lotion, shampoo and cleaning products are seen as luxuries. $50 (25 meals for the hungry at Shepherd’s Table) Shepherd’s Table serves more than 50,000 meals each year to the hungry. For some, the free noontime meal is the only healthy and nutritious meal they get all day.


taKe 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Pink drink, briefly 6 Arson aftermath 9 Hutt crime lord of sci-fi 14 According to 15 Grazing area 16 Light purple 17 O’Neill drama set in Harry Hope’s saloon 20 Tailor’s target 21 Many a Beethoven sonata ender 22 Popeye’s __’ Pea 23 Jabber on and on 24 __ in November 25 Likable prez 27 More than feasts (on) 28 With 30-Across, drama based on ‘70s presidential interviews 30 See 28-Across 32 Aspiring doc’s course 33 Walked alongside one’s master 35 On the Pacific

Down 36 Fertilizable cells 38 “Just __!”: “Be right there!” 40 Drama about Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine 45 “Friendly skies” co. 46 Greatly feared 47 Comstock Lode find 48 Fred of “My Cousin Vinny” 50 Oozed 52 With 54-Across, “Viva La Vida” rock group, and what 17-, 28/30and 40-Across each is? 54 See 52-Across 55 Pottery “pet” 58 Smooth transition 60 Pastoral poem 64 Invisible vibes 65 More than most 66 Wine tasting criterion 67 Quilting parties 68 Corrda cheer 69 Neuter, horsewise

1 Slyly spiteful 2 Irish actor Milo 3 Say what you will 4 Golda of Israel 5 “The Lord of the Rings” baddie 6 Answering the penultimate exam question, say 7 Actor Connery 8 How lovers walk 9 “Jersey Girl” actress, to fans 10 Goals 11 Emulated Mt. St. Helens? 12 With __ breath: expectantly 13 Pains’ partner 18 Answering machine button 19 Journalist Roberts 24 Name, in N”mes 26 Program file suffix 29 Not counterfeit 31 “The Good Earth” mother 32 “Nonsense!” 34 Tractor manufacturer 35 Give __: yank

37 By way of 39 Believability on the street, slangily 41 Driver’s license fig. 42 Threat words 43 Actor Snipes 44 Thought 49 “March Madness” games, informally 51 Sizing up 53 “Whip It” band 54 Like the driven snow 55 Red wine choice, for short 56 Tint 57 Wrath 59 Salon goop 61 Mommy deer 62 Initials on L’Homme fragrance 63 Took the reins

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013 11

Horoscopes Two heads are better than one. Don’t be too proud to accept assistance from an unlikely source in the week ahead. Don’t be too quick to make decisions or you may have to spend extra time cleaning up the mess later.

Own up to your responsibilities. Don’t pass the buck along to others regarding matters you should be taking care of yourself. Paying careful attention to details this week could prevent mistakes down the road.

Play to win. Allow your competitive nature to take charge by engaging in sporting activities. You’ll fare far better by working hard to strengthen your muscles rather than your mind this week. Hold off on important decisions.

Pace yourself. If you try to get too much done too quickly, you’re likely to make careless mistakes. Prioritize tasks in order of importance in the week ahead. The outlook of friends and family may change.

Look before you leap in the upcoming week. Diving into the water without knowing how deep it is could leave you hurting. The same is true when undertaking new projects without knowing all the facts first.

Rise to the challenge. Cast your doubts by the wayside so that confidence helps you conquer problems in the week ahead. You’re better suited to activities that require the use of brain, not brawn.

If you’re going to lead people, you’d better have someplace to go. Focus on the bigger picture this week. Ensure that activities lead to the ultimate goal rather than simply where your fancies lead you.

Put your talents on display. No matter what you decide to do, do it where someone can see you so you gain notice and respect. In the week ahead, you could start a conversation that yields valuable insights.

Little things mean a lot. A series of small successes could eventually snowball into something much bigger in the week ahead. You can test uncharted waters without fear of repercussions.

It can’t always be party time. Social activities may beckon, but you’re still aware of nagging tasks this week. Take time to set your affairs in order, fix what needs fixing, and get organized.

The more the merrier. Make mundane chores a bit more interesting by enlisting the help of others in the week to come. Save deep thinking for later in the week and tackle routine tasks right away.

He who hesitates is lost. Valuable opportunities may pass you by if you aren’t assertive enough to grab the wheel this week. Act quickly, or by the time you mull things over it will be too late.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Content Agency 2013

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • LUSTY • SWOON • PASTRY • ALIGHT

Answer:

The hunters described the deer fight as a -“STAG” SHOW


12

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Soccer falls in close game with Marist, page 14; Girls cross country team advances to sectional, page 15

www.bolingbrookbugle.com

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

13

PLAYOFF READY Raiders head into 8A postseason as only unbeaten team

By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

The Bolingbrook football team completed its undefeated regular season last week with a 35-6 win at Sandburg which earned them the SouthWest Suburban Conference Blue Division title. In that game, quarterback Quincy Woods ran the ball 20 times for 168 yards and scored three touchdowns. Dariel Greer, who splits time with Woods in passing situations, was 5-of-7 passing for 91 yards and had a 38-yard touchdown pass to Parrker Westphal. Mike Valentine added a threeyard plunge and the Bolingbrook defense scored as Bernard Flowers added a fumble recovery for a score. Bolingbrook now hosts Bloom Township from Chicago Heights in round 1 of the Class 8A IHSA playoffs.

THE GAME WHO: No. 16 Bloom (5-4) at No. 1 seed Bolingbrook (9-0) WHERE: Bolingbrook High School, 365 Raider Way,

Bolingbrook. WHEN: 6 p.m., Sat. Nov. 6

THE BREAKDOWN WHEN BOLINGBROOK HAS THE BALL The Raider offense is far from the most explosive team on the offensive side of the football, but that is because of choice. Bolingbrook has a ball-control offense that will grind opponents down and tire them early before looking to score the bulk of its points after halftime. Don’t take that to mean the Raiders don’t have playmakers. Quarterback Quincy Woods is a do-it-all threat on the field. He has carried the ball 98 times this season for 550 yards and seven TDs.While he doesn’t pass much, Woods has connected on five of his 11 passes on the season. When the Raiders go to the air, Dariel Greer often relieves Woods and is 25-of-53 for 306 yards and four TDs on the season. Woods, however, is not on the sideline holing a clipboard when Greer See READY, page 17

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Bolingbrook’s Quincy Woods has been a triple threat this season.


