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SPORTS Mistwood’s performance center one of a kind

www.bolingbrookbugle.com

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NEWS Emerald ash borer to devastate Bolingbrook trees

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Our Community, Our News

JUNE 20, 2013

Vol. 6 No. 49

PUTTING THE POW BACK IN POWWOW Siegel’s Farm to honor heritage of Native Americans By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

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Laura Katauskas/STAFF REPORTER

The Siegel Family, Paul, Sue, Kaity and Zach partner with President of the American Indian Center Joseph Podlasek in announcing the first Summer Powwow Cultural Days.

free spirit design teepee sits in the middle of the Siegel’s Cottonwood Farm, a centennial farm in existence since 1909, immersed in heritage and now on the brink of sharing the heritage of Native Americans in the first Powwow to be held on a farm in Illinois. Paul and Sue Siegel, owners of Siegel’s Cottonwood Farm, which sits along Weber Road, between Caton Farm and Renwick Roads, have formed a partnership with the American Indian See POWWOW, page 5


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013


News

Airport bill hitting some turbulence By Nick Reiher Managing Editor

One of Will County’s Springfield lobbyists told board members June 11 that a meeting with Illinois Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider could help alleviate some of their concerns due to the last-minute passage of a bill that will move the South Suburban Airport in Peotone forward. Brent Hassert, a former Will County Board members and state legislator,told members of the board’s Legislative and Policy Committee that Senate Bill 20, which contained multiple pieces of economic development legislation, was put together in the closing days of the Legislature’s spring session. Along for the ride on that bill was legislation creating the South Suburban Airport Act, which dedicates funding to the development of a new airport in Peotone and calls for the airport to be built by the Illinois Department of Transportation and operated in a publicprivate partnership, known as a “P3.” The Illiana Expressway is being built the same way. Hassert said Gov.Pat Quinn,tired of watching the airport issue stalled on governance issues, pushed for the legislation.Will County legislators, knowing Will County officials as a whole have long supported an airport in Peotone as an economic development engine, pushed for the legislation, he said. Some Will County Board officials were not pleased with the legislation, however, which gives control of the airport to the state. The board has gone on record as saying if there is to be an airport,Will County should control it since it would be built in Will County. County Board Speaker Herb Brooks,

D-Joliet, sent a letter to media outlets last week chastising legislators for approving a bill that contradicts board policy without any discussion. He called for the county’s airport consultants to review the bill and report back to a committee-of-the-whole. Board Member Judy Ogalla, R-Monee, did not attend Tuesday’s meeting. But at a board Executive Committee meeting last week, Ogalla, a member of Shut This Airport Nightmare Down (STAND) chastised County Executive Larry Walsh and legislators for giving IDOT “the keys” to the airport. Walsh, who attended Tuesday’s meeting, and Hassert told the board members that’s how things can happen in Springfield. Dormant legislation,especially one pushed by the governor, can get new life in the waning days of the legislative session. Hassert said the whole issue developed within 48 hours, giving little chance for anyone to comment. Legislative Committee Chair Bob Howard, D-Beecher, said he was down in Springfield as the issue was being discussed. He didn’t realize it until the last day.“I have (the airport) issue day to day,”he said.“I see (this legislation) as a positive.” Walsh and Hassert reiterated what Republican Caucus Chair Jim Moustis, R-Frankfort Township, said at the recent Executive Committee meeting: Now is the time to make sure Springfield knows Will County deserves to be at the table when a governing authority is put together. Noting the airport legislation calls for IDOT to working with local municipalities and other stakeholders,Hassert said Secretary Schneider likely would be willing to meet with them to discuss the bill and its ramifications. Contacted after the meeting,Schneider said

IDOT would be glad to sit down with County Board officials on a project anticipated to employ more than 11,000 workers during construction and as many as 14,000 people after it becomes operational. “We have spoken to many Will County groups and would be glad to meet with the county board at a time that is mutually convenient,” she said in a statement. At it happened, Schneider was in Joliet only days after the passage of the bill for a June 4 Joliet Chamber luncheon. She said after years of gridlock, the South Suburban Airport plan now “is going forward.” She also said IDOT will indeed work with locals to find a way to address the concerns of the municipalities and other stakeholders for the project to be successful. Schneider said she knows the quick take provision in the airport legislation is a concern for landowners, as it is for those in the path of the proposed Illiana Expressway. But she said quick take would be “a last resort,” used only if necessary and within a year of actual construction using that particular land. Walsh and Hassert also cautioned that nothing is set in stone for the airport.The state still will need to advertise for a private owner/ operator. If the state can’t find a suitable one, they said, there will be no airport. U.S. Rep. Robin Kelly, D-Chicago, who replaced Jesse Jackson Jr.,Will County’s main opponent in the battle for control of the airport, said she believes there still needs to be a governing authority composed of representatives from local municipalities. Hassert said that would resurrect the control issue that long prevented the airport issue from moving forward.

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013 3

Edward seeks Bolingbrook residents for committee Edward Hospital is seeking Bolingbrookarea residents to fill openings on its Patient/Family Advisory Committee, composed of Edward patients, family members of Edward patients and Edward employees. The deadline to apply is July 12. The committee was formed in 2008 with the goal of incorporating the patient and family’s perspective into the design and evaluation of Edward processes, services, environment, equipment and patient communication. “Serving on the committee is an important responsibility because we’re the voice for every patient and family member at Edward,” says Jim Freeland, chairman of Edward Hospital’s Patient/ Family Advisory Committee. “It’s very rewarding to know the ideas and changes we recommend directly impact and improve their treatment and experiences.” Membership on the committee requires attendance at monthly meetings with the opportunity to participate in other committees of the member’s choice. To keep the committee’s perspective fresh, members are limited to two-year terms. For more information and to submit an application, visit www.edward.org/pfac. 


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

Emerald ash borer to devastate Bolingbrook trees By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

The invasion of the Emerald Ash Borer a few years ago is beginning to take its toll, with the cost of removing and replacing 36,000 ash trees set nearing the millions. With the spring, almost summer-like weather, trees everywhere are budding and a vast difference in the canopy of the trees is taking shape, a sure sign the tree has been infected. In Bolingbrook alone, where the EAB was first discovered in the spring of 2011, more than 100 trees are dying, with more and more being found to be infected each year. The Village Board recently approved an approximate $66,000 tree replacement program of 142 affected trees, mainly in the area of Route 53 and Boughton Road. Mayor Roger Claar reported this was just the beginning of a serious problem that is going to require a lot of money and time to correct.

Emerald ash borer symptoms, signs The most visible sign of infestation is crown dieback. Branches at the top of the crown will die and more branches will die in subsequent years. As the tree declines,“suckers,” or new young branches, will sprout from the base of the tree and on the trunk. The bark may also split vertically and woodpeckers may feed on the beetle leaving visible damage on the bark. Successful treatments with insecticides are limited but continue to be studied. All ash trees near any new infestation will most likely become infested and die. Adult beetles emerging from trees will leave a unique “D” shaped exit hole.This is a small 1/8-inch diameter distinctly “D” shaped hole that may appear anywhere on the trunk or upper branches.

After a comprehensive study, the village estimates there are13, 000 trees in the public parkway throughout the village and at least double that amount on private property. An invasive beetle, the EAB feeds on the inner bark of ash trees, effectively preventing the tree from transporting water and nutrients. If the bug is not addressed, it has the potential to wipe out the entire ash tree

species. The village investigated insecticides, but the insecticide is not a sure thing and would be too expensive to cover all the trees in the village. The Public Works Department will remove any dead or dangerous trees as they appear. According to the Illinois Arborists Association, if a tree has lost more than 50 percent of its canopy, it is probably too late

to save the tree. Native to Asia, the EAB is an exotic beetle that was unknown in North America until June 2002 when it was discovered as the cause for the decline of many ash trees in southeast Michigan and neighboring Windsor, Ontario, Canada. According to the Illinois Department of Agriculture, no bigger than a penny, this green menace has wreaked havoc on millions of ash trees in the Midwest and if not controlled it could wipe out the ash tree species in North America. The adult beetles nibble on ash foliage but cause little damage. The larvae (the immature stage) feed on the inner bark or cambium layer, which is the crucial layer between the bark and wood of ash trees, disrupting the tree’s ability to transport water and nutrients. It is said that the EAB probably arrived in the United States on solid wood packing material carried in cargo ships or airplanes originating in its native Asia. In November 2011, the

IDOA expanded its quarantine, including Will County, because of a rapid expansion of the beetle, hinting to a disastrous attack that hasn’t let up. The quarantine is intended to prevent the artificial spread of the beetle through the movement of infested wood and nursery stock. Specifically, it prohibits the removal of the following items from quarantined area: the emerald ash borer in any living stage of development; Ash trees of any size; Ash limbs and branches; Any cut, nonconiferous firewood; Bark from ash trees and wood chips larger than one inch from ash trees; Ash logs and lumber with either the bark or the outer one-inch of sapwood, or both, attached; Any item made from or containing the wood of the ash tree that is capable of spreading the emerald ash borer; Any other article, product or means of conveyance determined by the IDOA to present a risk of spreading the beetle infestation. See EMERALD, page 10