14

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

Sports

Raider soccer falls in regional opener By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

The No. 9 Raiders’ emotional season ended with a hard-fought 1-0 loss at the hands of No. 8 Marist. “It was disappointing,” Bolingbrook coach Jamie Clemmons said. “We prepared the best we could, we did the best we could out there and it just wasn’t enough. Half of the game we played well. In the first half they dictated play and we played how they wanted and they got the first goal. I told the guys before the game whoever scored the first goal was going to win the game. We had a lot of great chances and put the pressure on them, but they put the ball away.” The Raiders’ season started off on a bad note when junior varsity player Javier Vera, 17, drowned in the Elmhurst Chicago Stone Company quarry in late August. “It was a tough year,”Clemmons said. “It is disappointing for the senior class. They are a fantastic group of guys and a lot of them I had since they were freshmen

or sophomores and I wanted them to go out with something special considering all that happened this season.” Clemmons said there had been high expectations this season. “We had pretty lofty goals this year of winning a conference title and winning a regional title,” Clemmons said. “I felt we had the team and the right things going on where we could have done that.”

ROMEOVILLE Thornton co-op soccer team has only lost twice this season, one of those coming at the hands of Romeoville in the first week of the season.The Spartans were hoping to use that success in becoming the only team to hand Thornton two losses. The No. 5 seed Wildcats had different ideas however as they broke open a game that was tied at one goal each at halftime and claimed a 6-1 win in the IHSA Class 3A Stagg Regional semifinal Oct. 23. Thornton got on the board first with a goal at the 32 minute, 52 second mark of the first half.

That lasted for nearly 30 minutes when Jason Silvar scored on a header off a free kick from Daniel Ibarra for No. 11 Romeoville (10-8-2) with 4:00 remaining in the half. “We dominated the last 10 minutes (of the first half),” said Romeoville coach Nick Cirrincione.“We got a goal back, we had a chance to go ahead on a free kick. If you don’t score, you don’t win.” Thornton wasted no time taking the lead as the Wildcats went up 2-1 with 37:04 remaining in the game. Thornton went on to add the four additional goals. “We just had a bad second half at the wrong part of the season,” Cirrincione said. “The 6-1 score looks worse that it was. (We had too many) mental breakdowns. We had mental breakdowns in the first three minutes of the game. They have a hard time

with peers and dealing with communication with them. They are not used to it. I can say something to a kid and they are fine with it, but if another player says it, they are all upset. We had mental breakdowns at the wrong time. “We told them at halftime if we had no mental breakdowns defensively in the second half, we win the game. They have great players and they can finish and they did. When they were close, they finished. They might have made 75 percent of their chances. They are the real deal and we saw that today. I think they were a little more motivated than we were. They are a good program and they were the better team today. I have to give them credit.” Just as they did a year ago, the Spartans had things going in the right direction at the end of

the year, just as Cirrincione had hoped. “(The season) started slow and we went 6-0-2 at the end and peaked at the right time,” he said. Cirrincione said the biggest issue this season was a lack of leadership, which he hopes will change next season. “We have to find a leader who is willing to be a leader all year. We brought in our senior JV goalie and made him a captain and we were 6-0-2 with him,” Cirrincione said. “Finding the right leaders goes a long way in high school. Last year, we had three great leaders and they did everything great and this year we struggled with that leadership. It would come in and out.We have the right guys coming back who can do it and if they take the lead, we will be good.” mark@buglenewspapers.com

Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

Senior Hugo Lopez and the Raiders fell 1-0 to Marist in the playoff opener.


Sports

Girls cross team advances to sectional On the girls side, Bolingbrook placed fifth as a team at the Plainfield South Regional and advanced as a team to sectional. Freshman Trianna Rodriguez was the top runner, placing sixth in 18:46. “I was really happy,” Rodriguez said. “I’m just really happy I made it here and I couldn’t have done it without my teammates. I was nervous (coming in) but I was mostly excited to be here with my team.” She was followed by scoring runners Marissa Caputo (13th, 19:17), Arianna Amill (24th, 19:41), Sydney Banks (38th, 20:34) and Cassandra Cerpa (50th, 21:07). Rodriguez said she is going to give it her all at the sectional meet Saturday, but knows this is her first attempt at qualifying for state. “I’m trying to break my PR,

which is 18:37,” Rodriguez said. “I’m going to try to make it to state but I won’t be disappointed if I don’t because I have three more years.” Romeoville missed out at the Marist Regional, placing one spot out of advancing, however, two individuals will attempt to advance to state. • Sierra Scanlan was 25th in 20:37, while Samantha Pagan was 42nd in 22:01.

BOYS XC The Romeoville boys cross country team had a bit of a drive to go for their Class 3A regional meet hosted my Marist, but it was worth the trip. The Spartans placed seventh at the meet and advanced to sectional as a team. Mike Samuelson led the way, placing 28th in 16:44. He was

followed through the chute by Evan Banasiak (30th, 16:47), Ian Irvine (33rd, 16:53), Carlos Ibanez (39th, 17:12) and Matt Bush (46th, 17:22). John Suits (46th, 17:22) did not score. Bolingbrook missed on qualifying as a team by one place at the Plainfield South, but junior • Jonathan Cook advanced with a 20th-place time of 16:30.

NCAA FOOTBALL Bolingbrook graduate Antonio Morrison recoredd four tackles in Florida’s last game played, a loss to Missouri. The sophomore now has a total of 18 solo tackles and 21 assisted tackles this season, for a season total of 39, second most on the Gators. Morrison missed the first game of the season.

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

15


16

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

sPorts

playoFFS With 11 teams in the Voyager Media coverage area in the playoffs, there is a lot of excitement in the area. Here are some things to look for in each division.

CLASS 5A Team to beat Scott: No. 1 Montini (9-0).

Obvious pick here as the twotime defending champs. Mark: I have to go with Scott here, until they are knocked off they are the champs.

Sleeper team Scott: No. 6 Lincoln-Way West (8-1): In a loaded top half of the bracket, the Warriors have about the best possible draw.A meeting

with a Catholic power in the semis could be in store. Mark: Sycamore (9-0): I know, how can a 9-0 team be a sleeper, right? When you are in a bracket with Montini, JCA, Kaneland and Springfield SHG you can fall through the cracks. Well, don’t sleep on the Spartans.