Voyager wins major IPA awards Eminent domain case to be lengthy battle By Jonathan Samples Staff Reporter

The Bugle/Enterprise/Sentinel newspapers were big winners during the Illinois Press Association’s 2013 Convention on June 13 and 14 in Springfield, winning a slew of advertising and editorial awards. Voyager Media Publications Advertising Manager Patrick Ryan took home the 2012 Advertising Sales Manager of the Year award for his work selling display ads and managing the Voyager sales staff. “It was a great honor to win the award,” Ryan said. “It’s more than an individual award; it’s a team award. Without my team, I wouldn’t have won anything.” Voyager Media Publications – which include the Bugle, Enterprise and Sentinel newspapers -has won the award back to back. General Manager Michael James won the award in 2011. The Voyager Media Publications editorial staff also won several awards. Assistant Editor Jonathan Samples won a firstplace award and honorable mention for single-page design. The staff of the Shorewood Sentinel also won a third place award for single page design. Sports Editor Scott Taylor and sports reporter Mark Gregory won a first-place award for the sports section.Taylor also won third place awards for a sports column and sports photo. Bugle reporter Laura Katauskas won third place in the Robert M. Cole Award for best school

By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINOIS PRESS ASSOCIATION

Patrick Ryan (left) receives award for Advertising Sales Manager of the Year from IPA Executive Director Dennis DeRossett.

board coverage. The Voyager Media Publications advertising staff won first place in the category of best community focus special section for the “Enterprise 125th Anniversary Edition.” Ryan Beavers won a first-place award for best rich media online ad and an honorable mention for best ad less than a full page. Carolin Frusher won third place for best holiday ad and received an honorable mention for best full color ad. Creative Director Andrew Samaan won a second-place award for best house ad and honorable mentions for best rich media online ad.

The Northern Will County Water Agency recently met, confirming the case of eminent domain to acquire a pipeline from the American Lake Water Company and a move to gain control of the water system for its communities. The group of village mayors from Bolingbrook, Homer Glen, Lemont, Romeoville and Woodridge make up the agency that has been meeting since 2008. The agency has been looking to clear a path to potentially take over the Bedford Park water pipeline, owned by American Lake Company, a subsidiary of Illinois American Water. Village leaders contend taking over the pipeline will help them control outrageous water rate increases. “We are a regulated utility governed by the Illinois Commerce Commission, which provides third-party oversight,”

said Michael Smyth, Sr., Manager of Field Services and Production, Illinois American Water - Chicago Metro. “Our rates for water and wastewater service reflect the true cost of service, while neighboring communities subsidize their rates through other taxes and fees such as property taxes or sales taxes.” Bolingbrook Village Attorney Jim Boan explained the process of eminent domain is a lengthy one and that both groups are in the preliminary process of pulling information together for the judge who will eventually hear the case. He expects the first status report for August 15. After American Lake Water Company rejected a second offer of $37.6 million for its purchase, the water agency opted to authorized the Tressler law firm to file the eminent domain (condemnation) case for the pipeline’s assets in December 2012. Boan said the case is likely to See DOMAIN, page 10


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POWWOW Continued from page 1 Center of Chicago and will be hosting the Summer Powwow Cultural Days July 20 and July 21. The teepee was brought to the farm a few years back, after Sue Siegel decided to embrace and investigate her Cherokee background. The fourth-generation of farmers, the Siegel family, rooted in tradition, has been sharing the importance of farming to the area for years, inviting thousands of city children for a day out at the farm, offering a look into a completely different lifestyle that teaches how farmers feed the world. “It becomes a cultural story. I love teaching about our heritage and am proud to be a thirdgeneration farmer,” said Siegel. “Our heritage is engrained with the early Americans. I love to see where we have been so it may help us know where we are going.” Building upon their outreach efforts, the Siegels sought a way to enrich the community about

Indian culture. A partnership was born with President and Executive Director of the American Indian Center Joseph Podlasek, who also is the President of the National Urban Indian Family Coalition and a Commissioner of City of Chicago Human Relations commission and the idea of a summer Powwow came to life. A powwow is a gathering of North America’s Native people. The word derives from the Narragansett word powwaw, meaning “spiritual leader.” A modern powwow is a specific type of event where both Native American and NonNative American People meet to dance, sing, socialize, and honor American Indian culture. “The American Indian Center is dedicated to servicing the needs of our community,” said Podlasek.“In addition we want to share our heritage and with the Siegels we can do that in a bigger way. We can start that in this area—it will be a great family event. It will be about getting to know one another and becoming friends.” The main focus of the festival will be on the history and

Laura Katauskas/STAFF REPORTER

Cyndee Foxstar and Michael Pamonicutt perform the traditional dance style.

heritage of the Native American Indian Culture in this country and specific to Will County. The Powwow promises to include interactive, educational fun with folk dancers in jingle dress, storytellers, archery and more. The event will be held at the farm from 10:30 a.m. to 5

p.m. July 20 and 21 at the farm located at 17250 Weber Road, Lockport. “A big part of the Indian culture is step back from the urban environment—that’s what farming is all about as well,” said Siegel.“We both find family heritage vital and we

want to share that.” The American Indian Center of Chicago represents the largest non-reservation population of Native Americans in the United States. For more information, visit www.aic-chicago.org or www. cottonwoodfarms.net


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Police Blotter

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Bolingbrook Police Department. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination. Dwayne Massey, 41, 412 Western Ave., Joliet, was charged at 3:28 a.m. June 2 with failure to signal and DUI,following traffic stop at Bolingbrook Drive and Lily Cache Lane. Olga Arredondo, 21, 424 Hallmark Lane, was charged June 5 with two counts of aggravated battery of child, following an incident on May 13. Alfonso Hernandez, 20, 17 S. Fernwood Drive, was charged at 1:03 a.m. June 6 with failure to signal, DUI and resisting a peace officer, following a traffic stop on the 100 block of North Bolingbrook Drive. He also was charged with theft of services in the 100 block of Old Chicago Drive after removing a vehicle without paying the tow bill. A 1999 Honda Accord was taken from parking Lot F of Fernwood Drive between June 5 and 6. Officers were called to Best Buy, 315 N. Weber Road, June 6 for the report of a retail theft. Suspects are seen on video taking headphones and exiting the store without paying at 4:50 p.m. Loss valued at $450. Officers responded to the 300 block of Whitewater Drive for the report of a burglary to motor vehicle. The radio faceplate was removed and the glove box was rummaged through between June 2 and June 6. An iPhone and iPod were taken from an unsecured vehicle between noon and 4 p.m. June 6. Loss valued at $850. Mario Scott, 36, 501 Preston Drive, was charged with aggravated battery June 6 following an incident on May 21. Susan Astrowski, 38, 148 Turtle St., Shorewood, was charged with theft at Home Depot, 105 N. Weber Road, at 3:53 p.m. June 7 after taking U.S. currency from cash registers. was taken from 10 Aan purse unlocked vehicle on the 200 block of Jonathan Way between June 6 and June 7. The purse and empty wallet were located in a neighboring yard June 7. Wolff, 57, 317 11 Raymond Hadleigh Road,was charged with aggravated battery, criminal

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trespass to property, disorderly conduct and resisting a peace officer on the 500 block of South Bolingbrook Drive at 8:50 p.m. June 7. were called to a 12 Officers business on the 300 block of Veterans Pkwy., June 7 for the report of a theft. An unknown subject asked to borrow a cell phone. The subject grabbed the phone, ran to a waiting vehicle and drove off at 7:45 p.m. Loss valued at $325. were called to the 13 Officers 600 block of Preston Drive June 7 for the report of motor vehicle theft. A 1997 Oldsmobile Bravada was taken from the lot between June 6 and June 7. McKown, 27, 1212 14 Kyle Courtland Circle, Plainfield, was charged with four in-state warrants on the 300 block of Veterans Pkwy. at midnight June 7. Baedke, 51, 26323 W. 15 Susan Mapleview Drive, Plainfield, was charged June 8 with failure to notify damage, driving too fast for conditions, illegal parking, two counts of DUI, reckless driving and hit & run, at 119th Street and Naper-Plainfield Road at 2:48 a.m.

Officers were called to a business on the 300 block of Marmon Drive June 8 for the report of a theft. Loss valued at $40. were called to the 17 Officers 500 block of East South Frontage Road June 8 for the report of motor vehicle theft. A 2004 Freightliner and trailer were taken between 12:30 a.m. and 6:23 p.m. Oldsmobile Bravada 18 Awas1997 taken from a parking lot on the 600 block of Preston Drive between June 7 and June 8. were called to 19 Officers Petsmart, 159 N. Weber Road, June 9 for the report of a retail theft. Numerous boxes of flea and tick control were taken off the shelves between 1 and 7 p.m. Loss valued at $2,700. Michaelsen, 50, 20 Joseph 3871 Munson St., Plano, was charged with improper lane usage, illegal transportation of alcohol and two counts of DUI, following a traffic stop at Boughton Road and Janes Avenue at 2:14 a.m. June 9. Kelly, 49, 139 Seabury 21 David Road, was charged with equipment violation, improper lane usage, no insurance and

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DUI, following a traffic stop at Ashbury Road and Balmoral Drive at 2:40 a.m. June 9. responded to the 22 Officers 500 block of East South Frontage Road, for the report of a theft. A section of fencing was cut to gain entry. A 1988 Great Dane trailer was taken between June 7 and June 9. were called to the 23 Officers 610 building of Preston Drive June 10 for the report of a residential burglary. The homeowner discovered the front door open at 3 a.m. Several rooms were rummaged through and numerous pieces of jewelry, a coat, trading cards, Mac Power book and PS3 were taken. Loss valued at $21,000. responded to 24 Officers Macy’s, 645 E. Boughton Road, June 10 for the report of a retail theft. Unknown subjects took several items of clothing and exited the store without paying at 4:30 p.m. Smith, 21, 125 25 Deanglo Somerset Lane, was charged with an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop in Lot B of Beaconridge Drive at 8:18 p.m. June 10.

Jared Speer, 20, 108 Cedarwood Lane, was charged with an in-state warrant, following a traffic stop atAnnerino Drive and East North Frontage Road at 7:29 p.m. June 10. 17-year-old was charged 27 Awith disorderly conduct on the 600 block of Preston Drive at 7:22 p.m. June 10. burglary from a motor 28 Avehicle parked on the 700 block of Hawthorn Court was reported June 10. business window was 29 Adamaged on Territorial Court between 3 and 9 a.m. June 10. Damage valued at $1,000. residence window was 30 Abroken in Lot G ofWildwood Lane at 3:02 a.m. June 11. Gooden, 20, 135 31 John Somerset Lane,was charged with an in-state warrant on the 400 block of Standish Court at 9 p.m. June 11. Cruz-Castellanos, 31, 32 Luis 1138 White Ave.,Aurora, was charged with an in-state warrant, no valid driver’s license, driving without lights and no insurance, following a traffic stop on the 300 block of South Schmidt Road at 9:06 p.m. June 11.

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ForuM Post your thoughts! You’re invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to our newsroom at sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors

reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Send us your news It’s easy! Just follow the 5 W’s: What is happening: Describe the event or the purpose of the news release. Who: The subject of the event. Also, include a name and phone number or e-mail address that can be published so readers can call for more information. When: Give date and time. Why, or for what purpose: Explain the nature of the event. Where is it happening: Give the exact street address. E-mail community news releases to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com The Bugle reserves the right to subsequent publication of all submissions, in full or in part, through the newspaper’s archives or any other electronic library.

Send us your photos Did your club host a bake sale? Did your church group volunteer to paint a senior’s home? If you have photos from your group’s fundraisers or events we would be glad to publish them. Please submit them to sweditor@buglenewspapers.com. Be sure to include information about the event, such as when, why and where it occurred. Opinions printed on this page, whether in Letters to the Editor or in columns or cartoons, are the opinions of the writer and not necessarily of this newspaper, its publishers, editor or employees. Only editorials reflect the views of the newspaper.

General Manager V.P. Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Managing Editor sweditor@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Jonathan Samples Alex Hernandez Laura Katauskas Sue Baker Sports Editor Scott Taylor staylor@buglenewspapers.com Sports Reporter Mark Gregory mgregory@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Manager Pat Ryan pryan@enterprisepublications.com

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Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Enterprise Newspapers, Inc. 23856 Andrew Road #104 Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication sweditor@buglenewspapers.com www.buglenewspapers.com Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 12 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. classifieds@buglenewspapers.com Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at 12 p.m. Friday. announcements@buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

SPIKEYHAIR SUPPORT Boy, 8, designs toy to help autistic children By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

On a mission to help other children and families with autism, Paul Richards brought his 8-year-old grandson’s drawings to life in the form of Spikeyhair! characters. Looking to mass-produce the product, Richards is hoping to call on the support of the community. The Richards family knows first hand the struggles of living with autism. Tyler Richards, who around the age of 5, began drawing a series of characters he called Spikeyhairs, has a mild form of Information autism. on Spikey“All of them were hairs can be kinda like stuffed found at http:// animals,” said Tyler, spikeyhairs. who modeled them com, and at after his father’s www.indiegogo. Mohawk haircut. com/projects/ “Some of them spikeyhairs and were a little strange on Facebook at facebook.com/ because they have spikeyhairs. those spikes.” Richards said Tyler posted several of his Spikeyhairs! on the walls of their home, and he loved to show them to people. It gave him the idea that maybe he could share his Spikeyhairs! with the world. “They sat there for a couple of years, and I’m not quite sure what gave me the idea, but I just looked at them and thought this would be really cool to make a stuffed animal,” said Richards, a former counselor at Valley View’s Phoenix Experience. “I did some research and found a company that would match it perfectly with the drawings.” Thus was born the “Spikeyhairs!” company. His wish is to provide Tyler with a career and a lifestyle that will allow him to achieve the highest level of independent adult functioning he is capable of achieving. Right now, set to be a third-grader at Hermansen Elementary School, he is doing very well, loves computers and teaches himself wonderful things. “Tyler is very caring and generous and is always eager to donate toys he no longer plays with and gives things to other people,” said Richards. “It is this quality in him that made me realize the only way to share his Spikeyhairs! with the world is by sharing with others the rewards he receives.” However, he said he has found that for those living with autism, it is sometimes hard to find the support needed.He wants to help change that. If the product takes off, 25 percent of the proceeds will go to charities and organizations that directly benefit such families. As the business grows, so will their

Submitted Photo

Hermansen Elementary School third-grader Tyler Richards shows his “Spikeyhairs!” invention while his grandfather, Paul Richards, holds some of Tyler’s original designs.

donation. Richards said they are committed to raising and donating as much money as they can to help people living with autism to achieve whatever dreams they have. The prototype is complete, and Tyler is ecstatic to see one of his drawings come to life in the shape of a toy he could hold in his hand. Now the family is left with raising the funds to get the first toy into production. The Richards need $8,900 to make the first 500 Spikeyhairs! plush toys. And they need it by midnight July 6, because that’s the indiegogo.com fundraising deadline they’ve set for a go/no-go decision. Indiegogo.com is a website designed to help passionate, hard-working entrepreneurs raise money to bring their ideas to fruition.

“If we don’t get the $8,900, we won’t be able to produce them, and Indiegogo will give everyone their money back. It’s kind of all or nothing,” Richards said.“It won’t be the end of Spikeyhairs! though. It’ll put the plush toys on hold for a while, but we’ll still go on with fundraisers and other things.” Richards plans on helping the Hermansen autism program with a fundraiser next school year by selling Spikeyhairs! T-shirts and wristbands. He hopes to hold similar autism fundraisers throughout the area. He also hopes to create a Spikeyhairs! Foundation to fund special projects like sending siblings of children with autism to camp to learn about living with brothers and sisters who have autism.

Tyler also wants to create Spikeyhairs! pajamas, a mouse pad and a Kindle cover case “so if you drop it, it won’t break. And then I’m going to do a waterproof cover, too, with a Spikeyhairs! logo on the back.” Richards hopes Spikeyhairs! grows into a thriving family business that will not only generate some present income for his family but also help provide money for whatever Tyler needs in the future. “He’s been doing really well. But at this point, we don’t know how far he is going to go when he gets to be an adult,” Richards said.“It would be really cool if when he gets older he could take everything over and run it himself.” “That would be cool, yes,”Tyler said.


Calendar JUNE 20 Relay for Life Team Meeting. 7 p.m. at Village Hall, 1050 W. Romeo Road. Farmers Market. 3 to 8 p.m. at The Promenade, near the Village Green.Thursdays June 6 through August 16. 3 to 7 p.m. August 13 through Sept. 13 Preschool Playtime 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.Get ready for music, games and fun on Thursday mornings at the library. In the Activity Zone, we’ll play with big toys for big fun. Add imagination to Duplo blocks in the Construction Zone and build with our library blocks. Or shake and shimmy in the Music Zone, with a dance mix designed to get you moving. Drop in for your favorites, or come every week. Brick Building. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.Have fun building your own creations with LEGO® bricks supplied by the library.Your finished work will go on display until the next session when we meet again and start all over! Ages 5 and up. No need to register, just drop-in! Desserts From Around the World. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Join us as Chef Michael Niksic demonstrates some easy ways to create desserts with international flair! Enjoy some of these tasty treats and take home recipes you can use and become the envy of all your friends. Space is limited so register today!  Location: Romeoville Branch Meeting Room A - Main Level

JUNE 22 Microsoft Word 2010 Level 1. 11 a.m. to noon at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road,

Romeoville.Learn how to create a document, edit, format your text, and copy and paste.You’ll master all of these tasks and so much more!  Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab.

history and more! This program is for children 5 to 9 years of age.This week we will be reading Larry Get Lost in Chicago by John Skewes and then making Windy-City kites! The program is limited to 25 kids, so please register at the children’s services department to reserve your spot. A light snack will be included, so please notify us of any food allergies.