Rockford area with two-time state champs (2010-2011) and lone unbeaten in class. Mark: Crete-Monee (8-1): Another talented Crete team will be a tough team to knock out of the playoffs this year.

Pick

Scott: No. 6 East St. Louis (6-3): I’m sorry but I don’t care how good they are this year, they are dangerous. Mark: Providence Catholic (5-4): The Celtics already began their playoffs, beating Brother Rice in a win or go home game last week.With 54 playoff points, Providence is tied with Montini for most in the state. I said Crete will be a tough team to get out of the playoffs and the Celtics are just the team that can do it.

Scott: Montini. I will ride them until they lose. Mark: Sacred Heart-Griffin. I am taking SHG here because I believe whoever gets out of the other bracket will be beat up.

No. 4 JCA (8-1) outlook Scott: Not an easy draw for the Hilltoppers after an opening round cakewalk past Englewood. Kaneland and Montini are both in their quadrant and even if they get past that gauntlet two more good teams await. Could lose to Montini or win state. Mark: Scott said it all – tough draw for JCA and will take a lot for them to get through the bracket. The Hillmen will have to rely on a ball control offense and control the clock if they are going to win.

CLASS 6A Team to beat Scott: No. 1 Boylan (90): Building a dynasty in the

Sleeper

Pick Scott: Boylan.Them and CreteMonee in title game. Mark: Providence. I’m going to take my sleeper to the bank. One of the most battle tested team in the state, the Celtics have a solid running game and a few stud athletes. If not the Celtics, I think the winner will come from their neighbors in Frankfort in Lincoln-Way North.

No. 6 Romeoville (5-4) outlook Scott: First playoff appearance in 11 years for the Spartans and I

like their draw with Rich Central (8-1). Will be lots of athletes on the field and a toss-up. Will be tough to beat Lincoln-Way North in second round. Mark: Like JCA, Romeoville will have to control the football and keep the electric Rich Central offense off the field.

CLASS 7A Team to beat Scott: No. 3 Glenbard West (81): Always a dangerous team. Mark: Glenbard West is one of the top teams in the state again.

Sleeper Scott: No. 6 Plainfield East (6-3): I’m going to go out on a limb with this pick. The Bengals, in their first-ever playoff appearance, are coming off a 38-0 loss which makes this pick scary. However, if they play the way they have earlier this season, are a very dangerous team.Lincoln-Way East has beaten ONE playoff team all year, and beat non-playoff teams Carmel, Lincoln-Way Central and Joliet West by 10 points or less. Southern schools would likely make up their next two games, which gives them some hope before a Catholic school in the semis. Mark: Wheaton Warrenville South (7-2): The Tigers lost two games and are in a tough DuPage Valley Conference and will be ready of the playoffs. A No. 5 seed, they face No. 4 Dunbar to open. I’m not sold on public league teams and a win could spark a team like WWS that has a winning tradition.

Pick Scott: No. 2 Mt. Carmel (8-1): This is where I normally pick the Hilltoppers, but I think the Caravan will be riding off into the sunset in DeKalb. Mark: Glenbard West (8-1): While I really agree with Scott that Mt. Carmel should win this bracket, for the sake of making a different pick, I’ll take West. See POINT, page 18


Sports

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

17

Lewis University men’s soccer remains unbeaten The No. 20 Lewis University men’s soccer team scored a pair of first half goals on their way to the 2-0 Great Lakes Valley Conference victory over Drury at Harrison Stadium on Sunday (Oct. 27) afternoon to finish the regular-season without a road loss. “We played well at times, but we could have played better in the second half,” Lewis head men’s soccer coach Evan Fiffles said. “Drury is a very good team, so it is a good result on the road.” With the win, Lewis improves to 11-1-4 on the season and 10-1-

3 in GLVC action.The Flyers have not lost in their last 11 GLVC regular-season road contests, dating back to a 3-2 overtime loss to Southern Indiana on September 23, 2012. Drury falls to 12-5 on the campaign and 9-5 in conference play. Lewis senior forward Cristhian Ramirez (Wheeling, Ill./ Wheeling) opened up the scoring for the Flyers, as he gathered in a deflection from the 12-yard line and beat Drury goalkeeper Blake Andrews for the tally in the 24th minute. Flyer sophomore reserve Robert Zieba (Lockport, Ill./

Lockport) added an insurance goal - his third score in the last three games - converting a cross pass from junior defender Michael Pyle (Glen Ellyn, Ill./ Glenbard South) at the 37:05 mark to put Lewis ahead, 2-0. Drury held the advantage offensively, as they outshot Lewis, 18-9, while both teams had four shots on frame. Lewis goalkeeper Alec Pickett (Mokena, Ill./Providence ) made four saves on the afternoon to claim his eighth solo shutout of the season. In 16 games this season, the senior netminder has only given up eight goals.

READY

allowed 14.8 points per game this season, while Bolingbrook has scored 33.1. WHEN BLOOM HAS THE BALL When the Trojans are on offense that means the state’s best defense is on the field for Bolingbrook. No team in the upper four classes has allowed less points than the 6.1 points per game the Raiders have allowed this season (Class 4A Chicago Brooks equaled the Raiders). The Raider defense is paced by Westphal, the senior defensive back who is being recruited by every major college in the

country. The team’s leading tackler is sophomore Tuf Borland, who has posted 77 tackles on the season. As a unit, the Raiders have 22 take-aways this season, led by four interceptions from Jacob Huff. Julian Huff,Borland andWestphal all have two. Julian Huff (six sacks) and Micah Dew-Treadway (four sacks) lead the pass rush. Bloom will feature senior quarterback Kendall McGinnis, running back Justus Brantley and receiver Wiley Jonah. “They are athletic, but our kids can run with anybody,” said Bolingbrook coach John Ivlow.