Summer Reading Film Festival 1to 3:30 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Join us for a weekly film celebrating our Summer Reading Program Theme: Have Book, Will Travel. Each Saturday, we’ll be screening an exciting adventure movie set in a foreign country! Popcorn will be served. Join us this week for the classic Indiana Jones film Raiders of the Lost Ark. Join Indy on his race against the Nazis to find the lost Ark of the Covenant.This program is intended for patrons 16 and older.

Rotary Park Party. 6 to 8 p.m. at Rotary Park, 2023 Whitmore Drive. Spend an evening with your family, friends, neighbors, and the Romeoville Recreation Department right in the backyard of Romeoville. What’s Romeoville’s backyard you ask? Why, it’s the neighborhood parks, of course! Each month – May, June, and July – a different park is selected and there will be free, exciting activities for all to enjoy. For more information, contact the Romeoville Recreation Department at 815886-6222.

Midwest Gear Grinders Car Show. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Promenade, Bolingbrook. Benefits Misericordia.

JUNE 24 Toddler Time. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.Toddler Time at Romeoville is designed to help children and their caregivers develop pre-literacy skills through songs, stories and movement activities. This program is for children 3-35 months with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required.     Monday Kid’s Club. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Anything can be discovered between the pages of a book! Come to Monday Kids Club to learn about science, animals, art,

JUNE 25

Terrific T’s. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville.Terrific T’s

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013 brings the stories, activities and learning fun of storytime to a slightly younger audience.This program is for children ages 2 and 3 with a caregiver and will run for six weeks. Registration is required.     Microsoft Word 2010 Level 1. 2 to 3 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Learn how to create a document, edit, format your text, and copy and paste.You’ll master all of these tasks and so much more!  Basic computer skills are required prior to taking this class. Registration is required and begins one month prior to the class date. Call, visit, email or instant message our Adult Services desk to register. Class meets downstairs in the Computer Lab.

9

Tween Scene. 4 to 5 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Do you enjoy hanging out at the library? Well, come to Tween Scene! Each session we’ll have fun things to do like games, science, anime, manga, and crafts.This program is for ages 9-12.     Pajama Jam. 6 to 6:45 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West Normantown Road, Romeoville. Join us for stories, songs and projects. Wear your pajamas and get ready some fun! This program is all ages but is most suitable for children 7 years of age and younger.   Registration is required.     An Evening of Anime. 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Romeoville Branch Library, 201 West


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

Carillon community quilters honor veterans By Laura Katauskas Staff Reporter

In a visual showpiece of honor, a group of seniors from the Carillon community banded together to create a quilt of red, white and blue to be raffled off at the community’s annual Honor America Breakfast. Last year, a similar patriotic quilt was raffled off at the event and given to a soldier in Indiana. The quilting group hopes to do the same again this year at its July 4 celebration. “It is a quilt of valor that we have put together to honor our veterans and in return, we use it as a fundraising tool

for our activities club,” said Joanne Rohlicek. “It’s our hobby, but we enjoy the sharing of community, working together and the outreach to the greater community.” The activities club sponsors various projects throughout the year within the private community homes to support one another.

LAURA KATAUSKAS/STAFF REPORTER

Members of the Carillon Activity Club unveil the hand-crafted patriotic quilt. Each member created their own unique squares to be included in the quilt which will be raffled off during the club’s Honor America Breakfast.

EMERALD Continued from page 4 “The removal of the trees is not going to be easy—it is not just an easy fix: Cut the tree and use it for firewood; there is an entire process to this that is costly,” said Claar. The village plans to replace the trees as funds allow and will do so with a variety of different tree species. In addition, the process of identifying the trees in the neighborhoods is a long and arduous one.

DOMAIN Continued from page 4 take 18 months to litigate. The Illinois American Water Company has consistently maintained that using eminent domain to force the water company to sell their property and give control of it to the government would cost the taxpayers millions of dollars, increasing property taxes and fees on local residents. “The water agency members have yet to give their residents a business plan. The only portion of a customer’s bill the agency can impact is a $1.56 per 1,000 gallons of water,”said Smyth.“How can the agency spend millions of dollars on legal fees, consulting fees, agency start-up costs, bond fees, an eminent domain lawsuit and tens of millions of dollars or more on a pipeline take over and

Since the beetle was first confirmed in the Midwest in the summer of 2002, it has killed more than 25 million ash trees. The beetle often is difficult to detect, especially in newly infested trees. Signs of infestation include the presence of metallicgreen beetles about half the diameter of a penny on or around ash trees, thinning and yellowing leaves, D-shaped holes in the bark of the trunk or branches and basal shoots. Anyone who suspects an ash tree has been infested should contact the Public Works Department.

lower the cost to residents?” Boan said the agency has factored into the acquisition a budget for legal expenses. The agency has long defended the move, referring to a feasibility study that proves the endeavor beneficial; indicating a non-profit entity can operate a system differently when not looking to make a profit. Eminent domain is defined as the power to take private property for public use by a state, municipality, or private person or corporation authorized to exercise functions of public character, following the payment of just compensation to the owner of that property. Essentially, local governments may take private property through their power of eminent domain but must pay a fair price for it as decided by the court. Residents do not vote on eminent domain procedures; rather it is handle strictly through the court system.


taKe 5 Crossword Puzzle

Across 1 Esther Williams number 12 One who “must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES”: Eliot 15 Stage manager’s exhortation 16 Opposite of hence 17 1870s period costume named for a Dickens lass 18 Grille cover 19 Composer of “The Lovely Bones” music 20 1986-to-2001 orbiter 21 In sequence 23 Mason’s fee 26 Ones waiting for bottle openers? 27 Storm’s dir. 28 Ulster, for one 30 Indicate indifference 33 Printers’ primary colors 34 Debt-laden fin. deal

Down 35 Derisive call 36 Pep rally climax, perhaps 37 Transfer consequence, familiarly 38 Wood used in bows 39 Grinds 40 Auto club recommendation 41 It’s for the dogs 43 Trig. function 44 Like some prescription lenses 45 Took after 50 Establish firmly 52 __ Zion Church 53 Soprano Marton 54 Milne tyke 55 Hippie era swinger? 58 Heel in a bakery 59 Life-support system? 60 Paris’s Pont __ Arts 61 Mona Lisa Vito in “My Cousin Vinny,” for one

1 Improved, perhaps, as a road 2 Mark Yom Kippur 3 Letter-shaped workbench groove 4 School subj. for an au pair 5 Seuss hallmark 6 Big ox, say 7 Au courant 8 Copier tray size: Abbr. 9 Adriatic vacation destination 10 Coming into view 11 Chicken option 12 Two-wheeled carriage with a folding hood 13 Easy 14 Forest dweller with a cap 22 Ref. work 24 “Everybody Loves __”: Johnny Cash album 25 Sovereign euphemism 29 37-Across rentals 30 Like a prime candidate for disillusionment 31 Duffer’s dream

32 Mars and Mercury 33 Mint family plant 36 Eleventh-hour panic 37 “The Horse Fair” artist Bonheur 39 String in a preschool class? 40 Subterranean rodent 42 Narrow waterway: Abbr. 43 Fluffy clouds 46 Colorful talker 47 Style, as hair into a bouffant 48 Crusader’s targets 49 Kierkegaard et al. 51 Butler’s estate, for a time 56 __ Bund: Swiss newspaper 57 Pewter component

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013 11

Horoscopes When someone asks you to put it on the line, they don’t expect you to get out the clothespins and laundry. Be honest with yourself - and others - in the week to come. Don’t beat around the bush.

During the first half of the week, your decision-making skills are at their best, especially when dealing with finances. Be sure to get the best of everything; quality should not be confused with quantity.

In the week to come, you could realize that it’s not what you look at, but what you see that is important. Accept every opportunity to better yourself, even if it is dressed up and disguised as hard work.

You might be partial to material success, but are willing to get in touch with your spiritual side in your free time. There may be some things going on behind the scenes that will work out in your favor this week.

This week, events or friends could encourage you. Someone could offer you an incentive to begin a new study, join a team sports program or travel. Every opportunity contains a hidden benefit.

Speak gently. Develop the habit of speaking calmly and other people will begin to listen to what you say. During the week ahead, you can improve your reputation and engender good will through teamwork.

Some people are proud of good housekeeping, but you might take pride in good heart-keeping. In the week ahead, put your best efforts into mending fences and head off misunderstandings in advance.

Play to your strengths. The more you stretch mental and physical muscles, the stronger you will be. You may earn respect for insisting upon ethical and responsible behavior in the upcoming week.

Tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth and you won’t need to remember stories. The upcoming week provides opportunities to clear the air and put relationships back on track.

You might be wise to remember in the week ahead that it is often better to cross the line than to sign the dotted one. Just because everything is going well does not mean you can let down your guard

Make hay while the sun shines. In the early part of the week, you will be luckier and more content than usual and may have opportunities to express your creative talents or enjoy family entertainments.

An insight can incite a riot of thought. You might be tempted to take impulsive action at the drop of a hat in the week ahead, but by remaining calm, cool, and collected you can honor commitments, too.

Sudoku

Jumble

Tribune Media Services 2013

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Previous puzzle’s answers

Jumbles: • GASSY • KHAKI • POTENT • BANANA

Answer:

What she did to keep her hands soft -- NOTHING


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

Bugle Kids


INSIDE: Minooka’s Hannon leads volleyball All-Area tean, page 15; NASCAR remembers Jason Leffler, page 20

www.bolingbrookbugle.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

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Mistwood’s Performance Center completed By Scott Taylor Sports Editor

Mistwood Golf Club in Romeoville has spent the past few years in a renovation phase. While the total renovation still isn’t complete, the course is nearly done and the state of the art Performance Center is complete. On Monday, June 10, Mistwood had a media day to show the brand new center, as well as the redesigned course. The course itself has had a facelift, with changes to every hole. There are several small changes and a few major changes. The course now plays longer and swamp areas are now water hazards. It plays at 7,040 yards from the tournament tees, yet still is a very playable 6,249 yards from the blue tees and 5,244 from the red, with gold and black tees available to play as well between the tournament tees and the blue tees. People will surely come to Mistwood to check out the new design, but what might bring even more people there is the Performance Center. The Mistwood Performance Center is a 5,000 square foot Mark Gregory/Bugle Staff

See MISTWOOD, page 19

The Mistwood Performance Center offers many things, including a Trackman technology, which monitors several swing aspects.


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013


Sports

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

15

Minooka’s Hannon heads all-area team By Mark Gregory Sports Reporter

For the past few seasons, the Minooka boys volleyball team has grown into a perennial state power house. And for the past two seasons, setter Phil Hannon has been the person making the team go. This season, Hannon posted 881 assists to help lead Minooka to a 36-3 record. The Indians lost only twice to Illinois teams, both coming to state runner-up Lincoln-Way North. “It was a lot of fun,” Hannon said. “I have never had a team with so many hitting options. After my junior year, I was wondering who would be my main option and it turned out there was no main option. I could spread it around depending on who was on and where I was on the court. It made it a lot easier for me to play. Most people think the setter doesn’t get too excited when the ball goes down and they think the hitters get all the excitement, but when I see a ball go down, I know I was a part of that.” For his efforts, Hannon is the 2013 Voyager Media Boys Volleyball Player of the Year. “I wasn’t expecting to be recognized too much because I am just the setter on a team with these massive hitters everyone is talking about,” Hannon said. “But, I guess it feels pretty good to be the leader of that and be recognized for it. Other coaches would tell me and tell our coach they didn’t know how we would be without a good setter, so I guess I am almost compared to the quarterback. I just feed the other players and hope they do what they can with the ball.” While his main duties were as the setter, Hannon took pride on being a multi-dimensional player, adding to the team defense when he could. This season, he posted 50 digs and 69 blocks, the third-best block total on the team. “Since I had all the options, I didn’t have to make my sets exactly perfect. Because of that, I could focus on defense and helping the team there,” Hannon said. “My defense lacked the last two years and I worked hard on that. When I got a block, it felt great. A lot of teams would overpass and not expect a 5-11, 6-foot setter to jump up and block them. It was so much fun blocking kids that were way

bigger than me.” While the Indians are losing a lot of offensive firepower from this year’s team, coach Janel Grzetich said it will be tough to replace a setter like Hannon. “It will be extremely difficult to replace him,” she said. “Not only does the setter have to have unbelievable hands, but has to be able to read blockers and make a split-second decision if a pass is slightly off, which hitter do I go to in which rotation. It is very difficult and he makes it look easy.” Hannon will attend Southern Illinois University-Carbondale next season and will play volleyball for the club team, but not for the university team, instead focusing on his education. He plans to major in

aviation or music. “If I was a full-time athlete and a full-time student, I don’t know how I would be in school,” he said. The rest of the members on the Voyager Media All-Area team are:

DOUG AREMKA Plainfield North junior totaled 168 kills and 73 blocks, with a hitting percentage of .460. “Doug is one of the top middle players in the area,” North coach Kevin Vesper said. “Sixty-one percent of the sets he received were put down as a kill, which is an incredible stat. He is also a strong leader on and off the court. His senior year should only get better.”

GILIUS BLINSTRUBAS

Blinstrubas, a senior from

Downers

North, missed

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See ALL-AREA, page 16


16

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

Sports ALL-AREA

player and played six rotations for us.”

Continued from page 15

DAVID DEMARCO

matches this season due to bursitis in his foot, which flared up and caused him a lot of pain. And the Trojans definitely missed his presence. They went 19-7 with him in the lineup, and 3-7 without him. Nonetheless, Blinstrubas put down 216 kills and served at 89 percent, both team highs. He added 28 blocks, 31 aces and 104 digs. Blinstrubas will be playing collegiate volleyball at Sienna Heights (Mich.). “To be recruited no matter what level is pretty significant,” said Downers North coach Mark Wasik. “He was our go-to guy. He’s a consistent all-around

DeMarco was the heart and soul of Downers South’s state championship club. No matter where the ball happened to be on DGS’ side of the court, DeMarco managed to get to it. DeMarco totaled 404 digs and had 17 aces. He and Nick Timreck will be teammates on the Dominican University’s fledgling volleyball team in 2014. “We wanted the ball to kind of go to David’s direction so we could dig it,” Downers South coach Kurt Steuer said. “David is a vocal and emotional guy; he learned to control that emotional aspect. They (DeMarco and Tyler Kaczmarek) just knew where each other were going to be and who was going to get the ball. He’s definitely going to be missed in the back row and the guys will miss him.”

ANDRE FLORES A senior from Plainfield East, Flores guiding the Bengals to a regional title. He finished the year with 144 kills, 97 aces, 168 digs and 174 assists. “This last offseason he worked his butt off,” Vergo said of Flores. “In the last match against Bolingbrook and tonight, he showed that he wants this. He wants to put the team on his shoulders. He is on a level on his own right now.”

ELI GELFAND Named to the CSL South AllConference squad, Niles West’s Gelfand appeared to have the best chemistry with the team’s setter, Jordan Moy, on the team, according to coach Drew Roche. Gelfand netted 236 kills, 33 total blocks, 60 digs and 24 aces, for the Wolves, who advanced to the regional title game. “Eli wound up being our top hitter this year, and I think he was our go-to player,” Roche said. “He probably had the best approach and the best swing on our team, and it shows. He has a strong jump-serve. He’s got to work on his all-around game.”

JAMES HILL A senior from Plainfield South, Hill finished the year with 189 kills. See ALL-AREA, page 17


Sports ALL-AREA Continued from page 16 “He was instrumental in winning our first round regional game against Lockport,” Plainfield South coach Robert Majka said. “When we needed a kill we would tell our setters to set it high and watch him jump. He has incredible vertical. He would jump so high that he would be over their blockers as he was swinging. If we would have utilized him more in certain situations we would have had a few more wins.”

STEVEN LENDY Notre Dame coach Patrick Cole says Lendy, a junior, is the first player he’s ever had where allstate is a definite consideration going forward. Lendy registered team-bests in kills (286), digs (133), aces (34), and had 35 total blocks along with a .389 hitting percentage (third on the team). Lendy had 10 matches in which he posted at least 10 kills. “He’s progressing very, very rapidly,” Cole said. “He gave us a lot this year and we’re expecting more from him next year. He’s got a work ethic that’s incredible. I’ve seen very few people motivated like he is.”

BRIAN LYMAN JolietWest junior was a standout for the Tigers, posting 351 kills, 133 digs, 60 blocks and 37 aces. “Brian is a three-year starter for us and was our go-to attacker and leader this season,” said West coach Jason Herrmann.“He lead us in kills and aces and has become a premier outside hitter in our area. As I look forward to next season I am excited to see how Brian can lead us to the next level within the SWSC Conference.”

JORDAN MOY Niles West utilized a 5-1 system, and Moy ran the show for his team. The junior piled up 764 assists with 152 digs (second on the team), and served at a 90.6 percentage with 21 aces. “He definitely took a big step up from last year,” Roche said. “He’s a good players and he’s got a lot of potential. He’s got to focus on some things that he probably never quite realized before that we tried to work (on) with him this year. Hopefully it clicks in the off-season.”