Continued from page 13 enters the game. He lines up as a receiver and has caught a teamhigh nine passes for 104 yards. With Woods under center, he is joined in the backfield by running backs Jaden Huff (127 carries, 703 yards, 8 TD), Mike Valentine (67/465, 9) and John Hall (42/156, 2). The Bloom defense this season is paced by linebackers Kyle Pugh, Lawrence Evans and Dominique Taylor. The Blazing Trojans have

Andrews finished the contest with two saves. • The Great Lakes Valley Conference announced on Monday (Oct. 28) that Lewis University’s Alec Pickett (Mokena, Ill./Providence ) has been named the GLVC Men’s Soccer Defensive Player of the Week for the period ending October 27th. This is the third time that Pickett has won the award, after being recognized on both September 16th and 23rd this season. “Alec has been consistent all year and is having a great season,” Lewis head men’s soccer coach

THE X FACTOR Bolingbrook has a good mix of players who were on the team two years ago when it won the Class 8A state title and even more back from the team who was eliminated from the playoffs in the second round. “We still have seven guys on this team from the state championship team,” Ivlow said.“They know how to get to state and how to win. But the fact that we have so many guys back from last year’s team with the

Evan Fiffles said. “He has worked very hard and is well deserving of his third player of the week honor.” Pickett earned a pair of shutouts last weekend with a 1-0 win over Missouri S&T (Oct. 25) and a 2-0 whitewash of Drury on Sunday (Oct. 27) - giving him eight solo shutouts in 2013. His most impressive performance was a four-save outing against Drury. For the season, Pickett is 11-14 and has allowed eight goals in 1510:40 played, for a 0.48 goals See LEWIS, page 18 bitter taste of defeat in their mouths - that is a good combination.”

THE UNKNOWN “We don’t know a lot about them,” Ivlow said.“They are big and athletic, but we don’t see them or really any team that they���ve played, so we just have to see what they have Saturday night. That conference is from a different part of the region.We have to disregard their 5-4 record and come ready to play.” mark@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

LEWIS Continued from page 17 against average. As of October 20th, Pickett is seventh in the country in goals against average (0.54 GAA) and 10th in save percentage (.860).

MEN’S XC For the second-straight year, Lewis University seniors Andrew McLain (Fort Wayne, Ind./ Homestead) and Sean Smith (Winnebago, Ill./Winnebago) each earned All-Great Lakes Valley Conference accolades to push the Flyers to a second-place finish at the 8K GLVC Championships, hosted by Maryville University, at Forest Park on Saturday (Oct. 26) afternoon. McLain, who is a four-time AllGLVC honoree, finished third with a time of 24:12, while Smith took home 13th-place overall, crossing the finish line in 25:09. Southern Indiana, led by champion and GLVC Runner of the Year Johnnie Guy (23:46) won the overall title for the ninthstraight season with 24 points, while the Flyers were second with 88 points. Bellarmine’s Joshua Rodenberg placed 21st overall (25:49) to earn GLVC Freshman of the Year, while Southern Indiana’s Mike Hillyard was named the GLVC Coach of the Year. Lewis junior Andrew Knapik (West Dundee, Ill./DundeeCrown) was 17th overall with a time of 25:41, while senior Alessandro Mazza (Chicago,

POINT Continued from page 16

How our teams will fare Scott: No. 8 Downers North (5-4) has a great first round draw with Whitney Young. The Trojans will have to recapture last year’s magic to beat Wheaton Warrenville South in the next round. •No. 7 Benet (6-3) got punished with three losses down the stretch and will face Mt. Carmel. Hard to image it beating the Caravan and St. Rita in backto-back weeks. •Plainfield East (see above). Mark: Like I said I don’t trust many public league teams and Downers North gets Whitney Young for a week one upset win. • Benet draws one of the top

Sports

Ill./Walther Lutheran) finished 23rd (25:50). Lewis sophomore James Weissensel (Sandwich, Ill./ Marquette Academy) rounded out the top five for the Flyers with a 32nd place finish of 26:07.

MEN’S SWIMMING Lewis University freshman Victor Tarin (Godelleta, Valencia, Spain/IES Conselleria) has been selected as the CounsilmanHunsaker CollegeSwimming. com Men’s Division II Swimmer of the Week. Tarin is the first Flyer to receive the honor since Brandon Drogemuller (Hollister, Calif./San Benito) picked up the award on February 12, 2012. “Victor trains exceptionally hard,” Lewis head men’s swimming coach Roger Karns said. “He is a very focused young man and he’s helping set the direction of the squad.” Tarin was named Great Lakes Valley Conference Men’s Swimming and Diving Athlete of the Week, the league announced on Oct. 22 after a vote of the conference’s head coaches. On Friday (Oct 18) against Missouri S&T, Tarin broke the Lewis program and pool record, as well as registered a NCAA B cut time in the 200-yard freestyle (1:40.87), which he set originally on September 30 at the Lewis Alumni Meet. He also won in the 100-yard butterfly (50.97). Tarin closed out the meet with a time of 1:40.70 as the anchor leg of the 800-yard freestyle relay that posted a pool record 6:53.04, besting the previous mark of 6:54.11. teams in the state in Mt. Carmel and without a real running game, the Redwings will struggle to win. • Plainfield East: I have no doubt the Bengals can beat Lincoln-Way East after seeing the Griffins this year. They are not the same Griffins team as before and are beatable.

CLASS 8A Team to beat Scott: No. 1 Bolingbrook (90): Only unbeaten team in class looks for second title in three years. Mark: Loyola (8-1): The No. 1 ranked team in the state most of the season slipped after a loss last week but still a tough team.

Sleeper Scott: No. 7 Naperville Central (6-3): I don’t trust H-F, which could lead to a third round game

Submitted Photo

Paige Rydberg is the 2014 Novice Ladies Upper Great Lakes Champion. Paige captured the Gold Medal Tuesday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Paige was first after the short program and finished with a total score of 128 points, her best score of the season. Paige will continue her quest in November at the Midwest Sectional Championship being held in Lansing, MI where Paige will compete against 11 other skaters representing the Midwest Section. She will be training hard over the next 3 weeks in preparation for this event. The top 4 skaters at the Midwest Sectional Championship will earn a spot at The 2014 National Championship being held in Boston, MA in early January. This is the second year that Paige has captured the Gold Medal at The Upper Great Lakes Championship. In 2013, Paige won the Intermediate Ladies event.

with Neuqua. Mark: No. 8 Marist (6-3): A tough three-loss team, Marist has lost to JCA, St. Rita and Note Dame, all playoff teams. Marist has a lot of weapons and could make a run if it gets hot at the right time.