BROOKS NEVERLY The senior three-year starter was, in Downers North coach

Mark Wasik’s words, “Probably one of the strongest, if not the strongest, libero I’ve ever seen. … His overall quickness, his ability to read opponents’ shots and keep rallies alive. He was probably our best and strongest player overall on the team.” Next spring, Nevrly will team up with his former Downers South rivals, Nick Timreck and David DeMarco, at Dominican University in River Grove, which is starting up a new Division III team. Nevrly had 418 digs, 24 aces and a 96.1 percent servereceive average, and added 38 assists.

MIKE O’NEILL Joliet Catholic senior posted 292 kills, 241 digs and 34 blocks this season for a Hilltopper team that advanced to the finals of the Joliet West Regional.

JORDAN PAWLICKI Pawlicki, a junior, came into his own this season for the state champion Mustangs. Pawlicki amassed an eye-popping 930 assists, and added 226 digs and 30 aces. “He took our offense and led it,” Steuer said. “He’s an athletic kid that gets to a lot of balls. He just made good decisions, ran our offense through our middles and could

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

find the hot hitters, too. He’s just a smart setter. He takes a look at matchups throughout the game and makes his decisions.”

MITCH PERNIAR Minooka junior showed what he could do this season, helping Minooka post a 36-3 record. He posted 231 kills, 75 blocks and had 27 aces. “He was an excellent right-side hitter and put up a strong block against other outside hitters,”said Minooka coach Janel Grzetich. “As a left-handed hitter, his hard cross-court and line shots were difficult for opponents to block.”

TOM POZNANSKY Poznanski, a senior from Plainfield Central, finished the season with 238 kills, 26 aces, 126 digs and 57 blocks. “Tom was a leader for our team on and off the court,” Plainfield Central coach Jessica Clark said. “He is an amazing competitor,and takes the game very seriously. He

17

approaches the game with great focus and worked all season to be better each day.”

MATT SVETLECICH He posted a team-best 299 kills for the state-qualifying Minooka Indians. He added 75 blocks and 37 aces. “He was a consistently strong hitter for us this year and he had an extremely good court sense,” said Grzetich.

NICK TIMRECK When Timreck got on a roll, he was virtually unstoppable, as Lincoln-Way North learned the hard way during the state championship match for Downers South. The 6-foot-6 senior banged down 235 kills and had 72 blocks and 61 digs. “Everybody knew who he was around the area and the state,” Steuer said. “He’s a smart player See ALL-AREA, page 19


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013


THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

19

Slammers kids camp set for June 24 The best way to learn is to learn from the pros. Young, future baseball stars have that opportunity to learn the fundamentals of the game from the current stars at the Joliet Slammers Kids Camp on Monday, June 24 at Silver Cross Field. Current Joliet Slammer Pitching Coach Eric Coleman, along with Hitting Coach Dave Garcia and First Base Coach Bill Booker will direct the sixhour baseball clinic starting at

ALL-AREA Continued from page 17 in terms of shots, using tips and roll shots to put the ball where nobody was. He loves to get those big kills and it fires him up. He wants to celebrate with his teammates (after a kill); he thrives upon doing that. “He just wanted it more and more and more each time.”

MISTWOOD Continued from page 13 building. It features 11 heated hitting stations for practice throughout the year, two teaching bays with state-of-theart technology, a club repair room, full service bar with eight flat screen televisions and a turf room for private events. Among the staff at the Performance Center is John Platt, the 2011 Illinois PGA Teacher of the Year. The putting lab features

8 a.m. Slammers’ third baseman Kyle Maunus, closer Justin Erasmus, and starting pitchers Brett Zawacki and Corey Kimes will also work with the participants throughout the day. The Slammers Kids Camp costs $80.00 per player and each camp purchase offers more than the six hours of baseball fundamentals. Each participant will receive lunch, Slammers souvenirs and four tickets to a future Joliet

Slammers home game. “This camp will give players at any level, from tee ball to just before high school the fundamentals to be successful in the game of baseball,” Booker said. “If you want to be successful you need to learn and master the fundamentals of the game.” Players will be divided into groups based on their age and playing abilities and will rotate through different stages to learn all aspects of the game

MAALIK WALKER

NATE WOLF

One of the more powerful players in the area, Walker posted 177 kills and a teambest 135 blocks for Minooka. Walker will play next season on McKendree University’s inaugural men’s volleyball team. “He was a very powerful hitter and his leadership on the court was outstanding,” Grzetich said.

Wolf, an all-CSL South pick from Maine South, has grown not only in height—he was 5-8 his freshman year; now he’s 6-8—but more important, he’s grown on the volleyball court. The Ball State recruit passed up his senior year on the basketball team, deciding to devote all his energies to volleyball. It paid off as he led Hawks, who advanced to sectionals, in kills (251) and passing percentage (2.42 on a

technology to improve your game around the green. There is Quintec Putting Analysis, which is an HD camera-based software that tells you your putting angle, where you hit the ball on the face, the consistency of your strokes and the accuracy of your strokes, among other things. There are several different tools the staff uses to help you fix and work on the issues you have with your stroke based on the computer results, as well as what the staff sees. You can use your own putter and they have putter there you can use to and can get fitted into to purchase. They

can match your putter style and customize the length, loft and lie. Stepping outside there is the driving range, where the left portion of the range is set up with the Trackman technology, which is radar-based analytic software, as well as the Foresight GC2, which is an HD Camera-based analytic software. It allows you to see several different swinging stats, including your swing speed. From there the staff can fit you into the clubs that you need to be successful in the fitting center. For instance, the media was able to use the technology and were fitted for what driver shaft, loft

including throwing, fielding, hitting and pitching. Participants are asked to bring their own equipment including a glove, bat, spikes and to wear baseball attire. For those interested, registration is still open and interested participants can call the Slammers main office number at 815-722-2287 or log onto jolietslammers.com. A registration form can be found at www.jolietslammers. com/2013baseballcamp.

3-point scale) to go along with 142 digs, 14 solo blocks and 26 block-assists (second on the team), and 24 aces. “The difference between last year and this year are tremendous,” said Maine South coach Gary Granell. “He came in at 6-8 this year and not only was he bigger, but he was better.”

SAWYER YEAZEL

Courtesy of Joliet Slammers

Kids can learn from the pros on June 24 at Silver Cross Field.

was a three-year starter for the Redwings. He was second on the club with 173 kills and 138 digs, led the team with 32 aces and had 22 blocks with a 2.4 passing percentage on a 3-point scale. “He’s an outstanding all-around player, and definitely one of our go-to guys,” Benet coach Amy Van Eekeren said.“He executes in the front row and back row really well. He’s a momentum player and really carries our team.”

The Benet senior, named ESCC Player of the Year this spring,

Scott Taylor and Mike Sandrolini also contributed

and angle worked out best for them. Stepping down from the training and fitting area is where the heated driving range is, with heating lights and concrete. The mats throughout the center are almost as good as fairway grass is. After your workout, you can come inside the center to grab some refreshments at the bar area or sit down at the tables and watch TV. There are also TVs by the driving range so you can stop between shots and catch the action. There also is a club repair room

where you can get new grips or even get your clubs fixed for both repair or to better suit your game. The major change still ahead for Mistwood, is the likelihood of a new clubhouse, but there still is no exact timetable. All in all, Mistwood Golf Club has turned into a place where you can go back to every week or spend an entire day there. That was the case at the media day, where there was time to get fitted, to play a round and still relax before calling it a day. Follow Scott @Taylor_Sports staylor@enterprisepublications.com


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buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

Nascar remembers Jason Leffler By David Caraviello NASCAR.com

The NASCAR community was left stunned Wednesday night by the news that driver Jason Leffler had been killed in an accident during a sprint-car race in New Jersey. Leffler, 37, died in a crash at Bridgeport Speedway, a fiveeighths mile high-banked dirt track in Swedesboro, N.J. He was pronounced dead shortly after 9 p.m. Eastern time, according to the Associated Press. RETURN TO DIRT-RACING ROOTS EXCITED LEFFLER A native of Long Beach, Calif., Leffler has been a fixture at NASCAR’s national level since

1999.The two-time winner on the NASCAR Nationwide Series leaves behind a young son, Charlie. “NASCAR extends its thoughts, prayers and deepest sympathies to the family of Jason Leffler who passed away earlier this evening,” NASCAR said in statement. “For more than a decade, Jason was a fierce competitor in our sport and he will be missed.” According to local news reports from the area, Leffler had to be extricated from his vehicle and was taken by ambulance to a local trauma center, where he later died from his injuries. Bridgeport Speedway immediately suspended racing for the rest of the night after the accident occurred.

NASCARmedia.com

Jason Leffler signs autographs for fans before a Nationwide race in 2011. Leffler, 37, died last week after an accident during a sprintcar race in New Jersey.

“I’m completely devastated to hear about Jason Leffler. It doesn’t seem real. Pray for his family tonight,” Nationwide Series driver Trevor Bayne wrote on Twitter, echoing the sentiments of many who knew the well-liked former U.S.Auto Club champion. “Sitting here in disbelief,” veteran NASCAR driver Elliott Sadler wrote on Twitter.“All I can think about is Charlie. Prayers to

his little boy.” Leffler made his first NASCAR start this season in Sunday’s Sprint Cup Series event at Pocono Raceway, where he finished 43rd. Although he competed at NASCAR’s top level for both Joe Gibbs Racing and Chip Ganassi, his best years came on the Nationwide tour, where he finished inside the top 10 in points five times. He won

Nationwide races for owners Gene Haas and Todd Braun, and also won a Camping World Truck Series event in 2003 for Jim Smith. But Leffler’s roots were in the USAC ranks, where he won three midget titles to go along with a silver crown championship. He returned to those roots this season, competing most of the year in a winged sprint car.

WEEKLY RACING UPDATE STANDINGS

BIFFLE WINS FORD’S 1,000th RACE Greg Biffle feels right at home at Michigan International Speedway. He took the lead for good on a late restart and ran away from the field in the closing laps to win Sunday’s Quicken Loans 400. The No. 16 Ford driver won his second straight race here and the 19th of his career. Four of those victories have come at MIS. “It’s definitely a special day,” Biffle said after delivering Ford Motor Co. its 1,000th victory in NASCAR’s three national touring series. “Just super-excited for Ford and sure excited to be No. 1,000.” The win secured Biffle a berth in the 2014 NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race and moved him up a spot to eighth in the standings. Second a week ago at Pocono, Biffle led the pack to the restart on lap 173 and outran Martin Truex Jr. to stay out front. He led a race-best 48 laps. Owner Jack Roush’s operations center is in suburban Detroit and he considers MIS his home track. He was beaming almost as broadly as his driver. “We expect to be at our best when we come to MIS and I am glad we could pull it off,” Roush said. “I was a little nervous for a minute there, but I am glad it worked out and glad we could give Ford its 1,000th win.”

2012 Sprint Cup Series 1) Jimmie Johnson 538 2) Carl Edwards -31 3) Clint Bowyer - 49 4) Kevin Harvick -62 5) Matt Kenseth -82 6) Kyle Busch -86 7) Dale Earnhardt, Jr. - 91 8) Greg Biffle -95 9) Brad Keselowski -108 10) Tony Stewart -121 11) Paul Menard -123 12) Kasey Kahne -121

2013 Nationwide Series 1) Regan Smith 2) Sam Hornish, Jr 3) Justin Allgaier 4) Austin Dillon 5) Elliot Sadler

495 -58 -59 -67 -71

2013 Quicken Loans 400 finishers 1) Greg Biffle 2) Kevin Harvick 3) Martin Truex, Jr. 4) Kyle Busch 5) Tony Stewart 6) Matt Kenseth 7) Clint Bowyer 8) Carl Edwards 9) Joey Logano 10) Jeff Burton 11) Austin Dillon 12) Brad Keselowski 13) Danica Patrick 14) Paul Menard 15) Trevor Bayne 16) Ricky Stenhouse, Jr. 17) Aric Almirola 18) Ryan Newman 19) AJ Allmendinger 20) Juan Montoya


Seniors

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

21

Inheritance, long-term care, tapping retirement savings By Jill Schlesinger Tribune Media Services

Every few months, I like to use this space to empty out the inbox and answer some reader questions. And just a reminder: If you have a financial question or a comment about a recent column, send it to askjill@jillonmoney. com. And if you would like to be a guest on my syndicated radio show, call 1-855-411-JILL. Q. My ex-husband’s father died recently and left six of his grown grandchildren $40,000 each, but his two grandchildren from my marriage were excluded (due to the messiness of my divorce). The cousins want to reduce their inheritances and include my children, but I am worried that this may not be legal. What are your thoughts? - Patty A. You are smart to recognize that a will is a legal document, but

this is actually not a legal issue. Some might say that it is heresy to mess with the deceased’s wishes, but let’s deal with the mechanics first. Once the money is distributed from the estate to the six adult grandchildren, it is theirs to do with what they please. If one wants to blow the amount on a car, so be it. Similarly, if all six chose to give $10,000 each to anyone, including your grown kids, it is perfectly legitimate. (The IRS annual gift tax exclusion is $14,000 annually, so there would be no gift tax applied to these gifts.) If just three of the six want to be generous, that’s fine - there does not need to be consensus. It may not be exactly what grandpa wanted, but it is a pretty cool demonstration of cousinly love. Q. With regard to self-insuring

for long-term care, does net worth mean with or without the house you live in? - Joan A. For most planning issues like long-term care (LTC) or retirement needs analysis, I suggest excluding the equity in your home. As we all learned during the last downturn, selling an illiquid asset like a home can be difficult. Also, many people would prefer to stay in their homes, even if they were afflicted with a long-term illness. That said: If you are single and are willing to sell your home to enter a facility, you could include the home as part of the planning process. One more note about a recent LTC column: Alan correctly pointed out that I omitted New York Life as a quality provider of LTC insurance. Q. I am 68 years old and will retire at the end of the year. I have

three different “pots” of savings, with roughly equal amounts: my 401(k), a Roth IRA and a regular investment account. Does it matter which account I draw from to supplement my Social Security income? - Jerome A. Sometimes it can be easier to accumulate retirement savings than to figure out how to actually tap the money when you need it. Remember to keep at least one year’s worth of expenses sacrosanct in a safe (read: boring and low interest) account, like a savings, checking or short-term CD.The emergency reserve fund should be in a non-retirement account. You should then plan on depleting the pots as follows: non-retirement accounts first, followed by employer-based retirement accounts and IRAs, and lastly, Roth IRAs. The theory is based on taxation: the non-

retirement funds have already been subjected to income tax, so using them may mean liquidating and paying capital gains rates, but those rates are lower than income tax rates. Retirement assets come next because Uncle Sam will force you to withdraw funds starting after age 70 1/2 anyway (these funds have not yet been taxed at either the federal or state levels). Roth IRAs should come last because you have paid all of the taxes due. If you are fortunate enough not to need your Roth IRA funds, they will pass to your heirs, free of income tax. Of course, if you have a total estate that is subject to federal or estate tax, your Roth IRA will be included as an estate asset. Now, keep those questions coming - I really do enjoy hearing from you!

Lifestyle changes may help lower risk of gout attacks By Tribune Media Services

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Are there natural ways to prevent gout attacks or at least lessen the severity? I don’t want to take medication if it’s not necessary. ANSWER: If you have been diagnosed with gout, you can make lifestyle changes that may help lower the risk of future gout attacks. Gout is a form of arthritis that happens when sharp particles, called urate crystals, build up in a joint, causing severe pain, tenderness and swelling. One joint commonly affected by gout is located at the base of the big toe. Urate crystals form when high levels of uric acid are present in the blood. Your body produces uric acid when it breaks down purines substances found naturally in the body, as well as in certain foods. Uric acid usually dissolves in your blood and passes through your kidneys into your urine. But sometimes your body either produces too much uric acid or your kidneys flush out too little uric acid. When this happens, gout often results. One of the most helpful ways to prevent gout attacks is to maintain a healthy body weight. Research has shown that excess weight is a major risk factor for developing

gout. If you are overweight, losing weight can lower uric acid levels in your body and significantly reduce your risk of gout attacks. Regarding the type of diet you should follow, the traditional thinking was that reducing the amount of foods that contain purines could substantially decrease the risk of gout flares. However, managing a low-purine diet can be quite cumbersome, and the success of such a diet in lowering blood uric acid levels is actually quite low. Even if you strictly follow a low-purine diet, the decrease in your blood uric acid level is rarely enough to cure gout. Instead, a lower-calorie diet - one that replaces refined carbohydrates (sugar, white flour, others) with more complex carbohydrates, limits meat, and increases vegetables and fruit often can be much more effective at reducing blood uric acid levels than a low-purine diet. Specifically, to lower your risk of gout, eat fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fat-free or low-fat milk products. Get your protein mainly from lowfat dairy products because they may protect against gout. Limit the meat, fish and poultry you eat to no more than 4 to 6 ounces a day. Drink 8 to 16 cups, or about 2 to 4 liters, of

fluid daily, with at least half of that being water. In addition, avoid foods and beverages that have been shown to increase the risk of gout attacks, including those that are rich in fructose, such as fruit-flavored drinks, non-diet soda and many processed foods. Drinking alcohol, especially beer, is also a significant risk factor for gout. Studies have suggested that drinking two or more beers a day can double the risk of a gout attack. So limit the amount of alcohol you drink, or avoid it completely. Although you mention a preference not to take medication, if you have other health problems, some medications taken for those conditions may also be useful in preventing gout. For example, the blood pressure medication losartan has been shown to lower uric acid levels, and a variety of medications used to treat high cholesterol also have a beneficial effect on blood uric acid levels. If you have high blood pressure or elevated cholesterol and are managing them with medication, talk to your doctor about using a drug that could help prevent gout, as well. Finally, if lifestyle changes aren’t enough to control gout, very effective medications

are available. If you decide to try medication, talk to your doctor about which one is right

for you. - Tim Bongartz, M.D., Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