Pick Scott: Bolingbrook. Defense wins championships. That will be put to the test for sure, but I see the Raiders being tough to score on and they have enough offense to put up some points. Mark: I have made my point clear about not wanting to agree with Scott here, but in this case, I have to. I agree fully here that the Raider defense is just too good.

How our teams will fare Scott: No. 9 Notre Dame (6-3)

has a winnable game at Fremd, but a tough game at Loyola second round. The Dons will have to get back on track and play their best game of the season to get Maine South. •No. 12 Niles West (6-3) gets No. 5 Maine South (7-2) in the lone battle of Voyager teams. The Hawks of Maine South cruised to a win earlier this year and should have a showdown with Loyola in the quarters a win there and state is within reach. •Bolingbrook (see above). •No. 9 Plainfield South (6-3) has a tough game with 6-3 Marist, but it is winnable. However, we’ve seen the Cougars the past two years against Bolingbrook and neither year was pretty. •No. 10 Downers South returns to the playoffs and is in a good bracket. The Mustangs could lose in the first round to Naperville Central or make a

run to the quarters. Mark: Notre Dame jumps all the way up to Class 8A and will see the difference in week 2 against Loyola. • While it is tough to beat a team twice in the season, I think Maine South will do that against Niles West. It is unfortunate when two league teams have to face off in the first round. • Plainfield South and Marist should be like a video game. Neither team plays great ball control, but both can hit big plays all day. The winner gets the Brook where big plays are just not an option. • The Raiders feature one of, if not the, best defense in the state and that will take them to the title. • Downers South could beat the No. 7 seed Naperville Central, but I am sold on H-F’s team speed and think the Mustangs would have their hands full.


buglenewspapers.com/football

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Hawks, Wolves to meet in first round By Mike Sandrolini Sports Reporter

Three weeks ago, Maine South and Niles West clashed in a CSL South game. At that time, the Wolves were sitting on top of a 6-0 record, while the Hawks entered the contest 4-2. Maine South handed the Wolves their first loss of the year, 35-20, and since then, the two clubs have been heading in opposite directions. The Hawks rolled on to their 13th consecutive CSL South championship, while the Wolves dropped three in a row to end the regular season. This weekend, they meet again in the first round of the Class 8A playoffs as the Hawks play host to the Wolves. Maine South (7-2) is the fifth seed in the 8A upper bracket, and Niles West (6-3) is seeded No. 12. Maine South has won seven straight since falling to fourtime defending Class 5A state champion Montini in the seasonopener, and then to Wheaton Warrenville South in Week 2. Both Montini and WWS are among the favorites to win the 5A and 7A crowns, respectively. The Hawks, who disposed of Waukegan, 40-14, in their final regular-season game last Friday night, have been relying offensively on their ground game most of the year with senior Clay Burdelik and junior Justin Fahey leading the charge. Lately, however,sophomore quarterback Brian Collis, who took over as the starter earlier this season, has been getting into a groove. Collis threw for over 200

yards during the first half of the Waukegan game, and has a nice stable of wideouts to choose from, including senior George Sajenko and juniors Vinny Labus, Tommy Bazarek and George Sargeant. Despite losing 30-20, Niles West played better last Friday against playoff-bound Glenbrook South—certainly better than its performance in Week 8 when New Trier pounded the Wolves, 36-7. Junior quarterback Tommy Galanopoulos threw for over 200 yards and two touchdowns vs. the 7-2 Titans and ran for a 2-yard score. He’s considered to be one of the best quarterbacks in the conference. The Hawks will have to watch out again for senior Andrew Mihulet, the Wolves’ two-way threat who intercepted three passes and also ran back a kickoff 93 yards for a touchdown in their loss to Maine South. mike@buglenewspapers.com

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The amount of Voyager Media teams which have qualified for the IHSA state playoffs

Mike Sandrolini/Bugle Staff

Niles West’s Nick Johnson is tackled by Maine South’s Vinny Labus in an earlier meeting this year.


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CALENDAR Continued from page 9 with Resident ID. Register at the Bolingbrook Recreation and Aquatic Complex or visit signmeup.com. For more information call 630-739-1705.

ONGOING American Legion Auxiliary Unit 18 Bingo. 11:30 a.m. Sundays at Leo’s Bar & Grill, 201 East Romeo Road. (2 blocks east of Route 53 on 135th Street). For more info, call 815-886-5600. Doors open every Sunday at 11:30 a.m. We have food for purchase along with your favorite raffles and fun. Everyone is invited. Panic Group

Attack Support of Bolingbrook.

Anyone who is dealing with panic attacks, anxiety attacks, or social phobia is welcome to attend this support group. We meet every second and fourth Thursday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. Please visit Meetup.com to RSVP http:// www.meetup.com/AnxietyPanic-Attack-Support-GroupOf-Bolingbrook-Naper/. American Sign Language interpreted Mass is offered at St. Francis of Assisi, 1501 W. Boughton Road in Bolingbrook every Sunday at the 8:15 a.m. Mass. Power Connection’s LARGE FOOD PANTRY. Open on the 2nd and 4th Mondays of the month from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. Enjoy your shopping experience. For a

News $20 donation you can shop the aisles of canned/boxed goods, drinks, deserts, snacks, breads, fruits & vegetables. You will also receive a pre-selected bag of meat. There is no income verification and ALL residents of Illinois are welcome. The Resale Connection is also open from 9a.m. to 6:45 p.m. on those Mondays. We carry clothing for men/women/children as well as household items, furniture, sundries, toys and so much more! Cleaning out your house? We accepts donations Monday-Thursday, 9am-4pm. Call (630) 679-6899 or visit www.thepowerconnection.org for more information/services available such as our Extension Food Pantry, Computer Classes, Forklift Classes. Volunteer opportunities also available to serve your community. Power Connection Computer Classes. Classes begin at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. General or Microsoft Word classes are offered. Cost is $30. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org Power Connection Forklift classes. Classes begin July 11 or August 15 at 999 Remington Blvd, Suite F, Bolingbrook. We offer a one week class for forklift certification, you must be able to read/write fluent English.

$50 fuel fee due by start of class. Call Power Connection at (630) 679-6899, or visit www. thepowerconection.org.

1:30 p.m. on Wednesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 3 to 6 years.

Tween Scene. Tuesdays 4 to 5 p. m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Do you enjoy hanging out at the library? Well, come to Tween Scene! Each session we’ll have fun things to do like games, science, anime, manga, and crafts. For children 8-12. Registration is required. Contact the Children’s Services Department for more information.

Pajama-Jam Family storytime. 6 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. All ages. Wear your pajamas.

Preschool Playtime. 10:30 a.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Brick Building Club. 4 p.m. on Thursdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.

Family storytime. 7-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Fountaindale Public Library. On Tuesday evenings, get the family together to hear stories and sing songs in the storytime room. TOPS (Take Pounds Off Sensibly), IL114 Romeoville, meets 5:15 p.m. Mondays at the Romeoville Police Department, 1050 W. Romeo Road. For more information, call 815-886-9252.

Terrific Ts. 10:30 a.m. on Tuesdays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 2 to 3.

Golden Age Club. Thursdays noon to 4 p.m. at the Romeoville Recreation Department. Members must be 50 years and up to join, and may do so by coming to any Thursday meeting. Transportation is available by calling the Recreation Department at 815886-6222 at least 24 hours before the event. For more information about the club, call Noel Maldonado at the Recreation Center.

Storytimes. 10:30 a.m. and

See CALENDAR, page 21

Toddler times. 10:30 a.m. on Mondays at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Ages 3 to 36 mos.


News CALENDAR Continued from page 20 Citizens Against Ruining the Environment. Every third Monday of the month at 6-7:30 p.m. at SOS Children’s Village, 17545 Village Lane, Lockport. This volunteer non-profit environmental organization is dedicated to serving Will County and the surrounding area. For more information or a meeting agenda, call Ellen Rendulich at 815-834-1611. Bolingbrook Machine Knitting Club. All skill levels are welcome to begin or further their knowledge of knitting with a machine. The group meets the last Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m. There is no charge to attend this group. They meet in the community room of Bolingbrook Fire Station 4, 1111 W. Boughton Road. Please park on the West Side of the building. For more information, contact

Rose at 630 739-2784 or Sharon at 630 471-9650. Birth After Cesarean. Meet other moms who are planning their natural birth after cesarean section.Come for encouragement, support and information to plan your next birth. Meetings at noon the first Monday every month in Romeoville. Contact Melanie at 253-861-5897 or VBACesarean@ aol.com Are you affected by someone’s drinking? Open meetings are held every third Friday of the month from 7 p.m.8:30 p.m. at 265 Republic Ave. in Joliet. Contact Al-anon/Alateen at 815-773-9623 or visit www. niafg.org for more information. BolingbrookAmateur Radio Society. The Bolingbrook Amateur Radio Society meets on the third Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. at Fire Station #5, 1900 W. Rodeo Drive in Bolingbrook. All ham radio enthusiasts are invited to attend. Meetings usually include a

presentation and refreshments. VE testing is held prior to each meeting at 6:30 p.m. for those wishing to take any level of license exam. Candidates must bring a photo ID, any pending Certificates of Successful Completion, and the test fee of $15. For more information, visit www.k9bar.org. Fly tying. 7-8:30 p.m. at Outdoor World, 709 Janes Ave., Bolingbrook. Join master fly tier Bob Davenport in the Fly Fishing Department for some great tips on fly tying and to answer any questions or concerns you may have. For more information, call the store at 630-296-2700. Employment. Will County Workforce Services host its free weekly Career Café for job seekers at 10:30 a.m. every Tuesday in Room 519 of the JJC Renaissance Center, 214 N. Ottawa St., Joliet. Reserve a spot by calling 815-727-4444, Ext. 122, or emailing bwashington@ willcountyillinois.com.

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Real Estate & Business

Accurate expectations generate job satisfaction Q. I’ve been in my industry for 15 years and am really unhappy about where I am in my career. I look around and see people who started out with me doing much better. I figure I must be making mistakes that they aren’t. I spend a lot of time at work trying to figure out why I’m not at the top of my industry. How can I stop being so miserable? A. You can stop being so miserable by realizing that other people’s jobs are a lot like other people’s marriages; you really can’t know the actual experience of other people from the outside looking in. Most of the clients I talk to in the middle of their careers are miserable not because of what they have accomplished but because of what they

believe they should have accomplished. When we compare where we are and who we are to our ideals, all of us feel inadequate. Ambition is a fine attribute when we are inspired to take intelligent risks and make difficult changes in how we operate. When your ambition gets you to have honest conversations with your management about what you need to learn or do to get ahead, bravo! If instead of focusing on your next goal, you focus on your global sense of inadequacy, your ambition is a hindrance and not a help. Quit focusing your attention on the 5 percent of people in your industry who are the tiny minority. Realize that they may have had multiple advantages you cannot access. They may be

related to people who promoted them, they may be married to people who helped them, and they may have had blind dumb luck to be in the perfect place at the perfect time. All your explanations at present for your current career conditions are about you “screwing up” and not that the exceptional 5 percent may have had opportunities you didn’t. The power you do have is to look at the majority of people in your industry and see where you’d like to go. Then to meet with your boss, evaluate your current job, and see what you can do right now to better your future. We all tend to believe the grass is greener on the other side. Unfortunately, that prevents us from growing where we are planted because we stop seeing the opportunities right in front of us.

Quit focusing your attention on the 5 percent of people in your industry who are the tiny minority. Realize that they may have had multiple advantages you cannot access.

Blaming ourselves is equally useless. Whether we actually made mistakes in the past or just believe we’ve made mistakes, the critical decision is to be more interested in fixing our present than ruminating about our history.

The last word(s) Q. Is there any good technique to avoid getting to the point where I want to smack some of my coworkers? I am so tired of telling them things I consider obvious! A. Yes, use your irritation to immediately speak up when you see a coworker setting up

a problem. Don’t wait until you are ready to blow your top.

(Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www.interpersonaledge. com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies.)