Real Estate & Business

Helping an employee understand the meaning of no Q. I have an employee that treats “no” as little more than a speed bump. He just goes faster and pretends I didn’t say anything.Also, if I give him an inch on any policy, he figures the policy doesn’t even apply. I have had repeated conversations where I point out the rules; he smiles and then does what he damn pleases. How do I get him to toe the line? A. You are facing a typical managerial frustration. Most people don’t like the word “no.” You will get your employee to toe the line when you stop talking and simply make it extremely painful to speed up as he cruises by

posted limits. The first time we learn to dislike the word “no” is when we are about 18 months old.The reason we have dubbed this developmental phase the Terrible Twos is because parents generally are put through heck by their clever, stubborn toddler. Unfortunately, the workplace is full of people whose parents never really figured out how to make them respect the word “no.” One of the best resources for effective management, ironically, is parenting books. Most problems you’ll run into as a manager are unresolved issues the parents of your

employees didn’t handle well. There are three styles of parenting, and managers often use only one of them.The first style is autocratic (You do what I say or I’ll spank you!), the second is permissive (Isn’t it cute you’re setting the cat’s tail on fire?), and the last is authoritative (I listen and understand but I have the final say). Most of your employees were either parenting with autocratic parents (which makes people sneaky) or permissive parents (which makes people narcissistic). The employees that were parenting with a balance of limits and consequences will never be your problem “children.” Your specific employee clearly had parents of the permissive sort. He expects you’ll talk and talk and

talk, and he can do whatever the heck he wants. If you want his respect, you need to stop talking and start acting. Set up a private meeting and let him know you want to continue to have him on your team.Then hand him a list of behaviors that aren’t working with a list of concrete consequences that will occur next time he does one of these behaviors. Classic consequences can include a day of suspension, being barred from participating in important events, and even ultimately losing his job. Remember throughout your conversations that these consequences are his choice! Make it clear to him that you respect whatever decisions he makes regarding his new knowledge

about behavior and consequences. Emphasize that you know he will let you know whether there is a match between what this job requires and what he is willing to do.Then let the chips fall. The beauty of this approach to parenting and to management is you are no longer the bad guy or gal. You have the power to determine all the boundaries and expectations, but your employee has the power to keep or lose the job. Next time your employee cruises past an office speed bump, the only one who will get hurt is him.As I have often told my kids, “Suffering is the great teacher of youth!”Take yourself out of the cycle of useless arguments. Let your employee suffer and decide whether he is ready to grow up.

Doing the right thing by paying back a family loan Dear Dave, I borrowed $30,000 from my aunt to buy a condo eight years ago.We had a deal that she would get her money back, plus a piece of the profits, when it sold. If there were no profits, she would get back her original $30,000. Recently

the condo sold and I lost the money I put into it, plus my aunt’s money as well. I make good money and don’t have any other debt, but I’m a little resentful now that she wants me to pay her back. Do you have any suggestions? Christine

Dear Christine, I don’t want to be mean, but you have no right to be resentful toward your aunt.This is the deal you signed up for, and she did nothing wrong.Wanting her money back now isn’t greedy or malicious on her part, and it’s definitely not worth putting a family relationship at risk. I know what you’re thinking, because it’s just human nature. You just went through a lot, and the situation didn’t work out as planned. Plus, it doesn’t sound like your aunt

is hurting financially if she put $30,000 toward helping you in the deal. Part of you is thinking she has plenty of money, so why doesn’t she just forgive the debt and forget about everything? If you were barely scraping by, I might suggest that you sit down and talk with her over a cup of coffee, explain the situation and ask her to forgive the debt. Right now, the little girl part of you is whining,“Oh, come on. Just let me go!” But the grown-up Christine

knows better.That part of you is whispering,“You know what to do…” Pay her back as quickly as possible, and get this bad deal behind you for good. You said you make good money, so just take care of your responsibility. It’ll hurt some, but it’s better than taking a chance on ruining the relationship with a very generous and loving aunt. —Dave


THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

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SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 259 Malibu Drive, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Singlefamily, one story. Gray frame of aluminum/vinyl.). On the 17th day of July, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff V. PRISCILLA LOPEZ Defendant. Case No. 10 CH 2669 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/20, 6/27, 7/4

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 155 Tilden Lane, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (Singlefamily, two-stories. Two car attached garage. White frame aluminum/vinyl.). On the 17th day of July, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: Regions Bank Plaintiff V. LATONIA JACKSON A/K/A LATONIA M. JACKSON; BILL RELIFORD Defendant. Case No. 12 CH 4826 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE at 136 Thornhurst Road, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 (Single Family). On the 10th day of July, 2013, to be held at 12:00 noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse under Case Title: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff V. Melinda Carver aka Melinda A. Carver aka Melinda Alvarez aka Melinda A. Alvarez; Timothy Carver; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Sally Alvarez; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. Case No. 11 CH 2547 in the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit, Will County, Illinois. Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1) (H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/151512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/20, 6/27, 7/4

For Information Please Contact: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax) PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Published 6/13, 6/20, 6/27


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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013


THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

25


26

THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

BOLINGBROOK

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. STATE OF ILLINOIS ) ) SS. COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

JPMorgan Association Plaintiff,

Regions Bank Plaintiff,

Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff,

Chase

Bank,

National

vs. Melinda Carver aka Melinda A. Carver aka Melinda Alvarez aka Melinda A. Alvarez; Timothy Carver; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Sally Alvarez; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendant. No. 11 CH 2547 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 12th day of December, 2012, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 10th day of July, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: 10 IN BLOCK 33 IN BOLINGBROOK SUBDIVISION, UNIT NO. 6, BEING A SUBDIVISION IN SECTION 11 AND 12, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED NOVEMBER 5, 1962 AS DOCUMENT NO. 970256, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 136 Thornhurst Road, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 Description of Improvements: Single Family P.I.N.: 12-02-11-404-024-0000 Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County. In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act. Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Freedman, Anselmo, Lindberg, LLC 1807 West Diehl Road Suite 333 Naperville, IL 60566 630-983-0770 630-428-4620 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County Published 6/13, 6/20, 6/27

vs. LATONIA JACKSON A/K/A LATONIA M. JACKSON; BILL RELIFORD Defendant. No. 12 CH 4826 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 10th day of January, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 17th day of July, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: LOT 28, IN BLOCK C, IN BALSTRODE FARMS UNIT NO. 1, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF SECTION 17 AND THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 8, IN TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AUGUST 23, 1973 AS DOCUMENT NO. R73-25734, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED APRIL 10, 1975 AS DOCUMENT NO. R75-08117, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 155 Tilden Lane, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Singlefamily, two-stories. Two car attached garage. White frame aluminum/vinyl. P.I.N.: 12-02-17-104-013-0000

vs. PRISCILLA LOPEZ Defendant. No. 10 CH 2669 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Public notice is hereby given that pursuant to a judgment entered in the above cause on the 10th day of January, 2013, PAUL J. KAUPAS, Sheriff of Will County, Illinois, will on Wednesday, the 17th day of July, 2013, commencing at 12:00 o’clock noon, on the first floor in the Will County Courthouse, 14 West Jefferson Street, in the City of Joliet, Will County, Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder or bidders the following-described real estate: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF WILL, STATEOFILLINOIS,BEINGLOT19,BLOCK 1 IN SUGARBROOK SUBDIVISION, UNIT NO. 4, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED 11/13/1969 AS DOCUMENT NO. R69-20989, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Commonly known as: 259 Malibu Drive, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 Description of Improvements: Singlefamily, one story. Gray frame of aluminum/ vinyl. P.I.N.: 02-11-307-034

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the time of sale and the balance within twenty-four (24) hours; plus, for residential real estate, a statutory judicial sale fee calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser to the person conducting the sale, not to exceed $300, for deposit into the Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund. No judicial sale fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. All payments shall be made in cash or certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

In the event the property is a condominium, in accordance with 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c) (1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified that the purchaser of the unit, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and legal fees required by subdivisions (g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9 and the assessments required by subsection (g-1) of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J) if there is a surplus following application of the proceeds of sale, then the plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the proceeding advising them of the amount of the surplus and that the surplus will be held until a party obtains a court order for its distribution or, in the absence of an order, until the surplus is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: FISHER & SHAPIRO, LLC. 2121 Waukegan Road Suite 301 Bannockburn, Illinois 60015 847-291-1717 847-291-3434 (Fax) PAUL J. KAUPAS Plaintiff’s Attorney Sheriff of Will County

Published 6/20, 6/27, 7/4

Published 6/20, 6/27, 7/4


THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013

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THE BUGLE JUNE 20, 2013


Bolingbrook 06-20-13