(c) 2013 INTERPERSONAL EDGE DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

A good idea to rent section 8 housing Dear Dave, I have some rental properties, and the government would like to turn a couple into lowincome housing. Is this a good idea, or should I find my own tenant? Marvin Dear Marvin, In these types of situations you’re generally talking about Section 8 housing. This means government-subsidized rent, and the person living there is in a lower income bracket. I put of few of my properties on Section 8 years ago, when I first started out in the real estate business. I can tell you from personal experience, it’s a good news/bad news scenario. If you own a property in a lower-income neighborhood, and you put it into the Section 8 subsidized housing program, the good news is that you’ll always get paid. This is because the federal government sends you your money. Unfortunately, the good news pretty well ends right there. The bad news is that some Section 8 folks have a real

entitlement mentality, and can be unreasonable to deal with on some issues. It’s also really hard to get them out of the property once they’ve taken up residence. Of course, not all people who participate in this program are like this. But you’ll run across your share of rough folks, irrespective of their race or the area of the country. More than anything, it’s the impact of the economic situations surrounding their lives. Another piece of bad news is that the government puts lots of stringent conditions on the property. That wasn’t so difficult for me, because I always kept my places in really good shape. But if you go this route, I promise you’ll come across all kinds of guidelines and regulations, some of which are silly and not very realistic. I got tired of the Section 8 experience pretty quickly, and I don’t own any property in that program today. If it were me, I’d just go find my own tenants. I know some things have probably changed since my time in the program. But if it’s like most things

that are government managed, the change hasn’t been for the better! —Dave

Brother’s bad deal Dear Dave, My husband and I hired my brother as our real estate agent. He’s just starting out in the business and working two jobs, but it’s been five or six months and he hasn’t helped us find a house. On top of this, we signed an exclusive buyer’s agreement with him. We’re worried about the agreement, how he’ll react and our family’s reaction if we fire him. Do you have any advice? Andrea Dear Andrea, I think you’ve given him a fair chance.Under the circumstances, he should be willing to release you from the exclusive buyer’s contract. I know he’s your brother, and that makes things kind of emotional. You might get some flak from the rest of your family, too. But guess what? It’s none of their business. What are you supposed to do, stay in a bad deal just because you’re related? I don’t think so!

No, you and your husband need to sit down with your brother and let him know in a gentle way that things aren’t working. Ask to be released from the exclusive buyer’s agreement, and wish him the best with his new career. Make sure to let him know you love and respect him, but that the situation with his multiple jobs, and the fact that you’ve made no progress in all this time, means you need to go in another direction. Hopefully, he’ll understand. Maybe your family will be reasonable, too. But those are things you can’t really control. Whether they want to behave like mature adults, or little kids pitching a fit, is up to them! —Dave *Dave Ramsey is America’s trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times bestselling books: Financial Peace, More Than Enough, The Total Money Makeover and EntreLeadership. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.


THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013 SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 109 KINGSTON RD., BOLINGBROOK, ILLINOIS 60440 (RESIDENTIAL). On the 14th day of November, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff V. DONALD A. SCHULTZ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; Defendant. Case No. 13 CH 67 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g) (4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Johnson, Blumberg and Associates, LLC 230 West Monroe Street Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 312-541-9710 312-541-9711 (fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 10/17, 10/24, 10/31

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 350 FLEETWOOD AVENUE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 (TWO STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME. TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE.). On the 21st day of November, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., S/B/M TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff V. ISIDRA GOMEZ Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 7906 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 245,621.67 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/151507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. For Information Please Contact: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 10/24, 10/31, 11/7

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 1191 John Hancock Drive, Bolingbrook, IL 60490 (condominium unit). On the 14th day of November, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: EVERBANK Plaintiff V. LATONIA DAILY and PATRIOT PLACE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 3764 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g) (1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 10/17, 10/24, 10/31


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

EVERBANK Plaintiff,

GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff,

vs.

vs.

LATONIA DAILY and PATRIOT PLACE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION Defendant. No. 12 CH 3764

DONALD A. SCHULTZ; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; Defendant. No. 13 CH 67

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 7th day of August, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 14th day of November, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: Unit 51-02 in Patriot Place Condominium, as delineated on a Survey of the following described parcel of real estate: Certain lots in Patriot Place, being a part of the Southwest Quarter of Section 25, Township 37 North, Range 9 East of the Third Principal Meridian, in the Village of Bolingbrook, according to the Plat thereof recorded July 28, 2005 as Document R2005127487, which Survey is attached as Exhibit A to the Declaration of Condominium Ownership recorded January 12, 2006 as Document No. R2006007404, as amended from time to time, together with its undivided percentage interest in the common elements, all in Will County, Illinois. Commonly known as: 1191 John Hancock Drive, Bolingbrook, IL 60490 Description of Improvements: condominium unit P.I.N.: 07-01-25-301-029-1002

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 6th day of August, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 14th day of November, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 11 IN UNIT NUMBER 5, BOLINGBROOK, A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 14 AND PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13 AND A RESUBDIVISION OF PART OF BOLINGBROOK SUBDIVISION UNIT NUMBER 3, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, AND IN RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED MARCH 14, 1962, AS DOCUMENT NO. 952123, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 109 KINGSTON RD., BOLINGBROOK, ILLINOIS 60440 Description of Improvements: RESIDENTIAL P.I.N.: (12) 02-14-210-035

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Heavner, Scott, Beyers & Mihlar, LLC 111 East Main Street, Suite 200 Decatur, Illinois 62523 217-422-1719 217-422-1754 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 10/17, 10/24, 10/31

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Johnson, Blumberg and Associates, LLC 230 West Monroe Street Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 312-541-9710 312-541-9711 (fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 10/17, 10/24, 10/31

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., S/B/M TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. ISIDRA GOMEZ Defendant. No. 10 CH 7906 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 30th day of October, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the 21st day of November, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, at the Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 10 IN BLOCK 4 IN BOLINGBROOK UNIT NO. 7, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN THE NORTH EAST 1/4 OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 350 FLEETWOOD AVENUE BOLINGBROOK, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: T W O STORY SINGLE FAMILY HOME. TWO CAR DETACHED GARAGE. P.I.N.: 12-02-14-205-010 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. Judgment amount is 245,621.67 plus interest, cost and post judgment advances, if any. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: PIERCE & ASSOCIATES ONE NORTH DEARBORN THIRTEENTH FLOOR CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60602 312-346-9088 312-346-1557 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 10/24, 10/31, 11/7

CYBER Continued from page 1 “Making sure we keep kids focused in the classroom is key to their success and in order to do this, we must continue to provide a safe, comfortable learning environment – both in and out of school,” said Manley. “Informing parents of the many dangers presented to their children online provides them a way to protect their children from inappropriate and unwanted comments or

material.” “While student safety has always been a focus of schools and communities, we now live in a digital world so that focus has had to evolve along with our students’ interests, said Jamie McGee Principal Tony Valenza. “As adults it’s our responsibility to become educated in the areas of cyberbullying and how to keep our children safe from on-line predators. To me, it’s just logical that we offer this training to our parents and members of our community.” The seminar will be held on Monday, November 4 at 7 p.m. at Jamie L. McGee Elementary School located at 179 Commonwealth Drive in Bolingbrook. The event is free of charge and open to all parents of the Valley View School District. For more information, or to RSVP, parents are encouraged to contact Rep. Manley’s constituent services office by calling (815) 725-2741 or at repmanley@gmail.com.

PRE-TEEN Continued from page 8 that will take place in Orlando, Florida. Over $30,000.00 in prizes and awards will be presented at the National Competition while each winner enjoys this expense paid trip of five nights and six days in Orlando, Florida. Community businesses, organizations, and private individuals will assist Raven in participating in this year’s competition by becoming an official sponsor to her. Through sponsorship, each contestant receives all the necessary training,rehearsals,and financial support which will allow Raven to become a very confident and well-prepared contestant in this year’s Chicago Pageant. Currently, Raven’s sponsors are, V&C Cleaning Services, The Robinson Foundation, Elate Salon, Tim & Julie Donoghue, Grandma Janet, Auntie Julie, Auntie Shawn, Eddee & Tricia Williams, Spoiled By Technology, and E Ralph Cable Inc. Any business, organization, or private individual who may be interested in becoming a sponsor to Raven may contact the Miss Pre-Teen Chicago pageant coordinator, at 1-877403-6678.


Food

THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013

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FOTOLIA.COM

use whatever mixture of nuts you want, and sprinkle with shredded coconut for a festive touch.

Most people limit their culinary creativity at Halloween to deciding what assortment of prepackaged candies they’ll offer to the little action heroes, fairy princesses and monsters who show up at the door yelling, “Trick or treat!” But, as much fun as that might be, I also like to make special little Halloween treats for my sons and their friends, as well as the grownups who might accompany them to our house. It doesn’t have to be anything complicated. Some years, I’ll just make a batch of basic sugar cookie dough, roll it out, and then use cutters in Halloween-themed shapes like ghosts, skulls, jack-o’lanterns, bats and witches’ hats to create individual cookies. I’ll bake the cookies in advance and, before people come over, prepare simple icings (or put out store-bought ones) in appropriate colors like orange, black, red, green and white. Then, when everyone arrives, young and older people alike have great fun decorating their own

cookies. I also might prepare a slightly more sophisticated treat for people to enjoy. One of my favorites is little tartlets filled with a mixture of crunchy nuts bound together in a thick, sweet mixture of corn syrup, brown sugar and eggs, all topped with golden-brown shredded coconut. The result is reminiscent of a great pecan pie, but with more variety, a little more richness to balance the sweetness, and a fun touch of tropical flavor from the coconut. The tarts themselves take just a few minutes to assemble and less than an hour to bake. Once they’ve cooled and you’ve unmolded them, they store well for a few days in an airtight container. So don’t be scared. Give this great recipe a try. I bet you’ll like it so much that you’ll start coming up with your own variations. Use whatever mixture of nuts you like and maybe even sprinkle in some chocolate chips before spooning in the corn syrup mixture. Go on making and enjoying this special treat throughout the holiday season to come. (c) 2013 WOLFGANG PUCK WORLDWIDE, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC.

INDI VID UAL MIXED NU T TARTS Makes 8 4-inch tarts

1 pound Sugar Dough (recipe follows) or refrigerated pie dough 2-3/4 cups light corn syrup 1-1/4 cups packed dark brown sugar 6 large cage-free eggs 3 large cage-free egg yolks 1 vanilla bean 4-1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 cup hazelnut liqueur, such as Frangelico 3 cups shelled unsalted mixed nuts, such as macadamias, pecans, walnuts, or cashews 1/2 pound unsweetened shredded coconut Whipped cream or ice cream, for serving, optional

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Cut the dough into 2 equal pieces. On a flour-dusted work surface, use a rolling pin to roll out each piece into an 11inch square. Place the squares on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and chill in the refrigerator for 20 minutes. With a 5-inch round tart ring or plate as your guide, use the tip of a small, sharp knife to cut out 8 circles of dough. Fit the circles into 8 individual 4-by-1/2inch tart pans. Trim the edges. Place on the baking sheet and refrigerate until needed In a large bowl, combine the corn syrup, brown sugar, eggs and yolks. Whisk until thoroughly blended. With a small, sharp knife, carefully cut the vanilla bean in half lengthwise. With the back edge of the knife blade, carefully scrape the seeds from each half. Put the butter and vanilla bean seeds and halves in a

small skillet. Heat over medium heat just until the mixture turns golden brown and smells nutty. Immediately scrape into the corn syrup mixture, removing the vanilla bean halves. Add the liqueur and stir until blended. Put the tart shells on a baking sheet. Evenly distribute the nuts among the shells. Ladle the corn syrup mixture equally among the shells. Bake the tarts on the baking sheet until the filling feels firm to a light, quick touch, about 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle the coconut over the tarts, and return to the oven to bake until the coconut turns golden, 10 to 15 minutes longer. Transfer to a rack to cool. To serve, slide a sharp knife tip around the side of each tart pan to loosen the dough and unmold the tarts onto individual plates. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream if you like.

SUGAR DOUGH Makes 1-1/2 pounds

2-1/3 cups cake flour or pastry flour 1/3 cup sugar 1/2 pound unsalted butter, chilled, cut into small pieces In a food processor fitted with the stainlesssteel blade, combine the flour and sugar. Add the butter and process until the mixture resembles fine meal. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and 1 tablespoon of the cream. Scrape the mixture into the processor bowl. Process until a ball of dough begins to form,

2 large cage-free egg yolks 1 to 2 tablespoons heavy cream

adding a little extra cream if necessary to bring the dough together. Carefully transfer the dough from the processor bowl to a lightly floured work surface. With clean hands, press the dough into a disc. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour or, preferably, overnight.


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THE BUGLE OCTOBER 31, 2013


Bolingbrook 10-31-13